Title:
Arm guard for preventing raptor nesting
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A cross arm utility pole guarding device for preventing raptor nesting is described. The device includes housing of non-conductive, non-sticky, preferably clear material, having an ultra violet protective layer with a sloped top to prevent debris from accumulating at the top of the housing. The housing is preferably connected by screwing the sides of the housing into and parallel to the cross arms of the utility pole. The method of preventing raptor nesting is by attaching the housing as stated above, parallel to the cross arms of the utility pole.



Inventors:
Harvey, James A. (Greensboro, MD, US)
Application Number:
10/791076
Publication Date:
09/29/2005
Filing Date:
03/02/2004
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A01M29/32; E04B1/72; E04H12/24; (IPC1-7): E04B1/72
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
QUAST, ELIZABETH A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
John C. Andrade (Dover, DE, US)
Claims:
1. A cross-armed utility pole guarding device for preventing raptor nesting comprising: (a) A housing of non-conductive, non-sticky material having a sloped top to prevent debris from accumulating at the top of said housing; (b) Means for connecting said housing to said utility pole parallel to said cross arms;

2. The cross arm utility pole guarding device of claim 1, wherein said housing is a continuous smooth surface.

3. The cross arm utility pole guarding device of claim 1, wherein more than 1 said housing is attached to said cross arms having a space of no greater than 4 inches separating said housings.

4. The cross arm utility pole guarding device of claim 1, wherein said housing is of a clear plastic having a UV protective layer.

5. The cross arm utility pole guarding device of claim 1, wherein said housing is rounded at said top of said housing.

6. The cross arm utility pole guarding device of claim 1 further comprising a side of said housing extending down from the top of said housing and further said sides having spaced holes suitable for screwing said side of said housing into said cross arms of said utility pole.

7. A method of preventing raptor nesting on a cross arm utility pole comprising attaching a housing of non-conductive, non-sticky material, having a sloped top preventing debris from accumulating at the top of said housing.

8. The method of claim 7 where more than one said housing could be attached wherein the space of said housings are less than 4 inches.

9. The method of claim 7 wherein the housing is made of clear-plastic having a UV protective layer.

10. The method of claim 7 wherein said housing further comprises sides extending down from the top of said housing, having holes in said sides suitable for screwing into said cross arms.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates to a device that prevents raptors from nesting on cross-armed utility poles and the process for preventing such raptor nesting.

2. Description of Prior Art

Raptors cause several problems for the utility business. Raptors, principally ospreys, have changed their nesting habits from trees to the use of utility poles. This creates an enormous burden for the utility business. The utilities must provide service and at the same time must protect the raptors.

When the raptors nest on utility poles, the nests can cause outages, system operation blinks, as well as pole fires that damage utility equipment and burn the nests. The primary cause is the debris in contact with high voltage conductors.

The problem with raptor nesting on utility poles is that the raptors have touch contact with the utility lines, which in many cases have been fatal to the raptor.

Prior devices that have been used to prevent raptor nesting have generally suffered from too many weaknesses. Typically they consist of many parts, which can be difficult to install, and at the same time, tend to have different portions of the unit that the raptors can find a place or starting point to build their nests. For example, as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 6,250,023B1, there are various points on the device where raptors can use a starting point for their nests.

What is needed is a simple device that is easy to install, is non-conductive, which would prevent the electrocution of the raptor and at the same time would stop the raptor from forming a nest on the structure.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is the object of the present invention to provide a system that is, simple and easy to install, and is non-conductive and at the same time effective in preventing raptors from nesting on such structure. The system of the present invention is a cross-armed utility pole guarding device for preventing raptor nesting. It comprises a housing of non-conductive, non-sticky material. The top of the housing is sloped at an angle to prevent debris from accumulating at the top of the housing. A means for connecting the housing to a utility pole parallel to the cross-arms will preferably be drilling holes in the sides of the housing and the guarding device can be screwed directly into the cross-arms at the sides so that the top prevents the raptors from nesting on the utility pole. Preferred embodiments of the invention are that the housing material is clear, having an ultra violet protective layer and having a continuous smooth surface. On some utility poles, the pole will actually extend through the housing and in that situation there would be two separate housing units with a gap of no more than 4 inches, preferably no more than 3 inches.

The method of preventing raptor nesting on cross arm utility poles is to attach the housing set out above on top of and parallel to said utility poles. This method of preventing raptor nesting has proven to be effective in the installations conducted to date.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the present invention installed on a cross-armed utility end pole.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the present invention, installed on a cross armed utility pole having a pole jutting up between the middle of the housing.

FIG. 3 is a side view of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is an end view of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is an end view of a rounded embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the present invention installed on a cross-armed utility end pole. The housing 20 is made of non-conductive, non-sticky material and has a sloped top to prevent debris from accumulating at the top of the housing. On the end pole shown, the housing completely covers the top 22 of the utility pole 10. The housing 20 is one continuous smooth surface. The housing 20 is attached parallel to the cross arms 12 which are attached by supporting struts 16 to the utility pole 10. The utility pole shown is an electrical utility pole and the bells 14 and the electrical wire 18 are shown attached to the cross arm.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the present invention installed on a cross arm utility pole and has a pole jutting up between the middle of the housing. This is by far the more common utility pole and since the top 22 of the utility pole 10 juts up above the cross arms 12 and has wire 18a running through the top 22, the housings cannot be continuous throughout. Therefore, there are two separate housing units 20a and 20b shown. The housing unit 20a is on the street side of the utility pole 10 and the housing 20b is on the curb side of the utility pole 10. The spacing 30 between housing units 20A and 20b should be no more than 4 inches, otherwise there will be sufficient space for the raptors to start a nest in the space, preferably it would be less than 3 inches. As shown, the side 24 of the housing is screwed into the cross arm with the screws 26 as shown. Most cross arm utility poles have two cross arms and the sides of the housing are screwed directly into the cross arms. There are three cross arms shown in FIG. 2 necessitating the addition of a piece of wood 27, screwed into the crossarms to screw the side 24 into with the screws 26.

FIG. 3 is a side view of the housing of the present invention only and shows the holes 28 in the side 24 of the housing unit 20 for attachment to the cross arm of a utility pole.

FIGS. 4 and 5 are end views of two embodiments of the present invention. In FIG. 4 the angle 32 of the top of the housing 20 should be sufficiently small as to prevent debris from accumulating at the top of the housing. An angle of 90 degrees is shown in FIG. 4 and anything less than that should be sufficient to prevent debris from accumulating at the top of said housing. Increasing the angle above 90 degrees, would reach a point where debris could accumulate at the top of said housing and the raptors would be able to build a nest at the top of the housing. FIG. 5 shows a rounded top 20c of the housing. While the top is rounded, the slope should still be sufficient so that debris cannot accumulate at the top of the housing.