Title:
Round putter
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A golf putter with a round putter head (10, 20, 30, 40, 60) having a radius which is less than the radius of a regulation size golf ball 70. The round putter head (10, 20, 30, 40, 60) is constructed of a single piece of standard sized bar stock. The putter head (10, 20, 30, 40, 60) has a contact area 74 with the golf ball 70 which is linear, and of narrow width. The contact area 74 on the golf ball 70 is horizontal in orientation. Additionally, the contact area 74 on the golf ball 70 usually spans the dimple 72 diameter.



Inventors:
Johnson, Lanny L. (Okemos, MI, US)
Application Number:
11/173127
Publication Date:
01/12/2006
Filing Date:
07/01/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/340
International Classes:
A63B53/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
HUNTER, ALVIN A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DAWSEY CO., L.P.A. (COLUMBUS, OH, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A golf putter comprising: (a) a shaft having a proximal end and an opposing distal end; (b) a grip for a golfer to hold the golf putter attached upon the proximal end of the shaft; and (c) a head attached to the distal end of the shaft for contacting a golf ball during putting having a heel end and opposing toe end and a face therebetween, wherein the head is constructed of standard sized cylindrical bar stock having a radius which is less than the radius of a regulation size golf ball, so that when used to putt the golf ball, the golf ball is contacted in an essentially linear contact area horizontal to the ground.

2. The golf putter of claim 1 wherein the radius of the cylindrical bar stock is less than 0.84 inches.

3. The golf putter of claim 1 wherein the radius of the cylindrical bar stock is between 0.125 and 0.5 inches.

4. The golf putter of claim 1 wherein the bar stock is stainless steel or brass.

5. The golf putter of claim 1 wherein the shaft attaches to the putter head towards the heel end of the head.

6. The golf putter of claim 1 wherein the putter head has variable weighting.

7. The golf putter of claim 1 wherein the putter head has bottom and posterior weighting.

8. The golf putter of claim 1 wherein the putter head is heel-toe weighted.

9. The golf putter of claim 1 wherein the shaft attaches to the putter head almost midway between the toe end and the heel end of the head and towards the heel end.

10. The golf putter of claim 1 having a radial wedge cut out running axially along a length from heel end to toe end of the putter head.

11. The golf putter of claim 10 wherein the radial wedge cut out is less than the length from heel end to toe end of the putter head.

12. A putter head for putting a golf ball comprising a heel end and opposing toe end and a face therebetween, wherein the head is constructed of standard sized cylindrical bar stock having a radius which is less than the radius of a regulation size golf ball, so that when used to putt the golf ball, the golf ball is contacted in an essentially linear contact area horizontal to the ground.

13. The putter head of claim 12 wherein the bar stock is stainless steel or brass.

14. The putter head of claim 12 wherein the radius of the cylindrical bar stock is less than 0.84 inches.

15. The putter head of claim 12 wherein the radius of the cylindrical bar stock is between 0.125 and 0.5 inches.

16. The putter head of claim 12 wherein the putter head further comprises a shaft-receiving aperture towards the heel end of the head.

17. The putter head of claim 12 wherein the putter head further comprises a shaft-receiving aperture almost midway between the toe end and the heel end of the head and towards the heel end.

18. The putter head of claim 12 further having a radial wedge cut out running axially along a length from heel end to toe end of the putter head.

19. The putter head of claim 18 wherein the radial wedge cut out is less than the length from heel end to toe end of the putter head.

20. The putter head of claim 12 wherein the putter head has variable weighting.

21. The putter head of claim 12 wherein the putter head has bottom and posterior weighting.

22. The putter head of claim 12 wherein the putter head is heel-toe weighted.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/586,318 filed Jul. 8, 2004.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

(1) Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to golf equipment, and more particularly to golf putters. Specifically, the present invention relates to a golf putter having a round cylindrical head prepared from standard sized bar stock, preferably metal. More specifically, the invention relates to a golf putter having a round cylindrical head preferably made from standard stainless steel or brass bar stock which has a radius less than the radius of a regulation golf ball, specifically on the striking face.

(2) Description of the Related Art

The traditional putter has a vertical blade with a flat surface and a vertical height usually one inch (25 mm) or greater. Subsequent traditional putters have a similar geometry on the face allowing for flat, convex, but not concave faces. The contact surface is often distinguished by the shape of the mass behind the vertical face. There have been putters with curved contact faces from heel to toe on the putter. This feature is permissible under United States Golf Association (U.S.G.A.) rules. There also have been putters that are totally cylindrical in geometry. Existing putters come in many sizes and geometries. There is often heel to toe weighting to resist the turning of the vertical positioned putter blade.

The rules of golf equipment are controlled by the U.S.G.A. for America. The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews (R. & A.) is the governing authority for the rules of golf in more than one hundred affiliated nations. More recently, in a written ‘statement of principles’ published jointly by the R.& A. and the U.S.G.A., it was acknowledged that, “History has proved that it is impossible to foresee the developments in golf equipment which advancing technology will deliver.” However, both the R.& A. and the U.S.G.A. remain vigilant when considering the equipment rules. The main objective of U.S.G.A. Rules 4 and 5 and Appendices II and III is to protect golf's best traditions, to prevent an over-reliance on technological advances rather than skill, and to ensure that skill is the dominant element of success throughout the game. Therefore, any club design must consider these rules if the club is to be deemed legal by the governing authorities of golf. Any putter must be compatible with the U.S.G.A. rules of golf in regards to being plain in shape, with runners that do not extend into the face, a width that is greater than the depth, a face without concavity, a face angle of no more than fifteen degrees, and an angle of shaft to the head of ten degrees incline or greater.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,508,342 to Drake discloses a golf putter having an elongate head connected to a shaft. The shaft has a shank with a handgrip adjacent its upper end, an offset portion connected to the lower end of the shank and extending transversely, and a depending portion projecting from the other end of the offset portion and connected to the head. The depending portion is connected to the head at a point which is adjacent the longitudinal center of the head and can be transversely between the longitudinal centerline and the back of the head. The offset portion can be inclined upwardly from the depending portion with respect to the longitudinal axis of the head and toward the front of the head at an angle of 10-30 degrees relative to the longitudinal axis of the head. Preferably the upper portion of the handgrip is inclined with respect to the shank toward the player and the ball striking face of the head.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,872,684 to Dippel discloses a golf putter with a substantially cylindrical club head made from a non-metallic plastic material such as acetal polymer and having weights recessed in the heel and toe ends. The diameter of the cylindrical club head is one and one-quarter inches. A visual alignment mark extends circumferentially partially around the cylindrical body at a position equidistant between the heel and toe ends.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,090,698 to Kleinfelter discloses a putter having a barrel-shaped club head, which allegedly has a center of percussion enlarged so as to make it easy to consistently impact a ball with the club head's sweet spot regardless of stroke or stance used or conditions of the putt.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,433,441 to Olsen, et al. discloses a golf putter with a two-piece cylindrical head which is a rod constructed from a hard material and fastened inside a thin walled tube cast from a soft, malleable material such as copper.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,447,310 to Jernigan discloses a putter with a head having a rounded striking surface and having a heel and toe which are of greater weight than the central part of the head.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,692,969 to Schooler discloses a putter with a pivotable head, the angle of which is adjustable relative to the shaft, includes a shaft having a lower end secured to a rotatable member rotatably disposed within a bore in the golf club head. The bore includes a longitudinally-elongate upper portion adjacent the upper surface of the head which restricts the range of motion of the shaft. The upper portion prevents movement of the shaft about the axis of the head and restricts the pivotal movement of the shaft to between about 30 degrees and 90 degrees relative to the head. A resilient locking member selectively locks and unlocks the rotatable member within the golf club head, permitting adjustment of the golf club shaft-head angle. A golfer can adjust the angle by applying weight or force.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,524,193 to Devore discloses a golf putter head having a cylindrical body with a flat top. The body of the putter is constructed of an outer shell of an aluminum alloy with an inner core of brass. The head has a groove across the flat face of the top and at its center for alignment.

While the related art teach round putter heads, there still exists a need for an improved round putter head.

OBJECTS

Therefore, it is an object of the present invention to provide an improved putter. It is further an object of the present invention to provide a putter with a round cylindrical head having a vertical radius on the striking face which is less than the radius of a regulation size golf ball. It is still further an object of the present invention to provide a putter with a geometry such that the resultant contact surface area between the putter and the ball at impact is linear and essentially horizontal. These and other objects will become increasingly apparent by reference to the following description and the drawings.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a golf putter comprising a shaft having a proximal end and an opposing distal end, a grip for a golfer to hold the golf putter attached upon the proximal end of the shaft, and a head attached to the distal end of the shaft for contacting a golf ball during putting having a heel end and opposing toe end and a face therebetween, wherein the head is constructed of standard sized cylindrical bar stock having a radius which is less than the radius of a regulation size golf ball, so that when used to putt the golf ball, the golf ball is contacted in an essentially linear contact area horizontal to the ground.

In further embodiments of the golf putter the bar stock is stainless steel or brass. In further embodiments the radius of the cylindrical bar stock is less than 0.84 inches (21.3 mm). In still further embodiments of the golf putter the radius of the cylindrical bar stock is between 0.125 inch (3.2 mm) and 0.5 inches (12.7 mm). In further embodiments of the golf putter the shaft attaches to the putter head towards the heel end of the head. In still further embodiments of the golf putter the shaft attaches to the putter head midway between the toe end and the heel end of the head. In further embodiments the shaft head is towards the center of the head just short of midway. In still further embodiments the shaft attaches to the putter head almost midway between the toe end and the heel end of the head and towards the heel end. In still further embodiments a radial wedge cut out runs axially along a length from heel end to toe end of the putter head. In still further embodiments the radial wedge cut out is less than the length from heel end to toe end of the putter head. In still further embodiments the putter head has variable weighting. In still further embodiments the putter head has bottom and posterior weighting. In still further embodiments the putter head is heel-toe weighted.

The present invention provides a putter head for putting a golf ball comprising a heel end and opposing toe end and a face therebetween, wherein the head is constructed of standard sized cylindrical bar stock having a radius which is less than the radius of a regulation size golf ball, so that when used to putt the golf ball, the golf ball is contacted in an essentially linear contact area horizontal to the ground.

In further embodiments of the putter head the bar stock is stainless steel or brass. In further embodiments the radius of the cylindrical bar stock is less than 0.84 inches (21.3 mm). In still further embodiments the radius of the cylindrical bar stock is between 0.125 inch (3.2 mm) and 0.5 inches (12.7 mm). In still further embodiments the putter head further comprises a shaft-receiving aperture towards the heel end of the head. In further embodiments the shaft-receiving aperture is towards the center of the head just short of midway. In still further embodiments the shaft-receiving aperture is midway between the toe end and the heel end of the head. In still further embodiments the shaft-receiving aperture is almost midway between the toe end and the heel end of the head and towards the heel end. In still further embodiments of the putter head a radial wedge cut out runs axially along a length from heel end to toe end of the putter head. In still further embodiments the radial wedge cut out is less than the length from heel end to toe end of the putter head. In still further embodiments the putter head has variable weighting. In still further embodiments the putter head has bottom and posterior weighting. In still further embodiments the putter head is heel-toe weighted.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates a face view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 10 according to the present invention.

FIG. 2 illustrates a toe end view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 10 according to the present invention.

FIG. 3 illustrates a top view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 10 according to the present invention.

FIG. 4 illustrates a face view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 20 according to the present invention.

FIG. 5 illustrates a toe end view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 20 according to the present invention.

FIG. 6 illustrates a top view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 20 according to the present invention.

FIG. 7 illustrates a face view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 30 according to the present invention.

FIG. 8 illustrates a toe end view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 30 according to the present invention.

FIG. 9 illustrates a top view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 30 according to the present invention.

FIG. 10 illustrates a face view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 40 according to the present invention.

FIG. 11 illustrates a toe end view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 40 according to the present invention.

FIG. 12 illustrates a back view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 40 according to the present invention.

FIG. 13 illustrates a top view of an embodiment of a golf putter head 40 according to the present invention.

FIG. 14 illustrates a cross-section view from the toe end of the golf putter 10 addressing a regulation size golf ball 70.

FIG. 15 illustrates a golf ball 70 showing the contact area 74 resulting from contact with a putter head according to the present invention. FIG. 15A illustrates a closer view of the designated region in FIG. 15.

FIG. 16 illustrates a face view of a further embodiment of a golf putter head 60 according to the present invention.

FIG. 17 illustrates a top view of the putter head 60 of FIG. 16.

FIG. 18 illustrates a toe end view of the putter head 60 of FIG. 16.

FIG. 19 illustrates a back view of the putter head 60 of FIG. 16.

FIG. 20 illustrates a bottom view of the putter head 60 of FIG. 16.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

All patents, patent applications, government publications, government regulations, and literature references cited in this specification are hereby incorporated herein by reference in their entirety. In case of conflict, the present description, including definitions, will control.

The term “contact area” is the area on either a blade or a golf ball where there is contact between the ball and the putter blade.

The term “proximal” refers to the side nearest to the golfer.

The term “distal” refers to the side away from the golfer.

The term “front” or “face” refers to the side of the putter head used as a striking surface which contacts a golf ball.

The term “back” refers to the side of the putter head opposed to the front striking face which contacts a golf ball.

The term “toe” refers to the side or end of the putter head which is away from the golfer when putting.

The term “heel” refers to the side or end of the putter head which is near the golfer when putting.

The term “horizontal” refers to the orientation parallel the ground when the putter is in use, which corresponds to the plane along the bottom side of the putter head.

The term “vertical” refers to an imaginary line which is normal to the horizontal plane of the ground, when the putter is in use.

A golf putter of the present invention includes a shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 with a proximal end (not shown) and a distal end 11B, 21B, 31B, 41B and a putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 mounted on the distal end 11B, 21B, 31B, 41B of the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41. In one embodiment, the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 is straight and constructed of chrome plated, connected, concentric steel cylinders. In other embodiments, the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 is a single-piece smoothly tapered stainless steel, graphite or other material suitable for this use. Further embodiments of the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 can be any shaft design known in the art. In some embodiments, the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 can be straight from the proximal end of shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 to within approximately 5.0 inches (127 mm) or fewer above the distal end 11B, 21B, 31B, 41B, 51B of the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41. The shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 can be of any type, including a belly putter type (not shown), which is longer than a traditional putter, and allows for a style of putting where the proximal end of the putter is stabilized on the player's belly. In some embodiments, the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 can be of a long putter type (not shown). In some embodiments, the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 is of a traditional short length, at least longer than approximately 18 inches (457 mm). In further still embodiments, the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 is relatively long (not shown), which makes it ideal for a pendulum style of golf stroke.

A grip (not shown) is located at the proximal end of the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 which allows a golf player to maintain a firm hold on the club. The grip material is constructed of a wrapped leather strip, and has a circular cross section of approximately 1.75 inches (44.5 mm) or less when applied to the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41. In other embodiments, the grip is constructed of rubber and has a non-circular cross-section without bulges or waists. In further embodiments, the grip can have a continuous, straight, slightly raised rib along the full length of the grip. In further still embodiments, the putter will have two grips which are circular in cross-section, with both grips coaxial with the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 separated by at least approximately 1.5 inches (38 mm). However, any grip known in the art can be used which fits the proximal end of the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41.

The face 19, 29, 39, 49, 69 of the round cylindrical putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 has a vertical radius which is less than that of a golf ball 70 and is constructed of standard sized bar stock, preferably stainless steel or brass. The round cylindrical putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 can be of a ⅛ (3.2 mm) to 7/16 inch (11.1 mm) radius. The distal end 11B, 21B, 31B, 41B of the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 can be attached to the round cylindrical putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 exactly centered between the toe end 13, 23, 33, 43 and the heel end 14, 24, 34, 44 of the round cylindrical putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60. Preferably, the distal end 11B, 21B, 31B, 41B of the shaft 11, 21, 31, 41 can be attached to the round cylindrical putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 just short of center between the toe end 13, 23, 33, 43 and the heel end 14, 24, 34, 44 of the round cylindrical putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 to line up the ball off the end of the shaft. The weight of the putter head of the present invention is most preferably 350 grams. Preferably, the weight of the putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 of the present invention is between 250 to 450 grams. For long putters such as belly putters the head can be up to 650 grams. The bar stock can be constructed of standard stainless steel. The sizes can be in metric or inch units. Any shape or size of a cut out is also encompassed by the present invention to allow for manipulation of the center of mass and total weight of the round cylindrical putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60. Also encompassed by the present invention are golf putters having round cylindrical putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 with various markings for alignment of the cylindrical putter head 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 to a golf ball 70.

One embodiment of the present invention is a golf putter with a round cylindrical head 10 having a toe end 13 and opposing heel end 14 shown in FIG. 1 through FIG. 3 constructed of ¾ inch (19 mm) Type 303 stainless steel bar stock having a ⅜ inch (9.5 mm) radius and weighing 375 grams. Optionally, weights are added to the putter head 10. The distal end 11B of shaft 11 is inserted into opening 12 in the top of head 10 approximately equidistant between toe end 13 and heel end 14 of round cylindrical head 10.

Another embodiment of the present invention is a golf putter with a round cylindrical head 20 having a toe end 23 and opposing heel end 24 shown in FIG. 4 through FIG. 6 constructed of ¾ inch (19 mm) 303 stainless steel bar stock having a ⅜ inch (9.5 mm) radius, weighing 375 grams. Optionally, weights are added to the putter head 20. The distal end 21B of shaft 21 is inserted into opening 22 in the top of head 20 adjacent to the heel end 24 of head 20.

Another embodiment of the present invention is a golf putter having a round cylindrical head 30 having a toe end 33 and opposing heel end 34 shown in FIG. 7 through FIG. 9 constructed of ⅞ inch (22.2 mm) 303 stainless steel bar stock having a 7/16 inch (11.1 mm) radius, weighing approximately 400 grams. Weights can be optionally added to the putter head 30. The distal end 31B of shaft 31 is inserted into opening 32 in the top of head 30 approximately equidistant between toe end 33 and heel end 34 of head 30, preferably just short of center towards the heel end 34.

A still further embodiment of the present invention is a golf putter having a round cylindrical head 40 having a toe end 43 and opposing heel end 44 shown in FIG. 10 through FIG. 13 constructed of 1 inch (25.4 mm) 303 stainless steel bar stock having a ½ inch (12.7 mm) radius, weighing 349 grams. Optionally, weights are added to the putter head 40. The distal end 41B of shaft 41 is inserted into opening 42 in the top of head 40 towards heel end 44 of head 40. Vertical wall 45 and horizontal wall 46 created by removal from the bar stock of a 3 inch (76.2 mm) long and ½ inch (12.7 mm) radius wedge running axially from toe end 43 to heel end 44 along the cylindrical bar stock defines a cut out portion of the putter head. Any shape or size of cut out is encompassed by the present invention to allow for manipulation of the center of mass and total weight of the round cylindrical head 40.

FIG. 14 illustrates a cross-section view from the toe end of the golf putter 10 addressing a regulation size golf ball 70 wherein the vertical radius of the face 19 is less than that of a golf ball 70. Each of the putter heads of the present invention when striking a golf ball 70 have a contact area 74 between the face and a golf ball 70 which is linear, and of narrow width. When used to strike a golf ball 70, the contact area 74 on the golf ball 70 is linear with a narrow width and is horizontal in orientation as illustrated in FIG. 15 and FIG. 15A. Additionally, the contact area 74 on the golf ball 70 usually spans the dimple 72 diameter. The contact area 74 is linear with a narrow width, and is also horizontal in orientation. Additionally, the contact area 74 on the golf ball 70 usually spanned a dimple 72 diameter on the golf ball 70 without entering the dimple 72 concavity, so that direction of roll is not influenced by the dimple concavity.

Another embodiment of the present invention is a putter head 60 as illustrated in FIG. 16 through FIG. 20 having a round cylindrical head 60 with a length defined by a toe end 63 and opposing heel end 64 and having a face 69 for striking a golf ball. The putter head 60 is constructed of brass bar stock. The toe end 63 of the brass bar stock has a beveled edge 63A, and the heel end 64 of the head 60 also has a beveled edge 64A. A bottom 65 of the brass bar stock is machined towards the toe end 63 and heel end 64 to create a machined portion 67 as illustrated in FIG. 20. This machined portion 67 provides a slight curvature to the bottom 65 of the putter head 60 as illustrated in FIG. 16 and FIG. 19. A shaft (not shown) can be inserted into opening 62 in the top 61 of the head 60. While the opening 62 is illustrated slightly off-center towards the heel end 64, the opening 62 can be placed at any location along the top 61 of the head 60. A wedge of the bar stock running axially along the top 61 and opposing the face 69 along the length of the cylindrical bar stock is removed to provide an elongate cavity 68. Any shape or size of cut out is encompassed by the present invention to allow for manipulation of the center of mass and total weight of the round cylindrical head 60. In the elongate cavity 68, centrally located along the length of the putter head 60 is a sighting line 68A. The sighting line 68A runs front to back in the cavity 68 to assist a golfer in aligning the putter head 60 to a golf ball when putting. Optionally, in some editions, weights are added to the putter head 60, however the elongate cavity 68 produces a heel-toe and underside weighting distribution. Preferably it weighs 340 grams, is near-center shafted, and is heel balanced. Preferably the face has a 0.5 inch radius curvature. Preferably the bottom is curved longitudinally with a ten inch heel-toe radius. Preferably the putter head 60 is CNC milled.

The resultant surface area of contact between the putters of the present invention (ie. radius less then that of golf ball) and the ball differs, being less than that produced by club/ball contact with a flat face or a larger round face putter. The vertical radius of the face 19, 29, 39, 49 69 of the putter head of the present invention is less than that of a golf ball 70, and in some embodiments less than half of the radius of a golf ball 70. In some embodiments of the putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 the vertical radius is ⅛ inch (3.2 mm) to 7/16 inches (11.1 mm). The contact area 74 on the golf ball 70 when struck by the putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 is horizontal in orientation. The length:diameter ratio of the putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 can be varied to suit the individual golfer. Some preferred length:diameter ratios include ranges of 4.0 to 6.5 or more. The slope of the putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 can be front to back (i.e. cross-section narrowing towards the back) or back to front (i.e. cross-section widening towards the back). Preferably, the weight of the putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 of the present invention is between 250 to 450 grams or more, however other weighted putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 are encompassed by the present invention. For long putters such as belly putters the head can be up to 650 grams. The weight of the putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 is most preferably 350 grams. The putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 can be constructed of any material including, but not limited to, aluminum, brass, and steel. Alternatively, the putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 can be made of any other natural or synthetic material. Further embodiments of the putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 incorporate various means of providing bottom weighting to the putter heads 10, 20, 30, 40, 60 and include embodiments having bottom posterior weighting.

The present invention further provides a set of putters comprising any of the putter embodiments described herein. In some embodiments, the set of putters comprises a plurality of putters each having a different radius and/or weighting profile. In further embodiments the putters in the set are constructed of different bar stock materials. In still further embodiments of the set of putters, the putters have various shaft placement or shaft types.

While the present invention is described herein with reference to illustrated embodiments, it should be understood that the invention is not limited hereto. Those having ordinary skill in the art and access to the teachings herein will recognize additional modifications and embodiments within the scope thereof. Therefore, the present invention is limited only by the claims attached herein.