Title:
Fitness/therapy device
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A fitness, exercise and therapy device which provides for the fitness, exercise and therapy of the abdominal areas, back, and other parts of the body, comprising of armrests (3a, 3b, 3c, 3d), handgrips (4a, 4b, 4c, 4d, 4e, 4f), a means for supporting the device. The device can be freestanding, or the device can be attached to an existing wall or other structure (either directly or indirectly), or the device can be supported from either above or below (ie. can be freestanding or non-freestanding), additionally, the device is available in either one-piece construction, two-piece construction, or, multi-piece/mulit-part construction. Further the device is relatively lightweight, easily movable, can be used in a variety of environments (ie. can be used at home, at the office, inside or outside, etc.). An individual approaches the device, places their arms atop the armrests, grasps the handgrips, and proceeds to either suspend their body above the ground, or, utilize the ground to assist them in their activities. While the individual's body is supported by the device (with or without the use of the ground), the individual proceeds to conduct the desired exercise, fitness and/or therapy activity. Further, several versions of the device are adjustable, to accommodate various size users. The use of a backrest is optional; also the use of cushioning/padding is optional.



Inventors:
Krystoff, Richard M. (Kaneohe, HI, US)
Application Number:
10/754144
Publication Date:
08/25/2005
Filing Date:
01/07/2004
Assignee:
KRYSTOFF RICHARD M.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/96
International Classes:
A63B23/00; A63B26/00; A63B71/00; A63B3/00; A63B9/00; A63B23/12; (IPC1-7): A63B26/00; A63B71/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20070298945Rotating exerciser system and methodsDecember, 2007Mehta
20090203500AUTOMATIC WEIGHT STACK CONTROLLER FOR FITNESS EQUIPMENTAugust, 2009Nishimura
20090312161Compound abdominal deviceDecember, 2009Nohejl
20090227433RESISTANCE APPARATUS FOR EXERCISE DEVICESSeptember, 2009Humble et al.
20070254788Sit-Up BoardNovember, 2007Nam
20070027006Compact abdominal exerciserFebruary, 2007Suiter
20080051268Exercise Assemblies Having Self-Adjusting Pad DevicesFebruary, 2008Ish
20020147082U shaped spring for strengthening the pubococeygeus muscleOctober, 2002Harding-randle
20070254777Slipproof pad structure of a slide boardNovember, 2007Huang
20080220942Nitro StikSeptember, 2008Boese
20080096724ANKLE REHABILITATION APPARATUSApril, 2008JU et al.



Primary Examiner:
HWANG, VICTOR KENNY
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Richard M. Krystoff (Kaneohe, HI, US)
Claims:
1. A fitness device, comprising: at least one armrest with a means to support a user's weight; at least one handgrip which is located such that a user can grasp the handgrip while also utilizing the armrest; the armrests, handgrips and means to support the same, are configured into a frame; a means to support the device.

2. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the frame is made of metallic material.

3. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the frame is made of non-metallic material.

4. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the frame is made of composite material.

5. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device provides a means to be attachable to a supporting surface or structure.

6. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device provides a means to be freestanding.

7. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device provides a means to be supported by a pull-up or chin-up bar.

8. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device provides a means to be supported at a door opening.

9. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device provides a means to be supported from above.

10. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device provides a means to be supported from below.

11. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device comprises of a one-piece frame.

12. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device comprises of a two-piece frame.

13. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device comprises of a multi-part frame.

14. All the claims of claim 13, wherein the device comprises of a multiple-part frame which incorporates a means to secure the parts together at a desired length.

15. All the claims of claim 13, wherein the device comprises of adjustable length parts, which also incorporates a means to secure the parts at a desired length.

16. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device incorporates cushioning and padding at, at least one area of contact with the user.

17. All the claims of claim 1, wherein the device incorporates an optional backrest.

18. A fitness device, comprising: a one-piece frame comprising v at least one armrest with a means to support a user's weight; at least one handgrip which is located such that a user can grasp the handgrip while also utilizing the armrest; the armrests, handgrips and means to support the same, are configured into a frame; a means to support the device.

19. A fitness device, comprising: a two-part frame comprising at least one armrest with a means to support a user's weight; at least one handgrip which is located such that a user can grasp the handgrip while also utilizing the armrest; the armrests, handgrips and means to support the same, are configured into a frame; a means to support the device.

20. All the claims of claim 19, wherein the device is comprised of more than two-parts.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE (ADDITIONAL)

THE APPLICANT CLAIMS THE BENEFIT OF THE PROVISIONAL PATENT APPLICATION DATED JAN. 8, 2003, WHICH RECEIVED THE APPLICATION NUMBER OF 60/439,091 AND THE CONFIRMATION NO. 4591 (PER LETTER FROM U.S. PATENT & TRADEMARK OFFICE, MAIL DATED MAR. 20, 2003).

BACKGROUND

This invention relates to fitness, exercise and therapy devices, specifically to fitness, exercise and/or therapy devices that assist in toning and exercising the abdominal area, as well as other parts of the body; and also for therapy for the back areas, as well as other parts of the body. The invention utilizes the benefits of having the user's body elevated above the ground, and also utilizes the benefits of having the user's body supported by the ground. Whereas there are several devices on the market that seek to accomplish many different fitness, exercise and therapy uses, non provide the benefits of the subject device which also include varying combinations of being lightweight, easily set-up/taken down, not bulky, relatively compact, portable, can be easily relocated from room to room, available in a variety of comfortable heights, adjustable, economical, and transportable, depending which version of the device is utilized. The device was inspired by seeking the convenience of a doorway pull-up/chin-up bar, and also observing the portability, convenience and design of chairs (including tubular metal frame chairs, tubular metal frame outdoor chairs, and bar stools), as well as other forms of movable furnishings.

BACKGROUND—CROSS REFERENCE

Please note that this Patent application is to include the information contained in the Disclosure Document Program (United States Patent and Trademark Office) submittal (reference dated Aug. 24, 2002), that was submitted to the Disclosure Document office on Oct. 4, 2002 at the time of 13:53 (Hawaii time) via United States Express Mail number EU 269119138US which resulted in the U.S. Patent Office's Disclosure Document Program issuing Disclosure Document Number 519358 on Oct. 4, 2002; Also, please note that this Provisional Patent application is also to include the supplemental information (referenced dated Oct. 5, 2002), that is contained in the supplemental submission to the Disclosure Document Program (United States Patent and Trademark Office) on Oct. 7, 2002 at 10:33 am (Hawaii time) via United States Registered Mail number RR838683093US, which resulted in the U.S. Patent Office's Disclosure Document Program issuing Disclosure Document Number 520005 on Oct. 15, 2002. Applicant also claims the benefit of the Provisional Patent Application dated Jan. 8, 2003, which received application No. 60/439,091; confir.# 4591, and DDP#s 519358 and 520005.

BACKGROUND—DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART

The inventions of U.S. Pat. No. 6,179,748 to Barr (2001), U.S. Pat. No. 5,871,422 to Elbogen (1999), U.S. Pat. No. 5,540,643 to Fontaine (1996), U.S. Pat. No. 5,302,164 to Austin (1994), U.S. Pat. No. 5,046,722 to Pryor, Fr. (1993), U.S. Pat. No. 5,096,187 to Marples (1992), Patent No. U.S. Pat. No. 5,080,352 to Freed (1992), U.S. Pat. No. 5,011,139 to Towley, III (1991), U.S. Pat. No. 4,838,250 to Angelo (1989), U.S. Pat. No. 4,662,629 to Plovie (1987), U.S. Pat. No. 277,399 to Worthington (1883), whereas these inventions fall within the general categories of fitness, exercise, or therapy, they are different and further do not accomplish the benefits that the subject invention accomplishes. Additionally, whereas Design Patent of U.S. Pat. No. Des. 339,835 to Hsieh (1993), and Design Patent U.S. Des. 300,157 to Yates (1989) also fall into the general categories of fitness, exercise or therapy, they are also different, and also do not accomplish what the subject invention accomplishes.

SUMMARY

A fitness, exercise and therapy device with or without the optional accessories which provides for the fitness, exercise and therapy of the abdominal areas, back and other parts of the body. Further the Fitness/Therapy Device has been designed as a One-piece device, a Two-piece device, and also as a More-Than-two piece device; is relatively lightweight, easily movable, available in freestanding or non-freestanding versions, can be used in a variety of environments, relatively inexpensive, and can be used at home, at the office, inside or outside.

DESCRIPOTION OF INVENTION

Typical Freestanding versions of the Fitness/Therapy Device are shown in FIG. 1 through FIG. 15; Additionally, typical Non-Freestanding versions of the Fitness/Therapy Device are shown in FIG. 16 through FIG. 23; Further FIG. 24 through FIG. 36 show various methods of supporting or attaching the Fitness/Therapy Device to a desired location, however, these are only a few of the many methods of securing/attaching the Fitness/Therapy Device to a desired location, and is not intended to be limiting in nature.

FIG. 1 reflects one of the most basic One-piece, Freestanding versions of the Fitness/Therapy Device, which includes a Base (1a and 1b and 1c), has Uprights (2a and 2b), Armrests (3a and 3b), and Handgrips (4a and 4b).

FIG. 2 reflects another version of a One-piece, Freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device. This version includes a Base (1a and 1b), Uprights (2a and 2b), Armrests (3a and 3b), Handgrips (4a and 4b), and the continuation of the one-piece frame at the handgrips via the handgrip being connected together (5).

FIG. 3 reflects another version of the freestanding fitness/therapy device, which includes the version of FIG. 1 above, and in additional, also incorporates additional stability and support with the additional support for the Base (9a) and the additional support for the Uprights (9b).

FIG. 4 reflects a basic design similar to either FIG. 1 or FIG. 2 above, however, FIG. 4 also shows variations of the configuration of the Uprights (6a and 6b), and also shows the alternative versions of the one-piece frame, by using either the continuation of the handgrips via the Handgrip connector bar (5) or the continuation of the base via the Base connector (1c).

FIG. 5 also reflects the basic design of either FIG. 1 or FIG. 2 above, however, FIG. 5 also shows still another variation of the configuration of the uprights (6a and 6b), and also shows the alternative versions of the one-piece frame, by using either the continuation of the handgrips via the handgrip connector bar (5) or the continuation of the base via a base connector (1c).

FIG. 6 reflects the above versions, and further reflects on the fact that since these versions of the fitness/therapy device are one-piece frames, this figure shows that either the base connector (1c) or the handgrip connector bar (5) between the handgrips can be the “continuing” component of the one-piece frame.

FIG. 7 reflects one of the versions of a Freestanding Two-piece fitness/therapy device. This figure shows that the uprights are multi-part, with the bottom portion of the uprights (2e and 2f) being telescoped (which slide into, or, outside of) the end of the upper portion of the uprights (2c and 2d), this allows for easy height adjustments, and also allows for easier transporting and storage. FIG. 7 also shows the handgrip connector bar (5), and base connector (1c). Please note that with this version the “upper portion” of the device is in One-piece; and the “lower portion” of the device is in One-piece.

Note that on several of the Multi-piece Fitness/Therapy Devices, that the Handgrip connector bar (5), and the Base connector (1c) are removable, thus, the entire Fitness/Therapy Device can easily be taken apart for storage and/or transporting.

Also note that at “telescoping” ends and connections, that the parts are secured together by a variety of methods, including but not limited to: holes which line up, with some form of pin(s), bolts, etc., which are then inserted into the lined-up holes; or a variety of types of couplers which tighten and secure around the components (including plumbing type couplers); and also a variety of types of clamps, etc.

In addition, for adjusting the height and length of various components for multi-piece versions (including the Two-piece versions) of the Fitness/Therapy Device, sections (including Upright “sections”) can be added and/or removed, to accommodate a variety of desired heights and/or configurations.

FIG. 8 shows another version of a Freestanding Multi-part fitness/therapy device, which provides an alternative method for adjustable Uprights via telescoping ends which are slidable into an “external connecting tube” (2g), and/or an “internal connecting rod” (2h) as shown at FIG. 9. This FIG. 8 also shows that the bottom portion of the Fitness/Therapy Device (1a, 1b, 1c and 2e and 2f) is “one-piece”, and that the upper portion of the Fitness/Therapy Device (2c, 2d, and 3a, 3b, and 4a, 4b, 4e, 4f and 5) is “one-piece”. Also incorporated into this FIG. 8 are Upper handgrips (Left Upper handgrip 4e and Right Upper handgrip 4f).

FIG. 9 is similar to FIG. 8, except that the configuration of FIG. 9 does not include upper-handgrips; and FIG. 9 shows an example of the “internal connecting rod” (2h), instead of the “external connecting tube” shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 reflects a One-piece Freestanding version of the Fitness/Therapy Device, which includes a Base (1a, 1b, 1c,), Uprights (2a, 2b), Armrests (3a, 3b), this FIG. Also includes Handgrips (4a, 4b) which are substantially in-line with the Armrests (3a, 3b); in addition, this FIG. also incorporates Upper-handgrips (4e, 4f) which are located above the armrests (3a, 3b). This FIG. 10 also shows a variation of the upright configuration (6a, 6b), and also shows how an optional handgrip connector bar (5) can be added, should one desire.

FIG. 11 shows a One-piece Freestanding version of the Fitness/Therapy Device, similar to FIG. 10, however with an additional set of handgrips (4c, 4d). These handgrips can be utilized for several purposes, however, the main purpose for the handgrips (4c, 4d) in this figure, is for use when components 4e and 4f are utilized as Armrests. Also, as referenced in FIG. 10, this version also utilizes the option handgrip connector bar (5).

FIG. 12 reflects a version of a Freestanding Multi-part Fitness/Therapy Device similar to FIG. 8, however with additional adjustment points which allow for more “custom” use of the device via adjustments for the armrests, in-line handgrips, upper-handgrips, height, etc., and also allows for easier transporting and storage (including Base connector (1c) joined other than at (1a or 1b).

FIG. 13 is similar to FIG. 12, with the addition of alternative configurations for the uprights (6a, 6b, 6c, 6d), and also an optional handgrip connector bar (5).

FIG. 14 reflects a version of a One-piece Freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device, which also incorporates an optional Upper-handgrip (4e, 4f) that is adjustable and slidable (8), and also incorporates an optional Handgrip connector bar (5).

FIG. 15 is similar to FIG. 14, with the addition of in-line Handgrips (4c, 4d) for use when the Upper-handgrips (4e and 4f) are also utilized as additional Armrests. This FIG. also shows an optional Handgrip connector bar (5).

(Below are Examples of Versions of “Non”-Freestanding Fitness/Therapy Devices)

FIG. 16 shows a version of a One-piece Non-freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device. The device includes armrests (3a, 3b), handgrips (4a, 4b) uprights (2a, 2b) which assists to support the device from above, and an Upper connector attachment bar (15) which can be utilized to hang, or otherwise support the fitness/therapy device and the user of the device.

FIG. 17 reflects another version of a One-piece Non-freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device. In this version of the device, the device utilizes armrests (3a, 3b), handgrips (4a, 4b), uprights (2a, 2b) which include a number of holes (16) which can be used to secure, screw, or otherwise used to attach the fitness/therapy device to a wall or other desired location, to support the fitness device; the holes can also be used to secure the fitness/therapy device to permanently attached pins or other forms of fasteners, which the fitness/therapy device can then be easily attached and/or detached from. This version of the device also includes a handgrip connector bar that provides the continuity of the one-piece configuration.

FIG. 18. Shows another version of a One-piece Non-freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device. This version is similar to FIG. 16, however, this version incorporates a handgrip connector bar (5) as a continuation of the handgrips in, which are then secured together with either a coupler and/or a connecting rod, (etc.), that is inserted and/or otherwise secured on both sides of the ends of the tubing.

FIG. 19 is essentially the same as FIG. 18, except with a slightly different configuration.

FIG. 20 reflects a basic version of a One-piece Non-freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device, wherein the device can be utilized in this form (without vertically oriented handgrips), or can be utilized in conjunction with any of the handgrips referenced in FIG. 31, FIG. 32, FIG. 33, or FIG. 34, or similar. In addition, the version shown in FIG. 20 (as well as many of the other Non-freestanding versions) can be positioned for use in either the position shown in FIG. 20 with the connector attachment bar (15) located at the top of the device, or, the device can be positioned with the connector bar (15) being located at the bottom of the device, which among other benefits, also provides for the “continuity” of the “one-piece” frame.

FIG. 21 shows a version of a Multi-part, Non-freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device, wherein the device is detachable at the top and bottom connector bars, thus allowing for easier transporting and/or storage.

FIG. 22 reflects a basic version of a One-piece, Non-freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device which includes a bottom connector bar (17) and an optional/removable handgrip connector bar (5).

FIG. 23 reflects another basic version of a one-piece, Non-freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device with a bottom connector bar (17), and no upper connector bar.

FIG. 24 reflects a Multi-part Non-freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device, and also shows an alternative method of attaching the fitness/therapy device to a wall or other desired location by utilizing one of various methods of securing/attaching the fitness/therapy device (18).

FIG. 25, FIG. 26, FIG. 27, FIG. 28, FIG. 29, and FIG. 30 all reflect various and sundry methods of attaching a Fitness/Therapy Device to a wall or other desired surface and/or location; including several of the various methods to “hang” a Fitness/Therapy Device over a desired location; and also various methods to assist in securing a Fitness/Therapy Device above a door opening. Please note that these examples reflect only a few of the many methods of securing a Fitness/Therapy Device, and is not intended to be the only methods.

FIG. 31, FIG. 32, FIG. 33, and FIG. 34 reflect various and sundry handgrip attachments. Please note that these examples reflect only a few of the various handgrip types, and is not intended to be limiting.

FIG. 35 reflects Full length inside-door-frame support bars (20). These bars are attachable to either the inside of a door frame, or to the outside door frame, and incorporates a choice of aperatures, external supports, slits and/or slats, holes, etc., in which to secure horizontal bars (23) and/or other appropriate supporting structures, which support various versions of a Fitness/Therapy Device.

FIG. 36 same as FIG. 35, except the inside-door-frame support bars are in multi-parts, to accommodate various methods of attachment of a Fitness/Therapy Device.

FIG. 37 through FIG. 39 shows variations of Freestanding version.

Please note that when a Non-Freestanding version of the Fitness/Therapy Device is utilized at a door opening (or similar location), that some method is utilized to stabilize the device from “pivoting”, when the device is being used. The form of stabilization can be with the use of rigid or non-rigid materials, and can consist of many methods, including, but not limited to, a horizontal bar, or a non-rigid “strap” being secured behind the Fitness/Therapy Device. The horizontal bar or non-rigid strap may be attached to the two sides of the door jam. Please note that any of the Non-freestanding versions (as well as versions of the Freestanding device) of the Fitness/Therapy device can be attached or secured to a wall or other desired location, by utilizing a number of holes ( ) placed in the uprights of the Fitness/Therapy Device, which can be used to secure, screw, or otherwise be used to attach the Fitness/Therapy Device to a wall or other apparatus, to support the Fitness/Therapy Device. Further, the holes (or other forms of attachment) can be used to secure the Fitness/Therapy Device to permanently attached pins or other forms of fasteners (standard fasteners and/or non-standard fasteners), wherein the fitness/therapy device can then be easily attached and/or detached from the permanently attached pins (or other forms of fasteners). This method of attachment also provides an alternative means of adjusting the height of the Fitness/Therapy Device.

Also note that on the Multi-piece versions of the Fitness/Therapy Device (freestanding versions and also non-freestanding versions), that by utilizing a removable Handgrip connector bar (5), and also utilizing a removable Base connector (1c), that the entire Fitness/Therapy Device can easily be taken apart for easy storage and/or transporting.

Also note that at “telescoping” ends and connections, that the parts are secured together by a variety of methods, including but not limited to: holes in the component parts which line up at the desired position, then a type of pin, bolt, dowel, fasteners, etc. (including spring-loaded types), is inserted into the lined-up holes; or a variety of types of couplers which tighten and secure around the components, after the components are in their desired position (including plumbing type couplers); a variety of standard and non-standard clamps, etc.

In addition, for multi-piece versions (Freestanding and also Non-freestanding versions) of the Fitness/Therapy Device, Upright “sections” can be added and/or removed, and/or adjusted, to accommodate a variety of desired heights and/or configurations. Similarly, the position and location of the Handgrip(s) (for several of the multi-piece versions) can also be “adjusted”.

Also, please note that in certain situations, that a User of the device may choose to position themselves “facing” the device or with their back to the device, as such, the “Left” and Right” orientations would be deemed to be opposite of what is stated herein.

(also see attached additional information, including Supplemental Information for Provisional Patent Application)

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES

The invention, a Fitness/Therapy Device, is utilized for fitness, exercise, and/or therapy of the abdomen areas of the body, the back/spine areas of the body, together with other areas of the body. The Fitness/Therapy Device may be mounted about a doorway, can be suspended from above or attached from below (or a combination thereof), the device can be attached/secured to a vertical surface and/or associated structure, and/or utilized as a freestanding device. The device comprising of a relatively lightweight (but strong) frame, with several of the versions comprising of horizontally oriented supports for a user's Forearm(s), which allows the user to suspend the user's body above the ground (and/or with the user utilizing the ground for additional support). Several other versions of the device designed to support the user's Upper arm(s), which allows the user to suspend the user's body above the ground (and/or use with the ground). Both forms of versions also comprise of hand-grip(s) to be grasped by user's hand(s)/fingers. Further the Fitness/Therapy Device incorporates an optional backrest, with or without padding, and also optional padded support for the arms, and optional padding/cushioning for the handgrips. There are several versions of the Fitness/Therapy Device with some versions based on a one-piece frame, or single-piece frame, other versions based on a Two-piece frame, and other versions based on a multi-piece/multi-part frame. Upon observing several forms of tubular metal frame chairs and bar stools (and other furnishings), it became apparent to me that even though these items are lightweight and portable, they are constructed to handle the weight of sizable individuals, including the weight of individuals moving about; and although these items are designed and intended to be used for basically sitting, it became apparent to me that this lightweight, portable, and relatively inexpensive type of construction, as well as the general configuration, is ideally suited to be incorporated into the subject Fitness/Therapy Device invention.

It is the object of the subject invention to provide an effective fitness, exercise and therapy device, that is convenient and easy to use, versatile as to where the device can be used, relatively lightweight, and relatively inexpensive to produce. As such, several versions of the device incorporate a “one-piece” frame, other versions incorporate a “two-piece” frame, and other versions incorporate a “multi-piece” frame.

The “one-piece” frame is the most basic and will accommodate the needs of many individuals, however, the “two-piece” versions of the device and the “multi-piece” versions of the device provide benefits that the “one-piece” device does not provide.

With the “Two-piece” frame device and/or the “Multi-piece” frame device, the Uprights incorporate “telescoping” ends (or other means of adjusting the height of the Uprights), which allows for easy height adjustment, to accommodate the height of a variety of users. This adjustment at the Uprights also make storage and transporting more convenient).

Additionally, with the “Multi-piece” versions of the Fitness/Therapy Device, the device can be adjusted in a wide variety of areas, in addition to the height adjustment, including, but not limited to the fact that the device can be disassembled, for ease of storage, transporting, etc.

As each of the “one-piece” versions, “Two-piece” versions, and/or “Multi-piece/Multi-part” versions have their respective benefits, it is important to note that each are important.

Typically, the fewer parts that an item requires, the less the cost of production and/or assembly of that item is; at the same time however, there are also other important factor that a user of the Fitness/Therapy Device would consider when determining which of the devices is most appropriate for their use. These other considerations may include (among other considerations): how compact the device is (and/or can the device be disassembled), ease of storage, number of users who will be utilizing the same Fitness/Therapy Device, and the frequency that the device will be transported (and space available therein), as such, depending on the priorities of any particular User, one version of the Fitness/Therapy Device may be more desirable than another version of the Fitness/Therapy Device.

Additional Information

The Fitness/Therapy Device to be patented is a device that allows for exercise and/or therapy of the various parts of the body via a portable, lightweight device that is convenient to use and may be easily put in place, removed, relocated room to room, and/or from one location to another location. Additionally, the device is designed to either be a freestanding device, and/or the device may be attached or installed at and in doorway(s); Attached/installed on vertical oriented surfaces or their associated structure (including door(s)); and/or attached to/supported by/part of, a freestanding stand. Additionally, the device may be attached either directly or indirectly via fasteners, hooks, couplings, clips, supporting frame(s), screws, bolts, etc.

The device is relatively lightweight (but strong), may be easily attached and/or removed, and allows an individual to benefit from the related exercises and/or therapy without the need to participate in a commercial gym, therapist office, or have to purchase and/or deal with bulky and/or expensive equipment.

In addition to several of the versions being designed as a stand-alone device, several of the versions have also been designed to be utilized together with what has been considered and/or described as a “chin-up/or pull-up” bar (including chin-up/pull-up bars that are attached about a doorjamb/door); these versions of the Fitness/Therapy Device are easily attached to, and/or, supported by these chin-up/pull-up bar.

The invention may be constructed either of tubing of various thickness and shapes (including but not limited to round, oval, oblong, rectangle, square, etc.); rectangular channel material; sufficiently strong but lightweight flat strips of material, and/or other material(s), including extruded materials, materials that are bent into shape, materials that are molded into shape, and/or otherwise fabricated with materials and techniques which will allow for the configuration of the Fitness/Therapy Device to be constructed with sufficient strength to sufficiently support the weight of the user. These materials may be either metallic, non-metallic, composite, or a combination thereof. Further the Fitness/Therapy Device can be constructed of either a single-piece of material that is bent into shape, extruded and/or configured into shape, molded into shape, and/or otherwise produced in any other appropriate manor (or otherwise configured and/or shaped); or, the Fitness/Therapy Device can be constructed of a multi-piece frame (including a two-piece frame), which is, assembled, connected, fastened, bolted, screwed, (and/or otherwise assembled and secured together). A backrest (with or without cushioning/padding) may be utilized (at the user's option), should the user choose to utilize one. Additionally, should the user choose, optional padding/cushions may be utilized for the portion(s) of the frame that are in contact with the user during use of the Fitness/Therapy Device (namely at the Armrests and/or the hand-grips. Should cushioning/padding be utilized, the cushioning/padding can easily be attached/secured to the frame via clips and/or Velcro type material, or can be “slid-on” to the frame, and/or attached/secured in any other appropriate manner. Further, the armrests and/or handgrips can also be “shaped” to conform to the arms and/or hands and fingers (or elsewhere on the Fitness/Therapy Device where the user's body makes contact with the device). This would allow the user to be more comfortable and/or secure when using the Fitness/Therapy device.

Further, a lightweight but strong material (metallic, non-metallic, composite, and/or a combination thereof) that is sufficiently strong and is available in sheets, strips (and/or other various forms), and can be bent, molded, assembled, fabricated, and/or welded (etc.) into the desired shape, this would also be an acceptable material for the device.

This simple exercise, fitness and/or therapy device is novel and new, as exemplified by the fact that in spite of many different forms of exercise, fitness and/or therapy devices that have been invented over the years, none provide the various combination(s) (depending on which version) of use, benefits, simplicity, height variation, portability, and/or inexpensive cost, of the subject Fitness/Therapy Device.

Several of the versions of the subject Fitness/Therapy device have been designed to allow for easy set-up/removal about a doorway opening/door jam, consistent with the methods utilized to install a typical “chin-up/pull-up bar.

For versions of a Non-freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device, an analogy may be drawn, between the ease of set-up, and use, of the subject Fitness/Therapy Device, and that of the ease of set-up, and use, of what has typically been termed a “chin-up/pull-up” bar—especially when considering the door jam versions of each. Additionally, for versions of a Freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device, analogies can be drawn as to the portable nature of the Freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device, and the portability of a typical metal frame office chair and/or metal frame barstool.

When considering fitness, exercise and/or therapy equipment, often it is helpful to have the ability to adjust the equipment to be most comfortable for the user. As such, the following has been incorporated into the various versions of the subject Fitness/Therapy Device:

The Armrest and/or Handgrip height for the Non-freestanding one-piece (single-piece) frame version of the Fitness/Therapy Device is determined by the height in which the device is attached to the desired surface (ie. wall, or other desired locations of placement), and/or, if the device is attached indirectly, the height is determined by what height the various support connectors which the Fitness/Therapy Device is attached to, are placed. Since many of the various forms of attaching the Fitness/Therapy Device can be quite small in size, support connectors can be put in place (and/or attached) at various heights, thus allowing for easy height “adjustment” for the Fitness/Therapy Device, by relocating the Fitness/Therapy Device from a connector (or set of connectors) at one height, to another connector (or set of connectors) which have been put in place at an alternative height.

Also, if a Non-freestanding, one-piece (single piece) frame version of the Fitness/Therapy Device is being suspended from above, the height at which the device will be at, is determined by the length of the support(s) and/or the height at which the support(s) are attached to the desired location.

If the Fitness/Therapy Device is attached to/connected to a doorway pull-up/chin-up bar, then the portable pull-up/chin-up bar is place in the desired location to accommodate the desired height of the Fitness/Therapy Device.

The height of the Non-freestanding two-piece frame version of the Fitness/Therapy Device can be “adjusted”, by adjusting the length of the telescoping uprights, to the desired length, then securing that length (in addition to the methods of adjustment(s) referenced in the Non-freestanding one-piece version).

For the Non-freestanding multi-piece frame Fitness/Therapy Device (more than “two-pieces”), the height can be height adjusted as referenced above, and also adjusted by connecting the frame lengths via the optional connection placements.

The Freestanding single-piece frame Fitness/Therapy device is readily available from the factory in several predetermined heights. Further, to increase the versatility of a freestanding single-piece frame version of the device, for a variety of different user heights, the user can utilize a “step” (form of step to be determined by the user), which the user can step upon, to make it easier to reach the armrests and/or handgrips; or, the user can place the Fitness/Therapy Device on a form of “platform” (of the user's choosing), to raise the device higher above the ground.

The height of the Freestanding two-piece frame version of the Fitness/Therapy Device can be “adjusted”, by adjusting the length of the telescoping Uprights, to the desired length, then securing that length (and/or adding/removing Upright segments to the Uprights).

The height of the Freestanding Multi-piece frame Fitness/Therapy Device can also be adjusted as referenced above (freestanding two-piece frame version).

Further, the fact that the Fitness/Therapy device (the benefits vary depending on which version of the device is being utilized) is simple, lightweight, portable, allows for easy adjustment of height (for ease of use) and relatively inexpensive, the desired benefits can now be utilized and enjoyed by many individuals, across a broad cross-section of income classes, in their own home and/or office, whereas previously they would have had to either go to a commercial gym, therapist office, and/or, spent considerably more money, to obtain related benefits. This Fitness/Therapy Device is also useful and helpful, for individuals who have physical impairments, and/or require assisting apparatus (wheelchair, etc.).

DRAWINGS

DESCRIPTION

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a view of one of the versions of a One-piece Freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device, with the One-piece device connected at the base.

FIG. 2 is a view of one of the versions of a One-piece Freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device, with the One-piece device connected at the Handgrips.

FIG. 3 is a view of one of the versions of a One-piece Freestanding device connected at the base, with additional support for the base and uprights.

FIG. 4 is a view of one of the versions of a One-piece Freestanding device, reflecting that the connector can be at either the Base or the Handgrips; figure also indicates that the Uprights/Base can be configured in various positions.

FIG. 5 is a view of one of the versions of a One-piece Freestanding device, reflecting that the connector can be at either the Base or the Handgrips; figure also indicates that the Uprights/Base can be configured in various positions.

FIG. 6 is a view of one of the versions of a one-piece Freestanding device, reflecting that the connector can be at either the Base or the Handgrips; figure also indicates that the Uprights/Base can be configured in various positions; this figure also shows that either the Base Connector, or the Handgrip Connector can be made optional.

FIG. 7 is a view of one of the versions of a Two-piece Freestanding device, which adjusts at “telescoping” Uprights (or other method of having the Uprights adjustable). This figure also reflects that “above” the telescoping point is the upper portion of the device, and below the telescoping point is the lower portion of the device. The telescoping design allows of the uprights to be adjusted, and/or taken apart for storage and/or transportation, etc.

FIG. 8 is a view of one of the versions of a two-piece Freestanding device, reflecting various methods of attaching the two-piece device together. In this figure, the uprights are connected via tubing (interior or exterior), whereas the tubing can be secured to lock in the desired height of the device. This version also includes Upper Handgrips, which allow the user a variation for supporting the user's weight while performing various activities, and also provides a variation for fitness and therapy to the upper body.

FIG. 9 is a view of one of the Multi-piece Freestanding versions, reflecting that the base is One-piece, and the upper portion of the device is One-piece, whereby the device is connected along the length of the Uprights.

FIG. 10 is a view of one of the versions of the One-piece Freestanding device, which also includes the Upper Handgrips, a modified upright/base design, and an optional connector to be put in place a the Upper Handgrips.

FIG. 11 is similar to FIG. 10, however, this figure delineates that either the Base Connector or the Upper Handgrip Connector can be optional.

FIG. 12 is a view of one of the versions of the Multi-piece Freestanding device, showing that this version of the device can be adjusted to “custom-fit” many different sized individuals; this version also allows for assembling/disassembling at many points, thus making this version of the device suitable for easy transporting and can also be stored in compact areas when not in use.

FIG. 13 is similar to FIG. 12 above, with a slight variation in the Upper Handgrip Connection.

FIG. 14 is a view of one of the versions of the Multi-piece Freestanding device, with a sliding Upper Handgrip; this figure also reflects the alternative design for the Uprights and Base.

FIG. 15 is similar to FIG. 14, with a slight variation in the Upper Handgrip Connector.

FIG. 16 is a view of one of the Non-Freestanding, One-piece versions of device with an Upper Connector/Attachment Bar, whereas this version of the device is either attached, and/or suspended, and/or connected to a suitable location.

FIG. 17 is a view of one of the Non-Freestanding, One-piece versions of the device whereby the device is connected at the Handgrips, and is attached to a suitable location via attachment holes along the uprights.

FIG. 18 is similar to FIG. 16 (Non-freestanding One-piece), except that this version includes a Connector Bar at the Handgrips, whereby the ends are connected together between the Handgrips.

FIG. 19 is similar to FIG. 18 (Non-freestanding One-piece), except the uprights have a greater length. A variety of lengths are incorporated into the design.

FIG. 20 is similar to FIG. 16 (Non-freestanding One-piece), except the Handgrips are incorporated as an extension of the Armrests.

FIG. 21 is a view of the one of the versions of Non-freestanding Multi-piece device, whereby the Handgrips are incorporated into the Armrests, with the additional choice of utilizing the Handgrip Connector as a Handgrip; also, this is one of the Non-freestanding versions which has the Uprights below the armrests for a variation of attaching the device to a desired location.

FIG. 22 is similar to FIG. 21 Non-freestanding Multi-piece), except the device can be assembled/disassembled at the Handgrip Connector and also at the Bottom Connecting Bar; this makes for easier transporting and storage.

FIG. 23 is view of one of the Non-freestanding, One-piece versions, which includes a Bottom Connecting Bar and with the Uprights below the armrests.

FIG. 24 is a view of one of the Non-freestanding, Multi-piece versions, which show the device being attached to a desired location via a supporting connection at the Upper Connector/Attachment Bar. Variations on this general type of attachment can also be utilized with One-piece versions.

FIG. 25 is a view of one of many methods of connecting or attaching the device to a desired location; this type of attachment would allow the device to be suspended from above (whereby the “hook” is facing towards the device.

FIG. 26 is similar to FIG. 25, except this attachment would be attached to the device with the “hook” at the back of the device and facing away from the device.

FIG. 27-FIG. 30 are views of various and sundry attachment methods for the device; please note that these are just a few of the various methods of attaching the device to a desired location, and includes some, but by no means all of the various methods in which to attach/suspend/secure the Non-freestanding device to a desired location.

FIG. 31-FIG. 32 are views of variations of Handgrip Connectors.

FIG. 33 is a view of a variation on the Handgrip, which also includes extended Handgrips for alternatives for different forms of activities including variations on dips, etc.

FIG. 34 is similar to FIG. 31, except FIG. 31 is for a Non-freestanding version of the device where the Uprights are above the Armrests, whereas FIG. 34 shows a version of a Handgrip Connector Bar for one of the versions of Non-freestanding devices which have the Uprights below the Armrests.

FIG. 35 is a view of Full Length (substantially) Vertical Support/Attachment Bars which can be installed between door jams (typically at openings where door is removed), at the outside of a door jam, or otherwise attached to a surface or associated structure. The Vertical Attachment Bar supports horizontal tubes and/or bars, which the device is suspended from/attached to. This allows the device to be easily set in place at varying heights, and also incorporates end connectors to allow for standard Pull-up/Chin-up bars to be attached.

FIG. 36 is similar to FIG. 35, except instead of the Vertical Support/Attachment Bars being the full length of the height of a standard door opening, the Vertical Support/Attachment Barr are available in shorter lengths, thus allowing for more flexibility in location of placement.

FIG. 37 through FIG. 39 shows variation of Freestanding version.

Please note that on the two-piece versions and/or multi-piece versions of a Fitness/Therapy device (Freestanding and/or Non-freestanding versions), that whereas “telescoping” ends are a common method of obtaining the ability to adjust the height/length of the Uprights and/or be able to detach the upper and lower portions from each other, other suitable method to accomplish this means is also intended to be incorporated herein.

Also, please note that the design of multi-piece versions are easily redesigned into two-piece versions; also note that one-piece versions are easily redesigned into two-piece version. As the marketplace will dictate which versions are most marketable (among other reasons), the subject Fitness/Therapy Device is intended to include all reasonable variations thereof.

REFERENCE NUMERALS

LIST OF REFERENCE NUMERALS

  • 1a. Base Left Side
  • 1b. Base Right Side
  • 1c. Base Connector
  • 2a. Left Upright
  • 2b. Right Upright
  • 2c. Upper Left Upright (if Multi-part)
  • 2d. Upper Right Upright (if Multi-part)
  • 2e. Lower Left Upright (if Multi-part)
  • 2f. Lower Right Upright (if Multi-part)
  • 2g. External Support for Adjustable Upright Component(s)
  • 2h. Internal Support for Adjustable Upright Component(s)
  • 3a. Left Armrest
  • 3b. Right Armrest
  • 4a. Left Handgrip
  • 4b. Right Handgrip
  • 4c. Left Handgrip (Reverse Position)
  • 4d. Right Handgrip (Reverse Position)
  • 4e. Left Upper handgrip
  • 4f. Right Upper Handgrip
  • 5.Handgrip Connector Bar
  • 6a. Alternative Left Upright/Base
  • 6b. Alternative Right Upright/Base
  • 6c. Alternative Left Upright/Base (if Multi-part)
  • 6d. Alternative Right Upright/Base (if Multi-part)
  • 8a. Slidable Connection for Upper Handgrip, with locking apparatus
  • 8b. Genaric type clamp/Keeper (optional)
  • 9a. Additional Base Support
  • 9b. Additional Upright Support
  • 10. Locations of Adjustment. Ie. Telescoping components; slidable components; and/or other appropriate form of by-pass, and/or other means for allowing adjustments including but not limited to height and/or length adjustments, and/or locations for parts to be connected together (inclusive of reasonable means for Telescoping Tubes, for Length Adjustment, and including means of securing/locking the desired adjustments in place.
  • 11.-14. N/A
  • 15. Upper Connector/Attachment Bar
  • 16. Attachment Holes
  • 17. Bottom Connector Bar
  • 18. Various Methods of Attaching and/or Securing Non-Freestanding Versions of Device to: Wall, Suspended From Above, Attached/Secured to a Chin-up/Pull-up Bar, Attached Between Door Jams/to Door Frame, Etc.
  • 19. Extended Handgrip
  • 20. Full-Length Vertical Support Bar(s) To Be Attached To Inside of Door Frame/Door Jam, or, Outside of Door Frame/Door Jam, or, Attached to Vertical Surface and Associated Structure. These Vertical Support Bars Provide Support for (One or Two) Horizontal Tubes or Rods, or, Pull-up/Chin-up Bars, which are Attached One End At Each Vertical Support Bar, (or other means of supporting a Fitness/Therapy Device), Whereby the Fitness/Therapy Device is Attached/Secured To the Horizontal Tubes or Rods, and/or other means of Supporting the Fitness/Therapy Device.
  • 20a. Various Shaped Support Holes/Openings Within Support Bar
  • 20b. Variuos Shaped External Supports On Support Bar
  • 20c. Various Shaped Supports at Support Bar (Combination of Openings and External Supports)
  • 20d. Holes/Fasteners For Attachment to Door Frame/Door Jams
  • 21. Partial Length Vertical Support Bar(s) To Be Attached To Inside of Door Frame/Door Jam, or, Outside of Door Frame/Door Jam, or, Attached to Vertical Surface and Associated Structure. These Vertical Support Bars Provide Support for (One or Two) Horizontal Tubes or Rods, or, Pull-up/Chin-up Bars, which are Attached One End At Each Vertical Support Bar, Whereby the Fitness/Therapy Device is Attached/Secured To the Horizontal Tubes or Rods, and/or other means of Supporting the Fitness/Therapy Device.
  • 21a. Various Shaped Support Holes/Openings Within Support Bar
  • 21b. Variuos Shaped External Supports On Support Bar
  • 21c. Various Shaped Supports at Support Bar (Combination of Openings and External Supports)
  • 21d. Holes/Fasteners For Attachment to Door Frame/Door Jams
  • 22. Door Frame/Door Jam
  • 23. Horizontal Tube and/or Rod whereby the Fitness/Therapy Device is Supported By/Attached to, and/or utilized to stabilize the Fitness/Therapy Device (typically while in use). Please note that the Horizontal “tubes and/or rods”, can be replaced by utilizing non-rigid materials, such as straps, to support and/or stabilize the Fitness/Therapy Device.

Backrest (Optional). Please note that various forms of a backrest (optional) may be utilized. If utilized, the backrest can either be attached to the Fitness/Therapy Device, or, if the device is attached to a wall (or other location), the backrest can be secured to the wall (or other location). Again, please note that the user has option not to use a backrest at all.

End of Reference Numerals

Operation

In operating the Fitness/Therapy Device, the user positions himself or herself according to which activity the user chooses to perform, and also which version of the device is being utilized. Although there are numerous activities that can be performed and conducted with the subject invention, below are a few positions and activities that can be conducted:

A.

For Freestanding Multi-piece (Multi-part) versions of the device.

1) (Utilizing in-line Handgrips; See FIGS. 1-24, 31-34) The user approaches the invention, adjusts the height of the invention to the desired height such that the forearms (portion of the arms located between elbows and hands) rest comfortably on top of the respective Armrests while the feet are on the ground (or if desired such that the user is on their tiptoes; or, if desired, so the feet and toes are above the ground);

    • the user further positions himself or herself such that their Left forearm rests on top of the Left Armrest (3a), and their Right forearm rests on top of the Right Armrest (3b); while the user positions their forearms in place, the user also grasps the Left Handgrip (4a) with their Left hand and fingers, and also grasps the Right Handgrip (4b) with their Right hand and fingers.

(Note that depending on which version of the invention is being used, and which position the user is standing, in relation to the Fitness/Therapy Device, the user could either utilize Armrests (3a) and (3b), together with Handgrips (4a) and (4b); or, if utilizing a version of the Fitness/Therapy Device similar to the device referenced in FIG. 11, then the user could also utilize part numbers (4e) and (4f) as Armrests, together with Handgrips of (4c) and (4d)).

The user is now in a position to perform the following activities (as well as other activities):

    • a) A variety of Vertical Knee Raises (raising one's knees to a desired height, and then lowering the knees to a desired levels—and repeat until the desired number of Vertical Knee Raises are completed).
    • b) Leg Raises (with the user's legs at various desired levels of being straight, the user raises and lowers their legs, pivoting at the hips or other desired pivot points—and repeating for the desired number of repetitions);
    • c) Various suspension and quasi-suspension exercises, which depending on what level of stress, workout, and/or therapy the user desires, the user will either keep their feet or toes on the ground, and/or raise their feet and toes above the ground, whereby the user's weight is supported, with or without additional movement. Additional weight can be added to the individual, if desired.
    • d) Ankle, foot and/or toe exercises and/or fitness. Users elevate their feet and/or toes above the ground (or if desired, also utilizing the ground for additional support), and performs various ankle, foot and/or toe exercises and/or therapies.

2) (Utilizing Above-arm Handgrips; See FIGS. 8, 10-15, and similar/related versions) The user approaches the invention, adjusts the height of the invention to the desired height such that the Upper-arms (portion of arms located between shoulders and elbows) rest comfortably on top of the respective Armrests while the feet are on the ground (or if desired such that the user is on their tiptoes; or, if desired, so the feet and toes are above the ground);

The user further positions himself or herself such that their Left Upper-arm rests on top of the Left Armrest (3a), and their Right Upper-arm rests on top of the Right Armrest (3b); while the user positions their Upper-arms in place, the user also grasps the Left Upper Handgrip (4e) with their Left hand and fingers, and also grasps the Right Upper Handgrip (4f) with their Right hand and fingers.

The user is now in a position to perform the following activities (as well as other activities):

    • a) A variety of Vertical Knee Raises (raising one's knees to a desired height, and then lowering the knees to a desired level—and repeat until the desired number of Vertical Knee Raises are completed);
    • b) Leg Raises (with the user's legs at various desired levels of being straight, the user raises and lowers their legs, pivoting at the hips or other desired pivot points—and repeating for the desired number of repetitions);
    • c) Various suspension and quasi-suspension exercises, which depending on what level of stress, workout, and/or therapy the user desires, will either keep their feet or toes on the ground, and/or raise the feet and toes off the ground, whereby the user's weight is supported, with or without additional movement. Additional weight can be added to the individual, if desired.
    • d) Ankle, foot and/or toe exercises and/or fitness. Users elevate their feet and/or toes above the ground (or if desired, also utilizing the ground for additional support), and performs various ankle, foot and/or toe exercises and/or therapies.

3) (Utilizing Armrests as supports for grasping with hands and fingers) The user approaches the invention, adjusts the height of the invention to the desired height such that the user can comfortably grasp the Armrests with the user's Hands and Fingers, with the hands above the respective Armrests;

The user further positions himself or herself (facing the Fitness/Therapy Device) such that their Left hand and fingers grasps the Armrest which is in front of the Left Arm (grasping the Left Armrest (3a)), with the user's Left hand being located above the respective Armrest; and at approximately the same time, the user with their Right hand and fingers grasps the Armrest which is in front of the Right arm (grasping the Right Armrest (3a)), with the user's Right hand being located above the respective Armrest; the user starts out with their arms approximately straight up from and above their respective hands, with the user's weight being substantially supported; the user then bends their elbows, and lowers themselves to a desired level; then raises themselves up again by straightens their elbows—and repeating; all during the raising and lowering of oneself, the knees are bent to allow the user to lower and raise oneself without the feet making contact with the floor, or, if the user desires, the user can keep their feet in varying levels of contact with the floor, which would assist the user in the raising and lowering of oneself. (Note that depending on which version of the invention is being used, and which position the user is standing in relation to the invention, the user could, as an alternative, grasp (4e) and (4f) with their respective hands and fingers, with their hands above the respective Armrests being used as grasping bars).

Among other activities, the user is now in a position to perform the following:

    • a) A variety of “Dips” (see above);
    • b) A variety of “Leg Raises” (with the user's legs at various desired levels of being straight, the user raises and lowers their legs, pivoting at the hips or other desired pivot points—and repeating for the desired number of repetitions);
    • c) Various suspension and quasi-suspension exercises; and/or therapies, which depending on what level of stress and workout the user desires, will either keep their feet or toes on the ground, and/or raise the feet and toes off the ground, whereby the user's weight is supported, with or without additional movement. Additional weight can be added to the individual, if desired.
    • d) Ankle, foot and/or toe exercises and/or fitness. Users elevate their feet and/or toes above the ground (or if desired, also utilizing the ground for additional support), and performs various ankle, foot and/or toe exercises and/or therapies.

4) Same as #3 above, however, User grips Armrests with Hands and Fingers, with hands below respective Armrests, to perform:

    • a) Assisted/Guided squats, whereby the user keeps their feet on the ground (or toes on the ground), and proceeds to bend one's knees and lowering one's body-to a desired level, then, depending on whether the user chooses to have more stress on the upper body, or on the lower body, the user would choose whether to have more assistance from the upper part of the body (pulling oneself up with the hands and elbow), or more assistance from the lower part of the body (pushing up from the feet and knees), and would raise oneself up. The user would repeat the above for the desired number of repetitions and placing the desired burden on the respective parts of the upper or lower parts of the body.
    • b) Knee Bends (similar to “a” immediately above).
    • c) Parallel Bar Pull-ups. The user would allow their weight to be supported by their hands and fingers, and either have their body “dangled” from their hands and fingers (with their feet not touching the ground), or the user can choose to keep their feet and/or toes on the ground, and thus utilize their lower part of their body to assist in raising and lowering their body, and then proceed to pull oneself up with their hand and fingers by bending their elbows, and then lowering oneself again, by straightening one's elbows—and repeating for the desired number of repetitions (with a choice of varying burden placed on either or both the upper parts of the body and/or the lower parts of the body.
    • d) Ankle, foot and/or toe exercises and/or fitness. Users elevate their feet and/or toes above the ground (or if desired, also utilizing the ground for additional support), and performs various ankle, foot and/or toe exercises and/or therapies.
      B.

For Freestanding/One-piece versions of the device. Same as above (A), except the device/invention is not adjustable, therefore the user would choose which of the standard height devices to acquire/purchase, and/or if the user desired to acquire/purchase more than one device (of varying heights), to accommodate various individuals and/or activities

C.

For Non-freestanding/One-piece versions of the device. Same as above, however, the user would choose what height to place the device, and/or what height to place the fastener(s) which the device will be attached to/connected to/ supported by.

D.

For Non-freestanding/Two-piece and/or Multi-piece versions of the device. Same as above, except the user would also have the choice of adjusting the device itself, to the desired height and/or adjustment.

(also see attached additional information, including Supplemental Information for Provisional Patent Application)

Conclusion, Ramifications, and Scope

Accordingly, the reader will see that the subject Fitness/Therapy Device provides important advantages over other exercise and therapy devices, including abdominal and back exercise and therapy devices. Additionally, since much of the effectiveness of any type of exercise or therapy equipment, is derived from consistent and continuous use, and the more convenient a particular device is to use—the more use the device will typically receive. As such, since the subject Fitness/Therapy Device is relatively lightweight, can be manufactured and sold for a reasonable price, the device can be easily set up, and/or, relocated from room to room, place to place, can be used at the home or office, and can be used indoors or outdoors, the device will be able to be used regularly, consistently and frequently.

Additionally:

The Fitness/Therapy Device is available in a variety of versions, including freestanding and/or can be attached to other structures; and,

The Fitness/Therapy Device can be utilized at existing doorways; and,

The Fitness/Therapy Device can be utilized together with other equipment that a user may already have, including pull-up or chin-up bars; and,

The Fitness/Therapy Device (typically non-freestanding) can be attached to, fastened to, or hooked to other surfaces, structures, and/or supporting devices. Many methods of attachment are available, including, but limited to, screwing, bolting, or otherwise attaching permanent fasteners to a wall or other surface (or other supporting locations), whereby the permanently attached fasteners includes a hook or other component suitable for the Fitness/Therapy Device to be attached to/supported by, and further, whereby the small attachment fasteners remain intact in the wall (or other supporting location), and the Fitness/Therapy Device can be easily attached to/removed from, the permanent attachment fasteners. This allows for the Non-freestanding Fitness/Therapy Device to be easily put away and/or stored—then easily reattached at a desired time.

Although the description above contains many specifics, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention but as merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of this invention. For example, the Fitness/Therapy Device can be made from many different types of materials, the design could include varying configurations, various types of fasteners can be utilized to connect the multi-piece Fitness/Therapy Device, various supporting attachments may be utilized to attach or support the Fitness/Therapy Device to various supporting structures, walls, pull-up/chin-up bar (or other locations which are suitable for the Fitness/Therapy Device to be attached to. Additionally, various forms of padding and cushioning are optional, which make using the Fitness/Therapy Device more comfortable for use, etc. Additionally, should a user choose to utilize some form of a backrest, although it is not a requirement, they are free to do so.

Further, and as referenced herein, there are several versions for a user to choose from, including (but not limited to) a “one-piece” frame version, or a “two-piece” frame version, and/or one of the “Multi-piece” frame version. Whereas the two-piece frame version incorporates many of the benefits of the Fitness/Therapy Device, the user's needs will determine which of the various versions are more preferred. As each version incorporates several different benefits, the user would weigh their needs as to price, compactness, adjustability, where one chooses to utilize the device, and the needs for transporting and storing the device.

Also, please note that the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents, rather than by the examples given.

SEQUENCE LISTING

Non-applicable

FEDERAL SPONSORED R & D

Non-Applicable