Title:
Chopsticks with embedded toothpicks
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Wooden disposable chopsticks are used in many household families and in many eastern oriental restaurants. After eating a hearty meal, chopstick users look out for toothpicks to clean any excessive food particles that may have gotten stuck between their teeth. The invention is ideal for users because it eliminates the users from seeking out a separate toothpick and from the merchant from buying extra packs of toothpicks. It is also cost effective and reduces the unwanted space for the toothpick packs that the merchant would have placed.



Inventors:
Lee, Kyu Nam (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/138709
Publication Date:
12/08/2005
Filing Date:
05/27/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47G21/06; A47G21/10; A47G21/12; (IPC1-7): A47G21/10
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KRAMER, DEAN J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KYU NAM LEE (RANCHO PALOS VERDES, CA, US)
Claims:
1. A pair of chopsticks comprising: a main body consisting of two identical sticks of equal length wherein at least one of the chopsticks body has a single toothpick embedded into the chopsticks.

2. A pair of chopsticks as claimed in claim 1, wherein a single or more toothpick is embedded into the chopsticks.

3. A pair of chopsticks as claimed in claim 1 and claim 2, wherein the overall structure of the toothpicks are carved out.

4. A pair of chopsticks as claimed in claim 1, claim 2 and claim 3, wherein a sizeable toothpick is carved out on the top surface of the body of the chopsticks for insertion.

5. A pair of chopsticks as claimed in claim 1 and claim 2, wherein the overall structure of the toothpicks are hollowed out.

6. A pair of chopsticks as claimed in claim 1, claim 2 and claim 5, wherein a sizeable toothpick is hollowed out on the top center surface of the body of the chopsticks for insertion.

7. A pair of chopsticks as claimed in claim 1 and claim 2, wherein the toothpicks are fixed within the space to where the toothpicks have been formed.

8. A pair of chopsticks as claimed in claim 1 and claim 2, wherein the toothpicks are placed with an adhesive compound within the space to where the toothpicks have been formed.

Description:

This non-provisional application is being claimed the benefits of an earner provisional application; application No. 60/576,459 filed Jun. 3, 2004.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of Invention

The present invention relates to chopsticks. More specifically, the invention relates to a wooden disposable chopstick with embedded dual toothpicks. The shape and form of the toothpicks are carved out, but remains intacted with the disposable chopsticks. The overall form and structure of the chopsticks is maintained herein.

2. Description of the Prior Art

Current industries have been trying to find a solution for the perfect chopsticks. Throughout the years, various different types of chopsticks have been known in the prior art. Although chopsticks are primarily used in the Far East as a kitchen utensil for grasping food, chopsticks today is commonly used in the West due to an increase in restaurants offering eastern delicates. One of the greatest challenges for foreigners who have never picked up a pair of chopsticks is learning and mastering on how to hold the pairs of wooden sticks. In order for individuals to learn properly on the mechanics of holding a pair of chopsticks, several inventions have been invented to oversee this problem.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,414,310 by Hiroshi suggest a chopstick holder for a pair of chopsticks to guide the chopsticks in a plane providing accurate closing of the tips using a pair pivoted by guide members with a spring member biasing the guide members to the open position. The said guide member has a channel to frictionally retain a chopstick therein and one or more inwardly extending guide flanges interleaved together and joined by a pivot pin. Similarly, U.S. Pat. No. 2,997,328 by Lee also suggests a similar invention for that of Hiroshi. The principle object of Lee's invention is to provide a unique chopstick combination in which a spring is mounted at the fulcrum, and a spring biasing mechanism to bias the rear end of the sticks together and the front end of the sticks apart. In Lee's chopstick device, the user merely needs to grasp the sticks in his hand at a point below the springs in such a manner as to force the operative end of the sticks together. The spring thus functions to return the operative ends of the stick to their spread position when the hand tensioning is released.

Nakatsu's apparatus for assisting in the use of chopsticks (U.S. Pat. No. 4,721,334) takes Hiroshi's and Lee's invention a step forward and elaborates further in solving the age old problem of mastering the use of chopsticks. In Nakatsu's invention, the device for assisting the chopsticks is characterized by a band spring of single-piece, molded or formed construction, free of separate and joined members that connects a pair of chopsticks at an adjustable distance from each other and enables their manipulation in a manner substantially identical and faithful to the proper holding and wielding of a pair of individual and unjoined chopsticks. A different, but similar invention can bee seen in Arima's invention (U.S. Pat. No. 3,323,825). In his invention; not only is his invention used for manipulating chopsticks, but can be used to manipulate other eating utensils. Although his invention specifically mentions chopsticks for his manipulator, it can be said that the invention can be used for tongs and salad spoons as well.

Nakatsu, Lee, Hiroshi and Arima's invention are all similar to one another. Their inventions help non chopsticks users in overcoming their disabilities and knowledge of chopstick usage. However, they all fail the idea of having toothpicks embedded into the disposable wooden chopsticks. They all fail to answer the question of incorporating two separate, but equally important kitchenware utensils into one combined eating utensil. A problem that this invention foresees.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

In reference to FIG. 2, the preferred embodiment of the present invention is that of a wooden disposable chopstick with toothpicks embedded into each individual wooden chopstick. The chopstick consists of a left toothpick 200 and a right toothpick 400 of equal lengths which have been carved out with the overall form and structure of the chopsticks being maintained. FIG. 3 shows the right toothpick 400 retracted out from the chopsticks for use. FIG. 4 shows the retracted right toothpick 400 ready for use.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to wooden disposable chopsticks. More specifically, the invention relates to a pair of wooden disposable chopsticks with embedded toothpicks. The overall shape and structure of the toothpicks are carved out from the two pair of chopsticks, with the general form of the wooden chopsticks being maintained herein.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a prior art for a regular pair of chopsticks;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the invention in question. Two separate, but equal length toothpicks are carved out, with the overall form and structure of the chopsticks being maintained;

FIG. 3 is that of FIG. 2, with one of the toothpicks retracted out from the chopsticks;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the retracted toothpick.