Title:
Paper-dispenser and waste-receptacle unit
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A compact, all-in-one paper-dispenser and waste-receptacle unit that is designed to attach to a wall or a door, such as a wall or door of a public restroom. The paper, which is preferably a paper-based sanitary product, such as a tissue or paper towel, is dispensed from the bottom of the unit. After use, the user can then deposit the paper into a waste receptacle opening at the top of the unit. The invention provides an advantageous public health function by allowing the user to withdraw a paper from the unit, use the paper as a barrier between the user's hand and a potentially unsanitary surface, such as a restroom door, and then safely discard the paper within the unit. Moreover, because the paper dispenser and receptacle are combined in a single unit, with the paper dispensed from the bottom, and the receptacle located at the top of the unit, the unit can be made compact, takes up very little space, and can be easily mounted on a wall or door.



Inventors:
Makiej, John (North Andover, MA, US)
Application Number:
11/148951
Publication Date:
01/05/2006
Filing Date:
06/09/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B65H1/00; A47K10/24
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
WAGGONER, TIMOTHY R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HAMILTON, BROOK, SMITH & REYNOLDS, P.C. (CONCORD, MA, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A paper dispenser and receptacle unit comprising: an upper portion comprising a cavity for receiving waste papers; and a lower portion adapted to contain a plurality of papers for dispense, the lower portion having an opening to permit papers to be dispensed.

2. The unit of claim 2, wherein the unit comprises an outer shell having an open cavity at the top of the shell defining a waste disposal portion, and a lower portion having an angled front surface defining the lower dispense portion.

3. The unit of claim 2, wherein the back surface of the unit is generally flat to permit the unit to be easily mounted to a wall or door.

4. The unit of claim 2, further comprising a receptacle sleeve disposed in the upper portion of the shell for receiving waste paper, the receptacle sleeve being removable from the unit by sliding the sleeve up and out of the cavity at the top of the shell.

5. The unit of claim 2, further comprising a paper-containing box disposed in the lower portion of the unit, the paper-containing box containing an opening that aligns with the opening in the bottom, angled-surface of the unit to allow withdrawal of the papers.

6. The unit of claim 1, wherein the upper and lower portions comprise two separate pieces.

7. The unit of claim 6, wherein during operation the upper and lower portions are secured together, and mounted on a back plate, which is attached to a door or wall.

8. The unit of claim 7, wherein the upper and lower portions are secured together by a locking mechanism.

9. The unit of claim 6, wherein the lower portion comprises a housing having an angled front surface with an opening on the angled front surface for dispensing papers.

10. The unit of claim 1, further comprising an angled box containing papers, the angled box being sized and shaped to fit into the lower dispense portion of the unit.

11. The unit of claim 1, further comprising a transparent or semi-transparent window area on a front surface of the lower dispense portion of the unit.

12. The unit of claim 11, further comprising a paper-containing box having a transparent or semi-transparent window area, such that when the box is disposed within the lower dispense portion, the window area of the unit aligns with the window area of the box.

13. The unit of claim 12, wherein the papers within the box are colored so as to permit a user to easily observe how many papers are remaining in the box.

14. The unit of claim 1, wherein the papers comprise tissues.

15. The unit of claim 1, wherein the papers comprise paper towels.

16. The unit of claim 1, wherein the unit is installed on a surface of a public restroom.

17. The unit of claim 1, wherein the upper and lower portions are housed in a cabinet, the unit comprising a door that is attached to the cabinet, wherein access to the upper and lower portions in the cabinet is achieved by opening the door.

18. The unit of claim 17, further comprising a latching mechanism for locking the door in a closed position during operation of the unit.

19. The unit of claim 17, further comprising a waste receptacle that is housed in the cabinet in the upper receptacle portion of the unit.

20. The unit of claim 19, further comprising means for preventing the removal of the waste receptacle from the cabinet while the door is in a closed position.

21. The unit of claim 19, wherein the cabinet comprises at least one separator for providing mechanical separation between the waste receptacle and the papers in the lower dispense portion of the unit.

22. The unit of claim 21, wherein the at least one separator comprises at least one support member attached to the interior of the bottom surface of the cabinet, the waste receptacle being supported by the at least one support member.

23. The unit of claim 22, wherein the unit comprises at least two support members, the support members defining a dispense area for housing tissues to be dispensed.

24. A method for dispensing and disposing of paper comprising: from a combined paper dispenser and waste receptacle unit, withdrawing a paper from an opening in lower dispense portion of the unit, the lower dispense portion being adapted to contain a plurality of papers for dispense, and disposing of the paper in an upper receptacle portion of the unit comprising a cavity for receiving waste papers.

25. The method of claim 24, wherein the unit comprises an outer shell having an open cavity at the top of the shell defining a waste disposal portion, and a lower portion having an angled front surface defining the lower dispense portion.

26. The method of claim 25, wherein the back surface of the unit is generally flat to permit the unit to be easily mounted to a wall or door.

27. The method of claim 25, wherein the unit comprises a receptacle sleeve disposed in the upper portion of the shell for receiving waste paper, the receptacle sleeve being removable from the unit by sliding the sleeve up and out of the cavity at the top of the shell.

28. The method of claim 25, wherein the unit comprises a paper-containing box disposed in the lower portion of the unit, the paper-containing box containing an opening that aligns with the opening in the bottom, angled-surface of the unit to allow withdrawal of the papers.

29. The method of claim 24, wherein the upper and lower portions of the unit comprise two separate pieces.

30. The method of claim 29, further comprising, prior to withdrawing a paper, securing the upper and lower portions to one another on a back plate which is attached to a door or wall.

31. The method of claim 30, wherein the upper and lower portions are secured together by a locking mechanism.

32. The method of claim 29, wherein the lower dispense portion comprises a housing having an angled front surface with an opening on the angled front surface for dispensing papers.

33. The method of claim 24, wherein the unit comprises an angled box containing papers, the angled box being sized and shaped to fit into the lower dispense portion of the unit.

34. The method of claim 24, wherein the unit comprises a transparent or semi-transparent window area on a front surface of the lower dispense portion of the unit.

35. The method of claim 34, wherein the unit comprises a paper-containing box having a transparent or semi-transparent window area, such that when the box is disposed within the lower dispense portion, the window area of the unit aligns with the window area of the box.

36. The method of claim 35, wherein the papers within the box are colored so as to permit a user to easily observe how many papers are remaining in the box.

37. The method of claim 24, further comprising separating at least one of the lower dispense portion or the upper receptacle portion from the unit and replacing the papers in the lower dispense portion.

38. The method of claim 24, wherein the papers comprise tissues.

39. The method of claim 24, wherein the papers comprise paper towels.

40. The method of claim 24, wherein the unit is installed on a surface of a public restroom.

41. The method of claim 24, wherein the upper and lower portions are housed in a cabinet, the unit comprising a door that is attached to the cabinet, wherein access to the upper and lower portions in the cabinet is achieved by opening the door.

42. The method of claim 41, further comprising locking the door in a closed position on the cabinet prior to withdrawing and disposing of the papers.

43. The method of claim 42, further comprising unlocking and opening the door to perform at least one of removing waste papers from the upper receptacle portion and replacing papers in the lower dispense portion.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/578,925, filed on Jun. 10, 2004, the entire teachings of which are incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

It is generally known that practicing good personal hygiene habits can help minimize the risk of contracting diseases and infections from microorganisms. However, even good personal hygiene habits may not be enough to prevent microbial contamination. For instance, in certain areas, such as in public restrooms, microbial contamination can be prevalent, with harmful germs being spread throughout the environment by hand-to-object transferal (especially by individuals who do not wash their hands), or through aerosolized dispersal. These harmful germs can collect on virtually any surface in the restroom, such as a countertop, door or door handle, and then spread to individuals who touch these surfaces.

This problem can be minimized by the frequent cleaning of surfaces that are at high-risk for microbial contaminants. However, given the impracticality of constant cleaning of these surfaces, there will almost always be opportunity for harmful germs to collect and infect individuals who contact the contaminated surfaces. In U.S. Pat. No. 6,508,383 to Lidahl, et al., it is suggested to provide sanitary towels in restrooms so that an individual need not directly contact a restroom door. This patent describes a restroom sanitation system having two spatially-separated units: an upper dispensing unit for dispensing a cleaning paper, and a lower receptacle unit for receiving waste paper.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a compact, all-in-one paper-dispenser and waste-receptacle unit. In one aspect, the unit is designed to attach to a wall or a door, such as a wall or door of a public restroom. The paper, which is preferably a paper-based cleaning product, such as a tissue or paper towel, is dispensed from the bottom of the unit. After use, the user can then deposit the paper into a waste receptacle opening at the top of the unit. The invention provides an advantageous public health function by allowing the user to withdraw a paper from the unit, use the paper as a barrier between the user's hand and a potentially unsanitary surface, such as a restroom door, and then safely discard the paper within the unit. Moreover, because the paper dispenser and receptacle are combined in a single unit, with the paper dispensed from the bottom, and the receptacle located at the top of the unit, the unit can be made compact, takes up very little space, and can be easily mounted on a wall or door.

According to one embodiment, the unit comprises an outer-shell piece having a large, open cavity at the top defining a waste disposal portion, and a lower portion having an angled front surface defining a dispense portion. The back surface of the unit is generally flat to permit the unit to be easily mounted to a wall or door. A removable receptacle-sleeve is disposed in the upper cavity, and locks into the unit. The sleeve is removed by sliding it straight up-and-out of the top of the unit opening. The sleeve contains the waste paper, and is designed for easy disposal. The empty sleeve is then slid down back into the unit and locked into place.

A paper-containing box, which can be a standard-sized tissue box, is positioned inside of and at the bottom of the unit. A small opening is located on the bottom, angled-surface of the unit to allow withdrawal of the papers. Once the paper box is used-up (empty), the box may be removed by sliding the ‘receptacle sleeve’ up-and-out of the unit. Then, reaching into the unit, the empty box may be pulled out and replaced with a new box.

In other embodiments, the unit comprises two separate portions: an upper, receptacle portion, and a lower, dispense portion which contains a paper-containing box. During operation, the two pieces are joined together, and are preferably mounted on a back plate, which is attached to a door or wall. A locking mechanism can be provided to secure the upper and lower portion to each other, as well as to the back plate, and to release both the receptacle and the lower dispenser portion from one another, which permits access to the paper box. A lock and keyhole can be provided on the front side of the unit.

In certain embodiments, the paper box can comprise an angled box that is designed specifically for the combined dispense/receptacle unit. The angled box is sized and shaped to fit into the lower dispense portion of the unit. In one embodiment, the angled box contains 100 tissues that are light blue in color. It will be understood that the box can contain any number of paper products, and the papers can be any desired color. The angled box includes a transparent or semi-transparent window area on at least one side of the box. When the box is inserted in the unit, the window area faces out towards the user, and aligns with a corresponding window area on the front surface of the unit. These window areas are designed to allow the user and/or custodian to observe how many papers are remaining in the box.

The upper, receptacle portion of the unit can be allowed to separate from the lower dispense portion and the back plate. The back plate is attached to a wall or a door. The lower-end of the back plate is attached to the lower, dispense portion of the unit. When the upper, receptacle portion is removed from the unit, the lower portion can remain attached to the back plate.

In yet another embodiment, an all-in-one paper-dispenser and waste-receptacle unit comprises a waste receptacle in an upper receptacle portion, and a paper dispenser in a lower dispense portion, where both portions are enclosed in a cabinet. Access to both the waste receptacle and the paper dispense compartment can be achieved when a door of the cabinet is opened. Preferably, the door can be locked from the outside. When the door is opened, the waste receptacle can be removed by sliding it straight forward (toward the user) and emptied of its contents, and the papers may be loaded for dispensing. When the door is closed, the top of the cabinet is exposed and the user may throw the waste papers into the receptacle. Preferably, the unit is designed so that the waste receptacle cannot be removed when the door is closed. The papers, which can be dry sanitary tissues, are dispensed from an opening at the bottom of the cabinet.

This invention provides a user a simple and effective option to help prevent the transmission of food borne illnesses commonly found in food establishment restrooms. When the present invention is placed next to the exit door or on the door itself, the worker or patron will have the opportunity to use a convenient tissue/paper towel as a barrier for the door handle or push plate. After use, he/she may choose to throw the tissue/paper towel into the unit's waste receptacle.

In general, protection against the viruses and bacteria commonly found in food establishment restrooms, for instance, only requires a dry non-antibacterial paper tissue/paper towel, which the public at-large already uses to protect themselves after they have washed their hands with soap and warm water. Antibacterial wipes that include alcohol have not proven to be particularly useful against these viruses/bacteria. According to the CDC, the concern in food service settings focuses on fecal pathogens (bacteria, enteric non-lipophilic viruses, and protozoan oocysts). Alcohol has shown to be ineffective against protozoan oocysts and, depending on the alcohol concentration, time, and viral variant, it may not be effective against Hepatitis A, or other non-lipophilic viruses. Therefore, a dry tissue or paper towel provided by this product is suitable when used as a barrier against the exit door handle or push plate after proper hand washing. When the user does not come into contact with the surface of an affected area, then the likely hood of transmission is reduced.

In one aspect, this device provides a tissue dispenser and waste receptacle all-in-one unit which conveniently helps users, including restaurant workers and patrons, do what they already do to prevent the transmission of food bourne illnesses after hand washing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following more particular description of preferred embodiments of the invention, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which like reference characters refer to the same parts throughout the different views. The drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon illustrating the principles of the invention.

FIGS. 1A-1D illustrate a first embodiment of a paper-dispenser and waste-receptacle unit having a one-piece outer-shell;

FIG. 2A is a side view of a second embodiment comprising an upper, receptacle portion, and a lower, dispense portion, mounted together against a wall;

FIG. 2B is a side view of the second embodiment showing the lower dispense portion separated from the upper receptacle portion;

FIGS. 3A and 3B are side perspective views of the second embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 4A is a top view of the unit, showing the interior of the upper receptacle portion;

FIG. 4B is a top view of the unit with the lower dispense portion separated from the upper receptacle portion;

FIGS. 5A is a front view of the second embodiment, with the upper and lower portions joined together;

FIG. 5B is a front view of the second embodiment, with the upper and lower portions separated from one another;

FIGS. 6A-6C illustrate an angled tissue box with a window portion;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a third embodiment of a combined paper-dispenser and waste-receptacle unit;

FIG. 8 is a front view of the third embodiment;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of the cabinet of the unit of FIG. 7;

FIG. 10 shows the cabinet with door hinge, tissue supports and latch assembly;

FIG. 11 illustrates a tissue support;

FIG. 12 is a side view of the latch assembly;

FIG. 13 shows the door of the unit of FIG. 7;

FIG. 14 is a side view of the unit of FIG. 7; and

FIG. 15 shows the waste bucket for the unit of FIG. 7.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

A description of preferred embodiments of the invention follows.

FIGS. 1A-1D illustrate a first embodiment of a combined paper-dispenser and waste-receptacle unit 10 having a one-piece outer-shell 11. The unit includes an outer-shell 11 having a large, open cavity 13 at the top, as shown in FIGS. 1A and 1B. The open cavity 13 defines a waste disposal portion of the unit. In certain embodiments, a removable receptacle-sleeve (not shown) can be located in the upper cavity 13, and lock into the unit. The sleeve can be removed by sliding it straight up-and-out of the top of the unit opening. The sleeve contains the waste paper, and is designed for easy disposal. When the waste papers have been disposed of, the empty sleeve can then slide back into the upper cavity 13 and lock into place. It will be understood that the unit can function without a receptacle-sleeve. For example, the user can dispose papers directly into the upper cavity 13, or instead of a sleeve that locks into the unit, a waste bag can be disposed in the cavity.

The lower portion of the unit 10 is used to dispense papers. As shown in FIGS. 1C and 1D, the unit has an angled front surface 15 that defines a dispense portion. The angled front surface 15 has a small opening 17 to allow withdrawal of papers from the interior of the unit. As shown in the cross-sectional view of FIG. 1D, a paper-containing box 19, which can be a standard-sized tissue box, is positioned inside the unit 10, abutting the interior of angled surface 15. Thus, a user can withdraw papers from the paper box 19 through opening 17 in angled surface 15. Once the paper box 19 is used-up (empty), the box may be removed by removing the waste paper from the upper portion of the unit (such as by sliding the ‘receptacle sleeve’ up-and-out of the unit). Then, reaching into the unit, the empty box may be pulled out and replaced with a new box. As is illustrated in FIG. 1D, the back surface 18 of the unit is flat to permit the unit to be easily mounted to a wall or door.

FIG. 2A is a side view of a second embodiment of a combined paper-dispenser and waste-receptacle unit 20 comprising two separate portions: an upper, receptacle portion 21, and a lower, dispense portion 23. The lower, dispense portion 23 is adapted to hold a paper-containing box. During operation, the two pieces are joined together, and attached to a flat surface, such as a door or wall. Paper is dispensed from the lower portion 23, and can be disposed of in the upper portion 21, which has a hollow interior with an opening 25 at the top. In a preferred embodiment, the upper portion 21 and the lower portion 23 are mounted together on a back plate, which is attached to a door or wall. A locking mechanism can be provided to secure the upper and lower portion to each other, as well as to the back plate, and to release both the receptacle 21 and the lower dispenser portion 23 from one another, as shown in FIG. 2B, and thus provide access to the paper box. A lock and keyhole can be provided on the front side 26 of the unit.

The second embodiment of the present paper-dispenser and waste-receptacle unit 20 is shown in perspective view in FIGS. 3A and 3B. As is shown in FIG. 3B, the bottom surface 22 of the upper receptacle portion 21 is angled upwards from the back surface 28 of the unit to the front surface 26 of the unit. The upper receptacle portion 21 is slightly recessed proximate to the bottom surface 22 to provide a small rabbet 31. The paper dispense portion 23 of the unit fits over the rabbet 31 in the bottom of the receptacle 21 to ensure a good fit when the two portions are engaged. The bottom surface 24 of the dispense portion 23 is also angled parallel to the bottom surface 22 of the receptacle 21, so that it faces out from the wall or other flat mounting surface. The bottom surface 24 also includes an opening 29 to allow withdrawal of papers from the interior of the dispense portion 23.

As illustrated in the top-view of FIGS. 4A and 4B, the hollow-interior 25 of the upper portion 21 of the unit serves as a receptacle for waste papers. The lower portion 23 easily engages to and disengages from the upper portion 21 by sliding along rabbet 31. The lower portion 23 serves as a dispenser for papers, and is adapted to contain a plurality of papers, such as in a paper-containing box 33 that is housed inside the lower portion 23, as shown in FIG. 4B.

In certain embodiments, the paper box 33 can comprise an angled box that is designed specifically for the combined dispense/receptacle unit. The angled box is sized and shaped to fit into the lower dispense portion of the unit. For example, as shown in FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C, the upper and bottom surfaces of the box 33 can be angled parallel to the lower surface 22 of the upper receptacle portion 21 and the lower surface 24 of the dispense portion 23 of the unit. In this way, the box 33 fits snugly in the cavity formed between the receptacle portion 23 and the dispense portion 21. In general, the shape of the box 33 is arranged in a way that provides a snug fit in the interior of the lower dispense portion 23 of the unit. As shown in FIG. 6C, the box 33 has an opening 39 on its bottom surface. This opening 39 aligns with opening 29 on the lower dispense portion 23 of the unit, so that papers can be withdrawn from the box 33 through openings 39 and 29 for use by a user. In the embodiment shown, the mechanism for each paper to be dispensed is similar to a standard tissue dispenser with an Interfold process that allows one tissue to be pulled after another. In other embodiments, the paper may be of the roll/tear type. Additionally, the tissue paper may be dispensed via a ‘Hands Free’ device (e.g. hand waving over a sensor).

In one embodiment, the angled box 33 contains 100 tissues that are light blue in color. It will be understood that the box can contain any number of paper products, and the papers can be any desired color. As shown in FIGS. 6A and 6C, the angled box includes a transparent or semi-transparent window area 35 on at least one side of the box. When the box is inserted in the unit, the window area faces out towards the user, and aligns with a corresponding window area 35 on the front surface of the lower dispense portion 23 of the unit, as shown in FIGS. 3A, 5A and 5B. These window areas 35 are designed to allow the user and/or custodian to observe how many papers are remaining in the box.

The upper, receptacle portion of the unit can be allowed to separate from the lower dispense portion and the back plate. The back plate is attached to a wall or a door. The lower-end of the back plate is attached to the lower, dispense portion of the unit. In certain embodiments, when the upper, receptacle portion is removed from the unit, the lower portion can remain attached to the back plate.

Another embodiment of the invention is shown in FIGS. 7-15. FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a third embodiment of an all-in-one paper-dispenser and waste-receptacle unit 70. This embodiment is designed with a waste receptacle sitting at the top of the unit in an upper receptacle portion 71 and a tissue dispenser in a bottom compartment of a lower dispense portion 73. Both portions are enclosed in a cabinet 77 that can be locked from the outside. Access to both the waste receptacle and the tissue compartment can be reached only when a door 75 of the cabinet is opened. When the door is opened, the waste receptacle can be removed by sliding it straight forward (toward the user) and emptied of its contents, while the tissues may be loaded for use. When the door is closed, the top of the cabinet is exposed and the user may throw the dry tissue waste into the receptacle. Preferably, the unit is designed so that the waste receptacle cannot be removed when the door is closed. When the door is closed, the tissues, which can be dry, colored (e.g. blue) tissues, can be dispensed from an opening at the bottom of the cabinet.

As shown in FIG. 7, the unit 70 comprises a cabinet 77 having a waste bucket 81 contained in an upper receptacle portion 71 of the unit. A door 75 is attached to the front surface of the cabinet 77, the door 75 being hinged to the cabinet at one side, and secured to the cabinet at the other side by a latch mechanism 79. When the latch mechanism is released, the door 75 is able to swing open on the hinge to expose the interior of the cabinet, including the waste bucket 88 in the upper receptacle portion 71, and the tissues in the lower dispense portion 73.

FIG. 8 is a front view of the unit 70, showing the door 75, and the angled bottom surface 85 of the cabinet 77. The angled bottom surface 85 is provided with an opening 87 for dispensing tissues from the lower dispense portion 73 of the unit.

The interior of the cabinet 77 is shown in perspective view in FIG. 9. This view illustrates the interior of the angled bottom surface 85 and the dispense opening 87. A plurality of holes 82 are provided in the rear surface of the cabinet for mounting the unit onto a wall or door. At the top of the cabinet there is a lip 81 that extends from the rear and side walls of the cabinet. The purpose of this lip is to help retain the waste bucket inside the cabinet when the door of the unit is closed and locked. Specifically, the waste bucket is prevented by the lip 81 from being removed out the top of the unit, and must be removed by sliding the bucket out of the front of the unit. The lip 81 can also serve as a guide to help the user insert and remove the waste bucket.

FIG. 10 again illustrates the interior of the cabinet 77, where the door hinge 84, tissue supports 88, 89 and latch mechanism 79 are also shown. The door 75 (shown in FIG. 13) is attached to the cabinet by hinge 84. When the door is closed, the latch mechanism 79 locks the door in place to prevent access to the interior of the cabinet. A suitable latch mechanism is shown in greater detail in FIG. 12. The latch mechanism includes a means for unlocking the door located on the side of the cabinet, as illustrated in FIG. 14. Preferably, the latch mechanism can only be unlocked using a key in order to prevent unauthorized access to the interior of the unit.

FIG. 10 also illustrates a pair of tissue supports 88, 89, which are attached to the interior of the bottom surface of the cabinet. The supports 88, 89 serve at least two functions. First, they define an area for housing the tissues to be dispensed through opening 87. The tissues can be housed in a tissue box that slides into the unit between the left and right tissue supports 88, 89. (Alternatively, the tissues can be inserted into the unit loosely, or held together using one or more bands, without a tissue box). The tissue supports 88, 89 also provide a mechanical spacing between the waste bucket in the upper receptacle portion 71 and the tissues in the lower dispense portion 73 of the unit. FIG. 11 shows one of the two tissue supports 89. When the tissue support 89 is mounted within the cabinet, the waste bucket can sit on the flat top surface(s) 90 of the supports, which keeps the waste bucket separated from the tissues in the lower dispense portion 73. An example of a waste bucket suitable for use in the unit is shown in FIG. 15.

While this invention has been particularly shown and described with references to preferred embodiments thereof, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes in form and details may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention encompassed by the appended claims.