Title:
Wood shingle panel with rear transverse metal slat
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A wood shingle panel of a given length for use to cover a wall or a roof. The panel is made of a plurality of wood shingles positioned in adjacent relationship to form a row. These wood shingles are attached to a slat consisting of a metal sheet of inverted J cross-section that extends along the length of the panel at a given distance below the top edges of the wood shingles rearwardly of the same. The slat made of a metal sheet has a main wall punched in such a way as to form a plurality of spaced apart spikes which act as nails to attach the wood shingles onto the slat when the main wall of the slat is applied and pressed onto the row of wood shingles. The metal slat also has an inverted U-shaped top wall that projects externally on top of the main wall when the wood shingles are attached to it. This inverted U-shaped top wall is sized to receive and hook onto the top edges of the wood shingles of a similar wood shingle panels positioned below.



Inventors:
Deschenes, Guildo (Ville Degelis, CA)
Application Number:
10/779697
Publication Date:
09/22/2005
Filing Date:
02/18/2004
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/551, 52/553, 52/560, 52/535
International Classes:
E04D1/00; E04D1/22; E04D1/26; (IPC1-7): E04D1/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20070199252Steel Building and a Steel Joint for a Steel BuildingAugust, 2007Boros
20090193747REINFORCED WOOD FLOORING WITH A DISCONTINUOUS GLUE PATTERN FOR TRUCK TRAILERS AND CONTAINERSAugust, 2009Chorney et al.
20080141445Inspection chamber and method for producing an inspection chamber with base segmentsJune, 2008Guitoneau
20090000212Fire ComponentsJanuary, 2009Kennedy
20050193641Slatwall with hanger securement trackSeptember, 2005Fischer
20060254175Modular plastic cabinet door and drawer frontNovember, 2006Thun
20020139077Pyramid crib blocksOctober, 2002Heckford
20100064596Three-Dimensional Documentation Lab ChamberMarch, 2010Bowsher
20060191218Floor covering having a removable decorative inlayAugust, 2006Pacione
20080216446Method and Elements for Forming a Building FacadeSeptember, 2008Lobson
20100064606Storm Shutter SystemMarch, 2010Devalapura et al.



Primary Examiner:
HORTON, YVONNE MICHELE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ROBIC (MONTREAL QUEBEC, CA)
Claims:
1. In a wood shingle panel of a given length for use to cover a wall or a roof, said panel comprising a plurality of wood shingles positioned in adjacent relationship to form a row that extends over said given length, said wood shingles having top edges that are in line along said given length, said wood shingles being attached to a slat that extends along said given length at a given distance below the top edges of said wood shingles rearwardly of said wood shingles, the improvement wherein: said slat consists of a metal sheet of inverted J cross-section, said metal sheet having a main wall punched in such a way as to form a plurality of spaced apart spikes, said spikes acting as nails to attach the wood shingles onto the slat when the main wall of said slat is applied and pressed onto the row formed by said wood shingles, said metal sheet also having an inverted U-shaped top wall that projects externally on top of the main wall when the wood shingles are attached to it, said inverted U-shaped top wall being sized to receive and hook onto the top edges of the wood shingles of a similar wood shingle panel positioned below.

2. The improved wood shingle panel of claim 1, wherein the top edges of the wood shingles are covered by a connector that extends along the row over the length of said panel.

3. The improved wood shingle panel of claim 2, wherein the connector consists of a metal sheet of inverted U-shape.

4. The improved wood shingle panel of claim 2, wherein the connector consists of a self-adhesive strip.

5. The improved wood shingle panel of claim 1, wherein the wood shingles are of a tapering side shape with a thickness that increases from their top edges down to their bottom edges.

6. The improved wood shingle panel of claim 2, wherein the wood shingles are of a tapering side shape with a thickness that increases from their top edges down to their bottom edges.

7. The improved wood shingle panel of claim 1, wherein the wood shingles have a height of about 15″ and the metal sheet acting as slat is nailed at such a height onto the rear of the row of wood shingles as to leave a height about 5″ free at the bottom of a similar panel when hooked onto it.

8. The improved wood shingle panel of claim 2, wherein the wood shingles have a height of about 15″ and the metal sheet acting as slat is nailed at such a height onto the rear of the row of wood shingles as to leave a height about 5″ free at the bottom of a similar panel when hooked onto it.

9. The improved wood shingle panel of claim 6, wherein the wood shingles have a height of about 15″ and the metal sheet acting as slat is nailed at such a height onto the rear of the row of wood shingles as to leave a height about 5″ free at the bottom of a similar panel when hooked onto it.

10. A kit for use to cover a wall or a roof, said kit comprising: a plurality of wood shingle panels as claimed in claim 1; and a plurality of other wood shingle panels useful to start assembly of said panels in an upwardly extending direction, said other wood shingle panels comprising a plurality of wood shingles positioned in adjacent relationship to form a row that extends over said given length, said other wood shingles having top edges that are in line along said given length, said wood shingles being attached to a slat consisting of a metal sheet of “h” having an inverted L-shaped portion that fit onto and is attached to the top edges of the wood shingles, said metal sheet also having an upwardly projecting flat portion that is devised to fit into the inverted U-shaped top wall(s) of said wood shingle panel(s).

11. A kit for use to cover a wall or a roof, said kit comprising: a plurality of wood shingle panels as claimed in claim 2; and a plurality of other wood shingle panels useful to start assembly of said panels in an upwardly extending direction, said other wood shingle panels comprising a plurality of wood shingles positioned in adjacent relationship to form a row that extends over said given length, said other wood shingles having top edges that are in line along said given length, said wood shingles being attached to a slat consisting of a metal sheet of “h” having an inverted L-shaped portion that fit onto and is attached to the top edges of the wood shingles, said metal sheet also having an upwardly projecting flat portion that is devised to fit into the inverted U-shaped top wall(s) of said wood shingle panel(s).

12. A kit for use to cover a wall or a roof, said kit comprising: a plurality of wood shingle panels as claimed in claim 6; and a plurality of other wood shingle panels useful to start assembly of said panels in an upwardly extending direction, said other wood shingle panels comprising a plurality of wood shingles positioned in adjacent relationship to form a row that extends over said given length, said other wood shingles having top edges that are in line along said given length, said wood shingles being attached to a slat consisting of a metal sheet of “h” having an inverted L-shaped portion that fit onto and is attached to the top edges of the wood shingles, said metal sheet also having an upwardly projecting flat portion that is devised to fit into the inverted U-shaped top wall(s) of said wood shingle panel(s).

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a wood shingle panel for use to cover a wall or a roof, which panel comprises a plurality of wood shingles held in parallel adjacent relationship by means of a rear transverse metal slat.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

It is of common practice in the construction industry to use wood shingle panels comprising a plurality of wood shingles that are positioned in adjacent relationship to form a row and are held in such a position by means of a rear backing board or slat nailed or glued to them. As non-restrictive examples of such wood shingle panels, reference can be made to the following U.S. patents:

    • U.S. Pat. No. 4,050,209 of 1977 (SHAKERTOWN CORP.);
    • U.S. Pat. No. 4,102,107 of 1978 (SHAKERTOWN CORP.);
    • U.S. Pat. No. 4,586,309 of 1986 (FERGUSON S.); and
    • U.S. Pat. No. 4,782,639 of 1988 (FERGUSON S.).

As to the utility and advantages of such panels, reference can also be made to the same patents.

A first problem with these existing wood shingle panels lies in that they make use of a backing board or slat made of wood that has to be nailed or glued to the rear surfaces of the wood shingles after the same have been positioned in a row. Such is time consuming and increases the cost of the resulting product.

Another problem with the existing wood shingle panels is that their backing board or slat made of wood are of rectangular cross-section and may be used to hang one panel above another one with the backing board or slat of the upper panel bearing out the top edges of the shingles of the lower panel.

However, such a “changing” is not really secure since the panels are not “hooked” to each other in such a position. Thus, the upper panel may sometimes fall down by inadvertence.

A further problem with the existing wood shingle panels is that their backing boards or slats made of wood may be subject to deformation especially in the presence of humidity.

Such may then cause deformation to the whole panels.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It has now been discovered that the above mentioned problem of manufacture may easily be solved if, instead of using a backing board or slat made of wood as it has been done so far, use is made of a slat made of metal that has, prior to being used, be punched to form a plurality of spikes projecting outwardly on one side of the slat in such a way as to be used as “nailing means”. Thus, one has just to press the so punched slat onto the row of wood shingles to connect them together to form the requested panel. As may be appreciated, such a pressing can be automatized on a conveyor, whereby a substantial reduction in the manufacturing cost is achieved.

It has also been discovered that the above mentioned problem of stability may be solved by giving an inverted U-shape to the upper edge of the metal slat and by sizing this inverted U-shape upper portion of the slat is such a manner that it may receive and hook onto the top edges of the shingles of a similar panel positioned below.

It has further been discovered that the problem of deformation of the panel in the presence of humidity may also be solved when use is made of a backing slat that is made of metal, inasmuch as such a slat is not subject to deformation due to humidity.

Thus, the object of the present invention essentially lies in a wood shingle panel of a given length for use to cover a wall or a roof, this panel comprising a plurality of wood shingles positioned in adjacent relationship to form a row that extends over the given length, the wood shingles having top edges that are in line along the given length, the wood shingles being attached to a slat that extends along the given length at a given distance below the top edges of the wood shingles rearwardly of said wood shingles.

This panel is improved as compared to the existing ones in that its slat consists of a metal sheet of inverted J cross-section. This metal sheet has a main wall punched in such a way as to form a plurality of spaced apart spikes, which spikes act as nails to attach the wood shingles onto the slat when the main wall of said slat is applied and pressed onto the row formed by said wood shingles. The metal sheet also has an inverted U-shaped top wall that projects externally on top of the main wall when the wood shingles are attached to it. This inverted U-shaped top wall is sized to receive and hook onto the top edges of the wood shingles of a similar wood shingle panel positioned below.

Preferably, the top edges of the wood shingles are covered by a connector that extends along the row over the length of the panel.

The invention and its advantages will be better understood upon reading the following non-restrictive description of a preferred embodiment of the invention, made with reference to the accompanying drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a portion of a roof covered by a plurality of wood shingle panels according to a preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the portion of the roof covered with wood shingle panels, as shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a side elevational view showing how the wood shingle panels as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, may be hooked to each other;

FIG. 4 is a rear elevational view of the wood shingle panels shown in FIG. 3, in spaced apart position relative to each other;

FIG. 5 is a rear perspective view of the wood shingle panels shown in FIGS. 3 and 4;

FIG. 6 is a rear perspective view of the wood shingle panels shown in FIG. 3, after they have been hooked to each other;

FIGS. 7a to 7c are partial perspective views of a portion of the upper edge of a wood shingle panel according to the invention showing three different types of connectors for covering the top edges of the shingles, respectively; and

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a portion of the metal slat used to manufacture the wood shingle panels shown in the previous Figures, this view showing the way this slat may be punched to form spikes.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION

The wood shingle panel 1 according to the preferred embodiment of the invention as shown in the accompanying drawings, is intended to be used to cover a wall or a roof 3. This panel 1 comprises a plurality of wood shingles 5 positioned in adjacent relationship to form a row that extends over a given length. The wood shingles 5 have top edges that are in line along the given length. The wood shingles 5 may have the same width or they may have different widths, as is shown in the drawings. They preferably have a tapering side shape with a thickness that increases from their top edges down to their bottom edges, as is also shown in the drawings. However, they may also have a constant thickness. Such is actually well known in the art and has not to be further described.

Like in all the existing wood shingle panels, the wood shingles 5 of the panel 1 according to the invention are attached to a slat 7 that extends along the given length of the panel at a given distance below the top edges of the wood shingles rearwardly of the same. The major difference with the existing panels is that, instead of being made of wood, the slat 7 consists of a metal sheet of inverted J-shaped cross-section having a main wall 9 punched in such a way as to form a plurality of spaced part spikes 11 (see, in particular, FIG. 8). The spikes 11 act as nails to attach the wood shingles 5 onto the slat when the main wall 9 of this slat is applied and pressed onto the row formed by the wood shingles 5. The metal sheet of inverted J-shaped cross-section also has an inverted U-shaped top wall 13 that projects externally on top of the main wall when the wood shingles are attached to it. This inverted U-shaped top wall 13 is sized to receive and hook onto the top edges of the wood shingles of a similar wood shingle panel positioned below, as is shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 6.

To facilitate such a hooking, the top edges of the wood shingles 5 may be covered by a connector 15 that extends along the row over the length of the panel. As shown in FIG. 7a, the connector 15 may consist of a metal sheet of inverted U-shape, which can also be punched to form nailing spikes. Alternatively, as shown in FIG. 7b, the connector 15 may consist of a self-adhesive strip applied onto the top edge.

In all cases, the use of such a connector 15 is not compulsory, as is shown in FIG. 7c. However, such a use is interesting in that it “forces” the top edges of all the wood shingles 5 to be in line and thus ready to fit into the inverted U-shaped top wall 13 of the slat 7 of another similar panel 1 when said other panel is installed above it (see the dotted lines in FIG. 3).

In use, the wood shingle panel 1 according to the invention can be installed with other similar panels onto a roof or a wall, in the very same manner as the existing panels. In this connection, reference can be made again to the above mentioned U.S. patents cited as relevant background.

However, as aforesaid, a first advantage of the panels 1 according to the invention as compared to the existing ones, is that they are much easier to manufacture, thanks to their slats 7 made of metal that has, prior to being used, been punched to form a plurality of spikes projecting outwardly on one side of the slat in such a way as to be used as “nailing means”. Thus, one has just to press the so punched slat onto the row of wood shingles to connect them together to form the requested panel. As aforesaid too, such a pressing can be automatized on a conveyor, whereby a substantial reduction in the manufacturing cost is achieved.

A second advantage of the panels 1 according to the invention is that, by giving an inverted U-shape to the upper edge of their metal slats 7 and by sizing this inverted U-shaped upper portion of the slats is such a manner that it may receive and hook onto the top edges of the shingles of a similar panel positioned below, one may easily install one panel above another one, with a minimum of risk that the upper panel falls down by inadvertence because it has been “hooked” badly to the lower one, while the person in charge of the installation is moving, installing other panels or hooking the same to the roof or wall.

A third advantage of the panels 1 according to the invention is that their slats 7 made of metal are not subject to deformation in the presence of humidity. The wood singles 5 may be subject to such a deformation, but such does not cause any problem inasmuch as they are held onto the slats 7 by means of spikes 11 punched therein, which, contrary to conventional nails or glue, may “fold” in one direction or another in the case of a shingle deformation.

From a practical standpoint, the wood shingle panel 1 according to the invention can be of any length and/or height. Prototypes made by the Applicant for test purposes actually had wood shingles 5 with a height of about 15″ and the metal sheet used as their slat was nailed at such a height onto the rear of the row of wood shingles as to leave a height “h” about 5″ free at the bottom of a similar panel when hooked onto it (see FIG. 2).

To start the installation of the wood shingle panels 1 onto a roof or wall, use can be made of “starting” panels, as it is also the case before with the existing wood shingle panels.

The wood shingle panels 1′ useful to start assembly of the panels 1 in an upwardly extending direction are also shown in the drawings. They comprise a plurality of wood shingles 5′ positioned in adjacent relationship to form a row that extends over a given length. The wood shingles 5′ have top edges that are in line along the given length, and they are attached to a slat 7′ consisting of a metal sheet having an inverted L-shaped cross-section 9′ that fit onto and is attached to the top edges of the wood shingles. The metal sheet forming the slat 7′ also has an upwardly projecting flat portion 13′ that is devised to fit into the inverted U-shaped top wall(s) of the wood shingle panel(s) 1. Preferably, the main wall of the inverted L-shaped of portion 9′ is punched to form a plurality of spikes 11′ that may be used as “nailing means”. Thus, the panels 1′ are as easy to manufacture as the panels 1. If desired, another punched slat 17′ may also be attached close to the bottom edges of the wood shingles 5′ for the purpose of stability.

Of course, the panels 1 and 1′ may be sold as a kit for use to cover a wall or a roof.

As may be appreciated, numerous modifications could be made to the wood shingle panels 1 and 1′ disclosed hereinabove without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.