Title:
Tricep and bicep exercise bar
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
This invention is a weight lifting exercise bar with handle grip members selectively rotatable relative to the longitudinal axis of the exercise bar so that the exerciser can perform weight lifting exercises benefiting different muscle groups using a single exercise bar and a single set of weights. A set of ball bearings sandwitched between a pair of concentric rings, the outer ring being secured to exercise bar and the inner ring carrying the handle grip member. The inner ring member having the ability to smoothly rotate three hundred and sixty degree's, clockwise and or counterclockwise, independently of the outer ring member by the use of the ball bearings sandwitched between the inner ring member and the outer ring member. This invention allows for the handle grips to be rotated independently and freely while raising and lowering the exercise bar during it's intended use.



Inventors:
De Lano, Michael Martin (Big Bear City, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/067459
Publication Date:
09/15/2005
Filing Date:
02/24/2005
Assignee:
DE LANO MICHAEL M.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/106
International Classes:
A63B21/072; A63B21/075; (IPC1-7): A63B21/072; A63B21/075
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
MATHEW, FENN C
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Michael Martin De Lano (Big Bear City, CA, US)
Claims:
1. In a exercise bar with a longitudinal axis having opposed end portions receiving selectively removable weights, a central portion and two spaced handle grip portions each inboard of said end portions and outboard of said central portion, each said handle grip portion Compromising: An outer ring member secured on one peripheral side to said outer portion and on opposite peripheral side to said central portion; An inner ring member concentrically captured in said outer ring member and being able to rotate smoothly and freely relative to said outer ring member by the use of multiple ball bearings sandwitched between said inner ring member and said outer ring member; a set of two retainer rings attached to each opposing side of said outer ring member; a cylindrical handle grip member extending across said inner ring member and being secured thereto; whereby, said handle grip member can be selectively and freely rotated three hundred and sixty degree's, in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction during and throughout it's intended use to permit various exercises to be performed without the removal of said weights from said exercise bar.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of Invention:

The present invention relates to exercise equipment and more particularly to an improved exercise bar for weight lifting.

2. Background of the Invention

The sport of weight lifting using exercise bars to lift weights is well known. In performing such lifting exercises, different bars may be used depending which set of muscle groups are being exercised during the lifting routine. For example, straight bars are used for general lifting, equal sets of weights being removabley secured near the outer ends of the bar, outboard of a gripping area. Curling bars are known to have a kink or bend in the bar in each of the two handle grip areas so that the exerciser's hands will be turned slightly relative to the axis of the bar during lifting. This increases the beneficial result to the bicep muscle. A tricep bar is known which has an even more pronounced bend in each handle grip portion so that exerciser's hands are positioned at even greater angle relative to the axis of the bar. As suggested by the name, this bar increases the benefits to the triceps during lifting exercise. With the use of the prior art and known bars, the exerciser would have to have either multiple sets of weights, each set being held on one of the respective bars for performing the various exercises serially, or else the exerciser would have to remove each set of weights from a particular bar and replace those selected weights on another one of the bars to perform the next lifting exercise. In any event the exerciser would have to have at least three separate bars for performing the three exercises described above. For each different angle of handle grip, the exerciser would require a separate bar and, perhaps, it's associated weights.

A number of exercise bars have been proposed in the past which vary the design of the straight conventional exercise bar. Some of these prior art exercise bars incorporate various bar configurations in which the weights are secured along one centerline of the device and the hands are positioned on a second centerline of the device. Patents illustrating these prior art units include

  • A. U.S. Pat. No. 4,461,473 July 1984 Cole
  • B. U.S. Pat. No. 6,217,494 B1 April 2001 Sandoval
  • C. U.S. Pat. No. 4,618,143 Oct. 1986 Twardosz

Various advantages accrue by using this two centerline concept, for example, the body may thereby be placed in a better position for exercise or the configuration of the bar might allow performance of exercises that cannot be carried out on a conventional straight exercise bar.

However, these prior art exercise bars function in essentially the same way as conventional straight exercise bars, that is, they simply provide a constant passive resistance to repetitive lifting exercise.

These prior art exercise bars, by providing constant passive resistance to a repetitively applied force, are useful in strengthening and defining like muscle groups. These prior art units, however, are not capable of rotation of the wrists while raising and lowering the exercise bar. These examples of prior art units do not posses the advantage or ability of rotation of the wrists, individually, outwardly or inwardly, during the course of exercising with the bars for their intended use.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Several objects and advantages of my invention are:

    • A.) To provide full rotation of the wrists, outwardly and inwardly, individually to the fullest extent while raising and lowering the exercise bar while performing exercise's for the tricep and bicep muscle groups.
    • B.) To provide a smooth rotation, clockwise and counterclockwise, of each handlegrip individually, while raising and lowering the exercise bar during the course of it's intended use.
    • C.) To provide an exercise bar that is fully capable of providing a means of exercising each area of the tricep and bicep muscle groups through the rotation of the wrists, outwardly and inwardly, of each hand individually while raising and lowering the exercise bar for it's intended use.
    • D.) To provide a means of adding or subtracting weight plates to vary resistance during exercise.

Only by rotating the position of the wrist during the performance of raising and lowering the exercise bar specifically for exercising the tricep and bicep muscle groups can you simultaneously exercise each of the three muscles compromising the tricep and both of the two muscles compromising the bicep.

The unique feature of my invention allows for the necessary, inward and outward, rotation of the wrists of each hand by the use of handle grips secured inside a set of rings that sandwitch a full set of ball bearings that provide a smooth rotation of the wrists while raising and lowering the exercise bar during it's intended use.

This innovative exercise bar is designed to provide a means of exercising the tricep and bicep muscle groups to their respective fullest extent through rotation performed during exercising each individual muscle group.

To exercise the tricep muscles the bar is raised overhead and placed behind the neck of the exerciser, with the wrists turned outward. As the bar is raised overhead the wrists of each hand are turned inward so that the tricep muscles experience a full range of motion. This motion is reversed while lowering the exercise bar.

To exercise the bicep muscles the bar is raised to a position at the hip in front of the exerciser. At this point the wrist of each hand are turned inward and the upper arms of the exerciser are held against the torso of the exerciser. As the exercise bar is raised upward from the hip position the wrist of each hand are slowly rotated outward until the bar is raised to a position under the exercisers chin. This motion is reversed while lowering the exercise bar.

DRAWINGS—FIGURES

FIG. 1.) This figure shows the front and rear views of the exercise bar.

FIG. 2.) This figure shows the various components that provide the means for rotation of the handle grips. The reference numerals used in FIG. 1. apply to FIG. 2. also.

DRAWINGS—REFERENCE NUMERALS

FIG. 1.) “TRICEP AND BICEP EXERCISE BAR”

A. 1) Two inch outside diameter, one and one eighth inch inside diameter, seven and one half inch long cylindrical sleeve.

A.2) One inch diameter, eight inch long cylindrical rod.

A.3) One quarter inch thick spacer plate.

A.4) One and one half inch diameter hole.

A.5) One inch diameter, five inch long cylindrical handle grip.

A.6) Seven inch outside diameter, six and one quarter inch inside diameter, one and one half inch width, outer ring.

A.7) Six inch outside diameter, five inch inside diameter, one inch width, inner ring.

A.8) Three sixteenths inch diameter, one half inch long, allen bolts.

A.9) Seven inch outside diameter, five and five eighths inch inside diameter, one quarter inch width retainer ring.

A. 10) Three eighths inch ball bearings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1—Preferred Embodiment

A preferred embodiment of the exercise bar of the present invention is illustrated in figure (1) front and rear views. The exercise bar is made entirely of carbon steel. The spacer (A.3) is one quarter inch thick and is lazer cut at each end of the spacer in a half circle the diameter of the outer ring (A.6) to provide a site for attaching the outer rings. The outer rings (A.6) are then welded to the spacer (A.3) at said site. Two one and one half inch diameter holes (A.4) are then drilled into the spacer (A.3) centered at the top and bottom of said spacer (A.3) to lighten the weight of the exercise bar. The two opposing ends of the exercise bar at the centerline of the exercise bar then have a one inch diameter, eight inch long cylindrical rod (A.2) welded to the centerline of the outboard outer ring (A.6), to provide a site for the attachment of a two inch outside diameter, seven and one half inch long cylindrical sleeve (A.1). The sleeve (A.1) provides a site for the addition and subtraction of weight plates. Centered in the inside diameter of the inner ring (A.7) a one inch diameter, five inch long handle grip rod (A.5) is then secured to (A.7) by welding at each end of the rod (A.5) to the inner ring (A.7).

One retainer ring (A.9) is then secured to one side of the outer ring (A.6) by means of adding (A.8), twelve, three sixteenths inch diameter, one half inch long alien bolts. One set of (A.10), forty eight, ball bearings are then placed on top of the retainer ring (A.9) in the inside diameter of the outer ring (A.6). the inner ring (A7) is then placed inside the outer ring (A.6). Then the second set of ball bearings (A.10) are placed inside the outer ring (A.6). The second retainer ring (A.9) is then secured to the outer ring (A.6) by means of adding twelve, three sixteenths inch diameter, one half inch long allen bolts (A.10).

CONCLUSION, RAMIFICATIONS, AND SCOPE

Accordingly, the reader will see that the tricep and bicep exercise bar invention can be used to exercise the tricep and bicep muscle groups in a new and unique method. With the inner rings, which houses the handle grips, having the ability to smoothly rotate three hundred and sixty degree's, clockwise and or counterclockwise, the range of motion achieved while using this exercise bar for it's intended use dramatically compounds the resistance applied to the tricep and bicep muscle groups. The angle at which each muscle group of the tricep and bicep can be exercised using this bar is limited only by the rotation of the exercisers wrists while raising and lowering the exercise bar for it's intended use