Title:
Ridge hook
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present ridge hook is capable of being used to secure a ladder to a roof. When installing or replacing a ridge cap, the present ridge hook provides necessary clearance between the ridge hook, the attached ladder, and the ridge cap. An arcuate portion is formed along the ridge hook. A second arcuate portion end of the arcuate portion attaches to a first linear portion end of a linear portion forming an obtuse angle {acute over (α)}. A second linear portion end of the linear portion attaches to a hook portion at a proximal end of the ridge hook. The ridge hook permits the installation, repair, and replacement of a ridge cap.



Inventors:
Young Jr., Gary G. (Franconia, NH, US)
Young, Miranda B. (Franconia, NH, US)
Application Number:
11/046076
Publication Date:
08/04/2005
Filing Date:
01/28/2005
Assignee:
YOUNG GARY G.JR.
YOUNG MIRANDA B.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04D15/00; E04G1/36; E06C1/36; E06C7/48; (IPC1-7): E04G1/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
CHAVCHAVADZE, COLLEEN MARGARET
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
SHEEHAN PHINNEY BASS & GREEN, PA (MANCHESTER, NH, US)
Claims:
1. A ridge hook, comprising: an arcuate portion having a first arcuate portion end and a second arcuate portion end; a linear portion having a first linear portion end and a second linear portion end where the first linear portion end is coupled to the second arcuate portion end at an obtuse angle; and a hook portion coupled to the second linear portion end.

2. The ridge hook of claim 1, wherein the obtuse angle is between one hundred (100) degrees and one hundred seventy (170) degrees.

3. The ridge hook of claim 1, wherein the obtuse angle is between one hundred twenty (120) degrees and one hundred fifty (150) degrees.

4. The ridge hook of claim 1, wherein the obtuse angle is approximately one hundred thirty-five (135) degrees.

5. The ridge hook of claim 1, wherein the arcuate portion spans an arc of about one hundred eighty (180) degrees.

6. The ridge hook of claim 1, wherein the arcuate portion comprises an arc with a diameter of approximately fifteen (15) inches.

7. The ridge hook of claim 1, wherein the arcuate portion, the linear portion, and the hook portion are formed from a single piece of metal.

8. The ridge hook of claim 1, further comprising a bracket at the first arcuate portion end.

9. The ridge hook of claim 1, further comprising a bracket mounted on the linear portion angled toward the hook portion, whereby the hook portion and the bracket work in combination to clamp onto a ladder.

10. The ridge hook of claim 9, wherein the bracket is removably mounted to the linear portion.

11. A method of using a ridge hook to repair a ridge cap, said method comprising the steps of: placing a ridge hook on a ridge of a roof, said ridge hook comprising: an arcuate portion having a first arcuate portion end and a second arcuate portion end; a linear portion having a first linear portion end and a second linear portion end, wherein the first linear portion end is coupled to the second arcuate portion end at an obtuse angle; and a hook portion coupled to the second linear portion end, attaching a ladder to the ridge hook; and repairing the ridge cap.

12. The method of claim 11, wherein the step of repairing the ridge cap further comprises replacing the ridge cap.

13. The method of claim 11, further comprising the step of attaching a ladder to the hook portion.

14. The method of claim 11, further comprising the step of clamping a ladder to the ridge hook between the hook portion and a bracket.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to co-pending U.S. Provisional Application entitled, “Ridge Hook,” having Ser. No. 60/540,563, filed Jan. 30, 2004, which is entirely incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is generally related to ladder accessories, and more particularly is related to ridge hooks.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A ridge hook enables a user to secure a ladder on a roof while working thereon. Many roofs now employ a ventilation system that includes a vent running substantially the length of the roof at a top, or ridge, of the roof. This ridge vent is covered by a ridge cap to prevent rain, snow, and other elements, from entering the vent while allowing proper air circulation under the roof. When a user needs to gain access to the roof, for example to repair roofing shingles or replace a ridge cap, a ridge hook can be used to temporarily secure a ladder to the roof by placing the ridge hook over the roof ridge and ridge cap to contact an opposite roof surface.

Typically, the ridge hook attaches to the ladder by placing one rung of the ladder into a small hook shape on one end of the ridge hook, and securing the next higher rung of the ladder to the ridge hook with a bracket. The opposite end of the ridge hook has another hook designed to grip the ridge of the roof. To secure the ladder to the roof, the ridge hook is placed onto the ridge of the roof with the hook making contact with the ridge on the opposite side of the roof. However, when in use on a home with a ridge cap, the typical ridge hooks come into contact with the ridge cap, making it difficult to remove or replace the ridge cap.

FIG. 1 illustrates a ladder 5 with a typical ridge hook 10 attached and positioned on a ridge cap 15 of a roof 20. As can be seen in FIG. 1, the ridge hook 10 does not provide sufficient clearance to the ridge cap 15 to allow removal or installation of the ridge cap 15. In fact, the ridge hook 10 is supported by the ridge cap 15, which is unsafe because the ridge cap 15 is not built to receive a ridge hook 10 or support the weight of a user. Also, the short length of the ridge hook 10 causes the attached ladder 5 to interfere with the ridge cap 15, which further impedes the removal or installation of the ridge cap 15.

Thus, a heretofore unaddressed need exists in the industry to address the aforementioned deficiencies and inadequacies.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Embodiments of the present invention provide a ridge hook and method for securing a ladder to a roof when a user performs operations on the roof, for example, but not limited to, repairing roofing material or installing a ridge cap.

Briefly described, one embodiment of the ridge hook, among others, can be implemented as follows. The ridge hook has an arcuate portion, which includes a first arcuate portion end and a second arcuate portion end. A linear portion, which includes a first linear portion end and a second linear portion end, is coupled to the second arcuate portion end at the first linear portion end. The coupling is made at an obtuse angle. A hook portion may be coupled to the second linear portion end.

The present ridge hook can also be viewed as providing methods for securing a ladder to a roof to allow a user to perform operations on the roof, for example, but not limited to, installing or replacing a ridge cap. In this regard, one embodiment of such a method, among others, can be broadly summarized by the following steps: attaching the ridge hook to a rung of a ladder adjacent to a top rung of the ladder; securing the ridge hook to the top rung of the ladder; and positioning the ridge hook over a ridge of a roof to provide necessary clearance to a ridge cap.

Other systems, methods, features, and advantages of the present invention will be or become apparent to one with skill in the art upon examination of the following drawings and detailed description. It is intended that all such additional systems, methods, features, and advantages be included within this description, be within the scope of the present invention, and be protected by the accompanying claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Many aspects of the invention can be better understood with reference to the following drawings. The components in the drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon clearly illustrating the principles of the present invention. Moreover, in the drawings, like reference numerals designate corresponding parts throughout the several views.

FIG. 1 illustrates an example of a prior art ridge hook positioned on the ridge of a roof.

FIG. 2 is a side view of a ridge hook in accordance with a first exemplary embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 3 is a front view of the ridge hook of FIG. 2, in accordance with the first exemplary embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 4 illustrates an example of the ridge hook in position on a ridge of a roof, in accordance with the first exemplary embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present ridge hook 100 is capable of being used to secure a ladder to a roof, which is necessary when a user performs operations on the roof, for example, but not limited to, repairing or replacing roofing material, or installing or replacing a ridge cap. When installing or replacing a ridge cap, as shown in FIG. 4, the present ridge hook 100 provides necessary clearance between the ridge hook 100, the attached ladder 505, and the ridge cap 515.

FIG. 2 illustrates a first exemplary embodiment of the ridge hook 100. An arcuate portion 104 is provided having a first arcuate portion end 110 and a second arcuate portion end 112. The second arcuate portion end 112 of the arcuate portion 104 attaches to a first linear portion end 114 of a linear portion 116 forming an obtuse angle α. A second linear portion end 122 of the linear portion 116 attaches to a hook portion 124 at a proximal end 126 of the ridge hook 100. The ridge hook 100, as described herein, permits the installation, repair, and replacement of a ridge cap.

The first exemplary embodiment, as shown in FIG. 2, contains further contemplated ridge hook 100 features. A first bracket 140 is coupled to the first arcuate portion end 110 of the arcuate portion 104. The linear portion 116 forms an aperture 128 (see FIG. 3) through which a fastener 130 may be inserted to couple a second bracket 132 to the linear portion of the ridge hook 100. The arcuate portion 104 has an inner surface 106 and an outer surface 108. The arcuate portion 104 forms an arc large enough to provide sufficient clearance between the inner surface 106 of the arcuate portion 104 and a ridge of a roof to allow removal or installation of a ridge cap. For example, the arcuate portion 104 of the first exemplary embodiment of the present ridge hook 100 spans an arc of about one hundred eighty (180) degrees, with a diameter of about fifteen (15) inches, across the inner surface 106. The present ridge hook 100 will provide clearance between the ridge hook 100 and the ridge cap for roofs ranging in pitch, for example, but not limited to, from about six (6) to about twelve (12) inches.

While the first exemplary embodiment of the ridge hook 100 incorporates an arcuate shape, one of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the arcuate shape may be replaced by other shapes constructed with an open portion to provide the necessary working clearance between the ridge hook 100 and the ridge cap. The arcuate shape may be replaced by, for example, but not limited to, an elliptical shape, a triangular shape, or a rectangular shape.

Returning to FIG. 2, as well as FIG. 3, the first bracket 140 is coupled to the first arcuate portion end 110. In the first exemplary embodiment of the ridge hook 100, the first bracket 140 has an L-shape. However, one of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the L-shape of the first bracket 140 may be replaced by other shapes to provide a contact surface with the roof. The L-shape of the first bracket 140 may be replaced by, for example, but not limited to, flat or cylindrical shapes. In alternative embodiments of the ridge hook 100, the first bracket 140 may be coated with, for example, but not limited to, rubber or plastic, to increase friction between the first bracket 140 and the roof surface and to provide protection for the roof surface.

The second arcuate portion end 112 attaches to the first linear portion end 114 of the linear portion 116, the linear portion 116 having a first surface 118 and a second surface 120. The arcuate portion 104 and the linear portion 116 attach at an obtuse angle β formed between a tangent to the outer surface 108 of the arcuate portion 104 and the first surface 118 of the linear portion 116. The obtuse angle α may be, for example, between one hundred (100) and one hundred seventy (170) degrees. The obtuse angle α allows the linear portion 116 to be positioned substantially parallel to the surface of the roof. For example, in the first exemplary embodiment of the ridge hook 100, angle α is about one hundred thirty-five (135) degrees. The arcuate portion 104 opens on substantially the same side of the ridge hook 100 as the second surface 120 of the linear portion 116.

The second linear portion end 122 attaches to the hook portion 124 at the proximal end 126 of the ridge hook 100. The hook portion 124 forms a concave upward hook opening toward the first surface 118 of the linear portion 116. The opening of the hook portion 124 is sized to accept a substantially circular or semi-circular rung of a ladder adjacent to a top rung of the ladder.

The second bracket 132 may secure a top rung of the ladder to the ridge hook 100. The linear portion 116 of the ridge hook 100 may form the aperture 128 spaced from the second linear portion end 122 a distance required to secure a top rung of the ladder to the ridge hook 100 with the second bracket 132. The second bracket 132 is secured to the first surface 118 of the linear portion 116 and to the ladder using the fastener 130 inserted through the aperture 128. In the first exemplary embodiment of the ridge hook 100, the aperture 128 is spaced between about twelve (12) to fourteen (14) inches from the second linear portion end 122. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the second rung of the ladder may be secured to the ridge hook 100 by other means, for example, but not limited to, clamps, straps, or bolts. In addition, spacing between the aperture 128 (FIG. 3) and the second linear portion end 122 may be larger or smaller.

The first linear portion end 114 is spaced from the aperture 128 at least a distance required to allow the linear portion 116 to extend beyond a first end of the side rails of the ladder. For example, in the first exemplary embodiment of the ridge hook 100 the first linear portion end 114 is spaced at least about ten (10) inches from the aperture 128. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the at least ten (10) inch distance should be maintained between the attachment point for the ladder at the aperture 128 and the first linear portion end 114 to provide clearance between the first end of the side rails of a ladder and a roof ridge.

The arcuate portion 104, linear portion 116, and hook portion 124 may be constructed from a single piece of material, for example, but not limited to, iron, steel, or aluminum. Alternative embodiments of the ridge hook 100 may separately construct any or all of the arcuate portion 104, linear portion 116, or hook portion 124 and fasten them together by, for example, but not limited to bolting, screwing, welding, mechanically interlocking, or gluing.

FIG. 4 illustrates the ridge hook 100 attached to a ladder 505 and positioned over a ridge of a roof 510 having a ridge cap 515. When operating the first exemplary embodiment of the ridge hook 100, a user places a rung 520 of the ladder 505 adjacent to a top rung 525 of the ladder 505 in the hook portion 124 of the ridge hook 100. The second bracket 132 may be used to secure the top rung 525 of the ladder 505 to the ridge hook 100 by placing the second bracket 132 over the top rung 525 and tightening the second bracket 132 using the fastener 130. The ridge hook 100 is then positioned over a ridge of the roof 510. The first bracket 140 contacts an opposite surface of the roof 510 to secure the ladder 505 by the contact force of the first bracket 140 on the opposite surface of the roof 510. As can be seen in FIG. 4, the arcuate portion 104 of the ridge hook 100 and the linear portion 116 of the ridge hook 100 provide necessary clearance between the ridge of the roof 510, the ladder 505, and the ridge hook 100 to allow the ridge cap 515 to be installed or removed. The ridge hook 100 may be used in the same manner on roofs that utilize ridge caps and roofs that do not utilize ridge caps for any purpose requiring a ladder to be secured to a roof.

It should be emphasized that the above-described embodiments of the present invention are merely possible examples of implementations, merely set forth for a clear understanding of the principles of the invention. Many variations and modifications may be made to the above-described embodiments of the invention without departing substantially from the spirit and principles of the invention. All such modifications and variations are intended to be included herein within the scope of this disclosure and the present invention and protected by the following claims.