Title:
Front vented swimwear
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A swim suit having a plurality of vents defined in a upper portion of a front panel of the swim suit. The swim suit may be a pair of swim trunks or shorts or may be a suit including a chest panel. The plurality of vents facilitate the passage of gas and liquids therethrough, such as air bubbles that might otherwise be trapped within a swim suit.



Inventors:
Hobbs, Steven P. (Lafayette, CO, US)
Hobbs, Julie A. (Lafayette, CO, US)
Application Number:
11/010458
Publication Date:
06/16/2005
Filing Date:
12/13/2004
Assignee:
HOBBS STEVEN P.
HOBBS JULIE A.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A41D7/00; (IPC1-7): A41D5/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20070192942Air ventilator for helmetAugust, 2007Ahn
20050005339Camouflage and other patterns, articles comprising them, and methods of making and using sameJanuary, 2005Johnson
20050028249Tanning capFebruary, 2005Molnar
20070157368Smarty toesJuly, 2007James
20090158508Safety Helmet Especially for Motorcyclists Integrating a Light-Signalling DeviceJune, 2009Quaranta et al.
20090205101Shirt with Reinforced FrontAugust, 2009Vereen
20040040067Cap with assemble rail for accessoryMarch, 2004Pong
20080184463Helmet and Helmet Size Adjusting MethodAugust, 2008Sawabe
20040255367Secret places underwearDecember, 2004Harris
20090151731Head Positioning AidJune, 2009Scott et al.
20050076420Combination hat and integral storage pouchApril, 2005Hafif



Primary Examiner:
HOEY, ALISSA L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Marsh Fischmann & Breyfogle LLP (Lakewood, CO, US)
Claims:
1. A swim suit, comprising: a front panel having an upper portion; and a rear panel; wherein the front panel has at least one vent defined in the upper portion thereof to facilitate the passage of gas therethrough.

2. A swim suit as described in claim 1, wherein the swim suit further includes a waistband formed along an upper edge thereof proximate the upper portion of the front panel.

3. A swim suit as described in claim 1, wherein the swim suit is formed as a pair of shorts to be worn around the lower trunk of the wearer.

4. A swim suit as described in claim 1, wherein the swim suit is formed as a covering for a substantial portion of the chest of the wearer.

5. A swim suit as described in claim 1, wherein the at least one vent is generally wider than it is tall.

6. A swim suit as described in claim 1, wherein the at least one vent is formed as a buttonhole.

7. A swim suit as described in claim 1, wherein the at least one vent is sufficiently sized to allow air bubbles to escape therethrough.

Description:

This application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/528,928, filed Dec. 11, 2003, entitled “Front Vented Swimwear”, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD

This present invention relates generally to swimwear and more particularly to swimwear adopted for facilitating the passage of gases and liquids therethrough.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

With the growing recreational and therapeutic use of hot tubs and spas, many users commonly experience an annoying phenomenon. Due to submerged water jets and ports for injecting air into the tub/spa, it is not uncommon for a user to experience significant bulging and puffiness in their swim garments from the air trapped therein.

This phenomenon is particularly pronounced for males wearing boxer-style swim trunks. It is believed that air enters the loose, lower openings of such swim trunks adjacent the wearer's thighs. The air is then trapped within the swim suit just below the form-fitting elastic waistband, as the air attempts to travel toward the water's surface. A wearer who wishes to minimize this problem can periodically pull the waistband briefly away from their waist to release the trapped air and allow it to bubble up to the surface. Typically, even with the above-described release of air, the problem will occur again in a short time.

A similar problem can occur for women, depending on the style of swim suit. If the suit allows air to enter and has a form-fitting band along a top surface, air may become trapped inside in a fashion similar to men's swim trunks described above.

It is against this background and with a desire to improve on the prior art that the present invention has been developed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A swim suit is provided that includes a front panel having an upper portion and a rear panel. The front panel has at least one vent defined in the upper portion thereof to facilitate the passage of gas therethrough.

The swim suit may further include a waistband formed along an upper edge thereof proximate the upper portion of the front panel. The swim suit may be formed as a pair of shorts to be worn around the lower trunk of the wearer. The swim suit may be formed as a covering for a substantial portion of the chest of the wearer.

The at least one vent may be generally wider than it is tall. The at least one vent may be formed as a buttonhole. The at least one vent may be sufficiently sized to allow air bubbles to escape therethrough.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a swim suit on a wearer, showing air bubbles escaping from vents defined in a front panel thereof.

FIG. 2 is a front view of the swim suit of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a close-up view of one of the vents of the swim suit of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a front view of an alternative embodiment of a swim suit showing vents defined in an upper front panel thereof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Reference will now be made to the accompanying drawings, which assist in illustrating the various pertinent features of the present invention. Although the present invention will now be described primarily in conjunction with a swim suit, it should be expressly understood that the present invention may be applicable to other applications where release of trapped air is required/desired. In this regard, the following description of a swim suit is presented for purposes of illustration and description. Furthermore, the description is not intended to limit the invention to the form disclosed herein. Consequently, variations and modifications commensurate with the following teachings, and skill and knowledge of the relevant art, are within the scope of the present invention. The embodiments described herein are further intended to explain modes known of practicing the invention and to enable others skilled in the art to utilize the invention in such, or other embodiments and with various modifications required by the particular application(s) or use(s) of the present invention.

A swim suit 10 can be worn in conventional fashion by a wearer 12, as shown in FIG. 1. As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, the swim suit 10 includes a front panel 14 and a rear panel 16 that are stitched or otherwise attached together on opposite lateral sides at side seams 18. The panels 14 and 16 may also be stitched or otherwise attached together along inner seams (not shown) to define a pair of leg openings 20 and 22. The swim suit 10 also includes a waistband 24 attached thereto along a top edge of the panels 14 and 16. The waistband 24 may include elastic or a drawstring, or any other suitable means for holding the waistband 24 at or near the waist of the wearer 12.

The front panel 14 includes a plurality of vents 26 defined therein to facilitate the passage of gases and liquids therethrough. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, there are six such vents 26 arranged in an upper row of four vents 26 and a lower row of two vents 26. The vents 26 are generally oriented in a horizontal fashion that is generally parallel to the waistband 24. The vents 26 are further arranged in generally symmetrical fashion with half of the vents 26 being located to the left of a vertical centerline of the front panel 14 and the remaining half of the vents being located to the right of the vertical centerline of the front panel 14.

As shown in FIG. 3, the vents 26 are significantly wider than they are tall. The vents 26 may be formed as buttonholes in a conventional manner. The vents 26 may be approximately 1.9 centimeters wide 0.4 centimeters tall and adjacent vents may be spaced apart from each other by approximately 3.5 to 4.5 centimeters. The pair of rows of vents may be spaced apart from each other by approximately 3 to 4 centimeters. It should be understood, however, that the scope and teachings of the invention apply to any front-vented swimwear, without regard to the number, shape, size, type, or orientation of the vents 26 and without regard to the spacing, pattern, or specific arrangement of the vents 26. As merely a few examples, other types of openings such as grommets, zippers, and the like could be used.

A second embodiment is shown in FIG. 4, in which a portion of a woman's swim suit 30 is shown. The women's swim suit 30 includes a front chest panel 32 including six vents 34. Each of the characteristics described above of the vents 26 may apply to the vents 34 of the women's swim suit 30 as well.

As can be appreciated, the front and rear panels of swim trunks are differently shaped from each other, so that they are well adapted for the likely directions of movement for the wearer's legs. Specifically, they easily allow for a wearer to move their legs into a position for seating. It is from this position that is commonly used in hot tubs and spas that the front panel with the vents therein will allow for the passage of air therethrough so as not to trap air within the swim trunks.

The foregoing description of the present invention has been presented for purposes of illustration and description. Furthermore, the description is not intended to limit the invention to the form disclosed herein. Consequently, variations and modifications commensurate with the above teachings, and skill and knowledge of the relevant art, are within the scope of the present invention. The embodiments described hereinabove are further intended to explain best modes known of practicing the invention and to enable others skilled in the art to utilize the invention in such, or other embodiments and with various modifications required by the particular application(s) or use(s) of the present invention. It is intended that the appended claims be construed to include alternative embodiments to the extent permitted by the prior art.