Title:
Paint booth cabinet and brackets
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A removable, wall mounted enclosure, specifically for use in a paint booth, affixed to a set of mounting brackets (17) for easy removal and for holding the enclosure in a position that distances the main body (1) away from the paint booth wall at least ¼″ distance for the purpose of air to flow around the enclosure. Exterior Brackets (6) & (7) are connected to the main body (1) for the purpose of holding painting equipment, namely spray guns, at exterior of the enclosure. The interior of the enclosure comprises hooks (11), shelves (4) and brackets (13) & (14) for organization of the stored items within the enclosure.



Inventors:
Silverman, Clifford J. (Green Oaks, IL, US)
Application Number:
11/034369
Publication Date:
08/25/2005
Filing Date:
01/12/2005
Assignee:
SILVERMAN CLIFFORD J.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47F5/08; B05B15/12; B25H3/00; B25H3/04; (IPC1-7): A47F5/08
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
TRAN, HANH VAN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Clifford J. Silverman (Green Oaks, IL, US)
Claims:
1. A wall hanging enclosure comprising (a) a plurality of brackets connected to main body of said wall hanging enclosure comprising spray gun positions for enabling spray guns to be held in place by said brackets, and (b) a plurality of mounting brackets to provide a means for removal of said wall hanging enclosure from hanging position in a procedure that requires lifting said enclosure away from said wall, and (c) a gap in excess of ¼″ distance between said enclosure and said wall suitable for air to flow between said wall hanging enclosure and said wall, and (d) a plurality of brackets and hooks attached inside said wall hanging enclosure suitable for holding contents inside said wall hanging enclosure

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/536,577, filed 2003 Jan. 15 by the present inventor.

This application claims the benefit of a second provisional patent application filed 2004 Dec. 29, Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/639,891 depicts my alternative embodiment within in this patent application.

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not Applicable

SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of Invention

This invention relates to an enclosed storage device intended for use inside of paint booths to store various tools and materials and hanging spray guns on the exterior at connected brackets while painting cars, trucks or other objects.

2. Prior Art

The inventor has recognized, in the Automotive Refinish and Industrial Painting Industries, a specific need for an enclosure with brackets and attachments to provide storage of certain tools and materials while working in a paint booth. This enclosure, with brackets and attachments, is to be affixed upon a set of hooks or magnets to allow for simple removal by lifting away from a paint booth wall.

The result of not having a proper place to store the described tools and materials can result in the need for a painter to exit the paint booth in search of these items. This exit and reentry activity can create a problem of dirt being introduced to the painting atmosphere. Furthermore, this act of exiting the paint booth during a paint job can disturb any of the existing loose dust and over-spray that exists in a paint booth. The combination of dust and over-spray can easily find its way to the paint finish, creating defects in the paint film and resulting in a poor quality paint finish. Aside from dust and over-spray at risk of damaging a paint film, the tools and materials are also prone to damage from exposure to the paint's over-spray.

In most cases, OEM paint booths are not equipped with any type shelving, cabinets or other enclosures for the purpose of storing the said necessary tools and materials. Therefore, a painter does not usually have a place to put items, tools and materials while working in a paint booth, aside from a top the object being painted or on the floor. Although some OEM spray booth models have been known to provide a corner shelf that is bolted directly to the wall, it is not a common item that is offered for sale, nor is it seen in the market place often. Any type of product that will hold the tools and materials needed in a paint booth must usually be purchased as an aftermarket accessory, or is fabricated by the operators or owner of the spray booth in use.

Inventors have created various forms of designs to hold or store items in spray booths for use while painting a car. Most of these items have been relative to holding many of the items mentioned above. U.S. Pat. No. D314,486 to Day (1991) discloses a shelf for an automobile spray booth, however this shelf is permanently bolted and to the wall and offers no enclosure device to help protect the materials from dust and over-spray. This design is most appropriately used as a mixing shelf and storage shelf for paint that is to be applied on the vehicle or object in the paint booth at that time. Other items may be stored on the shelf such as tack cloth, razor blades etc.

U.S. Pat. No. D378,893 to Nordeen (1997) discloses a wall hanger for blow guns and spray guns. This design is also available as a permanent accessory for a mixing bench, prep station or mixing room. It is limited in its ability to hold many other items except a single spray gun, blow gun and air hose. It offers no enclosure for protection from over-spray within a paint booth.

Of the list of tools and materials my invention is intended to hold is an air hose, commonly used in a paint booth. The air hose that delivers the compressed air to the spray gun needs to be suspended or stored for use within a paint booth. U.S. Pat. No. 5,687,937 to Habib (1997) discloses a hose organizer that holds an air hose in such a way that it moves on a track along the ceiling while the painter walks along the object to be painted. The majority of the air hose's length is kept off of the floor due to this device, although the end of the air hose is not suspended by this device unless another air hose or paint gun holding bracket/accessory is present. Although this device shares a common purpose, my invention is quite different in relationship of other purposes.

Many types of storage units may be capable of holding the items necessary for inside a spray booth, although the available known art suffers from some or all of similar disadvantages. An example can be used to depict the reason for not using so many different types of cabinets or enclosures to be mounted inside a spray booth for reasons given similar to U.S. Pat. No. D315,995 to Miller (1991). This patent discloses a mobile storage unit for other purposes and industry. The construction of this embodiment would not apply well to a spray booth since is moved about on casters, therefore would not work well in most spray booths due to their grated floors. Although this is a small cabinet and offers many storage compartments, the overall design of it would attract and accumulate dust and over-spray on its surface, without allowing air to flow behind it when against the paint booth wall, making it undesirable to be placed in a paint booth. The lack of bracketing for spray guns and air hoses would also differentiate from my invention.

    • (a) Protection of said tools and materials from over-spray is not possible with any of the mentioned open air models
    • (b) All discovered OEM or aftermarket enclosure accessory or shelf intended for use in a paint booth is bolted or placed directly against the wall, not offering air passage gaps behind or around the enclosure.
    • (c) Special bracketing for placement of tools, spray guns, air hose and accessories of other designs would be the primary purpose of those inventions, where as the spray gun brackets that are attachable to my cabinet are of different design and are secondary to the application.
    • (d) Ability to remove a shelf, enclosure or bracket without the requirement of tools is not always an option with other designs.
      Reference list of prior art cited:
  • U.S. Pat. No. D314,486 to Day (1991)
  • U.S. Pat. No. D378,893 to Nordeen (1997)
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,687,937 to Habib (1997
  • U.S. Pat. No. D315,995 to Miller (1991)

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION—OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES

Accordingly, besides the objects and advantages of the enclosure and brackets to hold and store variously needed tools and materials inside the spray booth in my above patent, several objects and advantages of the present invention are:

    • (a) To provide method of portability and easy removal of the enclosure from the paint booth wall at any time, by using specially designed mounting brackets or high-powered magnets for suspension at the paint booth wall. Key importance is placed on the removable feature since it accommodates for cleaning ability of the booth wall and cleaning of the enclosure and brackets. Paint booths must be cleaned often due to the constant accumulation of dried paint over-spray. Any object mounted permanently to a paint booth wall becomes and obstacle for cleaning and may pocket over-spray.
    • (b) To allow for the connection and height adjustability of spray gun hangers
    • (c) To provide a gap between the cabinet and the wall to allow the booth's moving airflow to pass behind and around the device. Key importance is placed on this feature since it helps to avoid undesired turbulence of airflow, and reduces the pocketing, or build-up, of over-spray within the paint booth.
    • (d) To allow for sand paper, spray out cards and other items to be held upright and in place, via the brackets on the inside door frames
    • (e) To allow for tape, of various sizes, to be held upright inside the enclosure via the tape hooks.
    • (f) To allow for easy clean up due to the disassembly/removal of the shelves and doors from the cabinet's body, in addition to the above mentioned removal method of the cabinet from the wall.
    • (g) To allow for alternative mounting adjustments due to obstructions, variations on booth sizes, and designs, via its auxiliary mounting holes
    • (h) To allow for minimized damage to spray guns and gun cups due to the soft edge guard on the spray gun hanger contact point

SUMMARY

In accordance with the present invention, a removable, wall or corner mounted enclosure, temporarily affixed to a set of mounting brackets and held in a position that distances the cabinet body away from the wall of a paint booth of at least ¼″ for purposes of air to flow around the enclosure. Exterior Brackets are connected to the cabinet for the purpose of holding painting equipment, namely spray guns, on the exterior of the enclosure. The interior of enclosure comprises hooks, shelves and brackets for organization of the stored items within.

In the drawings, closely related figures have the same number but different alphabetic suffixes.

DRAWINGS—Figures

FIG. 1: Shows the overall preferred embodiment of a Paint Booth Cabinet and Brackets as a complete unit, with no numbering.

FIG. 2: Depicts the overall preferred embodiment of a Paint Booth Cabinet and Brackets as a complete unit, showing the component diagram and reference numerals

FIG. 3: Shows the Paint Booth Cabinet and Brackets in a spray booth, in one of the booth's corners. The illustration depicts the movement of airflow within a spray booth

FIG. 4: Depicts the Open Space, or gap, between cabinet and Booth wall, designed to facilitate the free passage of airflow behind the cabinet, to avoid turbulence and pocketing of over spray.

FIG. 5: Shows the Cabinet Body—a ‘Flattened View’ of all welded connected components with the reference numerals

FIG. 6: Shows the Top View of the Cabinet, referencing the key bends/flanges that attribute the air flow and mounting features

FIG. 7: Shows the Interior Shelf and its reference numerals

FIG. 8: Shows the method of attachment of the shelves to the cabinet body/shelf mounting flanges

FIG. 9: Shows the reference numerals related to the Door Frame

FIG. 10: Shows the reference numerals related to the Right Side Door

FIG. 11: Shows the reference numerals related to the Left Side Door

FIG. 12: Shows the reference numbers of the Door Hinge Assembly

FIG. 13: Shows a flattened view of the Upper and Lower Gun Hangers, prior to forming their respective bends

FIG. 14: Shows the difference between the Upper and Lower Mounting Brackets, differentiated only by the rolling/bend of the spray gun hanger flange.

FIG. 15: Shows the reference numbers of the Mounting Bracket and side view and top view of the component

FIG. 16: Depicts the use of the auxiliary mounting holes when there is an obstruction to mounting such as a narrow doorjamb.

FIG. 17: Shows the mounting bracket holding the cabinet at its main mounting holes

FIG. 18: Shows the mounting bracket holding the cabinet at its auxiliary mounting holes

FIG. 19: Shows a front view of Alternative Embodiment 1: Paint Booth Cabinet for straight wall (not corner mounted)

FIG. 20: Shows a dissected view of Alternative Embodiment 1: Paint Booth Cabinet for straight wall (not corner mounted)

FIG. 21: Shows top view of gun hangers for preferred embodiment with depiction of spray guns in place

FIG. 22: Shows side view of upper gun hanger for preferred embodiment with spray gun in place, using the rolled flange to keep spray gun in place

FIG. 23: Shows side view of lower gun hanger for preferred embodiment with spray gun in place, using the rolled flange to keep spray gun in place

FIG. 24: Shows top view of gun hangers for alternative embodiment 1 (not corner mounted) with depiction of spray guns in place

FIG. 25: Shows side view of left side gun hanger for alternative embodiment 1 (not corner mounted) with depiction of spray guns in place, using the rolled flange to keep spray gun in place

FIG. 26: Shows side view of right side gun hanger for alternative embodiment 1 (not corner mounted) with depiction of spray guns in place, using the rolled flange to keep spray gun in place

FIG. 27: Depicts the alternative embodiment 2 of a Paint Booth shelf with attached Cabinet as a complete unit, showing the component diagram and reference numerals

FIG. 28: Shows a side view of the alternative embodiment 2 of a Paint Booth shelf with attached Cabinet

FIG. 29: Shows a rear view, highlighting the mounting magnets of the alternative embodiment 2 of a Paint Booth shelf, attached cabinet not shown here

FIG. 30: Depicts the mounting method of mounting brackets/hooks used with alternative embodiment 1

FIG. 31: Depicts the mounting method of mounting brackets/hooks used with alternative embodiment 1 shown attached to a wall

FIG. 32: Depicts the mounting method of mounting brackets/hooks used with alternative embodiment 1 as a broken down item list

FIG. 33: Shows a side view of alternative embodiment 1 with mounting magnets in position to placed on a wall

FIG. 34: Shows the locations of the magnets on alternative embodiment 1

FIG. 35: Shows door handles and fasteners as an assembly

DRAWINGS—Reference Numerals

    • 1. Cabinet Body
      • 1a. Protrusion Flange to create distance gap from wall
      • 1b. Flat Flange section for Gun Hanger positions
      • 1c. Mounting Hook Flange
      • 1d. Gun Hanger Positioning/Screw Holes
      • 1e. Tape Hook Holes
      • 1f Upper Ledge
      • 1g. Lower Ledge
      • 1h Main Body
      • 1i Rear Left Wall
      • 1j Rear Right Wall
    • 2. Left Door
      • 2a. Door Handle Holes
    • 3. Right Door
    • 4. Interior Shelf
      • 4a Mounting and Reinforcement Flange
      • 4b. Hanging Hole (for shelf to be powder coated)
    • 5. Door Handle Assembly
      • 5a. Pull Position
      • 5b. Screw Holes
      • 5c. Screws
      • 5d. Locking Nut
    • 6. Upper Gun Hanger (channeled bracket)
      • 6a. Reinforcement Flange
      • 6b. Spray Gun Position
      • 6c. Spray Gun Roll/Flange (identifies as upper or lower bracket)
      • 6d. Channeled Bracket Body
    • 7. Lower Gun Hanger (channeled bracket)
    • 8. Edge Guard/Spray Gun Protector
    • 9. Gun Hanger Pressed-In (Pem) Nuts
    • 10. Gun Hanger Screws
    • 11. Tape Hook
    • 12. Company Emblem
      • 12a. Emblem Made In USA
    • 13. Sand Paper Bracket Upper
    • 14. Sand Paper Bracket Lower
    • 15. Main Mounting Hole
    • 16. Auxiliary Mounting Hole
    • 17. Mounting Bracket
    • 18. Cabinet Mounting Tab
      • 18a. Support and Extension Flange
    • 19. Screw Hole
    • 20. Self Drilling Screw
      • 20a. Shim
    • 21. Door Hinge Assembly
      • 21a. Male Hinge
      • 21b. Female Hinge
    • 22. Door Frame
      • 22a Center Post
    • 23. Item Holding Magnets
    • 24. Shelf Mounting Tabs
    • 25. Door Latch Magnets
    • 26. Center Post Dust Strip
      Alternative Embodiment (Straight Wall Design)
    • 27. Main body
    • 28. Hole-body construction rivet location
    • 29. Hole-mounting magnet
    • 30. Hole-mounting bracket
    • 31. Rivet
    • 32. Upper shelf
    • 33. Lower shelf
    • 34. Hole-gun hanger
    • 35. Gun hanger
    • 36. Upper door
      • 36a. Upper hinge
    • 37. Lower door
      • 37a. Lower hinge
    • 38. Mounting bracket collar
    • 39. Mounting bracket stud
    • 40. Mounting magnet
    • 41. Mounting magnet rivet
    • 42. Wall (of paint booth)
    • 43. Upper spray gun flange
    • 44. Lower vented shelf
      • 44a. Main body wall
    • 45. Vent holes
    • 46. Hanging holes
    • 47. Hanging enclosure
    • 48. Hanging wire

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EBODIMENT—FIGS. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 25, 26, 27, and 28

FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of the preferred version of my Paint Booth Cabinet and Brackets, comprising of formed sheet metal, although other materials such as plastics, wood or other composites may be used. The cabinet body 1, shown in FIG. 5 consists of a main body 1h, an upper ledge 1f, a lower ledge 1g, and a door frame 22, all welded together. Spot welding, riveting or use of fasteners can also be used to construct the cabinet body, although I prefer welding. The preferred design of the cabinet body 1 is shaped as a triangular fitting enclosure, to be used only in the corner of a room or spray booth as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, although other body styles can be used such as a square type or straight wall mounted type of design as shown in alternative embodiments FIGS. 19 and 20, or a reversal design of bracketing that suspends the enclosure, such as shown in FIGS. 27 and 28.

Main body 1h, shown as a flattened view in FIG. 5, comprises four main mounting holes 15 and four auxiliary mounting holes 16, both intended for hanging the cabinet body 1 on its two mounting brackets 17, shown in more detail in FIGS. 15 and 17. Each mounting bracket 17 is comprised of two cabinet mounting tabs 18. Two mounting brackets are used to hold the cabinet body 1 upright a wall 42 as shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. The preferred design of mounting cabinet body 1 is by the use of four cabinet mounting tabs 18. FIG. 4 shows the contact being made by the mounting brackets 17, and the main body 1h. FIGS. 16 and 18 shows the use of the auxiliary mounting holes 16 in the event of an obstruction in the mounting area. In some cases, shims 18a may be needed to extend mounting tabs 18 far enough to clear auxiliary mounting holes 16. Alternative ways to mount the cabinet can also be achieved by the use of high power magnets or by inserting screws or screws with collars to the wall for main body 1h to rest upon, or by any combination of all of these mentioned methods.

Main body 1h has a series of two sets of vertically spaced holes 1d at flat flange section 1b of main body 1b, shown in FIG. 5. These holes, separated three inches apart vertically, provide adjustable height positioning for upper and lower gun hangers 6&7. FIG. 2 shows gun hangers 6&7 attached to main body 1h of cabinet body 1. Alternative embodiments depict a straight wall mounted cabinet with gun hangers 35 bolted to the side of main body 27 as shown on alternative embodiment FIGS. 19, 25 and 26. Gun hangers shown in alternative embodiment #2 are part of that main embodiment in combination with upper shelf flange 43.

FIG. 5 shows two sets of double holes, tape hook holes, 1e, spaced one inch apart, at the lower part of rear left wall 1i and rear right wall 1j providing the positions for the preferred two inch length, tape hook 11, used for holding roll(s) of tape within cabinet body 1. Longer hooks may also be used, although this would consume more space inside cabinet body 1.

Spot welded to the interior of main body 1h and center post 22a are the shelf mounting tabs 24 to hold interior shelves 4 into place by fitting the mounting and reinforcement flanges 4a behind mounting tabs 24, creating a moderately snug fit to hold each of the two said shelves 4 into place. FIG. 8 shows the attachment of shelf 4 to mounting tabs 24 in more detail.

Main body 1h, shown as a top view in FIG. 6, is formed with six 45° bends. The various bends create a plurality of sections for the cabinet body's functions, and a primarily triangular rear body shape, needed for corner mounting. The mounting hook flange 1c embodies the section for main mounting holes 15, for cabinet body 1 to be held in place on the mounting brackets 17, as shown in FIG. 17.

The 45° protrusion flange 1a creates ½′ distance between the cabinet and wall 42, forcing the main body 1h to be further away from wall 42 by ½″. FIG. 4 depicts an illustration of distance of rear of cabinet body 1 from wall 42 created by a combination of protrusion flange 1a and mounting bracket 17. Mounting bracket 17 further extends the cabinet's distance from wall 42 by at least ¼″ due to the ¼″ support and extension flange 18a, as shown on FIGS. 15 and 17. The overall distance of cabinet body 1 is ¾″ (not including certain portions of the main body) although a variation any distance from wall 42 may be found adequate.

The flange section for gun hanger positions 1b, shown in FIG. 5, is the closely related to the 2″ width of the gun hangers' 6&7 vertical body 6d, shown in FIG. 13. Gun hangers 6&7 can be adjusted vertically by height by choosing the preferred set of gun hanger positioning screw holes 1d along flat flange section 1b.

Door frame 22 is connected to main body 1h, along with upper ledge 1f and lower ledge 1g, as shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and 9 by welding. Center post 22a is spot welded to door frame 22. Center post 22a has two shelf mounting tabs 24 spot welded to it. The ½″ wide (neoprene foam) center post dust strip 26 is held to center post 22a by its adhesive backing. Two door latch magnets 25 are held to center post 22a by an aerosol adhesive, at the top and the bottom ends of the center post 22a. Door hinges 21a (male sides) are spot welded to door frame 22 on both of the left and right sides, whereby the left and right side doors 2 &3, attach and detach via female hinges 21b.

FIGS. 10 & 11 show components of left and right doors 2 &3. Female hinges 21b are attached to left and right doors 2 &3 by spot welds. Female hinges 21b are positioned for proper alignment with male hinges 21a on door frame 22. Sandpaper brackets, upper and lower 13 &14, are spot welded to the interior side of both doors 2 &3. Four item holding magnets 23 are placed in any location on either or a combination of doors 2 &3. Item holding magnets 23 are ¾″ wide and 3/16″ thick with an MGO Grade of 8. Emblem 12 is affixed to the upper right side of the left door 2. Emblem 12a is affixed to the lower right side of the right door 3.

Door handles shown on FIG. 35 are fastened with screws 5c and locking nut 5d to doors 2 &3, in position at door handle holes 2a. Door handles are constructed of formed sheet metal, but can be constructed of other shapes or materials.

Mounting brackets 17 are affixed to walls 42 by three self-drilling screws 20. Each mounting bracket 17 has two cabinet holding tabs 18. Cabinet body 1 sets on two mounting brackets 17 at main mounting holes 15. Therefore, cabinet body 1 is positioned on all four cabinet mounting tabs 18. Cabinet mounting tab 18 is extended ¼″ away from wall 42 due to the length of the support and extension flange 18a, shown in FIGS. 4 and 15. In the event auxiliary mounting holes 16 must be used due to obstructions affecting main mounting holes 15, then shims may needed to be installed between mounting brackets 17 and wall 42, as shown in FIG. 18. Shims will protrude mounting tabs 18 far enough to reach the inside of auxiliary mounting holes 16. Three shims of approximately 1/4″ thickness are to be used per each self drilling screw 20 and screw hole 19, also shown on FIG. 18.

Upper and lower gun hangers 6&7 affix to the rear of the main body 1h at the desired gun hanger positioning screw holes 1d. The gun hanger pressed-in (pem) nuts 9 are positioned at gun hanger positioning screw holes 1d, and fastened to flat flange section 1b by gun hanger screws 10. The height distance of the spray gun position 6b in relation to upper ledge 1f or lower ledge 1g depends on the group of (four) gun hanger positioning/screw holes 1d used.

Strength and stability of the upper and lower gun hanger vertical body 6d is obtained by a combination of the thickness of the steel (13 gauge), and by the reinforcement flange 6a on both sides of vertical body 6d.

Vinyl Edge guard/spray gun protector strips are pressed on to the ends of the spray gun positions 6b for protection against scratches and damage to spray guns being stored on gun positions 6b.

The determining difference between upper gun hanger 6 and lower gun hanger 7 is the direction of the spray gun roll 6c. The gun hanger is upright with the spray gun roll 6c faces upward as shown on FIG. 14.

Operation—FIGS. 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 11, 12, 15, 17, and 18

This paint booth cabinet and brackets are designed to provide specific storage areas for the necessary and common tools and items for painters' use while in a spray booth as shown in FIG. 3.

The interior sections of cabinet body 1 comprise a plurality of removable shelves 4. Shelves 4 are removed and replaced by lifting up and out of the mounting tabs shown in FIG. 8. By removing any or all of shelves 4, the ease of cleaning of the interior is enhanced, and removal of either or all shelves 4 will provide optional interior configurations. The cabinet's interior can be configured and reconfigured with two, or one or zero interior shelves 4 attached at any time. The number of interior shelves 4 that are used is at the discretion of the cabinet's user.

As shown in FIG. 2, two tape hooks 11 provide a suspended location for the storage of masking tape. Two sets of holes 1e provide the positioning for tape hooks 11 on the interior of the cabinet body 1, located at rear left wall flange 1i and rear right wall flange 1j. When installed, tape hooks 11 suspend the roll(s) of tape off of the interior's lower ledge 1g. Tape hook holes 1e distance the lower ledge 1g by 4¾″. An average roll of tape, when full, will distance the lower ledge 1g by approximately 3/4″ from its lowest point when resting on either tape hook 11. The exact distance of the tape's lowest point is not critical, provided there is enough clearance to remove and reinstall the roll of tape in to the cabinet's interior. Tape that hangs upright is less prone to damage due to dust sticking to its edges. Once dust is on the edges of tape, the tape may not produce sharp masking lines, often a need in painting. Therefore, the tape may be disposed of or used for a different purpose or application.

Sand paper brackets upper and lower 13 &14 as shown on FIG. 10 and 11 are permanently spot welded to the left and right side doors 2 &3. Sand paper brackets 13 &14 provide a neat and organized storage area for sand paper, spray out cards and other paper items used by a painter. The total thickness of any stack of combined paper to be stored in the sand paper brackets 13 &14 is ½″ due to the opening between upper bracket 13 and the interior of the door 2 or 3. The total width of the combined paper to be stored in the sand paper brackets 13 &14 is 8″ due to the width of the upper bracket 13 section used for the placement of paper items. The total height of the paper stored in the sand paper brackets 13 &14 is 16″, starting from the lower sand paper bracket 14 to the top of the door 2 or 3. These dimensions allow for the storage of most types and sizes of the commonly used sand paper. Item holding magnets 23 keep the paper items in position when the doors 2 &3 are opened and closed. If not for the magnets 23, the paper would eventually find its way out of the brackets 13 &14. Magnets 23 are also used to hold the paper items from rolling or bending over and beyond the upper sand paper bracket 13. Magnets 23 have an MGO Grade of 8, providing enough power to hold the intended items in place with confidence.

Left and right side doors 2 &3 are removable due to the ‘pin style’ door hinge assembly 21 shown in FIG. 12. Door 2 and 3 must be opened perpendicularly, or at a 90° angle to the door frame, or to the angle of the door's fully closed position to be pulled upwardly by approximately 9/16″, to fully separate the female hinge 21b from the male hinge 21a, thus completely removing door 2 or 3 from door frame 22. Door 2 or 3 must be replaced on the hinge in the same manner. If the 90° angle is not met, then the top section of the door 2 or 3 will hit on the top part of door frame 22, thus not allowing hinges to connect. Once door 2 or 3 is removed from cabinet body 1, doors 2 or 3 and cabinet body 1 can be easily cleaned or maintained as necessary. The removable function of doors 2 and 3 also simplifies the manufacturing process of the complete assembly by allowing the doors to be powder coated while separated from the rest of the cabinet body 1.

Upper ledge 1f, shown in FIG. 2 and FIG. 6, provides the covering for the interior of cabinet body 1. Upper ledge 1f is flat and horizontally positioned with cabinet body 1, comprising no angle or slope. This allows the user to incorporate upper ledge 1f as a working shelf for mixing paints, storing temporary materials and other items. This design is preferred for corner mounted cabinet design such as the preferred embodiment, although a sloped top is possible, or a top with a rounded or, both for the purpose of avoiding storage of items and to facilitate air movement, reducing turbulence that may be caused by a flat surface.

FIGS. 4, 15, 17 and 18 show how mounting holes 15 and mounting brackets 17 provide a system for suspension, mobility and removal capability of entire cabinet body 1 assembly by lifting cabinet body 1 away from mounting brackets 17, thereby removing cabinet body 1 from wall 42 with no need for tools or adjustment or readjustment of fasteners. Mounting holes 15, shaped in the form of a pair of oval holes perpendicular to one another, connected at the outer ends, comprise the receiving opening for cabinet mounting tab 18 to fit within said connected oval holes comprising main mounting holes 15 or auxiliary mounting holes 16. As cabinet body 1 is moved in toward the corner of wall 42, main mounting hole 15, or auxiliary mounting holes 16, are aimed in and toward cabinet mounting tabs 18 until mounting tabs 18 protrude through mounting holes, thereby rested in place at the upper oval of the mounting tabs 15 or 16. In the event auxiliary mounting holes 16 must be used due to obstructions affecting main mounting holes 15, then shims may be needed to be placed between mounting brackets 17 and wall 42 as shown in FIG. 18. Shims 20a will protrude mounting tabs 18 far enough to reach inside of auxiliary mounting holes 16. One shim 20a of approximately 1/4″ thickness may need to be installed per each self drilling screw 20. In either case of use with main mounting holes 15 or auxiliary mounting holes 16, the entire device is conveniently portable for movement in and out of its location, although use of mounting brackets 17 is the preferred design of suspending cabinet body 1 at wall 42 for easy removal, other mounting option exists such as installing screws directly to the wall in positions closely related to mounting holes 15 or 16, but leaving extra screw body protruding from wall 42 to receive mounting holes 15 or 16 for a similar version of easy removal mounting. To improve on this method further, a type of plastic or metal spacer can be inserted around the screw in the location of the mounting holes 15 or 16 to rest upon. This spacer would act as a stopper to the wall in conjunction with protecting the threads of the screw from contact with mounting hole 15 or 16. Strong magnets is also an option for easy removal mounting. Aside other designs of mounting brackets such as z channel, or other hook types, cabinet body 1 could also be permanently mounted to wall 42 with fasteners.

Air passage and airflow are key elements in a spray booth for the purpose of evacuating paint mists, solvents and dust. Due to this air movement within a spray booth atmosphere, any ledge, shelf, or protrusion from the wall can create turbulence or pocketing of dust and over spray if there is no passage for the air to escape. Said turbulence and said pocketing of dust and overspray have the ability to produce defects in a paint film. The space, or gap, between cabinet body 1 and wall 42 of approximately ¾″ will overcome the element of said turbulence and pocketing of over spray. Both moving air and stagnant air is free to travel behind and in front of cabinet body 1, guarding against said turbulence or pocketing of dust and overspray. Space between cabinet body 1 and wall 42 is created by a combination of protrusion flange 1a in cabinet body 1 combined with extension from the wall by mounting bracket 17, more specifically support and extension flange 18a. A certain gap/space will still exist with or without the combination of said extension flange 18a and extension caused by said mounting bracket 17, although the combination of the two provide for the lengthiest gap of approximately ¾″. Other widths of gaps, larger or smaller, are suitable. Protrusion flange 1a of a 45° angle creates a ½″ distance between cabinet body 1 and wall 42, forcing main body 1h to be further away from wall 42 by ½″. FIG. 4 depicts the distance of cabinet body 1 from wall 42 created by a combination of protrusion flange 1a and mounting bracket 17 support and extension flange 18a. Mounting bracket 17 further extends cabinet body 1 distance from wall 42 by at least ¼″ due to the ¼″ length of support and extension flange 18a, as shown on FIGS. 15 and 17. The overall preferred distance of cabinet body 1 is ¾% (not including certain portions of main body 1) although a variations of distances closer or further from wall 42 may also be adequate.

Due to space confinements in a spray booth, spray gun hangers 6 &7 attach directly to cabinet body 1 at flat flange section 1b for added convenience and central storage ability for the user. Upper and lower gun hangers 6 &7 affix to the rear of the main body 1h at desired gun hanger positioning screw holes 1d. The gun hanger pressed-in (pem) nuts 9 are positioned at screw holes 1d, and fastened by screws 10 through flat flange 1b. The distance of spray gun position 6b in relation to upper ledge 1f or lower ledge 1g depends on the group of (four) gun hanger positioning/screw holes 1d used. Each user may find a particular height setting is desirable for the gun hangers 6 &7. Factors that could influence a user's preference are the user's height, reach, or purpose for using the device. Other factors that may force a certain setting to be used are various obstructions within the mounting area.

Alternative Embodiments: FIGS. 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33 and 34

There are various styles of this invention that are used. FIGS. 19 and 20 depicts a wall mounted style enclosure that hangs against the straight side of a wall 42, (not utilizing a corner sections of a wall 42). This embodiment comprises alternative mounting methods. Method one comprises of a plurality of powerful magnets 40. Said magnets 40 are riveted to the rear of cabinet body 27 in mounting magnet holes 29. Magnetic mounting allows the user to move the alternative embodiment style cabinet to any location in a sheet metal walled spray booth. Mounting method two comprises a system of mounting hooks shown in FIGS. 30, 31 and 32. The mounting hook system associated with alternative embodiment style comprises a plurality of mounting bracket collars 38, mounting bracket studs 39 and mounting hook holes 30 at main body 27. Mounting hook holes shaped as two circles of different sizes combined atop one another to a degree. The larger circle below and smaller circle above, combine together to create an entering hole below, and setting location for proper and stabile resting of cabinet body 27 on mounting bracket collar 38.

Both said mounting methods create similar air space between cabinet main body 27 and said booth wall 42 as described in the preferred embodiment. Said air space allows the said air flow within said spray booth to move, thus eliminating the possibility of said air turbulence or said pocketing of said over spray, in the same context as the preferred embodiment.

Cabinet body 27 similarly attaches a pair of spray gun hangers 35, of specific design to be relative with the preferred design. Difference among spray gun hangers 35 of alternative embodiment in comparison to spray gun hangers 6 &7 of preferred embodiment is primarily the overall shape of a 90° angle, the smaller size in comparison, and alternative holds just one spray gun per bracket instead of the preferred embodiment, which holds two guns per spray gun hanger 6 or 7. The alternative embodiment's gun hangers 35 also include the identical style of edge guard 8. The gun hangers 35 are bolted to the side of the cabinet body 27, in position at gun hanger holes 34, by use of nut 5c and bolt 5d. They may also be riveted or welded to cabinet body 27.

Alternative embodiment, similar to preferred body, includes two tape hooks 11 and two item holding magnets 23. The purpose of these items is the same as in the preferred embodiment.

Alternative embodiment body style shown in FIGS. 19 and 20 shows two doors, an upper door 36 and a lower door 37. Each door covers a separate compartment. The separation of compartments is due to upper shelf 32, riveted in to place. Body style of main body 27 comprises a sloped upper section. Said slope creates an added improvement to said air flow around the cabinet, in combination with said gap between cabinet and wall 42 due to ½″ thickness of mounting magnet, or ½″ length of mounting bracket collar 38. Air will have less tendency to pocket and swirl (turbulence) due to said slope top as shown in FIG. 33. Upper door 36 closes on body in slope shape due to body 27 overall shape. Door 36 is not sloped though body 27 is cut in this fashion as shown on FIG. 20.

Door 36 and 37 are attached to cabinet body 27 by piano hinge type hinges 36a and 37a. Four rivets are used to connect each door 36 and 37 to its hinge 36a and 37a. Other methods of attachment can be used such as varying amounts of rivets, or fasteners, or welding/spot welding.

FIGS. 27, 28 and 29 depict a second alternative embodiment design such as to the effect of a reversal of the preferred embodiment as described, but including most of the same functions. This is a type of double shelf bracket with an optional enclosure attached to it. Main rear body 44a comprising an upper spray gun flange 43, lower vented shelf 44 and builds out no enclosure as its main structure, but suspends a separated storage box, much like a recipe box, held by wire at hanging holes 46, flanged from lower vented shelf 44. Alternative embodiment is formed of sheet metal, but can also be made of other materials such as plastic or wood. As FIG. 27 shows, spray gun positions 6b are above, and vented shelf 44 is below. Main rear body 44a is mounted similarly as is the above described alternative embodiment, by use of a plurality of powerful magnets or embodiment can be bolted to said wall 42 by said mounting bracket collar 38 and mounting bracket stud 39.

Spray gun hanger positions 6b have identical spray gun roll flange 6c and edge guard 8 for holding and protecting spray guns. One tape hook 11 is attached in an identical procedure with tape hook holes 1e. More tape hooks 11 may also be used, primarily in other similar designs or sizes of this type of embodiment.

Item holding magnet 23 is included with embodiment. Magnet 23 can be moved anywhere within embodiment for storage of certain items.

CONCLUSION, RAMIFICATIONS, AND SCOPE

Accordingly, the reader will see that a paint booth cabinet and brackets of the types described will improve the painting atmosphere and productivity for a painter within a spray booth environment. The design, mounting methods, brackets, and attachments create a system for the user that the invention is intended to perform.

    • It permits itself to be placed in a spray booth without the fear of causing air turbulence or pocketing of over spray due to the body design and mounting brackets, magnets, or hooks
    • It permit the user to remove the unit with ease at any time due to the mounting designs that restrict permanent mounting due to the mounting brackets, magnets, or hooks
    • It provides tape hook(s) for holding tape upright within the enclosure or main embodiment
    • It provides special bracketing for holding sandpaper, or other paper type goods, in place for neater and safer organization.

It provides an attached, and adjustable, place for setting spray guns with the main embodiment. Special protection to spray guns is met by the edge guard that is equipped with the spray gun hangers

    • It provides multiple sections or compartments within its enclosure design for storage of various types of items.

Although the description above contains many specificities, these should not be construed as limiting the scope of the invention but as merely providing illustrations of some of the presently preferred embodiments of this invention. For example, the enclosure portion can have other shapes and sizes such as square, circular, size differences etc. The attachment to the wall can be in other forms such as with magnets or mounting hooks and brackets of other designs such as z channel, hooks and many other forms etc.

Thus the scope of the invention should be determined by the appended claims and their legal equivalents, rather than by the examples given.