Title:
Locker covering
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Locker coverings improve locker interiors suffering from usage. Locker coverings as a sheet, has two parallel longitudinal scores that divide the sheet into three equal width panels. The scores permit the panels to fold for storage in a roll and then, unfold for installation in a locker. The sheet has perforations at half-lengths and full lengths of a typical locker. Preferably, the sheet is paperboard with an adhesive backing. To install locker coverings, a user unrolls a portion of the sheet, separates the sheet at a perforation, and unfolds the panels. The user removes the backing, exposes the adhesive, and places the panels on the interior walls and rear of a locker for an improved appearance. Coverings may also include a single sheet having three strips of the locker coverings applied thereto, with a pressure sensitive adhesive as a backing, and a liner sheet that may be peeled therefrom upon application of the covering to the interior walls of the locker.



Inventors:
Gusdorf, Michael L. (Creve Coeur, MO, US)
Application Number:
11/080885
Publication Date:
09/22/2005
Filing Date:
03/15/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47B96/00; A47B96/20; E04H1/12; E04H1/14; (IPC1-7): E04H1/12; E04H1/14
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
CRONIN, RENA DYE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Paul M. Denk (St. Louis, MO, US)
Claims:
1. A liner for a locker comprising: a sheet, having a generally rectangular shape where the length of said shape exceeds the width, an obverse face and a reverse face opposite said obverse face; said sheet having one or more scores parallel to the length of said sheet, said scores divide said sheet into two or more panels; and, said sheet having one or more perforations perpendicular to the length of said sheet and regularly spaced at a length approximately the height of a standard locker; wherein one panel folds upon another panel.

2. The liner of claim 1 further comprising: indicia applied to said obverse face; said reverse face having adhesive, said adhesive temporarily covered with a removable backing; and, two scores parallel to the length of said sheet dividing said sheet into a left panel, a center panel, and a right panel opposite said left panel.

3. The liner of claim 2 wherein said left panel folds over said center panel then said right panel folds over said left panel and then said sheet is rolled.

4. A liner for a locker comprising: a sheet of material, having an obverse face and a reverse face opposite said obverse face, said obverse face having decorative printing and said reverse face having an adhesive with removable backing, a generally rectangular shape where the length of said shape exceeds the width; said sheet having two scores parallel to the length of said sheet dividing said sheet into a left panel, a center panel, and a right panel opposite said left panel; and, said sheet having one or more perforations perpendicular to the length of said sheet and regularly spaced at half the height of a standard locker wherein a user can separate a portion of said sheet to fit said locker; wherein said left panel folds over said center panel then said right panel folds over said left panel and then said sheet is rolled.

5. A method to line a locker, the steps comprising: scribing a rectangular sheet with two parallel and lengthwise scores forming panels and one or more perforations spaced at the height of half of said locker and perpendicular to the length of said sheet; and, folding said panels in an overlap; and, rolling said sheet; and, for installation, unrolling said sheet and detaching a portion of said sheet at the perforation nearest the height of said locker; and unfolding said panels; and placing said panels within said locker.

6. A liner for a locker comprising: a sheet, said sheet having a series of strips provided thereon, said strips being separate from each other, two of the strips provided for application to the interior sides of the locker, and having a width approximating the width of the locker sides, the third sheet having a width approximating the width of the back wall of the locker, so that the sheets may be pulled free from the roll and applied to the interior surfaces of the locker during application.

7. The liner for a locker of claim 6 wherein the sheets have pressure sensitive adhesive applied to their obverse face, and a liner sheet covering said adhesive, which may be peeled free thereof upon application of the sheets to the interior walls of the locker.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This nonprovisional patent application claims priority to the provisional patent application having Ser. No. 60/554,095, which was filed on Mar. 18, 2004.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The locker covering relates to interior wall finishes in general and more specifically to folding or rolls of continuous panels. A unique aspect of the present locker coverings is longitudinal scoring to fold the locker covering for rolled storage and to install the locker coverings as a unit upon the interior sides and rear of a locker.

Lockers see use in schools, shops, and facilities across the country. People store all manner of things within lockers: schoolchildren, store books and coats, shop workers, store uniforms, and tools, and facilities store equipment and supplies. Building owners typically retain ownership of lockers while allowing people to use the lockers. While not owners, people show less care in using lockers: backpacks get tossed into school lockers between classes, and mechanics hurriedly place tools in shop lockers. In time, dings and discolorations appear on the interior of lockers. Fashions also change over time making the original color less appealing to a locker user. A locker user may desire to change the appearance of the interior of a locker.

Prior art designs provided contact paper in rolls and cardboard with a printed grid as liners for lockers. The locker user would measure the width and height of interior locker walls and transfer the measurements to the contact paper or cardboard. The locker user then cuts the contact paper or cardboard to the measurements and installs it. Accuracy in measurements and cutting provides a tight fit of the contact paper and cardboard within a locker.

The present art overcomes the limitations of the prior art. That is, the art of the present invention, locker covering, allows ready installation of a liner with limited measuring or cutting by a locker user. The locker covering can be made of, scored, folded, or shipped in rolls for lower manufacturing and shipping cost. Or, individual strips of continuous rolls that may contain either single sheets or multiple sheets, generally in a roll form, or may be provided in sheet form, that may be applied directly to the locker or some portion or internal wall of the locker, can be fabricated for this product and for ready usage.

The difficulty in providing locker coverings is shown by the installation of a typical liner, contact paper. A user opens a locker, inserts a ruler or a tape, and then proceeds to measure the locker interior. In the dim and cramped space, the user obtains imprecise measurements. Few users measure the dimensions twice. Next, the user unrolls a portion of the contact paper. The user transfers the measurements to the contact paper and then cuts the contact paper. Opening the locker again, the user places an edge of the contact paper on the interior wall of the locker and inside the corner. Removing the contact paper backing in sections, the user presses the paper on the locker wall. The user should exercise caution lest the contact paper not install level. Contact paper also curves at the corners where the walls of the locker join the rear. A user often presses the contact paper into the corners, which may puncture or install the contact paper improperly. As the user nears the end of the installation, more or less of the contact paper remains than needed. Pulling or compressing the paper tempts the user. The end of the installation may leave a portion of the locker wall exposed or a portion of the contact paper wrinkled. The typical liner calls for measuring, cutting, and positioning, each step with risk of an improper installation. The present invention overcomes these difficulties.

The uses of contact paper, paperboard, and surface liners are known in the prior art. For example, many merchants sell contact paper for a variety of purposes. Contact paper has many colors and patterns to reflect decorating taste while resisting some abrasion. A user measures the surface to be covered then cuts the contact paper to fit. Often, a user installs the contact paper in sections upon a shelf or a wall. A user aligns adjacent portions of contact paper to maintain the pattern on the contact paper.

Paperboard sees similar liner use as the contact paper. However, paperboard has more rigidity than contact paper. Paperboard comes in sheet form often with a grid printed on the reverse side. A user transfers measurements to the grid and cuts the paperboard to fit. Paperboard may bend if folded over a straight edge. The propensity for an irregular bend leads users to install paperboard in separate pieces upon a wall.

Surface liners can attach to a locker interior. Trespa North America provides the Athlon® material for surfaces that endure high use and require maintenance. The Athlon® material comes in sheet sizes that users cut to fit the surface for covering. An applied adhesive binds the Athlon® material to the locker surface.

Thus, prior art devices and materials do not provide for a locker coverings pre-sized to fit a standard locker or half locker with folding panels. The prior art devices and materials omit perforations to detach a single locker portion from a sheet of material.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Locker coverings improve the appearance of lockers suffering from dings, discolorations, and usage. The locker coverings may start as a sheet with two parallel longitudinal scores, folds, or the like. The sheet may be in length of sheets, or it may be rolled up into rolls, or the sheets for covering the internal walls of a locker may be folded over, along the scores are folds, and then rolled into the configuration of a roll of paper or polymer material that may be used and applied to the interior surface of the locker. It may be cut the size from the roll. Or, individual strips of the sheet material may be applied in roll form, and will have pre dimensions that are similar to the standard internal dimensions for lockers. For example, many lockers are equally of an eleven and three quarter inch (11¾′) dimensions, may have approximately eleven and three quarter inch width (11¾′), and that will be for both the back wall, and even the interior of the locker door. Hence, a lengthy strip of the cover and material, whether it be paper, polymer, or other material, may be formed in strips of approximately eleven and three quarter inches (11¾′) in width, marketed in that manner, and then may be cut to size by the student, for application to the locker, such as to either of its interior walls, such as the side walls, or the back wall, and the same strip material may even be applied to the interior of the door, in order to enhance the appearance of the interior of the locker to the students wishes. Obviously, many different dimensions and widths for these strips can be embodied in the roll form, or sheet form, as for example, if a locker is oversized or double sized, it may be approximately twenty-two to twenty four inches (22-24′) in width, and therefore, one roll strip in material may be in that approximate width, while another strip in material may be sold, in roll form, to eleven to twelve inch (11 to 12′) width, for use upon the interior sides of the locker. Or, it is just as likely that the entire roll of material may have a pair of strips that are approximately eleven and three quarter inches (11¾′) more or less, wide, for the interior sides of the locker, and then have another strip arranged intermediate or adjacent thereof, and which may be to the width dimension of the back, or the interior door, for the locker, and all of this may be sold upon one single roll of material, ready cut, for stripping and application by the student, or cut in lengths for usage. Obviously, it will be desirable that the coverings be formed having a surface of pressure sensitive adhesive, that may be covered by a peelable strip, when it is formed into sheets, or rolls, for marketing. Where the scores divide the sheet into three equal width panels, the scores do not cut the sheet completely but permit the panels to fold for storage in a roll and for installation in a locker. The sheet is perforated in intervals of the half-length and full length of a typical locker. In the preferred embodiment, the sheet is paper, vinyl, or other polymer, or cloth, and with or without an adhesive backing. A user unrolls a portion of the sheet, separates the sheet at a certain perforation, and unfolds the panels. The user removes backing paper as needed to expose the adhesive and installs the panels on the interior walls and rear of a locker for an improved appearance.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows an oblique view of the preferred embodiment of the locker coverings constructed in accordance with the principles of the present invention;

FIG. 2 shows a plan view of the locker coverings in sheet form; and,

FIG. 3 shows an oblique view of the locker coverings in folded then rolled form.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Lockers begin with factory applied surface treatment and color. In time, the interior of a locker becomes dinged, discolored or stained from use. Color fashions change as well. Locker users seek to improve the appearance of a locker 2. The present art overcomes the prior art limitations by installing a liner 1 on the interior sides and rear of a locker 2 simultaneously. Turning to FIG. 1, the locker coverings 1 start as a rectangular sheet 3 with an obverse face 4 and an opposite reverse face 5. In the preferred embodiment, the locker coverings 1 has a sheet 3 incised lengthwise with two parallel scores 6. The scores 6 divide the sheet 3 into a left panel 10, a center panel 11, and a right panel 12. Functioning as hinges, the scores 6 allow the left panel 10 and the right panel 12 to rotate relative to the center panel 11 while remaining attached to the center panel 11. The left panel 10, the center panel 11, and the right panel 12, have generally rectangular shapes that correspond with the sides and rear of a locker 2. In the preferred embodiment, the left panel 10, the center panel 11, and the right panel 12 have equal width. Alternatively, the locker coverings 1 has an adhesive 8 applied to the reverse face 5 to secure the sheet 3 into a locker 2. A backing 9 covers the adhesive 8 prior to installation. Opposite the adhesive 8, the sheet 3 has indicia and coloring as desired on the obverse face 4. FIG. 1 shows the sheet 3 with a length for a typical half-length locker 2. Sheets 3 can be formed in lengths for half and full length lockers 2.

Viewing FIG. 2, the locker coverings 1 starts in flat form. The scores 6 defining the left panel 10 and the right panel 12 run lengthwise, parallel to the longitudinal axis of the sheet 3. In the preferred embodiment, the sheet 3 is generally one yard wide and the left panel 10, the center panel 11, and the right panel 12 each approximately one foot wide. The sheet 3 is perforated every length of a half locker 2. The perforations 7 penetrate the sheet 3 in an intermittent line thus permitting a user to detach a sheet 3. The perforations 7 extend across the sheet 3 and perpendicular to the scores 6. As can be seen also in FIG. 2, it is just as likely that the various panels 10, 11, and 12 may be separate from each other, and that each may be peeled free from its backing, for independent application to the interior side walls, and the interior back wall, for the locker, during application. Obviously, these coverings, in the sheet form, may be manufactured as a roll, and marketed in that manner to the students, for application.

Turning to FIG. 3, the locker coverings 1 has a rolled form for shipping and storage prior to use. The roll begins by scoring and perforating a sheet 3, then folding the left panel 10 upon the center panel 11, and the right panel 12 upon the left panel 10. With the three panels 10, 11, 12 overlapping one another, the folded sheet 3 of one panel width is rolled.

To utilize the present art, a user measures a locker 2 for length and panel widths. The user then unrolls a portion of the locker coverings 1 to fit the measured length. The user detaches sufficient locker coverings 1 at a perforation 7. After unfolding the panels 10, 11, 12, the user orients the right panel 12 towards the side of the locker 2 with hinges. The user places the sheet 3 into the locker 2 with the panels on corresponding sides in a dry fit. Once satisfied of the length and panels' position, the user removes the backing 9 from the adhesive 8. Then the user carefully positions the left panel 10 upon the left side of the locker 2, the center panel 11 upon the rear wall of the locker 2, and the right panel 12 upon the right side of the locker 2 adjacent to the door. The user applies pressure to adhere the locker coverings 1 upon the inside surfaces of the locker 2.

If a user seeks to line the inside of a locker 2 door, the user takes an additional sheet 3 of locker coverings 1 and unfolds the sheet 3. The user cuts along the score 6 and the perforation 7 to release a right panel 12 from the sheet 3. The user then positions the right panel 12 upon the inside of the locker 2 door for a dry fit. Once satisfied, the user removes the backing 9 from the adhesive 8 and positions the right panel 12 upon the inside of the locker 2 door. By applying pressure the user smoothes the right panel 12 to the locker 2 door.

From the aforementioned description, locker coverings have been described. The locker coverings is uniquely capable of adhering to the inside sides and rear of a locker as a unit to change the appearance of the locker when opened. The locker coverings and its various components may be manufactured from many materials including but not limited to paper, cardstock, cardboard, paperboard, laminates, polymers, ferrous and non-ferrous metals, their alloys, and composites.