Title:
Technique-development and strength-training device for skaters and method of use
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A training device that simulates the skating motions to develop effective skating technique as well as develop increased strength. The device comprises of a resistance cord assembly that has multiple resistance cords that are attached at one end to a hip belt and the other to a fixed point or partner. The resistance cord assembly is comprised of multiple resistance cords to allow for the increase or decrease of the number of resistance cords attached to the hip belt to modify the resistance. The modifiable resistance allows the user, regardless of weight, to provide resistance to allow them to conduct the movements partially or completely as well as slowly or dynamically.



Inventors:
Widdershoven, Paul Michael (Hampton, CA)
Ellis, Susan Gwen (Rothesay, CA)
Application Number:
11/128667
Publication Date:
12/08/2005
Filing Date:
05/12/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/121
International Classes:
A63B21/02; A63B21/04; A63B21/055; A63B69/00; A63B71/00; (IPC1-7): A63B71/00; A63B21/02
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
NGUYEN, TAM M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Paul Widdershoven (Hampton, NB, CA)
Claims:
1. A skate training apparatus comprising of a resistance cord assembly, attachable to a hip belt and a means to attach the resistance cord assembly to a fixed point or partner, said resistance cord having assembly having two ends, one end to allow attachment to the hip belt and the other end to attach to a fixed point or partner, said resistance cord assembly is comprised of multiple resistance cords to allow modification of the resistance.

2. The resistance cord assembly as recited in claim 1 wherein is made of elastic cord.

3. The resistance cord assembly as recited in claim 1 includes a mechanism on the end of each resistance cord to allow for attachment and/or removal to the said padded hip belt.

4. The resistance cord assembly as recited in claim 1 includes a means for attachment and/or removal of said resistance cord assembly to a fixed point or partner.

5. A method to develop skating technique and/or strength comprising of: a resistance cord assembly, attached to a hip belt to be worn around the user, whereby each cord of the said resistance cord assembly can be attached or removed to said hip belt to increase or decrease the resistance by increasing or decreasing the number of resistance cords attached to the said hip belt, that said resistance cord assembly is attached to a secure point or partner.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The purposes of the invention are:

    • To allow the user to simulate skating motions either on or off ice including forward strides, cornering, starts and lateral movements.
    • To allow the user to conduct the motions slowly and specifically
    • To allow the user to create muscle memory and transfer it to the ice
    • To allow the user to experience the feeling of the movements
    • To allow the user to simulate the skating motion during strength and power training.

A training device for skaters, including speed skating, ice hockey, inline hockey, ringette and inline skating to be able simulate the skating motion for use both on and off ice.

The device is designed so that a skater can learn fundamental technical movements by simulating different skating strides including, forward strides, cross-overs, corner pushes, and starts including forward and lateral, as well to be used for muscle memory development, strength training and power training.

All though others have invented technical development and strength training devices for skaters our invention is has many unique advantages because it:

    • Allows the user to more closely simulate the actual skating motion.
    • Can be used both for technical learning and power and strength training.
    • Provides adequate and variable resistance allowing the user to conduct partial and full movements very slowly and or dynamically regardless of height, weight or movement they execute
    • Allows the user to feel the pressure under the balls of their feet for maximum power during the entire execution of the push
    • Allows the user to experience the feeling of acceleration of their weight in the direction they wish to go.
    • Allows the user to improve timing and rhythm.
    • Provides options to be used solo or in conjunction with a partner

References

U.S. Patent Documents

Des. 360,452GesslerD21/238; D8/382
3,870,317Wilson273/188 R, 273/26 C
4,685,671Sport Cord IncA36B 21/02
4,544,155Wallenbrock, PerryA63B 21/04
5,846,167Pacific Cornetta IncA63B 31/00
4,328,964WallsA63B 21/04
  418,257Whitely
5,813,955Gutkowski, OlneyA63B 21/02
4,530,497Moran, BelleriveA63B 31/00
5,234,392ClarkB63B 23/04
5,176,599BeliakovA63B 21/02
6,093,024SokolowskiA63G 9/00
6,551,221MarcoA63B 071/00

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A training device that simulates the skating motions to develop effective skating technique as well as develop increased strength. The device comprises of a resistance cord assembly that has multiple resistance cords that are attached at one end to a hip belt and the other to a fixed point or partner. The resistance cord assembly is comprised of multiple resistance cords to allow for the increase or decrease of the number of resistance cords attached to the hip belt to modify the resistance. The modifiable resistance allows the user, regardless of weight, to provide resistance to allow them to conduct the movements partially or completely as well as slowly or dynamically.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING

Included are 14 drawings to assist in understanding the technique-development and strength-training device for skaters and the method of use:

FIG. 1. Is a perspective of the complete assembly.

FIG. 2. Is perspective of the stretch cord assembly.

FIG. 3. Is a perspective of the hip belt.

FIG. 4. Is a perspective of the end of the assembly and its securing features.

FIG. 5A. Is a perspective of the stretch cord attached to the ring.

FIG. 5B. Is an alternate perspective of the stretch cord attached to the ring.

FIG. 6. Is a perspective of the hook attached to the stretch cord and hooks attached to the hip belt.

FIG. 7. Is a perspective of the securing and placement of the D-Ring on the hip belt.

FIG. 8A. Is a perspective of how the stretch cord assembly can be secured to a rail.

FIG. 8B. Is a perspective of how the stretch cord assembly can be secured to wall with a hook.

FIG. 8C. Is a perspective of how the stretch cord assembly can be secured to partner with a second hip belt.

FIG. 9A. Is a perspective of where the hip belt is positioned on the user and a perspective of the initial position of the ankle angle initiating a forward stride.

FIG. 9B. A perspective of the ankle angle closed to its maximum position in a forward stride.

FIG. 10. Is a perspective of the stretch cords in an extended position.

FIG. 11. Is a perspective of the stretch cords in an extended position demonstrated with a partner.

FIG. 12. Is a demonstration of the user in a completed forward start movement.

FIG. 13. Is a demonstration of the user in a completed forward stride movement.

FIG. 14. Is a demonstration of the user in a completed corner push movement.

We have provided the following Reference Numerals to assist in following the description of the device and its method of use.

  • 10 Stretch Cord
  • 11 Ferrule
  • 12 Hook
  • 13 Ring
  • 14 Large Hook
  • 15 Attachment Strap
  • 20 Webbing
  • 21 D-Ring
  • 22 Padding

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1

The technique-development and strength-training device for skaters has been designed using a Stretch Cord Assembly FIG. 2, that provides resistance to the user, a Hip Belt FIG. 3 that is worn around the hips of the user and embodiments to attach the device to a fixed point or partner FIG. 4.

FIG. 2:

The Stretch Cord Assembly FIG. 2 is constructed of a number of Stretch Cords 10 passed through a Ring 13 and each cord is aligned at the mid point, and secured with a ferrule 11, shown in more detail in FIGS. 5A and 5B, At the end of each Stretch Cord 10 there is a hook 12 secured by folding over the Stretch Cord 10 and secured with a ferrule 11, shown in more details FIG. 6 The hook 12 is used to attach the individual Stretch Cords 10 to the D-Ring 21 of the Hip Belt FIG. 3, as shown in more detail in FIG. 6

The Ring 13 on the end of the Stretch Cord Assembly FIG. 2 has a Large Hook 14 clipped on, as well as and Attachment Strap 15, shown in more detail in FIG. 4, to be used to secure the assembly to a fixed object such as a pole or post FIG. 4, a rail FIG. 8A or hook FIG. 8B or a partner wearing an optional hip belt FIG. 3 as demonstrated in FIG. 8C

FIG. 3.

The hip belt FIG. 3 is constructed of Webbing 20. A closed loop belt is constructed by securing both ends of the Webbing 20 after one end of the Webbing 20 is passed through a D-Ring 21, and fastened to the other end of the Webbing 20 shown in more detail FIG. 7. The Webbing 20 has Padding 22 in the mid section to protect the user. The hip belt FIG. 3 is worn by the user as well as an option to be worn by a partner assisting the user, as shown in FIG. 8C.

How the technique-development and strength-training device for skaters achieves its result.

The stretch cord assembly FIG. 1 is attached to a secure object, such as a pole FIG. 4, a rail FIG. 8A, a wall FIG. 8B or to a partner as demonstrated in FIG. 8C, using either the ring 13, the large hook 14 or attachment strap 15. The user positions the hip belt around their hips as demonstrated in FIG. 9A. The optimal height to secure the Stretch Cord Assembly FIG. 2 for all movements is approximately equivalent to the height of the of the user, except for forward starts, where the optimal height to secure the Stretch Cord Assembly FIG. 2 is approximately nose height, unless being conducted with a partner, whereby the Cord Assembly FIG. 2 is secured to a hip belt FIG. 3 around the partners hips.

For the straight-away stride: The hip belt FIG. 3 is positioned so that the padding is on the opposite hip to the leg the user will be exercising and the Hip Belt FIG. 3 attached to the Stretch Cord Assembly FIG. 2 on the same side of the body as the leg they will be exercising, as shown in FIG. 9A

For Corners and Lateral Starts: The hip belt FIG. 3 is positioned so that the padding 22 is on the hip on the same side as the direction of the movement and the Hip Belt FIG. 3 is attached to the Stretch Cord Assembly FIG. 2 on the opposite side of the body to the direction of the movement, as shown in FIG. 14

For Forward Starts: The hip belt FIG. 3 is positioned so that the padding is on the front of the user and the Hip Belt FIG. 3 is attached to the Stretch Cord Assembly FIG. 2 to the rear of the user, as shown in FIG. 12

For continual motion exercises: (such as continual cross-overs, lateral starts and multiple stride forward starts)

A pair of the Stretch Cords 10 are positioned in the opposite direction of the user, FIG. 10 and attached to a Hip Belt FIG. 3 worn by a partner. The Hip Belt FIG. 3 is positioned and the Stretch Cord Assembly FIG. 2 is attached to the user using the same method as described above, as demonstrated in FIG. 12.

The number of Stretch Cords 10 attached to the Hip Belt FIG. 3 is determined by the user, with experimentation, and is dependent on the height, weight and the nature of the exercise the user will be conducting.

The device allows the user to adjust the resistance by adding or removing the number of Stretch Cords 10. This amount of resistance used, allows the user to simulate an array of skating movements for a pre-determined range of motion. This allows the user to conduct a number of progressions to learn each part of a skating movement, as shown in FIG. 9B and also to conduct complete skating movements slowly or dynamically as shown in FIG. 13. Repeating the movements on a regular basis will create lasting muscle memory.

The user can increase or decrease the amount of resistance by adjusting the number of Stretch Cords 10 attached to the users Hip Belt FIG. 3 to conduct an array of different skating movements and learn and improve areas such as:

    • To accelerate their weight or center of gravity in the direction they wish to move, referred in sport as weight transfer.
    • To initiate a push at the optimum position where their pushing foot is creating maximum force in to the floor or ice.
    • Timing and rhythm of a movement.
    • Correct body position at the initiation, through the movement and the end of a movement including forward strides, cornering, starts and lateral.

The variable resistance factor also allows the user to use the device as a strength-training device by adjusting the number of Stretch Cords 10 creating resistance that will allow the user to repeatedly complete a particular complete movement dynamically.

To use the device the user secures the Stretch Cord Assembly FIG. 2 to secure position as shown in FIG. 4, FIG. 8A, FIG. 8B or partner, as shown in FIG. 8C and places the Hip Belt FIG. 3 in a position as described above depending on the movement they will be conducting. They take the body position to simulate the initiation of a movement at a distance where the Stretch Cords 10 are tight but not resisting. The number of Stretch Cords 10 attached to the Hip Belt FIG. 3 will be determined by the nature of the movement, partial or complete as well as whether the movement will be executed slow or dynamically. The skating movement is initiated by the movement of the users body weight in the direction they wish to move by closing the ankle angle as demonstrated for a forward stride in FIGS. 9A and 9B.

Though there are many points to which a movement could be conducted, the primary are:

    • The point at which the body position creates maximum force in a downward position on the pushing foot at which point the push is initiated, as shown for the forward stride in FIG. 9B
    • and the point at which the push is completed and the body is in a position to initiate the next push or movement as demonstrated for the forward start in FIG. 12, forward stride FIG. 13, right corner push FIG. 14

These are not the only embodiments of our invention. Alternatively:

    • The stretch cords can be made from an alternate material that will provide adequate resistance and elasticity to allow the user to have both a partial and full range of motion.
    • The means of securing the hooks can be changed from metal ferrule to another material or method as long as it has the ability to with stand the forces applied to it when used.
    • The shape and material of the Ring can be changed as long as it allows for the attachment of the Stretch Cords and allows the Stretch Cord Assembly to be attached to a secure point.
    • The number of Stretch Cords can be increased or decreased as long it provides adequate resistance for the user to complete both partial and complete movements.
    • The padding on the Hip Belt can be made of an array of materials and attachment methods so to provide comfort to the user.
    • The size, material and design of the hip belt can be modified such that there is still a mechanism or means to attach it to the Stretch Cord Assembly and be able to support the load placed on it and provide sufficient support to the user.