Title:
Reversible watch
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Reversible watch, comprising a case (1) provided with a first face (10) for displaying first time indications and a second face (11) opposite said first face. A turning-over mechanism (20, 21, 22, 23) allows the case (1) to be turned over around a turning-over axis (201-211; 221-231) parallel to the 6 o'clock-12 o'clock axis so as to display at the wearer's preference either the first face or the second face. The turning-over mechanism comprising a pivoting arm (20, 21; 22, 23) on each side of the case that allows the turning-over axis to be moved back. The case (1) is connected with the arms (20, 21; 22, 23) to be able to pivot around the turning-over axis (201-211; 221-231). The length of the arms is sufficient for turning over the case without the winding button or other buttons coming into contact with other parts (17) of the watch.



Inventors:
Girardin, Philippe (La Cahux-de-Fonds, CH)
Chatelain, Yannick (Villers-Le-Lac, FR)
Turuani, Pascal (Les Fins, FR)
Tetu, Guillaume (Neuchatel, CH)
Application Number:
11/238848
Publication Date:
01/26/2006
Filing Date:
09/29/2005
Assignee:
TAG Heuer SA (Marin-Epanier, CH)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A44C5/00; G04B37/00; G04B37/04; G04C21/34
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MISKA, VIT W
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PEARNE & GORDON LLP (CLEVELAND, OH, US)
Claims:
1. Reversible watch, including: a case provided with a first face for displaying first time indications and a second face opposite said first face, at least one control element of the movement or movements of the watch, a turning-over mechanism for turning over said case around a turning-over axis, said turning-over axis being parallel to the 6 o'clock-12 o'clock axis during turning-over so as to display at the wearer's preference either said first face or said second face, wherein said turning-over mechanism includes a pivoting arm on each side of the case, said arms allowing said turning-over axis to be displaced, said case being connected with said arms so as to allow said case to pivot around said turning-over axis only when said arms are inclined by a predetermined angle relative to its initial position, the length of said arms being sufficient and their arrangement adapted to allow said case to be turned over without said control elements colliding with other parts of the watch during turning over.

2. The watch of claim 1, including at least one control element of the movement or movements of the watch protruding on a first portion of the case's periphery between 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock and at least one other control element of the movement or movements of the watch protruding on a second portion of the case's periphery between 6 o'clock and 12 o'clock.

3. The watch of claim 1, wherein said arms allowing said turning-over axis to be lifted above the initial plane containing the upper face of the case in resting position.

4. The watch of claim 1, including a frame connected with the watch's bracelet, said case being inside said frame in each of the two resting positions, said turning-over mechanism connecting unitedly said case with said frame during all phases of said turning-over.

5. The watch of claim 4, said arms closing two opposite front sides of said frame in folded-down position.

6. The watch of claim 1, said case pivoting relative to said arms around two pivots, said turning-over axis being defined by the line crossing said pivots.

7. The watch of claim 6, said arms being arranged so as to displace said pivots along a single degree of freedom.

8. The watch of claim 7, said arms being capable of pivoting around a fixed rotation axis.

9. The watch of claim 1, said case being rectangular or square, the length of said arms being more or less equal to the width of said case.

10. The watch of claim 1, said arms being oriented along different directions during turning-over, said directions being oriented along two planes parallel to one another.

11. The watch of claim 6, said turning-over axis crossing said case through the center.

12. The watch of claim 6, each arm being connected on the one hand to said frame to be able to pivot around said rotation axis, said rotation axis being fixed relative to said frame, each arm being furthermore connected in pivoting fashion with said case around said pivots, said pivots being mobile relative to said case.

13. The watch of claim 1, said arms being each connected with said case through at least one pivot moving in at least one slide during turning-over.

14. The watch of claim 6, said turning-over axis defined by said pivots crossing said case through the center along different directions when said arms are unfolded.

15. The watch of claim 1, said case and said arms further including two guiding slides and at least two guiding pivots, at least two guiding pivots traveling in each of said guiding slides, so as to maintain said case parallel to its initial resting position until the turning-over point.

16. The watch of claim 1, said arms each including at least one pivot traveling in one slide connected with the case, said case including at least one pivot traveling in one slide connected to each of said arms, the arrangement of said slides and of said pivots allowing said case to be kept parallel to its initial resting position until the turning-over point.

17. The watch of claim 16, including at least two pivots sliding in at least one same of said slides, the shape of said slide being adapted to prevent said two pivots from pivoting except in one point corresponding to said turning-over point.

18. The watch of claim 16, including at least one other slide connected to said case shaped like an S.

19. The watch of claim 1, said predetermined angle allowing said case to turn over without said case touching said frame.

20. The watch of claim 6, said turning-over axis crossing said case parallel to the 6 o'clock-12 o'clock diameter of said case.

21. The watch of claim 20, said turning-over axis being fixed relative to said case during the entire turning-over.

22. The watch of claim 1, said arms traveling in planes parallel to one another during turning-over.

23. The watch of claim 20, said case being rectangular or square, the length of said arms being lower than the width of said case but greater than the sum of the half-length of the case increased by the thickness of said control elements, so as to allow said case to be turned over without said control elements coming into contact with other parts of the watch during turning-over.

24. The watch of claim 20, said arms coming to lodge in folded down position in a hollow of said case.

25. The watch of claim 20, each arm being connected on the one hand to said frame to be able to pivot around said rotation axis, said rotation axis being fixed relative to said frame, each arm being furthermore connected in pivoting fashion with said case around said pivots, said pivots being fixed relative to said case.

26. The watch of claim 20, said arms allowing said pivots to pivot around a rotation axis connected with said frame.

27. The watch of claim 1, including: a first movement for displaying first time indications on a first face, a second movement for displaying second time indications on a second face opposite said first face, control elements on both diametrically opposed faces of said case for controlling both said movements.

28. The watch of claim 1, including: a first movement for displaying first time indications on a first face, a second movement for displaying second time indications on a second face opposite said first face, wherein said first movement is of mechanical type and in that said second movement is of electronic type.

29. Reversible watch, including: a case provided with a first face for displaying first time indications and a second face opposite said first face, at least one control element of the movement or movements of the watch on a first lateral side of said case and at least one other control element of the movement or movements of the watch on a second lateral side of said case opposed to said first lateral side, a turning-over mechanism for turning over said case around a turning-over axis, said turning-over axis being parallel to the 6 o'clock-12 o'clock axis during turning-over so as to display at the wearer's preference either said first face or said second face, wherein said turning-over mechanism comprises a pivoting arm on each side of the case, said arms allowing said turning-over axis to be displaced, said case being connected with said arms so as to pivot around said turning-over axis, the length of said arms being sufficient and their arrangement adapted to allow said case to be turned over without said control elements colliding with other parts of the watch during turning over.

30. Reversible watch, including: a case, a first movement for displaying first time indications on a first face, a second movement for displaying second time indications on a second face opposite said first face, a turning-over mechanism for turning over said case so as to display at the wearer's preference either said first face or said second face wherein said first movement is of mechanical type and in that said second movement is of electronic type.

Description:

REFERENCE DATA

This application is a continuation of International Patent Application 2004WO-EP050361 (WO04088436) filed on Mar. 24, 2004, claiming priority of Swiss patent application 2003CH-0556 filed on Mar. 31, 2003, the contents whereof are hereby incorporated.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention concerns a reversible watch and a method for turning over a reversible watch case.

DESCRIPTION OF RELATED ART

By reversible watch, one will understand a watch whose case comprises two faces and a turning-over mechanism allowing the user to display, according to preference, one or the other face. At least one of the faces comprises a dial with time indications; the opposite face bears either another dial with other time indications, for example another time zone or complementary functions, or a protective cover that is frequently decorated.

Reversible watches are for example known that comprise two mechanical movements for displaying for example two time zones on the two faces of the watch or for displaying the time on one face and auxiliary functions, for example functions of chronograph, moon phase, date etc., on the other face. Integrating two mechanical movements within a single case is however costly and requires a considerable thickness. Watches comprising a single mechanical movement capable of displaying indications on both opposite faces are also known; such movements, which are complex and often produced in limited quantities, are also expensive. Watches comprising two quartz movements head-to-tail are also known, but they have neither the advantages nor the prestige of mechanical movements. These watches require in particular one or even two distinct batteries.

Different turning-over mechanisms have been conceived. For example, watches are known in which the bracelet is turned over with the case, so that the inner side and the outer side of the bracelet and of the watch can thus be inverted. This solution requires however reversible bracelets and bracelet clasps, both sides of which must have a very highly-finished aesthetic.

Are also known watches in which the case pivots around a 9 o'clock-3 o'clock axis, i.e. an axis perpendicular to the bracelet. The turning-over mechanism in this case takes up the space around the case usually allotted to the time-set button and other control elements, which implies strict aesthetic constraints for the watch designers and manufacturers.

The most widespread reversible watches thus use a turning-over mechanism enabling the case to pivot around a 6 o'clock-12 o'clock axis in the bracelet's plane. Patent application FR2716353 for example describes a watch in which each end of the bracelet is connected to the case by means of a pivot making it possible to turn over the watch around the 6 o'clock-12 o'clock axis. It is however necessary to remove the watch from the wrist to make the case pivot. Similar solutions enabling a pivoting at the level of the bracelet's fastening are described notably in the documents GB2213612, GB2241868, EP346660, CH659167, FR2583897, CH172421, CH138929, U.S. Pat. No. 4,470,708 and CH674291.

Different known solutions further propose to insert the case into an external frame connected with the bracelet and to make the case pivot relative to the frame around a pivot, along the 6 o'clock-12 o'clock axis. Examples of such watches are described in the documents CH159446, CH176988 and EP562522 notably.

In these solutions, the case is however connected to the external frame by a single pivot allowing a relative movement of the case along two degrees of freedom. Such a pivot must thus be machined with a very high precision, which makes the mechanism more expensive. Turning over the watch requires moving the case relative to the frame along a complex three-dimensional trajectory that is difficult to determine, and generally requires the user to hold the glass or glasses between his fingers, leaving finger prints. Furthermore, the reliability of the turning-over mechanism is problematic since the pivot can jam/shrink or even break under the effect of even small impacts or torsions. Finally, the case and in particular the protruding elements of the case, such as control buttons, run the risk of coming into contact with the external frame during pivoting, which may scratch and mark them.

Patent CH177310 describes a reversible watch comprising a case provided with a pivot sliding in the slide of an external frame. Turning-over the case is achieved by pivoting the case around the pivot until it reaches a vertical position, displacing the pivot in the slide, then completing the pivoting of the case. In this case also the case is connected to the external frame through a single pivot, which causes reliability problems and machining difficulties.

Other reversible watches comprise a turning-over mechanism allowing the case to pivot around a 6 o'clock-12 o'clock axis use a case connected with an external frame by means of two pivots on the outer sides of the case guided in slides of the frame. Solutions of this type have been described notably in documents CH159982 and EP22255. In these watches, the reliability and solidity of the turning-over mechanism is improved thanks to the connection of the case with the frame at two points; furthermore, the handling required for turning over is more intuitive and does not require the glass to be touched. However, in these solutions, the case is turned over along an axis that is in a plane parallel to the watch and thus remains close to the bottom of the external frame. The lateral sides of the case must thus be adapted to allow the case to turn over without these sides touching the bottom of the external frame. In particular, it is impossible to place control buttons or winding buttons that are too protruding on the lateral side of the case close to the turning-over axis, as these elements would then risk colliding with the frame's bottom during turning-over. This solution is thus not adapted to watches having control elements on two opposed lateral sides, notably watches comprising simultaneously protruding control elements on a first portion of the periphery of the case between 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock and protruding control elements on a second portion of the periphery of the case between 6 o'clock and 12 o'clock.

FR766809 describes notably a reversible watch comprising a turning-over mechanism allowing the case to pivot around a 6 o'clock-12 o'clock axis. The case is connected to two rods parallel to one another and articulated relative to the watch case. The watch is turned over by lifting simultaneously the two rods and then turning over the case relative to an axis connected with the two rods. It is necessary to turn over the case by orienting the watch's lateral side that is free of any winding buttons towards the frame; the case could not be turned over if it has control elements on both lateral sides, for example at both 3 o'clock and 9 o'clock.

Furthermore, the case can pivot around the axis of the turning-over axis even when the rods are only partially raised. The case and the winding button at this occasion risk coming into contact with the frame 21, which could scratch or even damage them.

Finally, in most of the described solutions, a large portion of the slides are apparent at least during certain turning-over steps, which is not very aesthetic and especially risks them being exposed to dust or skin particles that can in certain cases block them and prevent the watch from turning over. Finally, the slides are wearing parts that cannot, or only with difficulty, be replaced when inaccuracies arise in guiding the case.

It is thus an aim of the present invention to propose a new reversible watch provided with a turning-over mechanism that avoids the flaws of the prior art turning-over mechanism.

In particular, it is an aim of the present invention to propose a turning-over mechanism that is sufficiently rigid and reliable and which allows cases provided with protruding control elements on one or several sides of the case to be turned over without these control elements or other parts of the case becoming damaged during turning-over.

It is another aim of the present invention to propose a turning-over mechanism in which the number of mobile parts is reduced in order to lower the manufacturing cost, to reduce the space requirements and to improve reliability.

It is another aim of the present invention to propose a reversible watch capable of offering a greater number of functionalities and displays on both faces of the watch than the prior art reversible watches.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to the invention, these aims are achieved notably by means of a reversible watch and a method comprising the characteristics of the independent claims of corresponding type, preferred embodiments being furthermore indicated in the dependent claims.

In particular, these aims are achieved by means of a reversible watch comprising a case provided with a first face for displaying first time indications and with a second face opposite to said first face, at least one element for controlling the watch's movement or movements protruding on a first portion of the case's periphery between 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock and at least one other element for controlling the watch's movement or movements protruding on a second portion of the case's periphery between 6 o'clock and 12 o'clock, a turning-over mechanism for turning over said case around a turning-over axis, said turning-over axis being parallel to the 6 o'clock-12 o'clock axis during turning-over, so as to display at the wearer's preference either said first face or said second face. According to the invention, the case is connected to pivoting arms so as to be able to pivot around a turning-over axis connected with the external frame; their length and arrangement are adapted to turn over the case without the control elements coming into contact with other parts of the watch during turning-over.

These aims are also achieved by means of a reversible watch comprising a case provided with a first face to display first time indications and with a second face opposite to said first face, at least one element for controlling the watch's movement or movements. A turning-over mechanism allows the case to be turned over a turning-over axis, said turning-over axis being parallel to the 6 o'clock-12 o'clock axis during turning-over, so as to display at the wearer's preference either said first face or said second face. According to the invention, the turning-over mechanism comprises an arm pivoting on each side of said case. The arms allow the turning-over axis to be displaced. The case is connected to the arms to as to allow the case to turn over around the turning-over axis only when the arms are included by a predetermined angle relative to the initial position. The length of the arms is sufficient and their arrangements adapted to allow the case to be turned over without the control elements or other parts of the case colliding with other parts of the watch during turning-over.

This solution has the advantage of displacing the case's turning-over axis during turning-over. It is thus possible to bring it in a more favorable position, allowing voluminous watch cases or those provided with protruding control elements on one or several faces to be turned over without the case or control elements touching other parts of the watch during turning-over.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will be better understood with the aid of the description of embodiments illustrated by the attached figures, in which:

FIG. 1 shows a view from above of a reversible watch according to a first embodiment of the invention, in folded-down position with a hand indicator on the visible face.

FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of the reversible watch according to the first embodiment of the invention, in folded-down position with a hand indicator on the visible face.

FIG. 3 to 10 show different perspective views of the watch according to the first embodiment of the invention, illustrated in different successive positions during turning-over.

FIG. 11 to 14 show different perspective side views of the reversible watch according to the first embodiment of the invention, illustrated in different successive positions during turning-over, in order to show in particular the slide mechanism used in the first embodiment.

FIG. 15 to 18 show different perspective views of the reversible watch according to a second embodiment of the invention, illustrated in different successive positions during turning-over.

FIG. 19 shows a cross-sectional view of a watch case according to the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF POSSIBLE EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 illustrates a view from above of a reversible watch according to a first embodiment of the invention. In this position, also illustrated in FIG. 2, the watch's face 10 comprising a hand indicator 100 is visible on the upside of the watch, the other face 11 with an alphanumerical display 110 visible notably in FIG. 10 being turned in the direction of the wearer's wrist. To simplify the figures, the display elements (hands or liquid crystal display) and the bracelet are represented only in the resting positions illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 10.

The watch comprises a case 1 containing the watch's movements and mounted in a frame 17 by means of a turning-over mechanism 2 described further below. A bracelet 13 is fastened to the frame 17 through horns 171. The movement controlling the hands' position can be wound up and/or reset by means of a winding button 16 on one of the lateral sides of the case 1. Other control elements, here push-buttons 14, 15, allow other functions of the watch to be controlled, notably functions displayed on the watch's other face, as will be described further below. The control elements 14, 15, 16 are distributed on two opposed lateral sides of the case and thus occupy both the portion of the case's periphery between 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock and the position comprised between 6 o'clock and 12 o'clock. The control elements are protruding, which allows an easier handling on both sides of the case 1.

The turning-over mechanism of this first embodiment comprises a pivoting arm 20 and 21 which, in folded-down position, covers the two opposed front faces of the frame 17. In the illustrated embodiment, the case is rectangular or square and the length of the arms is more or less equal to the case's width. The arms can unfold in the manner illustrated in the FIGS. 3 to 10 by pivoting in two vertical planes (i.e. perpendicular to the bottom 170 of the frame 17) around rotation axes 200 respectively 210 connected to the frame 17. The angle of rotation achieved by the arm 20 relative to its initial position is indicated in the figures by the reference α. The two rotation axes 200 and 210 of the two arms 20 and 21 are parallel to one another and connected to diametrically opposed positions of the frame 17.

The case 1 is connected to the two pivoting arms 20 and 21 through two pivots 201, 211 defining one turning-over axis. It can thus be turned over around the turning-over axis 201-211 when the arms are unfolded. In resting position, in order to display one of the faces 10 or 11, the arms 20, 21 are held by balls mounted on springs (not represented) engaged in holes 28 on the inner sides of the horns 171. A slight vertical force on the case 1 is sufficient to release the balls and free the arms to unfold them in order to turn over the case.

As can be seen in FIGS. 3 to 10, the arms 20 and 21 enable the pivots 201-211, and thus the turning-over axis, of the case 1 to be raised and aligned above the initial plane containing the upper face of the case in resting position. In this embodiment, the turning-over axis 201-211 thus moves by pivoting the arms 20, 21 around the rotation axis 200-210 during turning-over. The necessary handling for lifting the case 1 is thus intuitive and does not require complex movements. During all the turning-over phases, the arms 20-21 unitedly connect the case 1 with the frame 17.

The length of the two arms 20, 21 and the distance between the rotation axes of the arms 200-210 and the case's turning-over axis 201-211 are sufficient to allow the case to turn over without the control elements 14, 15, 16 or any other parts of the case 1 coming into contact with the frame 17 or with other parts of the watch. It is thus possible to switch the displayed face 10 or 11 when the arms are unfolded without risk of marking, scratching or even damaging the control elements 14, 15, 16 or the case 1. As illustrated notably in FIGS. 3 to 9, the two arms 20, 21 remain parallel with opposed orientations during turning-over.

As can be seen in particular in FIGS. 11c and 11d representing a view of the inner side of the arm 21, respectively a cross-section of this arm along the axis Xld, the two arms 20, 21 each comprise a first slide 202 (not represented) respectively 212 in the shape of an A, as well as a pivot 201 (not represented) respectively 211. The pivots 201 respectively 211 move in second slides 250 respectively 260 in the shape of an S machined in slide-holders 25 respectively 26 connected to the two front sides of the case 1. Inversely, the slide-holders 25 respectively 26 each bear two guiding pivots 251 (not represented) respectively 261 moving in first slides 202, 212.

The case 1 being connected to the external frame 17 by the two arms 20, 21 directed along opposed directions, it is displaced vertically, blocked in horizontal position and raises the two arms 20, 21. By lifting the case 1, the pivot 211 moves in the S-shape slide 260 connected with the case and simultaneously the two pivots 261 move in the A-shaped slide 212. In the same manner, the pivots 251 move in the slide 202 of the arm 20 whilst the pivot 201 moves in the slide 250 connected with the slide-holder 25.

The particular A-shape of the guiding slides 202, 212 as well as the lack of alignment of the two pivots 201 and 211 allow the case 1 to be kept horizontal, i.e. parallel to its initial resting position, in all positions with the exception of the turning-over point illustrated in FIGS. 13 and 14. The two pivots 201 respectively 211 are incapable of pivoting simultaneously, except when they are aligned in the turning-over axis, positioned at 6 o'clock and at 12 o'clock. In this particular position, the two pairs of guiding pivots 251 and 261 find themselves in the circular portion of the slide 202 respectively 212. The slide-holder 26 can then pivot around the pivot 211, the two guiding pivots 261 being also free to turn in the circular portion of the first slide 212. The slide-holder 25 performs a same turning-over movement around the pivot 201.

The case 1 can thus, in this particular position only, turn freely around the horizontal turning-over axis 201, 211. In all the other positions of the arms 20, 21, the turning-over is blocked by the pivots 201, 211 being non-aligned and by the pairs of pivots 251, 261 being guided in their respective slides. There is thus no friction possible between the front sides of the case 1 and the inner side of the arms 20, 21.

In the illustrated embodiment, the turning-over point is reached when the angle α of inclination of the arms 20, 21 is equal to approximately 50°, this value being chosen according to the arms' length and to the case's total width to ensure a turning over without collision in the position illustrated in FIGS. 4 to 8 and 13 to 14. It can thus be ensured that no point of the case 1 or of the control elements 14, 15, 16 comes into contact with the frame 17 when the arms 20, 21 are unfolded or folded down again.

The two pivots 201 and 211 define the turning-over axis around which the case 1 can be turned over. As these pivots move in the second S-shaped slides 250, 260, the turning-over axis defined by the line connecting the two pivots 201, 211 crosses the case 1 through the center along different directions when the arms 20, 21 are unfolded.

The non-rectilinear S-shape of the second slides 250, 260 allows the friction forces exerted against the pivots 201, 211 to be controlled. In particular, this shape allows the reaction force exerted by friction against the slides during unfolding and folding back of the arms 20, 21 to be varied in order to achieve a more intuitive elastic unfolding and folding-back effect. The turning-over mechanism could also function, in a less comfortable fashion, with rectilinear second slides 250, 260.

In a non-illustrated embodiment, the position of the slides and of the pivots on the case and the arms can be inverted. Furthermore, the “legs” of the A-shaped slides 202, 212 could be enlarged inwards so as to ensure a contact at a single point of the pivots 251, 261 and thus reduce friction.

In order to turn over the case and display the watch's other face, the watch wearer thus lifts the case 1 to disengage the spring balls from the holes 28, then pivots the arms 20-21 by 50° (in this example) until the turning-over position illustrated in FIGS. 4 to 8 and 13 to 14. In this position, the case 1 can pivot freely around the turning-over axis 201-211, while being guided by the guiding pivots 251, 261, between the two opposed horizontal positions illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 7. The watch wearer then pushes the case 1 back to fold the arms 20 and 21 and reach the second resting position illustrated in FIG. 10, with the second face 11 visible. The case 1 is held in this position by balls on springs (not represented) engaged in other holes 28 on the inner sides of the horns 171.

Slides 250, 260 united with the case 1 are wear parts. In a preferred embodiment, the slide-holders 25, 26 can thus be replaced without having to replace the entire case. They are thus preferably mounted or screwed on the front sides of the case 1 by screws engaged in holes 24; the slide-holders 25, 26 can also hide screws (not represented) allowing the case 1 to be opened for servicing or for replacing the battery.

It will be observed that the described device allows the case 1 to be turned over easily without having to remove the bracelet 13. It will also be observed that the larger portion of the different slides is hidden by the arms 20, 21, the slide-holders 25, 26 and the case 1 in all positions, notably in the resting positions, so that the risk of obstruction is considerably reduced.

The reversible watch of the invention advantageously comprises two distinct movements 12, 19 (FIG. 19) lodged one against the other in the case 1. The first movement 12 is a mechanical movement with manual or automatic winding, allowing the time and possible supplementary functions, for example a chronograph, to be displayed by means of hands 100 on the watch's first face 10. The second movement 19 is an electronic movement, for example a quartz movement, allowing other indications, for example a second time, the date etc., to be displayed on the liquid crystal display 110 of the second face 11. The watch thus combines the advantages of a hand indicator with those of an alphanumerical display, as well as the advantages of a mechanical movement (prestige, operating without battery) with those of a quartz movement.

A second embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 15 to 18. This second embodiment has the advantage of not requiring slides in the case 1, which allows use of a slimmer case. The slides are furthermore fragile elements, liable to become blocked in the case of mechanical shocks or obstruction through dust or skin particles for example. This embodiment has however the inconvenience that it does not entirely exclude the risk of contact between the case or the control elements and the frame, as will be seen further below.

The watch according to the second embodiment of the invention is represented in FIG. 15 in folded down position with the face 10 comprising an analog hand indicator 100 visible from above. It comprises a case 1 connected in articulated fashion with an external frame 17 by means of two arms 22, 23. The arms are articulated relative to the frame 17 around rotation axes 220, 230 (FIG. 12) one opposite the other, approximately at 6 o'clock and at 12 o'clock. The case 1 is capable of pivoting relative to the two arms 22, 23 around a turning-over axis defined by the two pivots 221, 231.

In this embodiment, as can be seen in FIGS. 16 and 17 in particular, the two arms 22 and 23 remain at all time parallel to one another. The case 1 illustrated is square or rectangular; the length of the two arms 22, 23 is lower than the length of this case, but sufficient for allowing the case to turn over when the arms are entirely unfolded perpendicularly to their initial position, without the control elements 14, 15, 16 or other portions of the case coming into contact with the frame 17. The length of the two arms 22, 23, must thus be sufficient for the distance between the rotation axes 220, 230 and the turning-over axis 221, 231 to be sufficient to the sum of the half-length of the case increased by the thickness of said control elements.

The turning-over axis, defined as the line crossing the two pivots 221, 231, crosses the case along a fixed direction parallel to the 6 o'clock-12 o'clock diameter but different from this diameter. Since the case 1 is fastened to the arms 22, 23 by axes without slides, the angle between this turning-over axis and the case 1 remains constant during the entire turning-over. The connection between the arms 22, 23 and the case is thus more rigid than in the first embodiment.

In the resting position illustrated in FIG. 15 with the analog face 10 visible and in FIG. 18 with the numerical face 11 visible, the arms 22, 23 come to lodge in folded down position in a hollow of the case 1. The turning-over mechanism is thus almost hidden in folded down position.

In order to turn over the case 1 and chose the face 10 or 11 to display, the watch wearer lifts the case 1 from the resting position illustrated in FIG. 15 to release the balls on springs from the holes 28, then pivots the two arms 22, 23 in a vertical plane until the case 1 is sufficiently far away from the frame 17 to allow the case to rotate without colliding. The case can then pivot easily around the turning-over axis 221, 231 to choose the visible face 10 or 11 to display. The arms then continue their rotation by 180° to fold back in the other resting position illustrated in FIG. 18.

As compared with the first embodiment, the control elements 14, 15 and 16 can possibly in this second embodiment come into contact with the bottom of the frame 17 if the case is turned over too fast or too late, i.e. when the angle α traveled by the arms 22, 23 is considerably different from 90°. Indeed, since the two pivots 221, 231 are always aligned, a turning-over is possible at any point. Furthermore, the case 1 does not remain horizontal during all phases of the displacement.