Title:
Fluid dispersion system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A fluid dispersion system for disposing of excess water from a distribution system includes an essentially upwardly-directed conduit connected with the fluid distribution system, an outlet from the conduit being essentially upwardly directed. A head is mounted with the outlet wherein the head includes a closure for normal seating with the outlet and wherein excess fluid pressure from the outlet causes the closure to move from the outlet and thereby permit the egress of fluid from the outlet. The fluid is permitted to run freely over and away from the area about the outlet. There is a cage for the closure to limit the movement of the closure between a position in abutment with the top of the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is below a predetermined amount, and the removed position from the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is above the pre-determined amount. The cage retains the closure such that when the fluid pressure drops below the predetermined amount, the closure is seated on the outlet. The top of the outlet is substantially aligned with or relatively slightly above an area about the conduit, the area being part of a culvert floor, such that fluid exiting the outlet runs from the culvert into a gutter.



Inventors:
Toromanian, Vrezh (Montebello, CA, US)
Application Number:
10/876498
Publication Date:
12/29/2005
Filing Date:
06/24/2004
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
405/37, 405/36
International Classes:
E03F1/00; E03F5/12; (IPC1-7): E03F1/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
SINGH, SUNIL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GREENBERG TRAURIG LLP (GT) (CHICAGO, IL, US)
Claims:
1. A fluid dispersion system for disposing of excess fluid in a fluid distribution system, such system normally being for distribution of fluid between a supply and end users, the dispersion system comprising: a conduit connected with the fluid distribution system, an outlet from the conduit being essentially upwardly directed; a head mounted with the outlet wherein the head includes a closure for normal seating with the outlet and wherein excess fluid pressure from the outlet causes the closure to move from the outlet and thereby permit the egress of fluid from the outlet, the fluid being permitted to run freely away from the area of the outlet; and the closure being mounted to have limited the movement between a position in abutment with the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is below a predetermined amount, and the removed position from the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is above the pre-determined amount, the closure being such that when the fluid pressure drops below the predetermined amount, the closure is seated on the outlet.

2. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein the closure moves into abutment with the closure downwardly solely under gravity to close the outlet.

3. A system as claimed in claim 1 including a series of outlet port and a series of closures, the closures being for seating with the respective series of ports.

4. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein when the outlet opens, the closure abuts a plate, the plate being contained in a cage and being located above the closure, the plate forming part of the cage with the port.

5. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein the top of the outlet is substantially aligned with or relatively slightly above an area about the conduit, the area being part of a culvert floor, the floor being preferably formed of concrete such that fluid exiting the outlet runs from the concrete culvert into a gutter, and wherein the gutter permits for further runoff of the fluid.

6. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein a cage is formed by a series of vertically-directed nuts and bolts directed between a base plate and a top plate and wherein the closure is housed to move upwardly and downwardly between the base plate and the top plate and wherein excess fluid runs out from the closure between the bolts.

7. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein the fluid distribution system is a water distribution system for an urban environment, and wherein the water distribution system includes multiple fluid paths, the paths being adapted to receive different amounts of water under different pressures and wherein an overflow of pressure in these different paths requires operation of a relief valve to permit excess fluid to escape to the environment from the distribution system from the dissipater, the dissipater being at an end of a fluid outlet.

8. A system as claimed in claim 7 wherein there are multiple closure outlets connected to the distribution system, and wherein there are plurality of dissipater heads connected with the water distribution system.

9. A system as claimed in claim 1 wherein the dissipater head is located in a culvert and the culvert is covered with a culvert top, the culvert base being relatively flat and without a basin for permitting accumulation of the excess water exiting the dissipater.

10. A fluid dispersion system for disposing of excess fluid in a fluid distribution system, such system normally being for distribution of fluid between a supply and end users, the dispersion system comprising: an essentially upwardly-directed conduit connected with the fluid distribution system, an outlet from the conduit being essentially upwardly directed; a head mounted with the outlet wherein the head includes a closure for normal seating with the outlet and wherein excess fluid pressure from the outlet causes the closure to move from the outlet and thereby permit the egress of fluid from the outlet, the fluid being permitted to run freely over and away from the area about the outlet; and the head including a cage for the closure and the closure being mounted in a cage thereby to limit the movement of the closure between a position in abutment with the top of the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is below a predetermined amount, and the removed position from the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is above the pre-determined amount, the cage retaining the closure such that when the fluid pressure drops below the predetermined amount, the closure is seated on the outlet.

11. A system as claimed in claim 10 wherein the closure moves into abutment with the closure downwardly solely under gravity to close the outlet.

12. A system as claimed in claim 10 including a series of outlet port and a series of closures, the closures being for seating with the respective series of ports.

13. A system as claimed in claim 10 wherein when the outlet opens, the closure abuts a plate, the plate being contained in the cage and being located above the closure, the plate forming part of a cage structure with the port.

14. A system as claimed in claim 10 wherein the top of the outlet is substantially aligned with or relatively slightly above an area about the conduit, the area being part of a culvert floor, the floor being preferably formed of concrete such that fluid exiting the outlet runs from the concrete culvert into a gutter, and wherein the gutter permits for further runoff of the fluid.

15. A system as claimed in claim 10 wherein the cage is formed by a series of vertically-directed nuts and bolts directed between a base plate and a top plate and wherein the closure is housed to move upwardly and downwardly between the base plate and the top plate and wherein excess fluid runs out from the closure between the bolts.

16. A system as claimed in claim 10 wherein the fluid distribution system is a water distribution system for an urban environment, and wherein the water distribution system includes multiple fluid paths, the paths being adapted to receive different amounts of water under different pressures and wherein an overflow of pressure in these different paths requires operation of a relief valve to permit excess fluid to escape to the environment from the distribution system from the dissipater, the dissipater being at an end of a fluid outlet.

17. A system as claimed in claim 16 wherein there are multiple closure outlets connected to the distribution system and wherein there are plurality of dissipater heads connected with the water distribution system.

18. A system as claimed in claim 17 wherein the dissipater heads are located in respective culverts and the respective culverts are covered with respective culvert tops.

19. A fluid dispersion system for disposing of excess water in a water distribution system in a town planning layout, such system normally being for distribution of water between a supply and end users in a town, the dispersion system comprising: a conduit connected with the water distribution system, an outlet from the conduit being essentially upwardly directed; a closure mounted with the outlet wherein the closure is for normal seating with the outlet and wherein excess fluid pressure from the outlet causes the closure to move from the outlet and thereby permit the egress of excess water in the distribution system from the outlet, the fluid being permitted to run freely away from the outlet into the environment without accumulation in the area of the outlet; and the closure being mounted to have limited the movement between a position of closure with the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is below a predetermined amount, and the removed position from the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is above the pre-determined amount, the closure being such that when the fluid pressure drops below the predetermined amount, the closure is seated on the outlet.

20. A system as claimed in claim 19 wherein the top of the outlet is substantially aligned with or relatively slightly above an area about the conduit, the area being part of a culvert floor, the floor being preferably formed of concrete such that fluid exiting the outlet runs from the concrete culvert into a gutter, and wherein the gutter permits for further runoff of the water.

Description:

BACKGROUND

This disclosure relates to the evacuation of fluids, more particularly excess fluids. There is provided a novel, improved system, method of and apparatus for removing fluids such as water from conduits and surfaces.

Regulation of the quantity and quality of run-off water entering urban drainage systems is currently a high priority for many local, state and federal environmental agencies.

Run-off from a water distribution system has chemicals such as chlorine. Such run-off has been allowed to flow unchecked into nearby storm drains. This may cause damage and pollution and require clean up of the environment.

Overflow basins have been provided to contain the excess water and then this may later evaporate. If not, the water becomes stagnant, and this causes the potential for rodent breeding and disease.

One method of resolving the problem is to block storm drain grates, thus preventing contaminated water from passing through them. The water is then allowed to stand until it either evaporates or is removed by a cleanup crew (usually with a vacuum truck).

Yet another method is to plug the drainage ports of catch basins and allow water to enter a basin. Later the contaminated water is pumped out and properly discharged.

The above methods are expensive and/or inconvenient. As indicated above, containment of the excess and polluting fluid is a serious problem. This is particularly true of fluid lying on a textured surface. Examples of textured surfaces commonly polluted with fluid contaminants include: asphalt road pavements, parking lots, and driveways; washed aggregate; driveways; concrete pavements, sidewalks, waterways, vaults, culverts, parking garages, driveways, hard packed gravel staging pads, remote roads, parking lots, and industrial yards.

These problems are resolved by the system and method of the disclosure.

SUMMARY

A fluid dispersion system is provided for disposing of excess fluid in a fluid distribution system. The system normally is for distribution of fluid between a supply and end users.

The dispersion system comprises a conduit connected with the fluid distribution system, and an outlet from the conduit being essentially upwardly directed. A head is mounted with the outlet. The head includes a closure for normal seating with the outlet. Excess fluid pressure from the outlet causes the closure to move from the outlet and thereby permit the egress of fluid from the outlet. The fluid is permitted to run freely away from the area of the outlet without accumulating in a basin.

The closure is mounted so as to have limited movement from a position in abutment with the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is below a predetermined amount. A removed position from the outlet is adopted when the pressure from the fluid is above the predetermined amount. The closure is such that when the fluid pressure drops below the predetermined amount, the closure is seated on the outlet.

The closure moves into abutment with the closure working downwardly preferably solely under gravity to close the outlet.

When the outlet opens, the closure abuts a plate, the plate being contained in a cage. The plate is located above the closure, and the plate forms part of the cage about the port. The cage is formed by a series of vertically-directed nuts and bolts directed between a base plate and a top plate. The closure is housed to move upwardly and downwardly between the base plate and the top plate. Excess fluid runs out from the closure between the bolts.

The top of the outlet is substantially aligned with or relatively slightly above an area about the conduit, the area being part of a culvert floor. The floor is preferably formed of concrete such that fluid exiting the outlet runs from the concrete culvert into a gutter. The gutter permits for further runoff of the fluid. There is no basin about the conduit.

One fluid distribution system with which the system works is a water distribution system for an urban environment. The water distribution system includes multiple fluid paths or conduits. The paths are adapted to receive different amounts of water under different pressures. An overflow of pressure in these different paths requires operation of a relief valve to permit excess fluid to escape to the environment from the distribution system or the dissipater.

The dissipater is located at an end of a fluid outlet. There can be a series of outlet ports and a series of closures. The closures are for seating with the respective series of ports. There are multiple closure outlets connected to the distribution system, and there is a plurality of dissipater heads connected with the water distribution system.

The fluid dispersion system for disposing of excess fluid in a fluid distribution system is normally for distribution of fluid between a supply and end users. There is an essentially upwardly-directed conduit connected with the fluid distribution system, and an outlet from the conduit being essentially upwardly directed. The head is mounted with the outlet wherein the head includes a closure for normal seating with the outlet. Excess fluid pressure from the outlet causes the closure to move from the outlet. This permits the egress of fluid from the outlet, the fluid being permitted to run freely over and away from the area about the outlet.

A series of outlet port and a series of closures can exist. The closures are for seating with the respective series of ports.

The dissipater head is located in a culvert and the culvert is covered with a culvert top. The culvert base is relatively flat and without a basin which would otherwise permit accumulation of the excess water exiting the dissipater.

There are multiple closure outlets connected to the distribution system and wherein there are plurality of dissipater heads connected with the water distribution system. The dissipater heads are located in respective culverts and the respective culverts are covered with respective culvert tops.

The disclosure is further described in an example with reference to the accompanying illustrative drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side view of a dissipater head.

FIG. 2 is a sectional side view of the dissipater head.

FIG. 3 is a sectional side view of the dissipater head with the lined flange plate raised from the closure at the end of the pipe.

FIG. 4 is a side view showing the pipe closure with the dissipater head mounted relatively flush with the floor of a culvert, the culvert leading into a gutter.

FIG. 5a is the cover plate for the culvert, and FIG. 5b is the top of a culvert.

FIG. 6 is a top view of the culvert layout showing four dissipater heads in a series connected with a distribution pipe.

FIG. 7 is a dissipater elevation front view

FIG. 8 is a water distribution system showing different parallel valve relationships and a release one-way valve directed to the relief flow line which in turn is connected to the pipe to the dissipater head.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

An example of the dissipation system and method of the disclosure is now described. The system is for disposing of excess water in a water distribution system in a town-planning layout, where such system is normally being for distribution of water between a supply and end users in a town. The dispersion system comprises a conduit connected with the water distribution system, an outlet from the conduit being essentially upwardly directed. A closure is mounted with the outlet wherein the closure is for normal seating with the outlet and wherein excess fluid pressure from the outlet causes the closure to move from the outlet and thereby permit the egress of excess water in the distribution system from the outlet.

The fluid is permitted to run freely away from the outlet into the environment without accumulation in the area of the outlet. The closure is mounted to have limited movement between a position of closure with the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is below a predetermined amount, and a removed position from the outlet when the pressure from the fluid is above the predetermined amount. The closure arrangement is such that when the fluid pressure drops below the predetermined amount, the closure is seated on the outlet.

The top of the outlet is substantially aligned with or relatively slightly above an area about the conduit. The area is part of a culvert floor, the floor being formed of concrete such that water from the outlet runs from the concrete culvert into a gutter. In turn the gutter permits for further runoff of the water.

The dissipater head 10 is connected to the flange 11 from an outlet to conduit 12. The conduit 12 is directed substantially vertically. The dissipater head 10 includes a welded neck flange 13 and a blind flange 14, which is spaced apart by steel coupler nuts 15. The nuts 15 are used to secure the coupler head and bolt heads 16 to the neck flange and blind flange in spaced relationship.

A cage is formed by the series of spaced vertically directed nuts 15 and bolts 16 directed between a base plate flange 13 and the top blind flange plate 14. The closure plate 17 is housed in the cage to move upwardly and downwardly between the base plate or flanged neck 13 and the top plate 14. The top of the plate 14 may be flat or may be centrally domed according to the nature of the material of which it is made and the pressure that it is to withstand. Excess fluid or water runs out from the closure between the nuts 15. The stainless steel plate 17 that sits on top of the outlet 11 is normally closed when in a normal position on repose.

Fluid flow in the nature of excess water under pressure through the pipe 12 is directed as indicated by arrow 18 to strike the underside 19 of the plate 17. This pushes the plate 17 upwardly to engage underneath the flange 14. The excess water then can exit from the outlet as indicated by arrows 20 and 21.

The dissipater head assembly is mounted such that it is relatively flush with the top 22 of a concrete base 23, which is part of a flat or sloped floor to permit water to exit as indicated by arrow 24 from the relief pipe 12.

The culvert is covered with a steel culvert top 25a and is substantially flush with the top of a pavement 26. The culvert top fits onto a frame 25b. The water exits from an open or grated outlet 27 and flows into the gutter 28, which is on the side of a roadway 29. The water would then flow along the gutter in the open, thereby dissipating as necessary any chemicals such as chlorine before entering the storm water drains.

In this manner, the excess water from a water reticulation system that may contain different amounts of chlorine is dissipated on the street before entering storm water drains. The aeration of the water in this manner also permits for chlorine to evaporate from the water, thus minimizing pollution.

Several dissipation heads can be arranged in a series 30, 31, 32 and 33 at the ends of vertical pipes which are connected to a branch system 34 which is itself connected to a central relief pipe 35. In this manner, there are a series of dissipater heads in one or more culverts. The pipe 35 is itself connected to a water distribution system generally indicated by numeral 36.

The inlet flow is indicated by numeral 37 and the water then passes through a first valve mechanism 38, a second valve system 39, and also a third valve system 40 as necessary. The outlet flow would pass through pipe 41 as required.

In the event of excess pressure, the valve system 42 operates so that water can pass through a one-way check valve 43 and then direct water to the relief flow pipe 35. This water in turn is directed to the dissipater heads.

Different electrical measuring and recording systems are used with each of these valves as may be necessary. Each of valves 38, 39, 40 and 42 is gauged to operate under different pressures and different volumes so that a variability of operation is possible. Excess pressure in the pipe 36 ultimately is directed to the relief pipe 35.

Many more examples of the invention exist each differing form the other in matters of detail only. For instance, there can be cases where instead of a vertically perpendicular upright system for receiving the head there can be a more angled system. The system and method is preferably one where the gravity effect of the plate is sufficient to close the outlet.

The scope of the invention is to be determined by the following claims.