Title:
Child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag is both a sleeping bag in an open configuration and a tote bag in a closed configuration. The sleeping bag comprises a cover blanket that is fixed to a base blanket and a pillow that is integrated into the base blanket. A main pocket is disposed at the pillow end of the base blanket, the base blanket and cover blanket being folded into the main pocket in the tote bag configuration, the main pocket being inverted to the rear side of the base blanket, exposing the pillow, in the sleeping bag configuration. Elastic straps disposed on the rear side of the base blanket are used in conjunction with the main pocket to attach the sleeping bag to a nap mat, if desired. A shoulder strap is provided for carrying the bag in the tote bag configuration. An accessory pocket is also provided for carrying drink bottles, diapers, etc.



Inventors:
Botera, Jose A. (Tamarac, FL, US)
Camelo, Maria Lucia (Tamarac, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/055053
Publication Date:
08/18/2005
Filing Date:
02/11/2005
Assignee:
BOTERA JOSE A.
CAMELO MARIA L.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A45F4/08; A47G9/08; A45C5/06; A45F3/02; (IPC1-7): A47G9/08
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LIU, JONATHAN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Richard C. Litman (Alexandria, VA, US)
Claims:
1. A child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag, comprising: a base blanket having a front side and a rear side; a cover blanket joined to the base blanket along a common edge so that the cover blanket is foldable over the front side of the base blanket to form the sleeping bag; a main pocket disposed at one end of the base blanket, the main pocket lying against the front side in a tote bag configuration and being inverted to lie against the rear side in a sleeping bag configuration, the cover blanket and a portion of the base blanket extending from the main pocket being folded over and stored in the main pocket in the tote bag configuration; a shoulder strap attached to the rear side of the base blanket for carrying over the shoulder in the tote bag configuration; and a pair of elastic straps disposed diagonally across opposing corners of the rear side of the base blanket, whereby the base blanket is adapted for attachment to a nap mat with one end of the nap mat being received in the main pocket and an opposite end of the nap mat being inserted beneath the elastic straps.

2. The sleeping bag according to claim 1, wherein the base blanket has a width of about nineteen and a length of forty-five inches.

3. The sleeping bag according to claim 1, wherein the cover blanket has a width of about twenty-two inches and a length of about thirty-six and a half inches.

4. The sleeping bag according to claim 1, wherein the base blanket is made from a flame retardant material.

5. The sleeping bag according to claim 4, wherein the flame retardant material is 100% woven microdenier polyester.

6. The sleeping bag according to claim 1, wherein the cover blanket is made from a flame retardant material.

7. The sleeping bag according to claim 6, wherein the flame retardant material is 100% woven microdenier polyester.

8. A child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag, comprising: a base blanket made from a top layer of fabric joined to a bottom layer of fabric about respective peripheries of the layers, the top layer defining a front side and the bottom layer defining a rear side of the base blanket; a pillow formed between the top layer and the bottom layer at one end of the base blanket; a cover blanket joined to the base blanket along a common edge so that the cover blanket is foldable over the front side of the base blanket to form the sleeping bag; a main pocket disposed at the pillow end of the base blanket, the main pocket lying over the pillow on the front side in a tote bag configuration and being inverted to lie against the rear side in a sleeping bag configuration, the cover blanket and a portion of the base blanket extending from the main pocket being folded over and stored in the main pocket in the tote bag configuration; and a shoulder strap attached to the rear side of the base blanket for carrying over the shoulder in the tote bag configuration.

9. The sleeping bag according to claim 8, wherein the base blanket has a width of about nineteen and a length of forty-five inches.

10. The sleeping bag according to claim 9, wherein the cover blanket has a width of about twenty-two inches and a length of about thirty-six and a half inches, the cover blanket extending to about the middle of the pillow.

11. The sleeping bag according to claim 8, wherein the base blanket is made from a flame retardant material.

12. The sleeping bag according to claim 11, wherein the flame retardant material is 100% woven microdenier polyester.

13. The sleeping bag according to claim 8, wherein the cover blanket is made from a flame retardant material.

14. The sleeping bag according to claim 13, wherein the flame retardant material is 100% woven microdenier polyester.

15. The sleeping bag according to claim 1, wherein a portion of the common edge disposed adjacent the pillow is left unconnected.

16. A child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag, comprising: a base blanket having a front side and a rear side; a cover blanket joined to the base blanket along a common edge so that the cover blanket is foldable over the front side of the base blanket to form the sleeping bag; a main pocket disposed at one end of the base blanket, the main pocket lying against the front side in a tote bag configuration and being inverted to lie against the rear side in a sleeping bag configuration, the cover blanket and a portion of the base blanket extending from the main pocket being folded over and stored in the main pocket in the tote bag configuration; a shoulder strap attached to the rear side of the base blanket for carrying over the shoulder in the tote bag configuration; mating patches of hook and loop fastening material disposed on the rear side of the base blanket and the main pocket, respectively, in order to retain the cover blanket and the base blanket in the main pocket in the tote bag configuration; and an accessory pocket disposed on the rear side of the base blanket, the accessory pocket being exposed exteriorly for carrying accessory items in the tote bag configuration, the accessory pocket being covered by the main pocket when the main pocket is inverted into the sleeping bag configuration.

17. The sleeping bag according to claim 16, wherein the base blanket has a width of about nineteen and a length of forty-five inches.

18. The sleeping bag according to claim 16, wherein the cover blanket has a width of about twenty-two inches and a length of about thirty-six and a half inches.

19. The sleeping bag according to claim 16, wherein the base blanket is made from a flame retardant material.

20. The sleeping bag according to claim 16, further comprising a pair of elastic straps disposed diagonally across opposing corners of the rear side of the base blanket, whereby the base blanket is adapted for attachment to a nap mat with one end of the nap mat being received in the inverted main pocket and an opposite end of the nap mat being inserted beneath the elastic straps.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/544,495, filed Feb. 17, 2004.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to children's bedding, and more particularly to a child's sleeping bag for toddlers that is convertible into a tote bag or shoulder bag for convenient and easy transport and storage.

2. Description of the Related Art

Providing children with a clean, comfortable place to sleep away from home is a common concern for caregivers. For example, children enrolled in nursery schools or day care often are requested to bring their own sleeping supplies with them. Having to transport a child's necessities can be a burden especially if it involves a number of separate items. For example, in order to provide the child with sleeping supplies, the caregiver must remember to bring at least two blankets and a pillow. A problem associated with bringing separate items is that they can become easily misplaced. Also, although it is important to have the right items, space is an important factor considered by caregivers. Carrying bulky items makes it difficult for the caregiver to easily transport the child and their necessities when on the go. As an added feature, it would be ideal if the sleeping supplies were compatible with nap mats that are normally provided by the school or day care facility. Therefore, a sleeping device that has inseparable parts, that can be folded into a useful compact carrying bag, and that can be used in conjunction with school or day care facilities is desired.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,105,188, issued to Perez-Mesa et al. on Aug. 22, 2000, describes a nap-sac carrying pouch and child sleeping system. The system includes a base blanket and a cover blanket, which can be folded and stored in a carrying pouch. U.S. Pat. No. 2,788,533, issued to Bornstein on Apr. 16, 1957, describes a mattress that can be folded and releasably fastened by sliding clasp fasteners to form a bag-like carrying means. The bag can be utilized to carry other articles.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,404,600, issued to DeMars on Apr. 11, 1995, describes a combination sleeping/carry bag. The device in the extended form is a sleeping bag. In the retracted form, the sleeping bag is converted into a carrying bag having a shoulder strap. In the bag formation, compartments are disposed within the bag to permit valuables to be stored within the bag. An attachable pillow can be joined to the sleeping bag when in the extended position.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,477,552, issued to Goldman on Nov. 11, 1969, describes a combination mat and tote bag. The mat is made of flexible material and has a number of fold lines to fold the mat upon itself. Pockets are attached to central panels so the mat can be folded and stored within the pockets. Straps are provided to permit the user to carry the folded mat as a tote bag.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,188,988, issued to Agyagos on Feb. 19, 1980, describes a sheet assembly for use as a multipurpose tote bag. The sheet assembly comprises two panels of material that are sewn together into a mat. The mat can be folded in an overlapping manner into a tote bag and secured in position with zipper fasteners. Pockets are disposed on a front panel of the tote bag to hold valuables. The sheet assembly can also be converted into a ground cover, a rain shelter and a portable dressing closet.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,210,891, issued to Avital et al. on May 18, 1993, describes a portable foam mattress and accessory kit. The mattress is folded into a portable shoulder-carrying bag having pockets on the cover of the carrying bag to store personal items or valuables. Straps provided on the bag permit the bag to be carried on a user's shoulder.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,343,968, issued to Louie et al. on Feb. 5, 2002, describes a combined sleeping bag and backpack. The backpack is constructed in the form of a character head. Attached to the head is one end of the sleeping bag. When the sleeping bag is extended, the head is disposed above the sleeping bag. However, when the sleeping bag is in the folded configuration, the bag is folded and stored into a pouch within the head.

Several other backpacks have been described that use straps to configure the backpack into a sleeping bag or another article. U.S. Pat. No. 6,243,892, issued to Kelling on Jun. 12, 2001, describes a sleeping apparatus. The apparatus includes a pad and an attached sleeping bag. To convert the invention into a backpack, the sleeping bag is folded into the backpack configuration and the pad is folded around the backpack. A number of straps then hold the sleeping bag and pad in its backpack configuration.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,035,855, issued to Kim on Jul. 19, 1977, describes a camping pack. The pack comprises a sheet having four panels and flaps. Fasteners secure the flaps and panels together to form a tent or a sleeping bag. U.S. Pat. No. 748,288, issued to Klein on Dec. 29, 1903, describes a convertible knapsack, hammock and sleeping bag. The '288 device comprises a rectangular sheet that can be converted into the knapsack, the hammock and the sleeping bag configuration. Adjustable fasteners hold the sheet in its particular configuration. In one folded configuration, open pockets can be disposed between the folds to hold objects. Also the fasteners can be adjusted for use as shoulder straps to hold the folded sheet as a knapsack.

Articles that are transformable between a bag and a personal wearing garment and/or a sleeping bag are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,574,397, issued to Dennard on Mar. 11, 1986 (an article used as a garment, a sleeping bag and a carrying bag); U.S. Pat. No. 6,061,831, issued to Rudolph et al. on May 16, 2000 (an article convertible into a coat, a sleeping bag or a backpack); U.S. Pat. No. 6,393,637, issued to Hoffman on May 28, 2002 (multipurpose article transformable into a personal cover or a sleeping bag); U.S. Pat. No. 6,421,834, issued to Kester on Jul. 23, 2002 (clothing convertible between a jacket and a backpack and which houses a tent); U.S. Pat. No. 5,815,833, issued to Kuo on Oct. 6, 1998 (an article convertible into a sleeping bag, a jacket and a carrying bag); and European Patent Number EP 933,031 published on Aug. 4, 1999 (an article convertible into a sleeping bag, a jacket and a carrying bag).

Blankets transformable into other configurations are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,381,306 issued to Innes on May 7, 1968 and British Patent Number 654,087 published on Jun. 6, 1951. A method for constructing a reversible duffle bag is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,047,001, issued to Willis on Sep. 10, 1991. A child carrier and protector is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,923,104, issued to Rice et al. on May 8, 1990 (the carrier can be used as a knapsack to carry possessions when not holding a child).

None of the above inventions and patents, taken either singly or in combination, is seen to describe the instant invention as claimed. Thus a child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag solving the aforementioned problems is desired.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag is both a sleeping bag in an open configuration and a tote bag or shoulder bag in a closed configuration. The sleeping bag has a cover blanket that is fixed to a base blanket and folds over a child lying on the base blanket. A pillow is integrated into the base blanket. A main pocket is provided at the pillow end of the base blanket into which the cover blanket and base blanket are folded to form the tote bag. A shoulder strap and an accessory pocket are attached to the bottom side of the base blanket. A pair of straps are disposed on the corners of the back side of the base blanket so that the sleeping bag can be attached to a conventional foam nap mat by inserting one end of the nap mat into the main pocket beneath the pillow and inserting the opposite end of the mat beneath the pair of straps.

In use, a busy mother or other caregiver can carry the child's sleeping bag over the shoulder using the shoulder strap, the sleeping bag being folded into the tote bag configuration. The main pocket is maintained in a closed position by mating strips or patches of hook and loop fastening material. The accessory pocket is available for carrying articles that may be needed by the child, such as a spare diaper, a sippy drink bottle, etc. When use as a sleeping bag is desired, the main pocket is unfastened and the blankets are folded out from the main pocket. The sleeping bag may be attached to a nap mat, if desired or available. The child lies on the bag, resting his or her head on the pillow, and the cover blanket attached to one side of the base blanket is folded over the child's body. Hence, the child's sleeping bag includes everything needed for making the child comfortable for a nap in one integrated package that is convertible to a tote bag for convenient transport and storage.

These and other features of the present invention will become readily apparent upon consideration of the following specification and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an environmental, perspective view of a child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag according to the present invention, shown in a tote bag configuration.

FIG. 2A is a perspective view of the child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag according to the present invention, shown in a tote bag configuration.

FIG. 2B is a perspective view of the child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag according to the present invention, shown on the opposite side from FIG. 2A, the main pocket being unfastened.

FIG. 3A is a perspective view of a child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag according to the present invention, the blankets shown in the process of being unfolded from the main pocket.

FIG. 3B is a perspective view of the child's sleeping bag according to the present invention, the cover blanket being unfolded and extended away from the base blanket and the main pocket in the process of being inverted to expose the pillow.

FIG. 3C is a perspective view of the rear side of the child's sleeping bag according to the present invention, showing the rear surface of the sleeping bag when unfolded for use as a sleeping bag.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the rear side of the child's sleeping bag according to the present invention, shown in a sleeping bag configuration with a nap mat exploded above the rear surface of the sleeping bag.

FIG. 5 is an environmental, perspective view of the child's sleeping bag according to the present invention, shown in a sleeping bag configuration with a child lying within the sleeping bag.

FIG. 6A is a is a perspective view of the child's sleeping bag according to the present invention, showing the first step in converting the sleeping bag to the tote bag configuration.

FIG. 6B is a perspective view of the child's sleeping bag according to the present invention, shown in the process of being folded into the tote bag configuration.

FIG. 6C is a perspective view of the child's sleeping bag according to the present invention, shown in a later stage of being folded into the tote bag configuration.

FIG. 6D is a perspective view of the child's sleeping bag according to the present invention, shown with the blankets in the process of being folded into the main pocket.

Similar reference characters denote corresponding features consistently throughout the attached drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The present invention is a child's sleeping bag convertible into a tote bag, designated generally as 20 in the drawings. FIGS. 1, 2A and 2B show the bag 20 of the present invention configured as a tote bag 20 or shoulder bag. A strap 22 is attached to the bag 20, which permits carrying the bag 20 over the shoulder, as shown in FIG. 1. An accessory pocket 24 is provided for carrying a spare diaper C, a child's drink bottle B, or other small items. An identification label 26 is disposed on the pocket 24, providing space for the user to designate ownership.

As shown in FIG. 2B, the main pocket 30, which contains the blankets forming the body of the sleeping bag when the bag 20 is folded into the tote bag configuration, has mating fasteners 32, 33 which keep the main pocket 30 closed in the tote bag configuration. The fasteners 32, 33 preferably comprise mating strips or patches of hook and loop fastening material, which provide for quick and easy closure of the main pocket 30. Hook and loop fastening material has been found preferable to snaps, buttons, buckles, clasps, or other such fasteners, which may cause the child discomfort while lying on the sleeping bag, although such fasteners may be used, if desired.

Referring to FIGS. 3A-3C, 4 and 5, the bag 20 comprises a base blanket 42 and a cover blanket 50 permanently joined to each other along a common edge by sewing an edge of the cover blanket 50 to an edge of the base blanket 42. As shown in FIG. 4, the cover blanket 50 folds away from the base blanket 42, three sides of the cover blanket 50 being unattached to the base blanket 42. The base blanket 42 is rectangular, having a front side 46 forming a sleeping surface upon which the child lies while sleeping, and an opposite rear side 47 adapted for placement on a floor or attachment to a nap mat, as described below. The front side 46 is formed by a top layer of material and the rear side 47 is formed by a bottom layer of material, the two layers being sewn together about their periphery, but otherwise slidable with respect to each other. A third layer of material is sewn between the top and bottom layers at the head end of the bag 20 to form a pillow 60, providing a cushion for the toddler's head. Both the top layer and the bottom layer of material forming the base blanket 42 are made from a machine washable, flame retardant material, such as 100% woven microdenier polyester. The 100% woven microdenier polyester meets international requirements of quality control such as National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 701 fire retardant standards and Federal Air Regulation (FAR) 25,853 flammability requirements. The base blanket 42 preferably measures about nineteen inches by forty-five inches.

The top layer forming the front side 46 may have a different color and/or a different appearance from the bottom layer forming the rear side 47, e.g., the top layer may have a quilted appearance, as shown in the drawings. Accessory pocket 24 is sewn to the rear side 47 of the bag, beneath the pillow 60, providing further cushioning for the child's head. A rectangular piece of fabric 44 made from the same material as the top layer of the base blanket 42 is sewn around three edges of the base blanket 42 at the head end of the blanket 42, forming the main pocket 30. The main pocket 30 is inverted to lie against the rear side 47 of the base blanket 42 beneath the pillow 60 when the bag 20 is in the sleeping bag configuration, as shown in FIGS. 3C and 4. Fastener 33 is sewn to the face of the main pocket 30 adjacent the free edge, and fastener 32 is sewn to the rear side 47 of the base blanket 42. Strap 22 has its ends sewn to the rear side 47 between fasteners 32 and 33. Strap 22 may be made from nylon webbing or similar material.

Main pocket 30 is preferably about ten to eleven inches deep when the base blanket 42 measures nineteen inches by forty-five inches. Accessory pocket 24 is preferably about eight to nine inches deep. These measurements will vary proportionally when the dimensions of the base blanket are larger or smaller.

A pair of elastic straps 36 and 38 extend diagonally across the lower corners of the base blanket 42, as shown in FIGS. 3C and 4, the straps 36 and 38 having their ends sewn to the side edges of the base blanket 42. Elastic straps 36 and 38 are used in conjunction with main pocket 30 to attach the sleeping bag 30 to a nap mat 70 frequently provided by nursery schools, day care centers, and other child care facilities. A typical nap mat 70 is a flame retardant vinyl pad, which is about ⅝″ thick and about 19″ wide and 45″ long. The base blanket 42 may be made in appropriate dimensions to accommodate nap mats which have different dimensions than those recited here for a typical nap mat. The bag 20 is attached to the nap mat 70 by placing one end of the nap mat 70 into the inverted main pocket 30 and inserting the corners of the opposite end of the nap mat 70 through elastic straps 36 and 38.

As shown in FIGS. 3B and 5, the cover blanket 50 is both shorter and wider than the base blanket 42. In length, the cover blanket 50 is about six to eight inches shorter than the base blanket 42, preferably being about 36.5″ long when the base blanket is forty-five inches long, the bottom edge being about even with the bottom edge of the base blanket 42, the top edge extending to about the middle of the pillow 60. The base blanket 42 and the cover blanket 50 are attached together along a common edge, but not for the full length of the cover blanket 50. The upper portion of the cover blanket 50 is not attached to the base blanket 42 along the common edge for about the upper eight to ten inches of the cover blanket 50. In use, the child lies upon the base blanket 42 with the cover blanket 50 folded over the child's legs and torso. The cover blanket 50 is about two to four inches wider than the base blanket 42, preferably about twenty-two inches wide when the base blanket is nineteen inches wide, in order to extend fully over the child's torso. The upper portion of the cover blanket 50 may be folded down under the toddler's shoulder, as shown in FIG. 5, or fully extended to cover the shoulder for additional warmth, as desired. The cover blanket 50 is also preferably made from 100% woven microdenier polyester, although a different fabric from the base blanket 42 may be used, if desired.

FIGS. 3A-3C show the bag 20 being converted from the tote bag configuration into a sleeping bag configuration. Fasteners 32 and 33 are unfastened to open the main pocket 30, and the cover blanket 50 and bottom portion of the base blanket 42 are removed from the main pocket and unfolded, as shown in FIG. 3A. The main pocket 30 is inverted, as shown in FIG. 3B, so that the main pocket 30 is on the rear side 47 of the base blanket 42, together with strap 22, fasteners 32 and 33, and elastic straps 36 and 38, as shown in FIG. 3C. The bag 20 may be attached to a nap mat 70, as indicated in FIG. 4 and described above. The child may recline on the front side 46 of the base blanket 42, covered by the cover blanket 50, as shown in FIG. 5.

FIGS. 6A-6D illustrate the process of converting the bag 20 from the sleeping bag configuration to the tote bag configuration. The main pocket 30 is inverted to its original configuration, in which pocket material 44 lies against the front side 46 and main pocket 30 opens at the front side 46 of the base blanket 42. The cover blanket 50 is folded over the base blanket 42, the extended width of the cover blanket 50 being folded back atop the base blanket 42, as shown in FIGS. 6A-6B. The bottom of the bag 20 is folded twice towards the main pocket 30, as shown in FIGS. 6B and 6C, and then folded a third time into the main pocket 30, as indicated in FIG. 6D. The fasteners 32 and 33 may then be secured to retain the blankets in the main pocket 30, the strap 22 and accessory pocket 24 now being disposed exteriorly, placing the bag 20 in the tote bag configuration of FIGS. 1 and 2A-2B.

The sleeping bag of the present invention is designed for use with toddlers between the ages of six months and five years. By being easily converted into a tote bag that can be carried over the shoulder, the present invention provides the busy mother or child care giver with a convenient and easy way to carry and transport all sleeping care needs in one integral package when taking his or her child to a nursery school, day care center, or other temporary care facility where naps are part of the daily routine.

It is to be understood that the present invention is not limited to the embodiment described above, but encompasses any and all embodiments within the scope of the following claims.