Title:
Simulated cushioned jogging and running mat
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable in-place beveled multilevel cushioned mat that allows simulated jogging and running. This cushioned mat comprises an upwardly inclined mid-foot level and an elevated heel level having a heel receiving surface adapted to receive a foot of a runner. It is made of a closed or open cellular foam system from polymeric elastomers. The mat may be made of a foam core with polymer coated shell or molded with one or more than one type of foam system.



Inventors:
Wong, Tony (Modesto, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/039464
Publication Date:
06/09/2005
Filing Date:
01/18/2005
Assignee:
WONG TONY
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/23
International Classes:
A63B23/00; A63B69/00; A63B21/02; A63B23/04; A63B26/00; (IPC1-7): A63B26/00; A43B13/18; A63B22/04
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
MATHEW, FENN C
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Tony L. Wong (Modesto, CA, US)
Claims:
1. A jogging mat comprising: an upwardly inclined mid-foot level; and an elevated heel level having a heel receiving surface adapted to receive a foot of a runner.

2. The mat of claim 1, wherein the upwardly inclined mid-foot level has a mid-foot receiving surface.

3. The mat of claim 2, wherein the mid-foot receiving surface and the heel receiving surface extend above the mid-foot level and the elevated heel level, respectively.

4. The mat of claim 2, wherein the mid-foot receiving surface and the heel receiving surface are recessed below the mid-foot level, and the heel level, respectively.

5. The mat of claim 2, further comprising a front toe level having a front foot receiving surface adapted to receive a foot of a runner.

6. The mat of claim 5, wherein the front foot receiving surface, the mid-foot receiving surface and the heel receiving surface extend above the front foot level, the mid-foot level and the elevated heel level, respectively.

7. The mat of claim 6, wherein the mat has a raised edge.

8. The mat of claim 5, wherein the front foot receiving surface, the mid-foot receiving surface and the heel receiving surface are recessed below the front toe level, the mid-foot level and the heel level, respectively.

9. The mat of claim 8, wherein the mat has a raised edge.

10. The mat of claim 1, wherein the mat is fabricated of at least one resilient shock absorbing material.

11. The mat of claim 1, wherein the mid-foot level transitions from a ground supporting surface to the heel level at an angle of between about 2.5 degrees to about 60 degrees.

12. The mat of claim 1, wherein the heel receiving surface has an anti-slip surface.

13. The mat of claim 1, wherein the mat is fabricated of at least one resilient shock absorbing material, with an outer polymer coated or fabric shell.

14. The mat of claim 1, wherein the mat has a bottom surface, wherein the bottom surface comprises an anti-slip surface.

15. The mat of claim 14, wherein the anti-slip surface comprises a tread and groove patterns.

16. A mat comprising: a front foot level having a front foot receiving surface; an elevated heel level having a heel receiving surface; and a base adapted to receive the front foot level and the elevated heel level.

17. The mat of claim 16, wherein the front foot receiving surface and the heel receiving surface extend above the front foot level and the elevated heel level, respectively.

18. The mat of claim 16, wherein the front foot receiving surface and the heel receiving surface are recessed below the front toe level and the heel level, respectively.

19. The mat of claim 16, wherein the mat is fabricated of at least one resilient shock absorbing material.

20. The mat of claim 16, wherein a distance from the front foot level to the heel level is approximately 0.25 inches to approximately 6.0 inches.

21. The mat of claim 16, wherein the heel receiving surface has an anti-slip surface.

22. The mat of claim 16, wherein the mat is fabricated of at least one resilient shock absorbing material, with an outer polymer coated or fabric shell.

23. The mat of claim 16, wherein the mat has a bottom surface, wherein the bottom surface comprises an anti-slip surface.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/139,756, filed May 2, 2002, which is incorporated herein in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to jogging mats and in particular to a cushioned multi-level jogging mat which varies in thickness from a lower anterior foot portion through a beveled, sloped or vertical mid section to a raised posterior foot portion for complete impact absorption during jogging in place.

2. Description of the Prior Art

This invention concerns a device, which is designed specifically for in-place jogging and running. According to Runner's World Magazine, running is most popular sport in the world. Running and jogging improve and maintain cardiovascular health, lower body strength, as well as mental and overall physical health. For active runners, it is important to keep a regular training schedule which often involves 3-6 days a week, in order to maintain or improve performance.

There are different types of in-place running and simulated running devices on the market. The most popular type is the treadmill. However, due to the cost to acquire the machine and space requirement, many people do not have the luxury of owning a treadmill. Besides the treadmill, there are other exercisers that simulate actual jogging and running to a certain extent. Yet many of them do not capture the essential elements of the jogging and running motion.

The actual running motion involves 3 stages of foot motion. First, there is the heel landing and striking stage. Then, there is a midstance stage in which the front and back of the foot are in contact with the landing surface. As the body moves forward, the heel lifts and the toes propel the body until the heel of the opposite foot strikes the ground.

All prior patents related to this application consisted of devices having flat foot contact surface. A flat surface in-place jogging running device with a non moving contact surface, does not truly allow the 3 stages of foot motion to occur. During in-place jogging or running on a non moving surface, as the center of gravity of the body moves vertically from the ground, the landing phase of the foot and propelling phase are done by the toes. Since our natural foot anatomy is adapted for the three stages of motion described above, landing on the toes on a flat surface increases strain on the foot. As a result, prolonged in-place jogging or running on a non moving flat surface can cause increased strain and even premature injury to the foot.

There were several patents granted for devices utilized shock absorbing and resilient materials, and were designed for in-place walking, jogging and running.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,253,661, issued Mar. 3, 1981 to Russell, provides a leg exercising device comprising a thick, resilient, flexible pad with a sloped top surface and sloped sides which reportedly provides for safe, non-jarring leg exercises involving running, squatting, squat-running, leg joint pivoting, balance and the like. Russell also has two other patents with side-by-side pads: U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,603,851 and 5,656,000. However the foot always lands on a flat surface.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,159,826, issued Jul. 3, 1979 to Hancock, claims a pneumatic jogging platform with resilient tubing under the pad and a flat surface.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,641,601, issued Feb. 15, 1972 to Sieg, shows a two pad device for walking, jogging and running exercise with flat surfaces.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,634,895, issued Jan. 18, 1972 to Childers, describes a flat broad pad inside a frame.

U.S. Pat. No. 1,931,146, issued Oct. 17, 1933 to Hampel, discloses a pad with corrugations for exercise having a flat landing surface.

None of the above patents has a multilevel surface with a beveled middle section suited for natural jogging and running motion.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A primary object of the present invention is to provide a cushioned multilevel jogging mat with an elevated heel cushion for anatomically corrected in-place jogging or running simulating the three stages of foot motion during actual running and jogging.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a cushioned jogging running mat that is inexpensive, portable, easy to store and more importantly, easily accessible.

One more object of the present invention is to provide a cushioned jogging and running mat that reduces jarring and impact to the joints in legs during simulated jogging and running.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide a cushioned jogging and running mat that can be used by a wide group of users across different recreational interests and experiences.

A further object of the present invention is to provide an alternate replacement for a more expensive treadmill.

An added object of the present invention is to provide a low impact exercise device for rehabilitation purposes.

Still a further object of the present invention is to provide a cushioned jogging and running mat that reduces the impact transmitted to the supporting surface and thereby reduces noise, so that disturbance to others can be minimized.

Yet one more object of the present invention is to provide various models having different heights and different inclines for various types of individuals having different needs and for different applications, such as low impact walking or high impact fast running in place.

Still one more object of the present invention is to provide a compact model having only the inclined section and the elevated heel section and utilizing the supporting surface, such as a rug or a rubber mat, as the toe portion.

In brief, the present invention provides a multilevel cushioned mat that simulates the three stages of foot motion in running and jogging while cushioning the impact on the feet and provides a solution to reduce strain on the foot during in-place jogging or running. The elevated section in the rear portion of the mat allows the heel to land with full shock absorption on the cushioned mat. After a very short midstance with the foot on the sloping beveled portion or vertical portion or curved portion making the transition between heel contact and toe contact, the body weight can be quickly transferred to the toes on the lower front flat section of the mat or underlying floor surface and lift the body upward. In this manner, the full motion of jogging or running is accomplished.

Various models are provided having different heights and different inclines for various types of individuals having different needs (such as children, fit adults, heavy adults, elderly) and for different applications, such as a slight incline with a relatively low heel section for low impact walking or slow jogging in place, a more inclined midsection with a moderately elevated heel section for greater impact jogging in place, and a sharply inclined midsection and substantially elevated heel section for high impact fast running in place.

A compact model has only the inclined section and the elevated heel section and utilizes the supporting surface, such as a rug or a rubber mat, as the toe portion. This model can easily be stored in a brief case or drawer and pulled out for in place walking, jogging or running workouts.

In one embodiment, the jogging mat comprises an upwardly inclined mid-foot level; and an elevated heel level having a heel receiving surface adapted to receive a foot of a runner.

In a further embodiment, the mat comprises a front foot level having a front foot receiving surface; an elevated heel level having a heel receiving surface; and a base adapted to receive the front foot level and the elevated heel level.

The primary advantage of the present invention is that it provides a solution for an anatomically corrected in-place jogging and running motion on a non moving surface, actually simulating the three foot motions of jogging and running while cushioning the foot.

A secondary advantage of the present invention is that it allows a convenient access to a 15-45 minutes workout at a flexible location.

Another advantage of the present invention is that it is inexpensive, portable and anatomically corrected and suited for all users across different recreational interests and skill levels.

An additional advantage of the present invention is that it is shock absorbing to lessen impact.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other details of my invention will be described in connection with the accompanying drawings, which are furnished only by way of illustration and not in limitation of the invention, and in which drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the anatomically corrected cushioned mat for running and jogging in place.

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the preferred embodiment of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention having two cushioned mats side by side.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of an alternate embodiment of the invention having an inner resilient core and an outer covering.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention having two cushioned mats, a flat bottom cushioned mat and a wedge-shaped top cushioned mat partially covering the bottom cushioned mat with the two cushioned mats aligned for interconnection.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention having three cushioned mats hinged together, so that they may be flattened out for storage and stacked for use with the cushioned mats aligned for stacking.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the invention used with a stand having hand rails.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention having a wedge shape with an elevated rear heel section and low sloping beveled front midstance section for walking or slow jogging in place, while utilizing the underlying supporting surface as the front toe portion.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention having a wedge shape with an elevated rear heel section and more steeply sloping beveled front midstance section for jogging in place, while utilizing the underlying supporting surface as the front toe portion.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention having a wedge shape with an elevated rear heel section and very steeply sloping beveled front midstance section for fast running in place, while utilizing the underlying supporting surface as the front toe portion.

FIG. 11 is a side elevational view of an alternate embodiment of the invention of FIG. 8.

FIG. 12 is a side elevational view of an alternate embodiment of the invention of FIG. 9.

FIG. 13 is a side elevational view of an alternate embodiment of the invention of FIG. 10.

FIG. 14 is a side elevational view of an alternate embodiment of the invention of having a flat rear wall and arched front surface forming both the elevated rear heel section and arched front midstance section for fast running in place, while utilizing the underlying supporting surface as the front toe portion.

FIG. 15 is a side elevational view of a variation on the preferred embodiment of the invention of FIG. 1 having a flat front toe section and a very slightly sloping beveled midstance section for walking or slow jogging in place, and a flat slightly elevated heel section.

FIG. 16 is a side elevational view of a variation on the preferred embodiment of the invention of FIG. 1 having a flat front toe section and a moderate sloping beveled midstance section for jogging in place, and a flat moderately elevated heel section.

FIG. 17 is a side elevational view of a variation on the preferred embodiment of the invention of FIG. 1 having a flat front toe section and a steeply sloping beveled midstance section for fast running in place, and a flat highly elevated heel section.

FIG. 18 is a side elevational view of a variation on the preferred embodiment of the invention of FIG. 1 having a flat front toe section and an arched section forming both the midstance section and the elevated heel section.

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of a variation on the preferred embodiment of the invention of FIG. 1 having a flat front toe section and a vertical midstance section, and a flat elevated heel section.

FIG. 20 is a side elevational view of a variation on the preferred embodiment of the invention of FIG. 1 having a flat front toe section and a vertical midstance section, and a flat elevated heel section.

FIG. 21 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention of having a flat elevated heel section and a vertical front midstance section, while utilizing the underlying supporting surface as the front toe portion.

FIG. 22 is a side elevational view of the alternate embodiment of the invention of FIG. 21.

FIG. 23 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention of having a flat rear wall and arched front surface forming both the elevated rear heel section and arched front midstance section for fast running in place, while utilizing the underlying supporting surface as the front toe portion.

FIG. 24 is a side elevational view of the alternate embodiment of the invention of FIG. 23.

FIG. 25 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the invention having a multilevel cushioned mat having a front toe level, an upwardly inclined variable mid-foot level and an elevated heel with a recessed foot surface.

FIG. 26 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention having a multilevel cushioned mat having a front toe level, an upwardly inclined variable mid-foot level and an elevated heel with an elevated foot surface.

FIG. 27 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the invention having a front base, an elevated variable height front foot level and an elevated heel level with a recessed foot surface.

FIG. 28 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention having a front base, an elevated variable height front foot level and an elevated heel level with an extended foot surface.

FIG. 29 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the invention having a base, an elevated flat heel level and an inclined mid-foot supporting surface with a recessed foot surface.

FIG. 30 is a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the invention having a base, an elevated flat heel level and an inclined mid-foot supporting surface with an extended foot surface.

FIG. 31 is a side elevation view of the alternate embodiment of the invention of FIGS. 25 and 26 showing the mat in use.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

In FIGS. 1-24, an anatomically corrected cushioned running mat 20, and 20A-R comprises a multilevel cushioned mat for jogging, running, and walking in place having a horizontally flat front toe level 21 and 21A-R, an upwardly inclined variable height mid-foot level 22 and 22A-R, and an elevated heel level 23 and 23A-R for an anatomically corrected in-place jogging and running device capable of receiving a heel of a runner with full impact absorption on the elevated heel level 23 and 23A-R, naturally assisting the rolling forward of the mid-foot of a runner on the beveled, arched or vertical mid-foot level 22 and 22A-R for a short midstance position, and receiving the toes on the lower front flat level 21 and 21A-R of the cushioned mat or the supporting surface in a position to push the body upward, all as seen in FIG. 2.

In an embodiment of the anatomically corrected cushioned running mat 20 of FIGS. 1 and 2 provides a cushioned mat 20, which is sufficiently wide to receive both feet of the user thereon during exercise.

The multilevel cushioned jogging mat is fabricated of a resilient shock absorbing material, such as being molded or cut from a foam material, or being fabricated of a foam core 25 having at least one foam material, with an outer polymer coated fabric shell 26, as seen in FIG. 4. Other fabrication options include having the cushioned mat fabricated of dissimilar foam materials bonded together (FIG. 5), fabricated of dissimilar foam materials multi-component molded, fabricated from an open cellular foam system, fabricated from closed cell type foam. The base foam material may consist of a material selected from a list of materials consisting of polyurethane, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, ethylene vinyl acetate, natural or synthetic rubber, or other resilient shock absorbing material. The cushioned mat is fabricated from a material having a density range from 2 lb. to 12 lb. per cubic feet.

In FIG. 5 the anatomically corrected cushioned running mat 20C is fabricated in two sections: a flat bottom section 29 and a wedge-shaped top section 28 with a horizontal elevated top 23C resting on the flat bottom section leaving a portion of the flat bottom section exposed to form the flat toe level 21C, the wedge forming the beveled variable height mid-foot level 22C, and the horizontal elevated end forming the elevated flat heel level 23C.

In FIG. 6 the cushioned mat 20D is formed in three sections hinged together by hinges 18 and 19 which could be strips of fabric, to fold out into a long flat cushioned mat for storage, wherein two of the sections are flat cushioned mats 27 and 29A with one flat cushioned mat 27 at the back and one flat cushioned mat 29A in the middle, the two flat cushioned mats 27 and 29A being hinged together by a flexible fabric strip 18 or other hinging means on a top side so that the middle cushioned mat 29A is pivotable toward the rear of the cushioned mat so that the middle section 29A overlaps the rear section 27 for an elevated base and the front section 28A having a wedge shape is hinged to the middle section 29A along a flexible strip of material 19 on the bottom so that after the middle section 29A is folded back on the back section 27, the front wedge-shaped section 28A is pivotable toward the front of the cushioned mat to partially overlap the middle section 29A, exposing a portion of the middle section to form the flat toe level 21D, the wedge resting on the middle section forming the beveled variable height mid-foot level 22D, and the horizontal elevated end forming the upwardly beveled variable height mid-foot level 22D, and the elevated flat heel level 23D.

In FIG. 7, the invention further comprises a stand 30 having two upright sides with a pair of vertical posts 31 supporting a hand rail 33 between the posts on each side secured to a flat bottom base 30 upon which the anatomically corrected cushioned running mat 20 rests enabling a user to hold the hand rails 33 while running in place on the cushioned mat 20.

In FIG. 3 an alternate embodiment of the cushioned mat 20A is formed in two identical sections each having the three levels 21A, 22A and 23A with the cushioned mats spaced apart so that each cushioned mat receives one foot of the user.

In FIGS. 15-19, the preferred embodiment has the three sections built-in (the flat toe section 21J-M, the inclined midsection 22J-M and the elevated heel section 23J-M.

In FIG. 15 a low model of the preferred embodiment of the multilevel cushioned mat 20J has a relatively thin toe section 21J and a very slight beveled incline section 22J, and only a slightly elevated heel section 23J for elderly people or young light weight children or low impact workouts such as walking or slow jogging in place.

In FIG. 16 a middle model of the preferred embodiment of the multilevel cushioned mat 20K has a slightly thicker toe section 21J and a moderately beveled incline section 22J, and a moderately elevated heel section 23J for the average person of average weight and age exercising moderately with medium impact jogging in place.

In FIG. 17 a high model of the preferred embodiment of the multilevel cushioned mat 20L has a slightly thicker toe section 21K and a steeply beveled incline section 22K, and a highly elevated heel section 23K for very fit healthy people exercising intensely with high impact fast running in place.

In FIG. 18 another high model of the preferred embodiment of the multilevel cushioned mat 20M has a slightly thicker toe section 21M and a steeply arched curve forming both the incline section 22M and the highly elevated heel section 23M for very fit healthy people exercising intensely with high impact fast running in place.

In FIG. 19 another different model of the preferred embodiment of the multilevel cushioned mat 20N has a normal toe section 21N, a vertical incline section 22K, and a moderately elevated heel section 23N for average people and average workouts. FIG. 20 shows the vertical incline model in action with the foot of a user (shown dashed) in the horizontal impact position and the midstance rolling forward onto the toe position with the cushioned mat compacting down and forward into a compressed incline position as shown in the dashed line 23N.

In FIGS. 8-14 and 21 and 22 alternate compact embodiments of the multilevel cushioned mat 20E-H and 20P and 20R all rely on the supporting surface in front of the cushioned mat as the toe portion 21E-H and 21P and 21R.

FIGS. 8-13 show three different compact models of the alternate embodiments of the cushioned mat 20E-G with a low incline 22E and low heel portion 23E model 20E for low impact walking in place and light jogging, a moderate incline 22F and moderately elevated heel portion 23F model 20F for moderate impact jogging workouts, and a steep incline 22G and highly elevated heel portion 23G model 20G for high impact workouts such as fast running in place.

FIG. 14 shows another alternate compact embodiment of the multilevel cushioned mat 20H relying on the supporting surface in front of the cushioned mat as the toe portion 21H. An arched front surface forms both the incline section 22H and the heel section 23H.

In FIG. 21 another compact model of the alternate embodiment of the multilevel cushioned mat 20P has no toe section built in, but relies on a portion of the supporting surface in front of the cushioned mat as the toe portion 21P. The mat itself has a vertical incline section 22P and a moderately elevated heel section 23P for average people and average workouts. FIG. 22 shows the alternate embodiment model in action with the foot of a user (shown dashed) in the horizontal impact position and the midstance rolling forward onto the toe position with the cushioned mat compacting down and forward into a compressed incline position as shown in the dashed line 23P.

In FIG. 23 another compact model of the alternate embodiment of the multilevel cushioned mat 20R has no toe section built in, but relies on a portion of the supporting surface in front of the cushioned mat as the toe portion 21R. The mat itself has an arched front portion, which forms both the incline section 22R and a moderately elevated heel section 23R for average people and average workouts. FIG. 24 shows the alternate embodiment model in action with the foot of a user (shown dashed) in the horizontal impact position and the midstance rolling forward onto the toe position with the cushioned mat compacting down and forward into a compressed incline position as shown in the dashed line 23R.

In FIG. 25, an alternative embodiment of an anatomically corrected cushioned running mat 20 is shown. The mat 20 comprises a multilevel cushioned mat for jogging, running, and walking in place having a horizontally flat front toe level 21, an upwardly inclined variable height mid-foot level 22, and an elevated heel level 23. The mat 20 is an anatomically corrected in-place jogging and running device capable of receiving the left and right heel of a runner with full impact absorption on the elevated heel level 23, naturally assisting the rolling forward of the left and right mid-foot of a runner on the beveled mid-foot level 22 for a short midstance position, and receiving the left and right toes on the lower front flat level 21 of the cushioned mat or the supporting surface in a position to push the body upward, all as seen in FIG. 31.

As shown in FIG. 25, the mat 20 also comprises a foot surface 38 comprising a pair of front foot receiving surfaces 42, a pair of arch or mid-foot receiving surfaces 44, a pair of heel receiving surfaces 46, which are recessed from the front toe level 21, the variable mid-foot level 22, and elevated heel level 23, respectively. The foot receiving surfaces 42, 44, and 46 can also include an anti-slip surface 48 to provide foot traction. The anti-slip surface 48 can be a tread and a groove pattern, an anti-slip material, any suitable surface pattern or any suitable material that provides foot traction to the user. The perimeter surfaces 50 around the perimeter of the mat 20 is drafted or angled for increased stability. The raised edge 52 along a front part 53 of the mat 20 keeps the feet and any debris dislodged from the feet or shoes within the mat 20 during exercising. The bottom surface 54 of the mat 20 can comprise an anti-slip material for an anti-slipping surface or have anti-slipping features such as tread and groove patterns.

FIG. 26 shows an alternative embodiment of an anatomically corrected cushioned running mat 20 comprising a multilevel cushioned mat for jogging, running, and walking in place. The mat 20 comprises a horizontally flat front toe level 21, an upwardly inclined variable height mid-foot level 22, and an elevated heel level 23 for an anatomically corrected in-place jogging and running device capable of receiving the left and right heel of a runner with full impact absorption on the elevated heel level 23, naturally assisting the rolling forward of the left and right mid-foot of a runner on the beveled mid-foot level 22 for a short midstance position, and receiving the left and right toes on the lower front flat level 21 of the cushioned mat 20 or the supporting surface in a position to push the body upward, all as seen in FIG. 31.

As shown in FIG. 26, the foot surface 38 comprises a pair of front foot receiving surfaces 42, a pair of arch or mid-foot receiving surfaces 44, a pair of heel receiving surfaces 46, which extend above the front toe level 21, the variable mid-foot level 22, and elevated heel level 23, respectively. The foot receiving surfaces 42, 44, and 46 can also include an anti-slip surface 48 to provide foot traction. The anti-slip surface 48 can be a tread and a groove pattern, an anti-slip material, any suitable surface pattern or any suitable material that provides foot traction to the user. The perimeter surface 50 around the perimeter of the mat 20 is drafted or angled for increased stability. The raised edge 52 along the front part 53 of the mat 20 keeps the feet and any debris dislodged from the feet or shoes within the mat during exercising. The bottom surface 54 of the mat 20 can comprise an anti-slip material for an anti-slipping surface or have anti-slipping features such as tread and groove patterns.

It can be appreciated that the foot surface 38 of the mat 20 can have any combination of recessed or extending foot surfaces 38, such that the front foot receiving surfaces 42, the pair of arch or mid-foot receiving surfaces 44, and the pair of heel receiving surfaces 46, can extend above or recessed below the front toe level 21, the variable mid-foot level 22, and elevated heel level 23, respectively, without departing from the present invention. For example, only the pair of heel receiving surfaces 46 can be either recessed or extending above the elevated heel level 23, wherein the front foot surfaces 42 and the pair of arch or mid-foot receiving surfaces are neither recessed nor extended.

The front toe level 21 transitions to the elevated heel level 23 at an angle of between about 2.5 degrees and about 60.0 degrees and more preferably about 9.5 degrees and 26.5 degrees. It can be appreciated if the mat 20 does not include a front toe level 21 (FIGS. 29 and 30), the mid-foot surface 22 has an angle of between about 2.5 degrees and about 60.0 degrees between the ground supporting surface and the heel level 23, and more preferably about 9.5 degrees and 26.5 degrees.

FIG. 27 shows another embodiment of an anatomically corrected cushioned running mat 20 comprises a multilevel cushioned mat for jogging, running, and walking in place. The mat 20 comprises a horizontally flat front base 60, an elevated variable height front foot level 62, and an elevated heel level 64 for an anatomically corrected in-place jogging and running device capable of receiving the left and right heel of a runner with full impact absorption on the elevated heel level 64, and receiving the left and right toes on the lower front flat level 62 of the cushioned mat 20 or the supporting surface in a position to push the body upward.

As shown in FIG. 27, the foot surface 38 comprises a front foot receiving surface 42 and a heel receiving surfaces 46, which are recessed from the front toe level 62 and elevated heel level 64, respectively. The foot receiving surfaces 42, 44, and 46 can also include an anti-slip surface 48 to provide foot traction. The anti-slip surface 48 can be a tread and a groove pattern, an anti-slip material, any suitable surface pattern or any suitable material that provides foot traction to the user. The perimeter surfaces 50 around the perimeter of the base mat 20 is drafted or angled for increased stability. The bottom surface 54 of the mat 20 can comprise an anti-slip material for an anti-slipping surface or have anti-slipping features such as tread and groove patterns.

FIG. 28 shows an alternative embodiment of an anatomically corrected cushioned running mat comprises a multilevel cushioned mat for jogging, running, and walking in place. The mat 20 comprises a horizontally flat front base 60, an elevated variable height front foot level 62, and an elevated heel level 64 for an anatomically corrected in-place jogging and running device capable of receiving the left and right heel of a runner with full impact absorption on the elevated heel level 64, and receiving the left and right toes on the lower front flat level 62 of the cushioned mat 20 or the supporting surface in a position to push the body upward.

As shown in FIG. 28, the foot surface 38 comprises a front foot receiving surface 42 and a heel receiving surfaces 46, which extend above the front toe level 62 and elevated heel level 64, respectively. The foot receiving surfaces 42, 44, and 46 can also include an anti-slip surface 48 to provide foot traction. The anti-slip surface 48 can be a tread and a groove pattern, an anti-slip material, any suitable surface pattern or any suitable material that provides foot traction to the user. The perimeter surfaces 50 around the perimeter of the base mat 20 is drafted or angled for increased stability. The bottom surface 54 of the mat 20 can comprise an anti-slip material for an anti-slipping surface or have anti-slipping features such as tread and groove patterns. The distance between the front foot level 62 and the elevated heel level 64 is preferably about 0.25 to about 6.0 inches and more preferably about 0.5 inches to about 3.0 inches.

FIG. 29 shows an another embodiment of an anatomically corrected cushioned running mat 20 comprising a multilevel cushioned mat for jogging, running, and walking in place. As shown in FIG. 29, the mat 20 utilizes the ground supporting surface as the flat front foot surface, and has a base 66, an elevated flat heel level 68 and an inclined mid-foot supporting surface 70 for an anatomically corrected in-place jogging and running device capable of receiving the left and right heel of a runner with full impact absorption on the elevated heel level 68, and receiving the left and right mid-foot on the inclined surface 70 of the cushioned mat 20.

As shown in FIG. 29, the foot surface 38 comprises a mid-foot receiving surface 44 and a heel receiving surface 46, which are recessed below the heel level 68, and the mid-foot supporting surface 70, respectively. The foot receiving surfaces 44 and 46 can also include an anti-slip surface 48 to provide foot traction. The anti-slip surface 48 can be a tread and a groove pattern, an anti-slip material, any suitable surface pattern or any suitable material that provides foot traction to the user. The perimeter surfaces 50 around the perimeter of the base mat 20 is drafted or angled for increased stability. The front surface 52 is of greater draft angle than the rest the surfaces. The bottom surface 54 of the mat 20 can comprise an anti-slip material for an anti-slipping surface or have anti-slipping features such as tread and groove patterns.

FIG. 30 shows an alternative embodiment of an anatomically corrected cushioned running mat comprising a multilevel cushioned mat for jogging, running, and walking in place, which utilizes the ground supporting surface as the flat front foot surface. The mat 20 comprises a base 66, an elevated flat heel level 68 and an inclined mid-foot supporting surface 70 for an anatomically corrected in-place jogging and running device capable of receiving the left and right heel of a runner with full impact absorption on the elevated heel level 46, and receiving the left and right mid-foot on the inclined surface 70 of the cushioned mat 20.

As shown in FIG. 30, the foot surface 38 comprises a mid-foot receiving surface 44 and a heel receiving surface 46, which extend above the heel level 68, and the mid-foot supporting surface 70, respectively. The foot receiving surfaces 44 and 46 can also include an anti-slip surface 48 to provide foot traction. The anti-slip surface 48 can be a tread and a groove pattern, an anti-slip material, any suitable surface pattern or any suitable material that provides foot traction to the user. The perimeter surfaces 50 around the perimeter of the base mat 20 is drafted or angled for increased stability. The front surface 52 is of greater draft angle than the rest the surfaces. The bottom surface 54 of the mat 20 can comprise an anti-slip material for an anti-slipping surface or have anti-slipping features such as tread and groove patterns.

It can be appreciated that the anatomically corrected simulated in place cushioned jogging and running mat 20 can be fabricated of an elastomeric material having a foam core having at least one foam material, with an outer polymer coated fabric shell, fabricated of dissimilar foam materials which are bonded together.

The cushioned mat 20 can be constructed of a foam core comprising of one or more foam materials 25, with an outer polymer coated fabric shell 26 as shown in FIG. 4 or the entire cushioned mat 20 can be molded with one or more types of foams. Alternatively, rigid members such as spring or structural reinforcement can be incorporated into the base material to enhance performance. In addition, dissimilar foam materials can be bonded or multi-component molded to form the mat 20.

The elastomeric material can be a foam material, an open cellular foam system, closed cell type foam or other suitable elastomeric material. The base foam material consists of a material selected from a list of materials consisting of polyurethane, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, ethylene vinyl acetate, natural rubber and synthetic rubber.

In addition, the mat 20 is preferably fabricated from a material having a density range from 2 lb. to 12 lb. per cubic feet, however, it can be appreciated that any suitable density range can be used.

Also, a system of elastomeric gel material consisted of at least one gel material having the characteristics of the foam described within this document can be used in place of a foam material or foam system.

It is understood that the preceding description is given merely by way of illustration and not in limitation of the invention and that various modifications may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the invention as claimed.





 
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