Title:
Reboard system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention relates to a reboard system for transporting infants and toddlers in a posture approximately half-lying, half-sitting, particularly in a car facing against the direction of travel thereof, comprising a seat surface and a very even, only slightly inclined backrest, whereby it is possible to vary the length of the backrest in the direction of the spine of an infant sitting in the reboard system, when a child is in the reboard system and/or when the reboard system is fastened to a seat of a car opposite the direction of travel thereof.



Inventors:
Kespohl, Horst (Aichelberg, DE)
Application Number:
11/114499
Publication Date:
11/03/2005
Filing Date:
04/26/2005
Assignee:
Recaro GmbH & Co. KG
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B60N2/28; B60R22/10; (IPC1-7): A47C1/08
View Patent Images:
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20020195864Body pressure disperse-type seatDecember, 2002Tobisawa et al.
20030011229Wheelchair having a height adjustable seatJanuary, 2003Bell
20040032153Light-weight snowmobile seatFebruary, 2004Atherley
20100289312VEHICLE SEAT, IN PARTICULAR COMMERCIAL VEHICLE SEATNovember, 2010Burr et al.
20100072793Baby Seat With Detachable CoverMarch, 2010Kress
20070180623Travel pillowAugust, 2007Stein et al.
20060103221Ergonomic chairMay, 2006Kleist
20130229045SEAT WITH STOWABLE SECURING SYSTEMSeptember, 2013Agustin



Primary Examiner:
ABRAHAM, TANIA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Pandiscio & Pandiscio (Waltham, MA, US)
Claims:
1. A reboard system (1) for transporting infants or toddlers approximately in a half-lying, half-sitting position, particularly in a car opposite its direction of travel, comprising a seat surface (4) and a backrest (6) inclined very shallowly relative thereto, characterized in that the length of said backrest (6) can be varied in the direction of the spine of an infant sitting in said reboard system (1), when a child is in said reboard system (1) and/or when said reboard system (1) is fastened on the seat of a car opposite the direction of travel thereof.

2. The reboard system as described in claim 1, characterized in that a region (10) supporting the head and/or back of the infant can be displaced or extended (26) relative to said seat surface (4) approximately in the direction of the spine of an infant sitting in said reboard system (1).

3. The reboard system as described in claim 2, characterized in that the displaceable head and/or back rest (10) in a retracted position reaches downward almost to said seat surface (4).

4. The infant seat as described in claim 2, characterized in that said displaceable head and/or back rest (10) is at least partially embraced supportingly on its outer side by an unchangeable region (9) of said backrest(6) that is integrated with the body of said reboard system.

5. The infant seat as described in claim 2, characterized in that a top edge of said displaceable head and/or back rest (10) in any extended position protrudes above a top edge of said unchangeable region (9) of said backrest (6).

6. The infant seat as described in claim 2, characterized in that a plate- or lobe-shaped extension is provided in the region of a bottom edge of said head and/or back rest (10).

7. The reboard system as described in claim 2, characterized in that said displaceable head and/or back rest (10) is displaceable (26) along a guide mechanism (15) of said backrest (6).

8. The reboard system as described in claim 4, characterized in that said displaceable head and/or back rest (10) can be locked in place on said unchangeable portion (9) of said backrest (6).

9. The reboard system as described in claim 8, characterized in that provided on said displaceable head and/or back rest (10) and/or on said unchangeable portion (9) of said backrest (6) is a series of openings (20) or recesses through which a lock pin (37) or the like is to be passed.

10. The reboard system as described in claim 2, characterized in that said displaceable head and/or back rest (10) is provided with lateral headrests (12).

11. The reboard system as described in claim 10, characterized in that the lateral headrests (12) are located between, i.e., within, lateral armrests (11) of said unchangeable region (9) of said backrest (6).

12. The reboard system as described in claim 1, characterized in that the reboard system (1) comprises a harness belt (22).

13. The reboard system as described in claim 4, characterized by a carrying handle (29) that is anchored (30) to the body of said reboard system (1).

Description:

The invention relates to a reboard system for transporting infants and toddlers in a posture approximately half-lying, half-sitting, particularly in a car facing against the direction of travel thereof, comprising a seat surface and a very even, only slightly inclined backrest.

Children weighing less than 9 kg must sit in a car facing opposite its direction of travel. For this purpose there are so-called reboard systems that are fastened to a vehicle seat facing against the direction of travel, i.e., with the backrest forward. These seats are designed for a maximum body weight of between 9 and 13 kg, which is reached by babies and toddlers between the ages of roughly 9 and 15 months.

It should be kept in mind, however, that at birth infants weigh at most only about ¼ to ⅓ of this amount and are barely restrained adequately in a conventional reboard system, so that they are poorly protected in the event of a collision, for example.

In addition, the reboard system is anchored to a vehicle seat by means of a three-point belt proper to the vehicle, which is passed in front of the backrest of the reboard system and then joined to the belt buckle provided for the purpose. The maximum belt length supplied in ordinary vehicles limits the overall dimensions of a reboard system. This, in turn, means that a child will grow out of a conventional reboard system fairly soon and the seat will therefore no longer support the child's head adequately.

The described disadvantages of the prior art give rise to the problem initiating the invention, that of designing a reboard system of the above species in such a way that it provides adequate retention and safety for an infant for the entire time from birth to the point when its weight reaches 13 kg as a maximum.

This problem is solved by the fact that the length of the backrest can be varied roughly in the direction of the spine of an infant sitting in the reboard system, in particular even when a child is in the reboard system and/or when the reboard system is fastened to a seat in a car opposite the direction of travel thereof.

By this means, the backrest can be adapted to the needs of the moment: for newborns, the length of the backrest is minimized by pushing down a region optionally flanked by lateral supports, which thus acts in the manner of a seat size reducer, i.e., provides the infant with improved lateral support. Later the backrest can be adapted to the growth of the child, preferably by sliding out the region optionally provided with lateral supports. The extendable region increasingly acts as a headrest alone, while a region beneath it that is preferably also enlarged laterally remains as the backrest and gives the growing child more room. Thus, the reboard system “grows” with the child and always protects it optimally.

Conversely, the backrest can also be shortened temporarily, for example when the reboard system is to be installed in a car and a three-point belt must be slipped over it for this purpose. This is not unimportant, since many three-point belts are relatively short even in their maximally extended position and thus can barely be pulled over a conventional reboard system, let alone the lengthened backrest of a reboard system according to the invention. Since when being installed in a car the entire reboard system with a child sitting or lying in it is usually placed on the car seat concerned, adjusting the backrest should be possible precisely when a child is in the reboard system.

Further advantageous features are constituted by a guide for the adjusting mechanism that is as clearance-free as possible, high stability even during sudden, sharp accelerations or decelerations, and the ability to lock the seat in arbitrary or stepped intermediate positions so that a given configuration cannot alter spontaneously.

It has proven advantageous for a medial plane approximating the backrest to form with a medial plane approximating the seat surface an obtuse angle of approximately between 100° and 160°, preferably between 110° and 150°, particularly between 120° and 140°. Such a large included angle allows the infant a relaxed, nearly recumbent position in which almost no stress is placed on the spinal column, since the backrest acts more as a bed than as a leaning-type support. However, the backrest still slopes gently upward and ensures good retention in the event of sudden deceleration of the vehicle.

It falls within the scope of the invention that the length of the reboard system measured roughly parallel to the bearing surface is greater than its height measured roughly perpendicular to the bearing surface, preferably more than 1.3 times greater, particularly more than 1.6 times greater, preferably irrespective of the adjusted length of the backrest. From this size ratio it is evident that the posture of the infant is more recumbent than seated.

The maximum length of the backrest in its extended state is preferably 1.3 to 1.7 times, preferably [sic] about 1.5 times the minimum length of the backrest in its retracted state. Such variability is necessary in order to meet the needs of the infant as its height increases from about 50 cm to about 85 cm.

The adjustability of the backrest can achieved by the fact that a region supporting the head of the (older) toddler can be displaced, i.e. pulled out, relative to the seat surface approximately in the direction of the spine of an infant sitting in the reboard system. As articulated hereinabove, this portion of the backrest, which is also to be referred to as a headrest, can assume the function of a seat size reducer for newborns and provide the infant with the necessary lateral restraint even in this early stage of life. To this end, the displaceable headrest can in its retracted position reach downward almost to the seat surface.

To provide adequate support for the head of the older toddler as well, the displaceable headrest should in its extended position be able to be extended by about half the amount of its (minimum) extent parallel to the spine of the child. This being the case, the retracted backrest is adapted to the size of a newborn but still short enough so that a three-point belt of any passenger vehicle can be slipped over it.

It has proven effective from a design standpoint for the longitudinal extent of the displaceable headrest plus a lobe-like prolongation formed in the lower region thereof to be roughly equal to the longitudinal extent of the backrest. This makes it possible to shift the region of the transition from the displaceable back portion to the body of the reboard system approximately into the area of the baby's pelvis, where owing to the sharply curved interior of the seat said transition can be made without any pressure points that can be felt by the child.

Since the displaceable headrest is preferably at least partially embraced supportingly on its outer side by an unchangeable region of the backrest that is in particular integrated with the body of the reboard system, even when the headrest is pulled out there still remains in the region of the lumbar spine a cross-sectionally bowl-shaped contour that provides optimum safety for the infant, even against side-on collisions or the like, at each stage of its development. Moreover, the displaceable headrest is additionally stabilized thereby and thus cannot bend appreciably during a sudden deceleration of the vehicle, but instead holds the child securely in its usual recumbent position.

The invention further provides that the top edge of the displaceable headrest in any extended position protrudes above the top edge of the unchangeable region of the backrest. Conversely, when the headrest is in the fully retracted state the unchangeable backrest region [sic] should protrude outwardly little if at all with respect to the unchangeable backrest region, so that the length of the reboard system can be minimized by pushing the headrest in and shorter three-point belts can be used if necessary. In the ideal case, the displaceable headrest in its fully retracted position is embraced completely by the unchangeable backrest portion.

Conversely, if the overall length of the reboard system when the backrest, particularly the headrest, is in the maximally extended state is equal to or greater than one and one-half times the length of a bottom bearing surface of the reboard system by which it is to be placed on a car seat, then even older infants will have ample room in a reboard system of this kind.

The invention further recommends that the backrest, particularly the displaceable headrest, protrude past a bottom bearing surface of the reboard system by which it is to be placed on a car seat at least by a quantity that is greater than one-third the length of the bearing surface, preferably greater than half the length of said bearing surface. Hence, only or primarily the backrest protrudes past the bearing surface, while the seat surface does so to a lesser extent or not at all. In this way, the reboard system can be pushed optimally up against the backrest of a car seat while at the same time resting on the car seat with full areal contact. This notwithstanding, the bearing surface of the reboard system can also be curved convexly in the longitudinal direction or can comprise runners in the manner of rockers, extending in the longitudinal direction of the reboard system, so that the reboard system can also be placed on a flat surface as a cradle. It is important that the most sharply curved region in the longitudinal direction of the reboard system have its inner face, where at any age the pelvic area of the child and hence the center of gravity of the reboard system is located, as directly above the bearing surface as possible. This ensures that regardless of the age of the child, the reboard system will always remain stable on a flat surface and will not be able to tip over, but will only rock at most.

To permit a predominantly recumbent position for the infant, the height of the horizontal top edge of the unchangeable portion of the backrest relative to the plane of the bearing surface should be between two and five times the minimum height of the seat surface relative to the plane of the bearing surface in roughly the region of the transition from the backrest to the seat surface.

It has been found effective to provide a plate- or lobe-shaped extension in the region of the bottom edge of the headrest. When the backrest is in the retracted state, this can either lie over the inner face of the unchangeable region of the backrest and/or over the seat surface, or it can insert into, and be then removable from, a slit in the region of the transition between the seat surface and the backrest. This lobe-shaped extension serves to impart a flat or only gently curving contour to the inner face of the backrest downward to the region intended for the baby's pelvis. This eliminates any pressure points in the region of the back that would be detrimental to the development of the spinal column. This extension could also, of course, be made of a rigid material, but a pliable material enables it to conform to the different curvature of the backrest or seat surface, depending on the degree of retraction.

The invention can be improved by having the plate- or lobe-shaped extension at the bottom end of the displaceable backrest/headrest be able to slide at least partially under the seat surface or the region of the transition between the backrest and the seat surface. The pushed-in portion of the headrest has sufficient space at that location so that the overall height of the reboard system need not be much greater than it was before. This is further aided by the fact that a lobe-shaped prolongation made of a flexible material can quickly be folded down into in a roughly horizontal position.

The headrest is preferably displaceable along a guide in the unchangeable region of the backrest. This guide preferably follows a straight course, but it could also be gently curved.

According to a further design specification, the (straight) guide for the displaceable headrest is inclined with respect to a medial plane approximating the seat surface by an angle of between 100° and 160°, preferably between 110° and 150°, particularly between 120° and 140°, so that the inner face of the headrest, regardless of its displaced position, remains roughly coplanar with its position in the retracted state.

It is recommended that the guide comprise undercuts, for example in the manner of dovetails, between the displaceable headrest and the supporting portion of the backrest. In this way, the position of the headrest is reliably secured even under sharp accelerative or decelerative forces. Such undercuts can alternatively be formed by screw heads that pass through longitudinal slits on the respective other portion of the backrest and embrace the edges of the slits involved. Complementarily thereto, it can be provided that the displaceable headrest can be locked in position on the backrest. This eliminates the sole degree of freedom of movement that remains during use, given the presence of the guide mechanism. Any possibility of injuries is completely removed in this way. The locking of the displaceable headrest on the backrest is effected by form-fit engagement, for example by means of a lock pin or the like, which, depending on the desired position, can be passed through various openings or recesses disposed on the displaceable headrest and/or on the backrest. The lock pins are preferably inserted from the back side or outer side of the reboard system inward, so that they are accessible even when a child is in the reboard system. However, the means for this purpose can also be a clamp body that is anchored on the headrest, for example by means of a (wing) bolt, and passes through or embraces the guide rail and is tightened thereon in frictional engagement to fasten it.

To protect the infant during side-on collisions as well, the displaceable headrest can be provided with lateral supports. An advantageous design rule provides that the longitudinal extent of the lateral head supports in the longitudinal direction of the backrest roughly corresponds to the minimum length of the backrest. The retracted headrest consequently acts as a complete seat size reducer. It is further significant for this function that the lateral supports be located between, i.e. within, lateral armrests of the supporting region of the backrest.

Also to protect the infant, disposed on each side of the seat surface is an upwardly extending side wall that can simultaneously act as an armrest. Such side walls/armrests of the seat surface are further suitable for fastening the reboard system to a vehicle seat if each is provided in its upper edge with a recess in which a safety belt proper to the vehicle can be laid.

Since the belt proper to the vehicle is not adapted to the needs of an infant or toddler, the invention provides on the reboard system a belt proper thereto, particularly a shoulder belt or harness belt. In this case, a belt buckle is located at the free end of a relatively short belt ribbon that is anchored or guided for example between the baby's legs in the region of the inner face of the reboard system or the seat surface. The tongues attached to the free ends of two harness shoulder belts can be inserted in said belt buckle.

The upper (visible) ends of the shoulder belts are to be guided through or anchored in slit-shaped recesses in the displaceable headrest, since in this way these guide points or anchoring points are always properly adjusted automatically as the reboard system is adapted to the increasing height of the infant.

The invention can be improved by having the shoulder belt guided through longitudinal recesses in the unchangeable portion of the backrest. This eliminates the need to rethread the shoulder belt when the headrest is adjusted. These longitudinal recesses—like the slits in the headrest that are aligned with them during any adjustment—preferably are located on both sides of a guide rail serving to effect said adjustment. The longitudinal recesses in the unchangeable portion of the backrest preferably run parallel to the guide rail; their width roughly corresponds to the width of the belt, and their length roughly to the maximum degree of displacement of the headrest relative to the fixed portion of the backrest.

The invention is also distinguished by a carrying handle that is anchored, optionally adjustably, on the body of the reboard system. The reboard system can thus, after being removed from a vehicle, be taken along and used to carry the baby. The handle is preferably U-shaped, with each of its two ends anchored on a respective side of the reboard system.

Finally, it is the teaching of the invention that a swivelable carrying handle is fastened or articulated in the region of the transition between the backrest/headrest and the seat surface. The swiveling of the carrying handle provides access to the interior of the reboard system so that an infant can be placed in it or taken out of it. The handle can optionally be locked in one or more positions so that the reboard system cannot tilt and the baby can always be carried lying nearly horizontally, regardless of its height. To this end, it is further advantageous if such a carrying handle is attached to or articulated on the reboard system approximately in the region of the center of gravity. This center of gravity is always located roughly in the area of the transition from the seat surface to the backrest.

Further features, characteristics, advantages and effects based on the invention will emerge from the following description of a preferred embodiment of the invention and an examination of the drawing. Therein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective diagram of an reboard system according to the present invention, in a configuration designed for newborn infants;

FIG. 2 is a perspective diagram of the reboard system of FIG. 1, in a configuration designed for infants about one year of age;

FIG. 3 shows the mechanism built into the reboard system of FIG. 1, also in perspective representation;

FIG. 4 is a front view of the arrangement of FIG. 3; and

FIG. 5 is a back view of the arrangement of FIG. 3.

A reboard system 1 according to the invention comprises a bottom portion 2 having a bottom bearing surface 3, and a top side, implemented as a padded seat surface 4, which is bounded on the sides by two armrests 5 and at the back by a relatively flat backrest 6.

Bearing surface 3 can be arched slightly convexly in the longitudinal direction of reboard system 1, so that the latter can be used on a flat surface as a cradle and so that it can be placed securely on a car seat. The belt proper to the vehicle is used to anchor the reboard system 1 thereon, and can be laid in two slit-like recesses 7 in the tops 8 of armrests 5.

Backrest 6 is composed of an unchangeable portion 9 and an extendable portion 10. Each portion possesses two forwardly projecting lateral armrests 11, 12. The extendable portion 10 of backrest 6 is narrower than unchangeable portion 9, and is accommodated in the manner of a seat size reducer between the lateral armrests 11 of unchangeable portion 9. A further seat size reducer 32, for example comprising side cushions 33, which is merely laid on the reboard system and can be removed at any time, can be present as well. In this configuration, reflected in FIG. 1, the reboard system 1 is particularly suitable for newborns less than about 50 cm long.

In the configuration according to FIG. 1, the lateral armrests 11, 12 of both rest portions 9, 10 lie flatly and roughly congruently against each other. In the region of the pelvis of an infant, the inner face or bearing surface 13 of backrest 6 merges into seat surface 4 with a gradual curvature and no perceptible bend. This curved region either closely approximates or merges with a sitting plane and a leaning plane. These planes (which may be hypothetical) form a very obtuse angle of about 120° to 140°.

In the position illustrated in FIG. 1, the center of gravity is located in the rearward half of seat surface 4. Hence, the bearing point of bearing surface 3 is located in this region when the reboard system is placed on a flat surface. The seat surface 4 or seat plane rises to its free edge at an angle of about 10° to 30°; the backrest 6 or back plane rises to its free edge at an angle of 25° to 55°, and the baby's upper body is therefore raised only slightly.

As can be seen from FIG. 2, movable rest portion 10 can be extended roughly in the direction of inclination of backrest 6 by no more than about half the length of unchangeable portion 9 of backrest 6. Adaptation to the increasing height of a child is thereby possible. In this configuration, reflected in FIG. 2, the reboard system 1 is optimized for an older infant about 80 cm tall. Displaceable portion 9 now no longer acts as a seat size reducer, but as a headrest instead. The additional seat size reducer 32 has been removed.

Movable backrest 10 includes an upper or distal segment comprising a weight-bearing portion 14 made of a rigid material, and, added to the bottom edge thereof, a flat, lobe-like prolongation 34. Lobe-like portion 34 has roughly the same width as upper portion 14 of movable rest 10 and is preferably thinner than upper portion 14; it can even be made of a pliable material such as foam or the like, since lobe-like segment 34 has neither a guiding nor a weight-bearing function, but instead is supported by unchangeable portion 9 of reboard system 1. It is connected to the upper portion 14 of backrest 10 and is further suitable for receiving a lumbar support device (lordosis cushion) for the child. Such a lordosis cushion can be formed by a roll of foam material—having a roughly semicircular cross section, for example—extending transversely to the sitting direction. To its two ends can be fastened the ends of a taut rubber band or the like, which runs behind lobe 34, thereby releasably retaining the lordosis cushion extending in front of it. As can be seen from FIGS. 1 and 2, this substructure 14, 34 of the extendable backrest portion 10 is provided with padding and a cover.

The displacement of movable portion 10 of backrest 6 is made possible by a guide mechanism 15, which can be recognized in FIGS. 3 to 5. It consists of several—four, in the present example—mutually parallel slits 16 extending roughly in the sitting direction in the unchangeable portion 9 of backrest 6. Each of these four slits 16 is penetrated by a screw 17 that is screwed into the back face 18 of extendable portion 10 of backrest 6. Said screws 17 are not screwed in completely, so that their shanks pass through the slits 16, and the screw heads 18, together with slipped-on washers 35, embrace the edges 19 of the slits with very little clearance. This clearance is adjusted so that the headrest 10 can be displaced in the longitudinal direction of the slit 16 without jamming.

This mechanism—infinite adjustment along a guide 15 roughly in the (inclined) plane of the backrest 6, together with locking and releasing means 36 that can be accessed from the back or outer face 21 of backrest 6—enables the length of the rest to be adjusted conveniently even when a child is in the reboard system 1 and/or the reboard system 1 is installed in a vehicle or is to be disengaged therefrom.

So that the headrest 10 can be locked in both end positions and optionally also in some intermediate positions, a plurality of bores 20 is provided in the substructure of extendable rest portion 10, preferably in a row one after the other along the central axis or axis of symmetry of said rest portion 10. Disposed in the bottom or outer face 21 of reboard system 1 is a tab 36 that can be moved roughly in the sitting direction relative to the unchangeable portion 9 of reboard system 1. This degree of freedom of movement results from the fact that said tab 36 is connected only along a small portion of its circumference to unchangeable rest portion 9 and thus can be bent away therefrom. Formed on the inner face (not visible in FIG. 5) of this tab 36 is a pin 37 or lug that passes through one of the bores 20 and thereby blocks any displacing movement of headrest 10. In the force-free state, tab 36 is pressed inward in such a way that pin 37 engages firmly in the bore 20 concerned. A rearward handle on tab 36, for example a formed-on recessed grip, allows tab 36 to be pulled backward conveniently.

According to FIGS. 1 and 2, the reboard system 1 according to the present invention is provided with a harness belt 22 to hold the infant securely during a car ride. Harness belt 22 comprises two shoulder belts 23, each of which has a buckle tongue at its free end, plus a short, lower belt that is anchored or guided roughly centrally to the seat surface 4 and carries at its free end a belt buckle in which the buckle tongues can be releasably inserted.

Each of the two shoulder belts 23 is guided through a respective roughly transversely extending slit 24 in the upper portion 14 of displaceable portion 10 of backrest 6 and through a respective longitudinal slit 25 in unchangeable portion 9 of backrest 6. On the back face 21 thereof, the two shoulder belts 23 can be connected to each other and/or to a tensioning device or other anchoring means, particularly to the fixed portion 9 of reboard system 1.

The transverse slits 24 in movable backrest portion 10 are disposed on either side of the central axis or the axis or plane of symmetry thereof and are each fitted to the cross section of a respective shoulder belt 23, with clearance in the range of 2 to 15 mm in each case. The locking system 20 must be made sturdy enough so that it is capable of absorbing the belt tension forces acting in the direction of displacement 26 when the shoulder belts 23 are deflected downwardly behind transverse slits 24.

Longitudinal slits 25 are located behind transverse slits 24. Whereas their width is roughly equal to the width of the shoulder belts 23 plus clearance, their length must be at least as great as the distance between the two outermost lock bores 20. When headrest 10 is in the fully retracted position, a transverse slit 24 is located roughly at the height of the top edge 27 of the longitudinal slit 25 concerned, while when headrest 10 is in the maximally extended position it is located at the height of the bottom edge 28 of the longitudinal slit 25 concerned, so that the passage of the belt is not impeded.

Disposed on the extendable portion 10 of backrest 6 is a canopy 38 that protects an infant from rain or bright sunlight. Since it is fastened to movable rest portion 10, this canopy 38 is displaced according to the position of extendable backrest 10 and, so to speak, grows with it. It can therefore—in contrast to conventional reboard systems—be used until the child has fully outgrown the reboard system 1. Canopy 38 can be attached by means of snap fasteners and can therefore be removable, for example during transport in a car.

A carrying handle 29 is articulated 30 to the outer faces of bottom portion 2 or armrests 5 so as to be swivelable about a transversely extending axis of rotation. The side legs 31 of carrying handle 29 are longer than seat surface 4 and/or longer than backrest 6 in their maximally lengthened configuration. In this way, carrying handle 29 can be placed in different positions and then locked in any of them, for example in the carrying position shown in FIG. 1 or 2; in a position above seat surface 4 for transport in a car (see FIGS. 3 and 5); or in a position behind backrest 6, as shown in FIG. 4, in which case the crossbar 39 of carrying handle 29 extends in approximately a common plane with a central segment of bearing surface 3 of reboard system 1 so that the latter can be placed on a flat surface without tipping or rocking.





 
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