Title:
Machine for drawing fluid from a sump for circulation
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A machine for drawing fluid from a sump for circulation with reciprocating rod, intake nozzle, rotating collar, fluid inlet, and fluid outlet.



Inventors:
Roberts, Freddie Ray (Clarksville, TN, US)
Application Number:
11/147733
Publication Date:
12/22/2005
Filing Date:
06/08/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
417/423.14, 417/572
International Classes:
F01M11/06; F04B17/00; F04B39/00; F04F7/02; F01M11/00; (IPC1-7): F04B17/00; F04B39/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BOBISH, CHRISTOPHER S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
David D. Winters (Clarksville, TN, US)
Claims:
1. A machine for drawing fluid from a sump for circulation, comprising: a reciprocating member at least one intake nozzle, at least one rotating collar, at least one fluid inlet port, and at least one fluid outlet port, wherein the motion of the reciprocating member is in directions defined by the center axis of the nozzle, the intake nozzle is mounted on the rotating collar via which it is in communication with the fluid inlet port, and the intake nozzle may communicate with a fluid source.

2. A machine as in claim 1 wherein the rotating collar with the intake nozzle mounted thereon, may rotate about the reciprocating rod such that the intake nozzle will tend to orient itself to extend from the reciprocating rod in the direction of the prevailing gravity or “g” forces in the plane of rotation.

3. A machine as in claim 1 wherein the fluid, after being taken up from the fluid source by the intake nozzle, returns to the fluid source via the fluid outlet port.

4. A machine as in claim 1 wherein ballast is added to the intake nozzle.

5. A method for drawing fluid from a sump for circulation, comprising: providing a reciprocating member, providing at least one intake nozzle, providing at least one rotating collar, providing at least one fluid inlet port, and providing at least one fluid outlet port, wherein the motion of the reciprocating member is in directions defined by the center axis of the nozzle, the intake nozzle is mounted on the rotating collar via which it is in communication with the fluid inlet port, and the intake nozzle may communicate with a fluid source.

6. A method as in claim 5 wherein the rotating collar with the intake nozzle mounted thereon, may rotate about the reciprocating rod such that the intake nozzle will tend to orient itself to extend from the reciprocating rod in the direction of the prevailing gravity or “g” forces in the plane of rotation.

7. A method as in claim 5 wherein the fluid, after being taken up from the fluid source by the intake nozzle, returns to the fluid source via the fluid outlet port.

8. A method as in claim 5 wherein ballast is added to the intake nozzle.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is based on provisional application Ser. No. 60/580,464, filed on Jun. 17, 2004.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

DESCRIPTION OF ATTACHED APPENDIX

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to the field of mechanical fluid movement and more specifically to a machine for drawing fluid from a sump for circulation. The need to circulate fluids, fuel, coolant, lubrication, etc., within an internal combustion engine is as old as the internal combustion engine itself, and for this purpose many different systems have been devised which universally involve some type of pump and circulatory conduits or some means of agitating a body of lubricant such that said lubricant is splashed onto surfaces requiring lubrication. The instant disclosure is a fluid pumping and circulation means that is simple and highly efficient and which is actuated by the reciprocal motion of a piston rod.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,466,687 by Perry teaches a lubrication pumping means that takes advantage of the motion of one or more reciprocating rods to force lubrication through conduits to the particular surfaces requiring lubrication.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,681,737 by Shinoda et al, teaches a lubrication system of an impeller type that relies on rotary motion.

U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/700,255 by Roberts teaches a fluid pumping system comprising two sump oil pick-up pipes having at their extremities sump oil pick up nozzles. The sump oil pick-up pipes communicate with a piston rod that reciprocates in a linear motion. The sump oil pick up nozzles face in opposite directions along the line of the piston rod motion that when said nozzles are immersed in the sump oil, the reciprocating motion of the rod causes them to be thrust to and fro through the oil. Sump oil will alternately be forced into by inertia one and then the other sump oil pick-up pipe as the direction of the linear movement of the piston rod changes.

The technology of Shinoda et al is typical of most pumping systems found in internal combustion engines in that it requires the reciprocal motion of the piston rods to be converted into rotary motion and that rotary motion used to power a pump. With such a system, when the engine is tilted, the efficiency of the pump decreases progressively until a point is reached at which the pump will no longer function. The instant technology, in substantial contrast to Shinoda et al, requires no such motion conversion and functions regardless of the orientation of the engine.

The Perry disclosure teaches utilization of the circular reciprocating motion of a piston rod to collect and drive lubricant. However, in substantial contrast to the instant disclosure, the technology as taught by Perry provides for only limited fluid circulation, having an inlet but not an outlet, thereby requiring any fluid that returns to the sump must do so via the same route as by which entered, but in the reverse direction. Fluid flow must change direction 180 degrees with each cycle. This severely limits potential heat exchange for cooling. It also limits the volume of fluid that can be effectively circulated in that the fluid inertia must restrict the distance of fluid travel between direction reversals within a very short range. In this, the herein taught technology differs significantly from Perry in that it provides for continuous, essentially unidirectional, high volume, fluid circulation.

Furthermore, although the technology taught herein relies wholly on inertia and dynamic pressure to impel fluid circulation, the Perry taught device relies heavily on piston cylinder vacuum created as a piston moves downward to move a fluid in further contrast to the present disclosure which comprises no such partial vacuum motive force.

The previous Roberts disclosure (U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/700,255) teaches a fluid pumping means for an engine similar in principal to the instant Roberts disclosure. However, in substantial contrast, the previous Roberts technology teaches no means for the sump oil pick-up pipes to swivel about the piston rod in response to gravity or “g” forces so as to render the fluid pumping means operable regardless of the orientation of the engine. The instant Roberts disclosure is therefore an improvement over the previous Roberts disclosure.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The primary object of the invention is to provide for fluid pick-up and circulation over a broad range of engine angles and g-force directions.

Another object of the invention is to provide for fluid pick up and circulation of sufficient value that one fluid designed for a specific purpose, lubricant for example, may also be utilized for other purposes, cooling for example.

Another object of the invention is to provide for fluid pick up and circulation such that the fluid is returned to its original source.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following descriptions, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein, by way of illustration and example, an embodiment of the present invention is disclosed.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, there is disclosed a machine for drawing fluid from a sump for circulation comprising: reciprocating rod, intake nozzle, rotating collar, fluid inlet, and fluid outlet.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The drawings constitute a part of this specification and include exemplary embodiments to the invention, which may be embodied in various forms. It is to be understood that in some instances various aspects of the invention may be shown exaggerated or enlarged to facilitate an understanding of the invention.

List of Illustrated Items

  • 10 Reciprocating rod
  • 20 Fluid intake port
  • 25 Fluid outlet port
  • 30 Fluid pick-up nozzle
  • 35 Nozzle ballast weight
  • 40 Rotating collar
  • 45 Rotating collar channel
  • 50 Collar outlet port
  • 60 Intake fluid pipe
  • 65 Fluid outlet pipe
  • 70 Sump fluid
  • 80 Motion vector arrow

FIG. 1 is a cross sectional view of the invention showing the reciprocating rod 10 with fluid entry port 20, fluid outlet port 25, pick-up nozzle 30, rotating collar 40, rotating collar channel 45, interior fluid pipe 60, fluid outlet pipe 65, sump fluid 70, and arrow 80 representing reciprocating motion in directions A and B.

FIG. 2 is an oblique view showing the reciprocating rod 10, pick-up nozzle 30, rotating collar 40, collar portal 50, interior fluid pipe 60, and arrow 80 representing reciprocating motion in directions A and B.

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view of the invention showing the reciprocating rod 10, with intake port 20, and exit port 25 (the functions of these 20 and 25, being exchangable), pick-up nozzle 30, rotating collar 40, collar port 50, fluid intake pipe 60, fluid outlet pipe 65 (the functions of these, 60 and 65 being reversible), sump fluid 70 and arrow 80 representing reciprocating motion in directions A and B. A nozzle ballast weight 35 has been added to increase the nozzles propensity to position itself in accordance with the pull of gravity.

FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view of the reciprocating rod 10, showing fluid intake pipe 60, fluid outlet pipe 65, fluid intake port 20, and outlet pipe port 25, elongated in orientation circumferential to the reciprocating rod 10, to increase fluid communication over a wide range of angles. Here as in FIG. 3, the fluid intake port 20 and intake pipe 60, may exchange functions with the fluid outlet port 25 and intake pipe 65 as the rotating collar may be reoriented.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Detailed descriptions of the preferred embodiment are provided herein. It is to be understood, however, that the present invention may be embodied in various forms. Therefore, specific details disclosed herein are not to be interpreted as limiting, but rather as a basis for the claims and as a representative basis for teaching one skilled in the art to employ the present invention in virtually any appropriately detailed system, structure or manner.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, reciprocating motion in directions A and B is used to scoop up, and circulate fluid, especially lubricant, throughout the interior of an engine or motor. In a machine that uses a fixed intake nozzle to draw up fluid from a sump for circulation, the nozzle might become isolated from the fluid contents, should the sump and contents be tilted or inverted. In such a circumstance, circulation would stop until an upright position was resumed. In a lubrication system, this could cause catastrophic damage.

Referring to FIG. 1, to prevent such an eventuality, in the preferred mode of the here taught technology, a pick-up nozzle 30 is mounted on a rotating collar 40 attached to a reciprocating rod 10. The rotating collar 40 allows the pick-up nozzle 30 to revolve around the reciprocating rod 10 in accordance to the dictates of gravity and/or “g” forces. Since the fluid 70 in the sump/reservoir also moves in accordance with such dictates, the pick-up nozzle 30 and the sump fluid 70 will tend to coincide, even at unusual angles or complete inversion. Thus, isolation of the pick-up nozzle 30 from the fluid 70 is prevented, even in unusual attitudes.

Further referring to FIG. 1, a rotating collar channel 45 is incorporated into the rotating collar 40 to allow fluid to flow laterally while under the collar 40 around the exterior of the reciprocating rod 10 until it encounters the interior fluid intake port 20. The fluid pipe outlet port 25 is located at a point along the rod that is outside the rotating collar 40.

Referring to FIG. 3, in an alternative configuration, fluid intake port 20 and fluid outlet port 25 may be located opposite each other on the reciprocating rod, under the rotating collar. In such a configuration, the fluid intake port 20 and fluid outlet port 25, respectively with the fluid intake pipe 60 and fluid outlet pipe 65 may reverse functions, according to the instantaneous location of the uptake nozzle. Either may serve as an intake or as an outlet. In order to maximize the angles that the pick-up nozzle 30 will stay in fluid communication with the interior of the reciprocating rod 10, the fluid intake and outlet ports 20 and 25 may be elongated in circumferential orientation around the reciprocating rod 10. (See FIG. 4.)

In operation, using either of the above FIG. 1 or FIG. 2 configurations, while the system is in an upright (the dominant) position, fluid 70 is scooped up into the pick-up nozzle 30 by reciprocating motion of the rod 10 to which it is attached. The fluid 70 travels in the fluid pick-up nozzle 30, up through the intake port 20, and into the fluid intake pipe 60, via which it is transported to its (not illustrated) circulatory route. The circulating fluid is then returned via the interior of the reciprocating rod 10 and passes through the fluid outlet pipe 65 and the fluid outlet port 25 to rejoin the fluid in the sump 70.

Should the system become tilted, or even inverted, about the axis of the reciprocating rod, the pick-up nozzle 30 will revolve around the rod 10 on the rotating collar 45 as dictated by the forces of gravity and/or g forces, thus staying in contact with the sump fluid 70.

While the invention has been described in connection with a preferred embodiment, it is not intended to limit the scope of the invention to the particular form set forth, but on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents as may be included within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.