Title:
Insulated tile and stone block wall
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An insulated tile or stone block wall assembly. The main element is composed of an outer and inner tile or stone facing bonded to an insulating core. The blocks are stacked and adhered together. The core geometry provides voids for forming concrete and placing steel and utilities. The resulting structure is a decorative, structural, and weatherproof finished product that is easy to install and cost effective to build. Drainage channels are provided behind a cast stone or stone facing to prevent water intrusion. The block insulation shapes are easy to cut making expensive molds unnecessary.



Inventors:
Morris, Richard D. (Punta Gorda, FL, US)
Application Number:
10/898785
Publication Date:
01/26/2006
Filing Date:
07/26/2004
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B2/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
WENDELL, MARK R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Richard D. Morris (Punta Gorda, FL, US)
Claims:
What I claim as my invention is:

1. An insulated ceramic tile or porcelain tile faced block comprising; a first ceramic tile, or porcelain facing element; a second ceramic tile or porcelain facing element substantially aligned and parallel with the said first element; each facing member further comprising an outer ceramic tile or porcelain face parallelopiped with all sides either substantially vertical or horizontal, and an inner ceramic or porcelain tile parallelopiped with all sides ether substantially vertical or horizontal; a parallelopiped element or rigid insulation adhered to and substantially covering the inside of said inner and outer facings; two center inner parallelopiped core elements of rigid insulation adhered to the inner and outer laminations of rigid insulation; said center core elements are substantially smaller in vertical height and horizontal width when viewed in elevation than said inner and outer laminations resulting in a vertical center opening and a channel on 4 non-faced sides of the said block; said blocks are stacked and adhered together; said blocks with said channels and opening create a form for the placement of concrete steel, and utilities;

2. An insulated ceramic tile, or porcelain tile faced block comprising; a first ceramic tile or porcelain facing element; a second ceramic tile or porcelain facing element substantially shorter of vertical dimension and parallel with the said first element; each facing member further comprising an outer ceramic tile or porcelain face parallelopiped with all sides either substantially vertical or horizontal, and an inner ceramic tile, or porcelain parallelopiped with all sides ether substantially vertical or horizontal; a parallelopiped element or rigid insulation adhered to and substantially covering the inside of said inner and outer facings; two center inner parallelopiped core elements of rigid insulation adhered to the inner and outer laminations of rigid insulation; said center core elements are substantially smaller in vertical height and horizontal width when viewed in elevation than said inner and outer laminations resulting in a vertical center opening and a channel on 3 non-faced sides of the said block; said blocks are stacked and adhered together; said blocks with said channels and openings create a structural form for concrete to fill and allow for the placement for steel and utilities;

3. An insulated cast stone or stone faced block comprising; a first cast stone or stone facing element; a second cast stone or stone, facing element substantially aligned and parallel with the said first element; each facing member further comprising an outer stone or cast stone face parallelopiped with all sides either substantially vertical or horizontal, and an inner stone or cast stone parallelopiped with all sides ether substantially vertical or horizontal; a parallelopiped element or rigid insulation adhered to and substantially covering the inside of said outer facings; two center inner parallelopiped core elements of rigid insulation are adhered to the outer lamination of rigid insulation and the inside face of the interior element of stone or cast stone; said center core elements are substantially smaller in vertical height and horizontal width when viewed in elevation than said inner and outer laminations resulting in a vertical center opening and a channel on 4 non-faced sides of the said block; said blocks are stacked and adhered together; said blocks with said channels and openings create a structural form for concrete to fill and allow for the placement of steel and utilities;

4. An insulated block according to claim 3 where the rigid insulation laminated to the stone or cast stone is extruded polystyrene with vertical and horizontal channels cut in it to drain any water that gets absorbed through the stone or cast stone

5. An insulated cast stone or stone faced block comprising; a first cast stone or stone facing element; a second cast stone or stone facing element substantially shorter of vertical dimension and parallel with the said first element; each facing member further comprising an outer stone or cast stone face parallelopiped, with all sides either substantially vertical or horizontal and, an inner stone or cast stone parallelopiped with all sides ether substantially vertical or horizontal; a parallelopiped element or rigid insulation adhered to and substantially covering the inside of said outer facings; two center inner parallelopiped core elements of rigid insulation are adhered to the outer lamination of rigid insulation and the inside face of the interior element of stone or cast stone; said center core elements are substantially smaller in vertical height and horizontal width when viewed in elevation than said inner and outer laminations resulting in a vertical center opening and a channel on 3 non-faced sides of the said block; said blocks are stacked and adhered together; said blocks with said channels and openings create a structural form for concrete to fill and allow for the placement for steel and utilities;

6. An insulated block according to claim 5 where the rigid insulation laminated to the stone or cast stone is extruded polystyrene with vertical and horizontal channels cut in it to drain any water that gets absorbed through the stone or cast stone.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to insulated tile, stone or cast stone form building blocks and, more specifically, to masonry blocks which include: the interior and exterior finish, insulation, vapor barrier, form work for concrete and steel structure and, passageways for electrical and plumbing.

The prime objects of the instant invention is to provide a block which, is light enough for one worker to place, works with industry standard modular dimensions, exceeds the code required insulation, has a vapor barrier, includes wall voids for concrete and steel reinforcing, accommodates plumbing and electrical runs, includes the interior and exterior decorative finishes, minimizes installation time, water and fire resistant, minimizes skill required to install, reduces the potential for shipping damage, easy to manufacture, reduces the number of different types of building blocks, reinforced concrete voids are large enough and combine to accommodate for stirrups, top and bottom steel for long span beams such as garage door headers, optimizes efficient use of materials and, is less costly to produce.

Prior Art has attempted to address these issues with numerous proposals. None of the prior art in combination or separately includes all the advantages of the instant invention.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,205,726 B1 to Hoadley discloses an insulated block but fails to provide a thin wall. The thicker walls required for masonry lessens the room available for concrete fill. To accommodate this geometry would add to the cost, waste useable floor space and exceed standard masonry modular dimensions. Additionally the masonry facing thickness would have to be increased to makeup for the increase in the cantilever created by the trough location not being centered on the edges of the block. The resulting pressure from the placement of the concrete could fail the unsupported leg of masonry if not made proportionately thicker. The shape of Hoadley's foam lamination is much more complicated to produce. Jambs at windows or doors that require a concrete fill cell would terminate with an exposed foam edge. Some of the foam would need to be removed so a concrete fill cell could be added. Hoadley also fails to explain how the required tie beam would be constructed using these blocks. Windows, doors, beams, and tie beams are an essential part of any wall system and it is not clear how Hoadley would accommodate. The protrusion of insulation shown at the top of the block would be subject to damage in shipping and more difficult to produce. This creates a mortar joint, that is not part of the instant invention and would require the skill of a mason. A vapor barrier and drainage is also not shown; this would be required to shed the water absorbed by the masonry. Additionally, many building codes require that adhered masonry not exceed an inch and five eights thick without mechanical fasteners.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,614,071 to Sams et al discloses an insulated block. In addition to some deficiencies noted in the Hoadley patent, Sams et al makes use of a masonry tongue and groove arrangement to secure one block to another thereby eliminating the need for mortar. Sams et al fails to show how the block would be sealed from infiltration of air and water. Additionally Sams et al masonry facing would be much more costly to produce.

No arrangement for fill cells were provided.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,584,043 to Riefler discloses a method of attaching standard ready made concrete block to rigid insulation. In addition to some of the deficiencies noted in Sams and Hoadley; this product would be thicker than required, heavy, and more expensive than the instant invention.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,653,170 to Sheckler discloses an insulated block with a wood insert. In addition to some of the deficiencies noted in Riefler, Sams and Hoadley, Sheckler does not provide for reinforced concrete fill cells in required locations.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,292,331 to Sams discloses an insulated block. In addition to some of the deficiencies noted in Sheckler, Riefler, Sams and Hoadley, Sams fails to show an adequate tie beam.

None of the above patents, taken either singly or in combination, is seen to describe the instant invention as claimed.

Accordingly, consideration of the prior art shows a need still exists for insulated masonry block which provides for a simple yet cost effective solution to thermal and moisture protection, structural requirements, and esthetic finish system.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

This present invention details a building block of modular dimensions, which can be assembled by one person of limited skill by gluing each block together one on top of the other. The resulting wall will contain the form for the subsequently added concrete and utilities. This wall system provides a complete structural, interior and exterior finish, thermal and moisture protection, an acoustical barrier, and a barrier against termites.

More specifically, the preferred embodiment is made of two layers of rectangular stone, cast stone or tile. They are then adhesively attached to rigid foam. A pathway is provided for utilities and concrete. Pathways for concrete are provided for at the edges or perimeter of the block while utilities are provided for at the center of the block. To secure the bocks together; waterproof adhesive is placed on the stone, cast stone or tile edges the building blocks are then laid up placing horizontal reinforcing steel before the next course of block. Once the adhesive has set up vertical steel is placed in the voids left between the stone cast stone or tile panels and concrete is placed to fill the voids.

According to other features of the present invention; corner, header, jamb and slab blocks can easily be made using the same basic concepts.

In the description and drawings that follow, the above features will become readily apparent:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING

The following description is best understood while viewing the following drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is an isometric view of the top course of insulated block or tie beam, beam, and corner block which provides additional space for concrete and stirrups when compared to the course below. This drawing is shown without the concrete infill. Additionally, a method is shown to close off the bottom of the beam with a finished material such as stone, cast stone, or tile when spanning an opening;

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the typical wall block and corner block showing the preferred embodiment with accommodations made for the utilities. Blocks are shown in the preferred stacking configuration. This drawing is shown without the concrete infill;

FIG. 3 is an isometric of a sill block and corner sill block on a concrete slab with thermal break (insulation) and method to shed water to the outside. The sill block is shown with voids to accommodate concrete and reinforcing steel. This drawing is shown without the concrete infill;

FIG. 4 is an isometric of a slab header block and corner header block used for forming and controlling the top of concrete slab. The slab header block is shown with an insulated face and voids to accommodate concrete and reinforcing steel. This drawing is shown without the concrete infill;

FIG. 5 is an isometric view of the resulting concrete geometry created by the blocks of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 1. A beam and other structural elements are shown as the structure turns a corner;

FIG. 6 is an isometric of the resulting concrete geometry created by the block of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 2. The basic wall structure and utilities are shown as the structure turns a corner;

FIG. 7 is an isometric of the resulting concrete geometry created by the insulated tile slab header block of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 3. The basic slab and foundation wall structure are shown as the structure turns a corner. The footer shown is not cast from the blocks and is shown for application only;

FIG. 8 is an isometric of a window sill and jamb. These are shown to illustrate the coordination with modular block and how water sheds off the sill. The jamb provides the termination for the standard wall blocks thereby containing the placement of the concrete;

FIG. 9 is a plan/sectional view of a wall constructed with insulated tile blocks of the preferred embodiment. This illustration shows how window and door openings can be accommodated;

FIG. 10 is an elevation view of the preferred embodiment assembled to form a wall with doors and windows;

FIG. 11 is a vertical section thru a wall sill;

FIG. 12 is a horizontal section thru an insulated block showing an adjustable jamb accommodating different size windows and doors;

FIG. 13 is a horizontal section thru an insulated tile concrete form showing an adjustable pressure treated wood jamb;

FIG. 14 is a vertical wall section from the footer up to the window jamb. This detail shows the relationship between various wall components. The windowsill, standard insulated tile concrete form, floor sill, and slab header block are illustrated here;

FIG. 15 is a plan/section thru a standard insulated tile concrete form. This detail shows the relationship between voids, insulation, and tile;

FIG. 16 is a plan/section thru a standard insulated stone concrete form. This detail shows the relationship between voids, insulation, and stone;

FIG. 17 is plan/section thru a insulated tile concrete corner form. This detail shows the relationship between voids, insulation, and tile;

FIG. 18 is plan/section thru an insulated stone concrete corner form. This detail shows the relationship between voids, insulation, and tile;

FIG. 19 is a vertical section thru a insulated tile concrete slab header block. This details shows the exterior tile and insulation higher than the interior tile and insulation allowing for the concrete slab to be formed up and leveled against;

FIG. 20 is a vertical section thru a insulated stone concrete slab header block. This details shows the exterior stone and insulation higher than the interior stone allowing for the concrete slab to be formed up and leveled against;

FIG. 21 is an elevation of an insulated tile of stone block.

FIG. 22 is a plan/section of a three unit wide block module factory built.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The preferred embodiment of the present invention consists of an assembly of insulated tile, stone, or cast stone concrete form blocks that when combined together provide a decorative finished wall system and insulation, FIG. 10.

FIG. 1 shows an isometric view of assembled insulated tile concrete forms from the tie beam 48 and down one course of block. The tile face 1, is laminated to the extruded polystyrene rigid insulation 3 by a polyurethane glue or other adhesive means. The rigid insulation 3 is then laminated to expanded polystyrene rigid insulation 4 by polyurethane glue or other adhesive means. The other side of the block 42 of the preferred embodiment is symmetrically laminated the same way. Each of the tile and insulation components are substantially rectangular in three dimensions. The center insulation (EPS) or expanded polystyrene 4. Utilities 5 have been accommodated for by a vertical run at the center of each block 42 by creating a vertical space between the two center insulation pieces 4. A beam is formed 47 by reducing the amount of center insulation 4 and providing a cast stone closure 2 to hold the concrete. The blocks or insulated tile forms 42 are assembled by gluing the edges of tile 1 and rigid insulation 3 to the edge of adjacent blocks. This would be accomplished be using a gel-polyurethane glue or epoxy. An important feature of the present invention is that no expensive molds are required to shape the foam, all the foam shapes can be hot wire cut from a readily available source of rigid insulation.

FIG. 2 shows an isometric view of two assembled courses of insulated tile concrete forms 42 and corner blocks 44. The joints of the blocks are glued together at 7. Vertical utilities 5 are run before the concrete is placed in the fill cells 9. Tile or facing material is shown cut for electrical outlets 6. Center rigid insulation (EPS) 4 is adhered to the two symmetrically laminated extruded insulation panels 3 and said panels are adhered to the tile facing 1.

FIG. 3 shows an isometric view of a cast stone sill over a insulated tile concrete form header block 49 and poured concrete slab 10 over Earth 12 The cast stone sill is adhered to the slab 11 on the inside edge and the insulated tile header block 49 with a expanding polyurethane glue. The slab rests on compact fill 12. The cast stone sill has a center foam thermal break in it 4. The insulation or thermal break is adhered to the two interior vertical sides of the cast stone sill 8. The sill is used for decorative purposes and to shed any water that penetrates the blocks above. The sill has openings 9 for reinforcing and concrete.

FIG. 4 shows an isometric view of the insulated tile, stone or cast stone header blocks. The header block is used to form and set the elevation for the top of slab 10 and, is adhered to the footer 23. The difference in height between the top of the exterior tile facing and the top of interior tile facing is distance A. The blocks also adhered to each other at joints 7. An insulated corner block 44 is adhered to adjacent blocks and footer 23. Header block is constructed of cast stone, stone, or tile.

FIG. 5 shows an isometric view of the internal concrete structure 14, which is formed by the insulated tile, stone or cast stone block (insulated block shown removed for clarity). The horizontal structure 18 formed by the insulated tile block serves to brace the vertical structure 19 also formed by the insulated tile block (insulated block shown removed for clarity). The vertical structure 20 is used for utilities as required and alternates between vertical structures 19. Where utility lines are not required this space is filled with concrete adding to the structure of the wall. Vertical structure 17 is a jamb, and is thicker to carry the loads transferred by the beam 15. This requirement is accommodated by the open-ended block 42 designs in combination with jamb 26. Stirrups 16 and reinforcing bars 13 are shown cast in the concrete beam. The section of the beam having the least structural value is shown displaced by the center foam section of block type 42 making the beam lighter and the better insulated.

FIG. 6 shows an isometric view of the lower part of the internal concrete structure 14, formed by the insulated tile block (insulated block shown removed for clarity). A hidden line 7 shows where the tile joints are. The said joints are additionally sealed by the concrete placement into the vertical cell 19 and horizontal cell 18. The location of an electrical outlet 21 is shown as a void in the vertical concrete structure 19. The concrete structure is steel reinforced 13.

FIG. 7 shows an isometric view of the concrete structure created by slab header block, the slab, 10 and cast stone sill 8. (Insulated slab header block and cast stone sill shown have been removed for clarity). Vertical steel reinforcing 13 is run continuous from the footer 23 up through the slab and sill. The footer is cast in the earth 12. The header block forms the vertical column 24. The sill forms shape 25.

FIG. 8 shows an isometric view of a cast stone sill 28 and a cast stone jamb 26 intersecting. The cast stone sill is designed to shed water to the outside and be adhered to the surrounding insulated tile blocks. The jamb is designed to be adhered to the insulated tile blocks and provide additional space for concrete and insulation 27. The preferred adhesive to adhere the blocks together is an expanding gel-polyurethane.

FIG. 9 shows a plan/sectional view of the insulated tile blocks assembled to create a wall incorporating a door 29, window 31, and garage door opening 30.

FIG. 10 shows an elevation view of the plan/section view shown in FIG. 9. The insulated tile blocks are shown assembled to create a wall incorporating a door 29, window 31, and garage door opening 30 with cast stone jamb 26 and floor sill 33. The slab header block 36, corner block 44, field block 42, and sill block 33 are shown.

FIG. 11 shows a vertical section view of a cast stone sill 33. The sill is composed of 3 pieces; an outer decorative cast stone shape 8 and an inside cast stone shape 53. Both are adhered to the center rigid foam 4. The sill is designed to drain water to the exterior and provide a decorative architectural element. The sill 33 is adhered to the concrete slab and the insulated block above. The said block sits on a flat horizontal area 34. The ends of the sill are butted together and adhered with an epoxy or expanding gel-polyurethane glue.

FIG. 12 shows a plan/section view of a cast stone jamb 26, which is adjusted for various opening sizes by sliding the jamb 26 over the insulated tile block 42 in a male female relationship and is adhered to the insulated tile block by abrading the surface 34 of the tile then adhering the jamb to the block using epoxy or expanding gel-polyurethane glue. The remaining void is then filled with concrete after the remaining wall system has been assembled and reinforced.

FIG. 13 shows a plan/section of a jamb 35 constructed of pressure treated lumber and is adjusted for various opening sizes by sliding the jamb inside the insulated tile block 42 in a male female relationship and is adhered to the insulation at 34. The remaining void is then filled with concrete after the remaining wall system has been assembled and reinforced.

FIG. 14 shows a wall section of assembled components. The footer 23 is designed as required by local soil conditions. The insulated tile block 42 is adhered to the top of the footer using epoxy or expanding gel-polyurethane glue. The slab header block 49 is then placed over the block below and adhered. The slab 10 is then poured. An insulated floor sill 33 is then adhered to the slab. A sill is not required with an insulated tile block system only when cast stone facings are used is the sill required. The sill is for shedding water to the exterior of the wall. The insulated tile block 42 is then placed on the sill or slab and adhered using epoxy or expanding gel-polyurethane glue. A plurality of blocks is laid in a stack bond arrangement until reaching an opening or beam block. The windowsill 28 is placed on top of the insulated tile block and adhered. The insulation 4 is used to insulate and form the concrete 39 in the correct locations. The insulation can be a combination of extruded or expanded polystyrene or just one type of foam.

FIG. 15 shows a plan view of the insulated tile block 42. The block is composed of an outer and inner tile face 1 rectangular in three dimensions, with rigid insulation 3 laminated to the backside of each tile, an insulated center 4 and open spaces 43. The tile is laminated to the insulation using epoxy or expanding polyurethane glue. The interior tile face provides a durable decorative finish. The exterior tile face provides a waterproof, cleanable, durable, fire resistant, and decorative finish. The rigid insulation 3 laminated to the tile provides a thermal break to prevent heat transfer through the concrete structure. Additionally said insulation supports and protects the tile facings giving them a wide edge to adhere the next block to. The center insulation 4 transfers shear forces and fluid forces created by the filling of the blocks open spaces with concrete. Additionally it also adds to the thermal resistance of the wall. It is anticipated the rigid foam 3 and rigid foam 4 could be all one piece. Both tile faces add to the strength of the block. This is an important feature to prevent the insulation from breaking apart when filling the open cells with concrete.

FIG. 16 shows a plan view of the insulated stone or cast stone block 45. The block is composed of an outer and inner stone or cast stone face 40 and, with rigid insulation 41 laminated to the backside of the exterior stone, an insulated center 4 and open spaces 43. The stone is laminated to the insulation using epoxy or expanding polyurethane glue. The interior stone face provides a durable decorative finish. The exterior stone face provides a durable, fire resistant, and decorative finish. The rigid insulation 41 laminated to the stone provides a thermal break to prevent heat transfer through the concrete structure, a vapor barrier, and groves 58 to channel water down to the sill and out the exterior side of the wall. Additionally, said insulation supports and protects the stone or cast stone facings giving them a wide edge to adhere the next block to. The center insulation 4 transfers shear forces and fluid forces created by the filling of the insulated stone blocks with concrete. Additionally said insulation adds to the thermal resistance of the wall. It is anticipated the rigid foam 3 and rigid foam 41 could be all one piece. Both stone or cast stone faces add to the strength of the block. This is an important feature to prevent the insulation from breaking apart when filling the open cells with concrete.

FIG. 17 shows a plan view of the insulated tile block corner 44. The corner block is composed of an outer and inner tile face 1, with rigid insulation laminated to the backside of each tile, an insulated center 4, and open spaces 43. The tile is laminated to the insulation using epoxy or expanding polyurethane glue. The interior tile face provides a durable decorative finish. The exterior tile face provides a waterproof, cleanable, durable, fire resistant, and decorative finish. The rigid insulation 3 laminated to the tile provides a thermal break to prevent heat transfer through the concrete structure. Additionally, said insulation supports and protects the tile facings giving them a wide edge to adhere the next block to. The center insulation 4 transfers shear forces and fluid forces created by the filling of the blocks with concrete. Additionally, it also adds to the thermal resistance of the wall. It is anticipated the rigid foam 3 and rigid foam 4 could be all one piece. Both tile faces add to the strength of the block, an important feature to prevent the insulation from breaking apart when filling the open cells with concrete. The Tile corner block provides a 90 degree change in wall direction. The triangular piece of rigid insulation 55 is provided to strengthen the corner and extends the full length of the block height.

FIG. 18 shows a plan view of the insulated stone or cast stone block corner 42. The corner block is composed of an outer and inner stone or cast stone face 1 with rigid insulation laminated to the backside of the exterior face of stone or cast stone, an insulated center 4, and open spaces 43. The stone is laminated to the insulation using epoxy or expanding polyurethane glue. The interior stone face provides a durable decorative finish. The exterior stone or cast stone face provides a cleanable, durable, fire resistant, and decorative finish. The rigid insulation 3 laminated to the stone or cast stone provides a thermal break to prevent heat transfer through the concrete structure. Additionally said insulation supports and protects the stone facings giving them a wide edge to adhere the next block to. The center insulation 4 transfers shear forces and fluid forces created by the filling of the blocks with concrete. Additionally, it also adds to the thermal resistance of the wall. It is anticipated the rigid foam 3 and rigid foam 4 could be all one piece. Both tile faces add to the strength of the block, an important feature to prevent the insulation from breaking apart when filling the open cells 43 with concrete. The stone or cast stone corner block provides a 90 degree change in wall direction. The triangular piece of rigid insulation 55 is provided to strengthen the corner. Other blocks forming various degrees in wall direction changes such as 45 degrees are anticipated.

FIG. 19 shows a vertical section view of the slab header tile block 49. Slab thickness is shown representing the difference in height A from the outside face 1 and the inside face 56. The header block serves as a form for the concrete slab.

FIG. 20 shows a vertical section view of the slab header stone or cast stone block 50. Slab thickness is shown representing the difference in height A from the outside face 1 and the inside face 57. The header blocks serves as a form for the concrete slab.

FIG. 21 shows an elevation of a typical stone or tile block 42 and the locations of the center rigid insulation 4. The block are adhered on the edges 7.

FIG. 22 shows a plan view of a longer version of insulated tile block 42 three units long, dimension B. The advantages are: less labor to install, less glue required as insulation is continuous, straighter coursing, and less labor to manufacture. It is anticipated the block would use stone or tile and include slab header blocks.

Whereas the preferred embodiment has been illustrated and described, variations may be made without deviating from the concept.