Title:
Flora ornaments
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A high-end fashion decorative natural flora ornament is presented comprising at least one attachment means and at least one flora that is attached to the attachment means and the attachment means is fixedly or detachably attachable to a person or to the accoutrements of a person, such as a purse, suitcase, or the like. The flora may be a live flower, a dried flower, a grass, an artificial flower, or the like. The attachment means may be an earring made from natural plant material that may be wood, grass, or the like. Alternatively, the earring may be made from a solid material, such as glass, ceramic, paper, plastic, or metal. The metal may be silver, sterling silver, gold, platinum, an alloy, or the like. Alternatively, the attachment means may be a bracelet, necklace, hair means, body-pierced ornament, a clip, such as a tie clip or broach, cufflinks, or a buckle, such as a purse or belt buckle.



Inventors:
Costanzo, Rebecca A. (Elma, NY, US)
Application Number:
10/891366
Publication Date:
01/19/2006
Filing Date:
07/14/2004
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
63/12
International Classes:
A44C25/00; A44C7/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
REESE, DAVID C
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Patricia M. Costanzo (East Aurora, NY, US)
Claims:
1. A decorative natural flora earring, comprising: a) at least one attachment means and b) at least one flora not coated with lacquer or metal; wherein said at least one natural flora is attached to said at least one attachment means.

2. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 1, further comprising wherein said at least one attachment means is attachable to a person.

3. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 1, further comprising wherein said at least one flora is detachably attachable to said at least one attachment means.

4. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 1, further comprising wherein said at least one flora is fixedly attachable to said at least one attachment means.

5. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 1, further comprising wherein said at least one flora is a live or a dried plant material.

6. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 5, further comprising wherein said at least one live or dried plant material is a flower.

7. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 1, further comprising wherein said at least one flora is an artificial flora.

8. (canceled)

9. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 1, further comprising wherein said earring is made from natural plant material.

10. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 9, further comprising wherein said natural plant material is wood.

11. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 9, further comprising wherein said natural plant material is a grass.

12. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 1, further comprising wherein said at least one attachment means is made from a solid material further comprising wherein said solid material is a metal selected from the group consisting of silver, sterling silver, gold, platinum, stainless steel, copper tin, plated metal, and metal alloys.

13. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 12, further comprising wherein said solid material is a glass.

14. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 12, further comprising wherein said solid material is a ceramic.

15. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 12, further comprising wherein said solid material is a paper.

16. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 1, further comprising wherein said at least one attachment means is jewelry.

17. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 1, further comprising wherein said at least one attachment means is a body-piercing ornament.

18. The decorative flora earring, as recited in claim 1, further comprising wherein said at least one attachment means is a clip.

19. A decorative natural flora earring, comprising: a) at least one attachment means and b) at least one flora not coated with lacquer or metal; wherein said at least one natural flora is attached to said at least one attachment means, wherein said at least one natural flora is a flower, wherein said at least one attachment means is an earring.

20. A method of making a decorative natural flora earring, comprising: a) providing for at least one attachment means and b) providing for at least one flora not coated with lacquer or metal; c) attaching said at least one natural flora to said at least one attachment means.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISK APPENDIX

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates generally to jewelry and more particularly to jewelry that incorporates flora as an essential part of the adornment jewelry, such as earrings that are made with fresh flowers.

The background information discussed below is presented to better illustrate the novelty and usefulness of the present invention. This background information is not admitted prior art.

Using jewelry for self adornment was as important to people in the past as it is today. Archaeological artifacts and written records provide detailed information on how men, women, and children, through the ages, have exhibited their jewels as body adornments.

There are many reasons for wearing jewelry and the reasons have varied throughout the ages. At one time, jewelry was worn by royalty to symbolize their position in the hierarchy of the court. Those who were not members of the royal family, but who were members of elevated classes, displayed their jewels to indicate their social and economic prominence. Members of less elevated classes, not to be left out; also wore jewelry, at least on special occasions such as feast days or weddings, to display their economic success to their community. Today, as in the past, jewelry is worn by a young man or woman to indicate his or her availability for marriage. In some countries, such as India, jewels are traditionally worn as a sign of marital status.

Jewelry, today, is worn for a variety of reasons: to project an image, to make a fashion statement, and to display one's discriminating taste and impeccable sense of style. Many women and men use jewelry to symbolize their personality and, even in today's modern world, jewelry is used to demonstrate one's station in life. In some countries, such as India, jewelry is considered to be more than just an accessory; there jewelry is often worn as a complete ensemble. Thus, it is common to see women wearing more than one necklace around their neck, sets of earrings, bracelets on the arms and the ankles, rings on the toes and fingers, not to mention ornaments on the forehead.

The desire to wear distinguishing jewelry is just as prevalent today as it was in the past. However, instead of producing distinctively unique jewelry, the world seems to be saturated with mass produced jewelry products that are often look-alikes or knock-offs. In addition to having a desire to distinguish themselves by wearing exceptionally designed and crafted jewelry, some people would also like to wear jewelry to make a statement. With so much jewelry being copied or imitated, however, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find jewelry that has a unique look, or jewelry that represents a particular value or belief. What is sorely missing in the art is jewelry that has a unique look, stands apart from other jewelry, and is capable of making a desired statement.

In addition to desiring jewelry that is exceptional and distinctive, many people today desire products that are non-toxic and environmentally friendly. Thus, jewelry made from natural objects and non-chemical substances would be preferred. However, it is difficult, if not impossible to find first-class jewelry made from non-toxic, natural, renewable material.

Flowers are natural. Flowers often emit perfumes, are often vividly colored, come in an extensive variety of shapes and sizes, are often non-toxic, and are renewable, natural materials that have been used as body adornments for centuries. For example, it is traditional for Hawaiian people to pick plumeria flowers and string them together to make the Hawaiian lei that is used to welcome and show honor to visitors to Hawaii. In Hawaii, as in many other places, a flower blossom, is often situated behind one's ear or in one's hair to express joy or celebration. In stories and in poetry a garland of flowers is often used to crown the heads of celebrants. The use of the garland is said to have come from the Romans celebration of Flora, the goddess of flowers, at the beginning of May. Today there are still May Day celebrations where a May Day Queen is chosen and sits in an arbor of flowers while young men and women with flower garlands on their heads often dance around her, rather than around a Maypole. What is missing in the art is jewelry that has an exceptionally distinctive appearance, is capable of making a desired statement, and is made from non-toxic, renewable, natural materials, such as flowers and other plant material.

Some jewelry, such as those jewelry pieces that include the use of diamonds in their design, have lost their appeal to many who feel that the social, as well as environmental consequences, of diamond mining are too offensive to justify their use. In such instances, not wearing or buying any jewelry whose manufacture is reported to use inhumane practices can be viewed as a statement in support of humane working conditions and/or as support for the use of environmentally friendly mining conditions. What is desperately needed in the art is jewelry that is manufactured using acceptable humane work practices and environmentally friendly methods of mining or extraction.

SUMMARY

The present invention satisfies the heretofore unmet need for jewelry that has an exceptionally distinctive appearance, is dramatic enough to make a desired statement, that is manufactured using acceptable humane work practices and environmentally friendly methods of mining or extraction, and is made from non-toxic, renewable, natural materials, such as flowers.

The present invention achieves the above and more by setting forth novel jewelry or jewelry-like ornaments that comprise flowers of an almost endless variety to please the most discriminating wearer of jewelry. In preferred embodiments the flowers are natural and alive. It is also contemplated that the flowers may be dried or preserved in some other manner if it is desired to keep the flowers as a memento. If desired, it is also contemplated to use flowers made from natural silk or other natural products.

The flora may comprise native and/or exotic species or varieties that may be small, a daisy for example, or large, approximating the height of a person. The vast variety of flowers used ensures a vast choice of sizes, shapes, and colors. Some delicately shaped, sweetly scented, lighted colored or white flowers are an ideal choice for weddings, for example. Other exotic, more strongly colored and scented and dramatically shaped flowers are perfect for those occasions that deserve the impact these flora are capable of making.

One preferred embodiment comprises a flora-earring made using an earring base of a natural material such as wood, grass, or sterling silver, for example, to which is attached a flora of a desired shape, size, color, fragrance, and impact. One such earring is made using gardenias as the flora. The gardenia flora-earring is impressively fragrant yet delicate in both shape and size and the white color of the flower is fitting for occasions such as weddings and confirmations, for example. If desired the flora may be dyed to any preferred color.

Another version of a flora-earring is the stunningly dramatic flora-earring that is made using an anthurium andraeanum. This dramatic red flower, which may be as large as about six inches wide and twelve inches long and displays a large yellow stigma at its center, places the wearer in the center of attention of any gathering. As a contrast, flora-pin-cushion-earrings create a light, flowing air that is expressed by the pendent, feather-like flowers of the pin-cushion flower. Although both flowers are red, the impression they each give is very different from the other. Flora-earrings made using bird-of-paradise flowers are exquisitely stunning and dramatic, but in a more discreet manner than those made using the large, red and yellow anthuriam flowers.

Yet another version of the invention, as disclosed herein, is the use of leaves or grasses as the natural flora. In preferred embodiments the leaves or grasses are natural and alive. It is also contemplated that the leaves and grasses may be dried or preserved in some other manner. If desired, it is also contemplated to use flowers made from natural silk or other natural products. It is also contemplated that plastic flowers be used, if desired.

Still yet other versions contemplate the use of bracelets, necklaces, rings, body-piercings, belt, shoulder straps, belts, buckles, hair ornaments, tie clips, purses, briefcases, and the like. In other words, flora-ornaments may comprise many articles that are carried by or attached to a person or any other animal as the attachment means.

The present invention makes available all of these advances in the art by providing for a method of making a decorative natural flora ornament and for a decorative natural flora ornament, comprising:

    • a) at least one attachment means and
    • b) at least one flora;
      wherein said at least one flora is attached to said at least one attachment means. In another preferred embodiment the at least one attachment means is attachable or attached to a person or to the clothes or belongings of a person.

Moreover, the at least one flora may be fixedly or detachably attached to the at least one attachment means.

The one or more flora may be live or dried plant material or a part of a live or dried plant. In one preferred embodiment the flora is a natural, live flower. In other adaptations, the flora may be a natural grass, fern, leave, plant stem or stalk, fungus, and, if desired, the flora may be a dried or otherwise preserved form of the natural, live flower, or if desired the flora may be an artificial flora. The flora may also comprise a combination of any type of flora.

In a preferred embodiment, the at least one attachment means may be made from natural plant material. The natural plant material may be a wood, a grass, reeds, or the like. Alternatively, the attachment means may be made from a metal. The metal may be silver, sterling silver, gold, platinum, tin, sterling silver, copper, an alloy, or a mixture or combination of any of these metals or alloys. If desired, the attachment means may be made from a glass, a ceramic, a paper, or a mixture or combination of any of these.

In a preferred embodiment the at least one attachment means is an earring. Alternatively the attachment means may be any form of jewelry or ornament, such as a body-pierced ornament, a hair ornament, a belt, a buckle, a clip such as a tie clip or a broach, or other article that is found position on or near a person, such as a purse or attaché case.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In order that these and other objects, features, and advantages of the present invention may be more fully comprehended and appreciated, the invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to specific embodiments which are illustrated in appended figures wherein like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several figures. It should be understood that these figures only depict a few preferred embodiments of the present invention and are not therefore to be considered limiting in scope. Thus, the invention will be described and explained with added specificity and detail through the use of the accompanying figures, in which:

FIG. 1a is a front view of two pairs of flora-earrings according to the teachings of the present invention.

FIG. 1b is a view of one of the flora-earrings, as shown in FIG. 1a, illustrating the flora-earring in use.

FIG. 2a is a front view of another pair of flora-earring to provide an example of the variety of flora that may be used as the flora part of a flora-earring.

FIG. 2b is a view of one of the flora-earrings, as shown in FIG. 2a, illustrating the flora-earring in use.

FIG. 3 is a side view of a flora-earring according to the present invention, illustrating the flora-earring made using a bouquet of gardenia flowers.

FIG. 4 is a partial side view showing flora-earrings made using a more sophisticated, elegant, elongate flower.

FIG. 5 is a front view of a flora-anthurium-earring to illustrate how dramatic, large, and colorful a flora-earring is capable of being.

FIG. 6 is a partial front view of a pair of flora-earrings made using large, elongate leaves to illustrate the drama of flora-earrings.

DEFINITIONS

Anthurium as used herein refers to the flower that is often referred to as the “heart of Hawaii”. The original anthurium was brought to Hawaii from Colombia in 1889 by an English missionary. Anthuriums offer vibrant colors, longevity and intrigue to flora-earrings.

Chemical as used herein refers to those substances that do not occur naturally, as well as to those substances that may have started as natural substances, but are modified to such an extent that they become non-natural substances.

Earring base as used herein refers to any type of earring to which the flora may be attached.

Flora as used herein refers to all vegetation, that is to all plant life, where the term “plant” may be defined as a living organism lacking the power of locomotion, as opposed to fauna, which refers to animal life, and is intended to include all organisms or part of organisms in the kingdom plantae, e.g. flowering plants, conifers, ferns, mosses, etc., and also includes related botanical kingdoms, such as the kingdom fungi, e.g. lichens, mushrooms, mold, etc. and the kingdom protista, e.g. algae, sea weed, etc.

Natural as used herein refers to substances or objects that occur naturally, as well as to those substances or objects that start as natural substances or objects and are not modified to such an extent that they become non-natural substances.

Non-Chemical as used herein refers to those substances or objects that are natural, i.e., occur naturally, as well as to those substances or objects that start as natural substances or objects and are not modified to such an extent that they become non-natural substances.

Ornament as used herein refers to an object that is used for adornment, especially for personal adornment; wherein such object is often referred to as jewelry, but does not necessarily have to be referred to as jewelry. Such ornamental objects may also be referred to as trinkets, charms, embellishments, adornments, trim, gildings, frills, ornamentation, and gems.

Stigma as used herein refers to that part of the female part of a flower that offers a sticky receptive surface to which pollen adheres.

List of Parts of the Invention And the Reference Numbers Which Refer To the Parts

1a One of a pair of flora-rose-earrings.

1b A mate to flora-rose-earring 1a.

2 A ring part of a hoop-like earring.

4 An example of attachment means used to attach a flora-earring to an ear, for example.

6 Rose petals wrapped about and attached to 2.

8 Rose leaves attached to 2.

10a A flora-orchid-earring.

10b A mate to flora-orchid-earring 10a.

12 A ring part of a hoop-like earring.

14 An example of attachment means used to attach a flora-earring to an ear, for example.

16 Orchid flower petals wrapped about and attached to 12.

18 Orchid leaves attached to 12.

20a A flora-pin-cushion-earring.

20b A mate to flora-pin-cushion-earring 20a.

22 A ring-part of a multi-hoop earring illustrating that the ring part of an earring, i.e., that part of the earring to which a flora is attached, need not be round, nor closed, in fact the ring part of the earring may be of any shape, size, or material desired.

24 Another example of attachment means used to attach a flora-earring to an ear, for example.

26 Pin cushion flower petals or leaves attached to 22.

28 Pin cushion flower leaves attached to 22.

30a A flora-gardenia-earring.

30b A mate to flora-gardenia-earring 30a.

32 A ring part of a hoop-like earring, illustrating that the ring part of an earring, i.e., that part of the earring to which a flora is attached, need not be round, nor closed, in fact the ring part of the earring may be of any shape, size, or material desired.

34 Another example of attachment means used to attach a flora-earring to an ear, for example.

36 Gardenia flower petals or leaves attached to 32.

38 Gardenia flower leaves attached to 32.

40a A flora-bird-of-paradise-earring.

40b A mate to flora-bird-of-paradise-earring 40a.

42 A ring part of a hoop-like earring, illustrating that the ring part of an earring, i.e., that part of the earring to which a flora is attached, need not be round, nor closed, in fact the ring part of the earring may be of any shape, size, or material desired.

44 Another example of attachment means used to attach a flora-earring to an ear, for example.

46 Bird-of-paradise flower petals or leaves attached to 42.

48 Bird-of-paradise flower leaves attached to 42.

50 A flora-anthurium andraeanum-earring.

54 Another example of attachment means used to attach a flora-anthurium andraeanum-earring to an ear, for example.

56 Anthurium andraeanum flower petals or leaves attached to 52.

58 Anthurium andraeanum sigma attached to 52.

60a An exotic leaf flora-earring.

60b A mate to exotic leaf flora-earring 60a.

62 A ring part of a hoop-like earring, illustrating that the ring part of an earring, i.e., that part of the earring to which a flora is attached, need not be round, nor closed, in fact the ring part of the earring may be of any shape, size, or material desired.

64 Another example of attachment means used to attach a flora-earring to an ear, for example.

66 Exotic leaf attached to 62.

It should be understood that the figures are not necessarily to scale. In certain instances, details which are not necessary for an understanding of the present invention, or which render other details difficult to perceive, may have been omitted.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring now with more particularity to the drawings, it should be noted that the disclosed invention is disposed to embodiments in a great variety of types of flora offering a huge assortment of sizes, shapes, and colors, in addition to a great variety of jewelry articles or attachment means onto which the flora are attached. Therefore, the embodiments described herein are provided with the understanding that the present disclosure is intended merely as illustrative and is not intended to limit the invention to the embodiments described herein.

The present invention is directed towards a high-end fashion decorative ornament comprising at least one attachment means and at least one flora that is attached to the attachment means. At least one flora may be fixedly or detachably attachable to the attachment means and the attachment means may be fixedly or detachably attachable to a person or to the accoutrements or trimmings of a person, such as a purse, attaché case, luggage piece, or the like. The flora may be a live flower, a dried flower, a flower that is otherwise preserved, a fungus, a grass, leaf, lichen, or moss, an artificial flower, or the like. The attachment means may be any type of jewelry or other adornment. In a preferred embodiment, the attachment means is an earring. The earring may be made from natural plant material that may be wood, grass, or the like. Alternatively, the earring may be made from a solid material, such as glass, ceramic, paper, plastic, or metal. The metal may be silver, sterling silver, gold, platinum, an alloy, or the like. Alternatively, the attachment means may be a bracelet, necklace, hair means, body-pierced ornament, a clip, such as a tie clip or broach, cufflinks, or a buckle, such as a purse or belt buckle.

Turning now to the drawings, FIG. 1a, two pair of flora-earrings are shown to illustrate one exemplary preferred embodiment of the present invention. Earrings 12a and 12b are designed so that, if desired, they may be worn as a set. Flora-earrings may use any desired earring to which a flora may be attached. The earrings may be simple ringed hoops or any other shape that is desired. Means 16 used to attach an earring to an ear are well-known art and will not be discussed further here. It is to be understood that any known or yet to be known means to attach an earring to an ear may be used. Once the style of earring is chosen, the flora is attached. The present invention contemplates many unique ways to attach a flora to an earring. Earrings 12a and 12b show one way to attach flora to an earring. In this example, rose petals 18 are tightly wrapped about ring-part 14 of the earrings. Once the petals are positioned about ring-part 14 of the earring, they are affixed by using a fixative. There are many fixatives that may be used. Fixatives, such as glues and pastes are well-known in the art and will not be discussed further. If flower petals were chosen, in part, for their scent, then a fixative should be used that does not prevent the scent from emanating from the flower petals. Alternatively, the fixative may be placed on the ring before the petals are positioned. Rose flower leaves 20 are artfully arranged about the earring to complement the rose petals. It will be appreciated that there are many ways to affix flora to an earring or to other attachment means, such as wire, tape, or by securing the flora by using the flora itself, much as an Indian sari is fixed about a body, for example. Any means of fixation, reversible or irreversible, is contemplated by the present invention.

FIG. 1a also illustrates flora-orchid-earrings 22a and 22b. The earring part of this set of earrings is of a more complex design as each earring comprises a set of open rings to which only a few wispy orchid flower petals are attached. These flora-earrings are simply designed to give a more basic look.

FIG. 1b is a view of one of flora-earrings 12a and 12b, as shown in FIG. 1a, illustrating the flora-earring in use. Even though flora-earrings 12a and 12b are among the most simply designed of the flora-earrings of the present invention, the unique and exceptional look of these flora-earrings is clearly appreciated.

FIG. 2a is a front view of another pair of flora-earring to provide an example of the variety of flora that may be used as the flora part of a flora-earring. Pin cushion flowers are used in making the flora-earrings shown in FIG. 2a. These flora-earrings convey a delicate, dainty, airy look, while their bright red feathery petals dictate the wearer's sense of taste and fashion.

FIG. 2b is a view of one of the flora-pin-cushion-earrings, as shown in FIG. 2a, illustrating the flora-pin-cushion-earring in use.

FIG. 3 is a side view of a flora-gardenia-earring according to the present invention. The flora-gardenia-earring is an example of how effective the use of a bouquet of flowers is when used as the flora part of a flora-earring. The natural white of the gardenia makes the flora-gardenia-earrings a natural choice for a wedding. In fact, the earrings may complement and/or match the bride's bouquet. The well-known soft floral scent of the gardenia is another benefit of the flora-gardenia-earring. If desired, however, white flowers, such as gardenias, may be dyed to any desired color.

FIG. 4 is a partial side view showing flora-bird-of-paradise earrings 40a and 40b made using the more discreetly sophisticated and elegant elongate flower of this exotic plant. Flower 48 is connected to flora-earring ring 42 using at least one bird-of-paradise leaf 48. In this particular example, the bird-of-paradise flower is attached to the earring so that the flower is suspended pendant-style. As with the other flora-earring examples, the flora-bird-of-paradise-earring is attached to an ear using attachment means 44.

FIG. 5 is a front view of flora-anthurium-andraeanum-earring 50. The significant size and dramatic, blood-red color of anthurium-andraeanum flower 56 together with its bright yellow-gold stigma 58 offers the ultimate in creating a spectacular and distinctive affect. Even considering the size of the anthurium-andraeanum flower this example of a flora-earring is easily, securely, and comfortably attached to an ear using attachment 54.

To make an exceptionally startling and bold statement, flora-earrings 60a and 60b are made with large sized and exotically shaped leafs 66 as shown in FIG. 6. Despite their size, these very large flora are light-weight enough to be easily and securely attached to ring part 62 and to be easily and securely attached to an ear via attachment means 64.

Thus, it has been shown that the described invention satisfies the heretofore unmet need for jewelry that has an exceptionally distinctive appearance, is dramatic enough to make a desired statement, is manufactured using acceptable humane work practices and environmentally friendly methods of mining or extraction, and is made from non-toxic, renewable, natural materials, such as flowers or other plant material.

The foregoing description, for purposes of explanation, uses specific and defined nomenclature to provide a thorough understanding of the invention. However, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the specific details are not required in order to practice the invention. Thus, the foregoing descriptions of specific embodiments are presented for purposes of illustration and description. They are not intended to be exhaustive or to limit the invention to the precise forms disclosed. Those skilled in the art will recognize that many changes may be made to the features such as shape, color, materials, other embodiments, and methods of making the embodiments of the invention described herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Furthermore, the present invention is not limited to the described methods, embodiments, features or combinations of features but includes all the variation, methods, modifications, and combinations of features within the scope of the appended claims. The invention is limited only by the claims.