Title:
Bowler's Finger Support
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A bowler's finger support encloses a middle finger used in the release of the ball and applies a radially inward compressive force substantially to the underside of the finger to resist the hyperextending force produced on release of the ball.



Inventors:
Addington II, Robert W. (Melbourne Beach, FL, US)
Application Number:
10/906201
Publication Date:
08/11/2005
Filing Date:
02/08/2005
Assignee:
ADDINGTON W. R.II
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A61F5/01; A63B69/00; A63B71/14; A63D5/00; (IPC1-7): A63D5/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
PIERCE, WILLIAM M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JOEL I. ROSENBLATT (Marietta, GA, US)
Claims:
1. A finger clamp for applying a compressive force against hyper-extension of a middle finger used in the release of a a bowling ball, comprising, a first means for enclosing a part of a finger; said first means including second means for applying a force to first means and including a radial force toward said finger; said second means including third means for holding said force from said second means, in place against said finger and directing substantially all of the force from said second means against the underside of said finger.

2. The finger clamp of claim 1, wherein said second means includes fourth means for wrapping said second means against said first means.

3. The finger clamp of claim 1, wherein, second means includes means for attaching said second means to said first means.

4. The finger clamp of claim 1, wherein said second means includes means for applying a compressive force.

5. The finger clamp of claim 1, wherein said fourth means includes fifth means for reversing the wrapping direction of said second means.

6. The finger clamp of claim 1, wherein said second means includes means for applying a force against said finger for holding the muscles or ligaments of said finger, in place against a hyper-extending force from the release of a bowling ball.

7. The finger claimp of claim 5, wherein said means for applying a force includes means for applying a force against a hyper-extending force from the release of a bowling ball.

8. The finger clamp of claim 4, wherein said means for applying a compressive force, includes means for applying approximately substantially all said compressive force against the underside of said finger.

9. A finger clamp for applying a compressive force to the underside of a bowler's finger to prevent hyper-extension in the release of a bowling ball, comprising, a tube shaped finger enclosurer; a wrapping sheet attached to said tube shaped enclosure; a fixture attached to said tube; said fixture forming an opening with said tube for passing said wrapping sheet there through; a first fastener and a second fastener, located on said wrapping sheet and displaced to be opposed and to cooperate, when said wrapping sheet is passed through said fixture and reversed in direction, to double said wrapping sheet back upon itself.

10. The finger clamp of claim 9, wherein said opening formed by said fixture includes as a side, at least part of the surface of said tube.

11. The finger clamp of claim 10, wherein said fixture is displaced on said tube to locate said wrapping sheet substantially around underside of said finger.

12. The finger clamp of claim 9, wherein, said fixture is displaced on said tube to locate said wrapping sheet whne doubled back upon itself to substantially be opposed to the underside of said finger and to apply a compressive force to the underside of said finger.

13. A method for applying a force to the underside of a bowler's middle finger to prevent hyper-extension in the release of the ball, comprising the steps of, enclosing a finger, applying a compressive force against the underside of a finger, to hold the muscles or tendons of said finger against a hyper-extending force from the release of the ball; and holding said compressive force, in place against the underside of said finger to resist stretching of the ligaments or muscles in said finger.

14. The method of claim 13, wherein said step of applying said compressive force includes the step of wrapping said finger substantially about the underside of said finger.

15. The method of claim 14, wherein said step of wrapping includes the step of wrapping said underside of said finger and reversing the direction of said wrapping to double said wrapping upon itself.

16. The method of claim 16, wherein said step of holding said compressive force, includes the step of using cooperating fasteners and displacing said cooperating fastener opposed to each other by said step reversing said direction of said wrapping.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

In order for a bowler to have the greatest advantage in his attempt to consistently score the maximum number of pins, the bowling ball is released from one or more of the middle fingers by applying pressure to ball through the bowling ball finger holes in a complex motion known to those skilled in the art as lift. Lift, as known in bowling and as shown for example in U.S. Pat. No. 4,371,163 of Shaffer, means imparting to the ball the two rotary motions of roll and spin. To achieve roll, the ball is made to rotate in a forward and downward direction relative to the horizontal axis along the direction of travel of the ball toward the pins and to achieve spin, the ball is made to rotate with a rotational component about the vertical axis of the ball, as viewed from above a ball thrown with the right hand. It is the spin that causes a desired scattering of the falling pins, increasing the chance for a strike.

As stated above, this complex motion of imparting two rotary motions of roll and spin is known to those skilled in the art as lift. Lift is produced, after the thumb has been removed from the ball, by one or more of the middle fingers applying a force to the ball at its release to rotate the ball upward, imparting the desired roll and spin. To perform this operation in the best manner requires the bowler, in releasing the ball, to consistently apply his maximum force through one or more of the bowler's middle fingers, against the interior surface of the bowling ball finger hole. In bowling, this operation is repeated from a minimum of twelve for a perfect game, to a maximum of twenty one times, depending on the bowler's success in scoring a strike or spare in the last regular frame. Multiplied by a number of games, for example in league play, there is typically three full games with a minimum of thirty six ball released to a maximum of sixty three balls released. The multiplied acts of bowling, involving lifting the ball on its release, produces multiple strains and stresses on the bowler's finger. Critical to properly lifting and releasing the bowling ball, is maintaining the best possible positioning of the middle finger or fingers against the bowling ball hole, to consistently apply the proper amount of lift to the ball. As the hard surface of the bowling ball finger hole is continually forced against the bowler's extended finger, producing stress and irritation in the finger, the ability of the bowler to maintain consistent control through middle finger or fingers at the ball release, is reduced, detrimentally affecting the bowler's ability to consistently lift the ball and consistently score strikes.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

This invention according to its inventive principles, prevents or reduces the amount of physical stress suffered by a bowler is repeatedly lifting the ball at its release, from the force of the ball against the releasing fingers. Bowling is a game of repeated consistent physical motion, designed to use the physical structure of the bowler's hand to apply a force to the ball in a particular intended manner, with the counter forces against the bowler's fingers causing internal damage to the muscles and tendons of the fingers at the areas of most stress, as produced by those counter forces. As the proper release of the ball as explained above, requires the bowler to apply a driving force to the ball at its release, extending the releasing fingers to apply a force through the finger tips while absorbing the ball's counter force against the driving fingers, stress is produced in the tendons and muscles of the releasing fingers, from the palm to the finger tips, causing irritation and damage to the muscles, tendons and their connections to the bone.

This invention, according to its inventive principles, as disclosed in a preferred embodiment, operates to reduce or prevent the counter force produced in the release of the ball, from causing stress or strain, on the bowler's releasing finger and from irritating or damaging the finger's muscles and tendons. The invention as disclosed according to its inventive principles, uses a means to clamp or to apply pressure and force to the bottom of the fingers and to the muscles and tendons arranged along the bottom part of the finger from the finger tip to the palm. However the principles of the invention are not limited to the bottom of the finger or to the finger or to any other part of the hand, including the palm, as may be stress when placing the bowling ball into play.

The means, disclosed in a preferred embodiment as a clamp, may be disposed in a glove or disposed in separate respective clamps at selected locations on the bowler's finger or fingers, as the bowler may prefer. The clamp, as shown according to the disclosed inventive principles, and according to a preferred embodiment, uses a padded enclosure, shown for a preferred embodiment, as a tube sized to fit over the finger at a joint or between the joints. The material used in the clamp may be any commercially available material known or which becomes known, to reduce or prevent pressure points along the finger and under the clamp. However, as would be apparent to those skilled in the art, the clamp may be a sheet made to be wrapped around the finger and held in place in a fixed position.

The function of the clamp, as shown according to the disclosed inventive principles, is to apply pressure and a force to the muscles and tendons of the releasing fingers. The force produced on the muscles and tendons, reduces or prevents the counter force of the bowling ball in the hyper extended direction relative to the finger, from stretching the muscles or tendons, or from causing microscopic separation of the tendons from the bones, preserving the bowler's control and the bowlers ability to repeatedly use the releasing fingers to accurately control the ball.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1. shows the invention according to a preferred embodiment, in its clamped position, as used on the finger of a bowler, which would be inserted into the finger hole of a bowling ball and used for release of the ball.

FIG. 2. shows, in a perspective view, the invention according to a preferred embodiment, off the bowler's finger.

FIG. 3. shows the invention, as shown according to the disclosed inventive principles, in FIG. 2, in a side view.

FIG. 4. shows the invention, as shown according to the disclosed inventive principles, in its clamped position as it would be used on a bowler's finger.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The clamp is shown in a position on a bowler's finger, generally by numeral 11, as used according to the disclosed inventive principles, in a preferred embodiment, on a bowler's middle finger 13 and between the first and second joints, 17, 15, proximate the finger tip 19. The finger tip 19 is shown placed for insertion into the finger hole 21 of bowling ball 23. The invention, shown as clamp 25 includes a tube section 27, sides or edges 14 and 16, which surrounds the middle finger 13 at the location as may be placed by the bowler. As would be apparent to those skilled in the art, the clamp 25 may include a wrapping sheet 29, which is wrapped around the middle finger 13, finger and held in place over the tube section 27, and as further shown and described with reference to FIG. 2. Tube section 27 is shown with an inner surface 30 and an outer surface 28. The clamp 25 includes a wrapping section 29 which is shown in a preferred embodiment, passed under the fixture 31 used to change the direction of the holding part 33 of the wrapping section 29, where it is folded back on the wrapping section 29. The holding part 33 includes on its hidden side, a fastener, 37b for example, as used in the preferred embodiment, VELRO, which connects with a matching VELCRO surface 37a on the wrapping section 29 and which is hidden in this FIG. 1 and shown in FIG. 2. As would be known and understood by those skilled in the art, the invention, the inventive principles are not limited to the use of a VELCRO fastener but any suitable fastening means, now known or as may be known in the future, may be used.

37a, 37b,

In operation, the finger 13 is placed in the clamp tube section 27 or if the clamp is in a sheet form, a disclosed with reference to FIG. 3, the clamp tube in sheet form 27, is wrapped around the finger 13 to form a tube in the form as shown by numeral 27. The wrapping section 29 is then pulled through bracket 31 and wrapped around tube section 27 applying pressure and in a preferred embodiment, a force to the underside of the finger 13 as shown by arrow 35. However, as would be known and understood by those skilled in the art, the clamp 25, may be positioned on the finger to apply a force to another location on the finger 13 or apply a force axially along the finger at any location from the finger tip 19 to the end of the finger 13.

The wrapping section 29 as shown in a preferred embodiment, is passed under the fixture 31 and between the fixture 31 and the part of the tube section 27 shown by numeral 41, to change its direction so it forms a new section identified herein as holding part 33, which folds backwards on wrapping section 29. The holding part 33 and the wrapping section 29 each include cooperative fastening sections for fastening holding part 33 to wrapping section 29 and holding the clamp 25 amd the force it exerts on tube section 27, in place relative to in its intended position on or against the finger 13. However, as would be known and understood by those skilled in the art, the clamp 25 may be used without the fixture 31, and the wrapping section 29 may be fastened on the opposite side of the tube section 29, which is not shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 2, shows the clamp 25 in an open perspective view, off the finger 13 and as it would appear to a bowler, in the process of applying to the finger 13. The wrapping section 29 is shown attached to the tube part 27 at the location on the tube section 27 shown by numeral 32. As known to those skilled in the art, wrapping section 29 may be attached by any suitable means now or hereafter known. In a preferred embodiment, the wrapping section 29 is stitched to the tube part 27. Fastening surfaces 37a and 37b are shown with surface 37b shown in phantom in a preferred embodiment where the wrapping section 29 is passed though fixture 31 to form holding part 33 (not shown in this FIG. 2), which folds back wrapping section 29 on itself forming holding section 33, where the fastening surfaces 37a and 37b are thereupon disposed opposite for an operative union fastening the holding part to the wrapping section and securing the clamp 25 in place on the finger 13 with the intended force and pressure applied to the finger 13 at a desired location applied by the wrapping section 29. The fastening surfaces in a preferred embodiment are matching VELCRO surfaces but may be any other suitable fastener as now or hereafter known,

In FIG. 3, is shown the clamp 25 as shown in FIG. 2, and shown in a side view.

The area of stitching 41 is shown in a preferred embodiment for attaching the wrapping section 29 to the tube section 27. An enhanced section 39 is shown placed in the tube section 27 to provide more padding at an intended area on the finger 13 where the most force and stress on the finger ligaments, muscles, and tendons, may be expected. As would be known to those skilled in the art, the tube section may be configured with or without an enhanced section 39 or with an enhanced section at any suitable location in the claim 25.

As shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 3, the clamp 25 may be formed in a sheet for example by cutting the tube section 27 at line 43-43a. As would be known to one skilled in the art, material may be added as shown by material piece 45 shown in phantom to add reinforcing.

FIG. 4, shows the clamp 25 in a preferred embodiment according to the disclosed principles of the invention, in its closed position with the holding part 33 folded back on wrapping section 29 and with the fastening sections 37a and 37b, in opposed and engaged position.