Title:
Form system wall tie and methods for making and using the same
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A form system wall tie and method for making and using the same. A wall tie is formed having a longitudinal axis and structure that is longitudinally symmetric. A tie rod at one end of the wall tie is attached to struts that, in turn, are attached to an attachment member that is adapted to engage a threaded rod. If desired, one copy of the wall tie can be engaged with a threaded rod having an anchor that can be affixed to a framework against which it is desired to pour a concrete wall, or the like, and the framework adjusted to the desired position. Alternatively, two copies of the wall tie can be placed end to end along the longitudinal axis and joined by a threaded rod, allowing a freestanding framework to be adjusted to the desired position before it is filled with concrete. The tie rod can be formed into shapes that are compatible with existing concrete form systems.



Inventors:
Titcomb, Paul S. (Sagamore, MA, US)
Titcomb, Ted (East Sandwich, MA, US)
Application Number:
10/732188
Publication Date:
06/09/2005
Filing Date:
12/09/2003
Assignee:
TITCOMB PAUL S.
TITCOMB TED
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04G17/06; F16B7/06; (IPC1-7): E04B2/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
SAFAVI, MICHAEL
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Robert M. Storwick (Mercer Island, WA, US)
Claims:
1. A wall tie for holding a form wall in a stationary position relative to a fixed point, comprising: an elongated tie rod having a longitudinal axis, the tie rod having a first portion and a second portion, the first portion being adapted for placement through the form wall and the second portion having a first attachment surface, the first and second portions being longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis; a plurality of struts having a first attachment portion and a second attachment portion, the first attachment portion being attached to the first attachment surface of the tie rod and extending away from the tie rod in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis; and an attachment member located on the longitudinal axis, the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts being attached to the attachment member.

2. The wall tie of claim 1, wherein each strut in the plurality of struts has an individual first attachment portion and an individual second attachment portion.

3. The wall tie of claim 1, wherein the attachment member is an internally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

4. The wall tie of claim 3, wherein the internally threaded element is a wire coil.

5. The wall tie of claim 1, wherein the attachment member is an externally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

6. The wall tie of claim 1, further including a fixed point attachment member and a longitudinal extension member, the extension member being adapted to be connected to the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts along the longitudinal axis and further being adapted to be connected to the fixed point attachment member.

7. The wall tie of claim 6, wherein the longitudinal extension member is a threaded rod.

8. The wall tie of claim 7, wherein the fixed-point attachment member is taken from the class including an anchor, a toggle tie, or direct epoxy attachment.

9. The wall tie of claim 1, wherein the elongated tie rod has a second attachment surface longitudinally displaced from the first and second portions in the direction away from the first portion and the tie rod is attached to the attachment member at the second attachment surface.

10. The wall tie of claim 9, wherein the attachment member is an internally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

11. The wall tie of claim 10, wherein the internally threaded element is a wire coil.

12. The wall tie of claim 9, wherein the attachment member is an externally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

13. A wall tie assembly for holding two form walls in a stationary position relative to one another, comprising: two wall ties, each wall tie including: an elongated tie rod having a longitudinal axis, the tie rod having a first portion and a second portion, the first portion being adapted for placement through the form wall and the second portion having a first attachment surface, the first and second portions being longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis; a plurality of struts having a first attachment portion and a second attachment portion, the first attachment portion being attached to the first attachment surface of the tie rod and extending away from the tie rod in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis; and an attachment member located on the longitudinal axis, the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts being attached to the attachment member, the two wall ties being placed in opposition to one another along the longitudinal axis; and a longitudinal extension member, the extension member being connected to the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts of each of the wall ties.

14. The wall tie assembly of claim 13, wherein each strut in both pluralities of struts has an individual first attachment portion and an individual second attachment portion.

15. The wall tie assembly of claim 13, wherein each of the attachment members is an internally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

16. The wall tie assembly of claim 15, wherein each of the internally threaded elements is a wire coil.

17. The wall tie assembly of claim 13, wherein each of the attachment members is an externally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

18. A method for making a wall tie for holding a form wall in a stationary position relative to a fixed point, comprising the steps of: a) forming an elongated tie rod having a longitudinal axis, the tie rod having a first portion and a second portion, the first portion being adapted for placement through the form wall and the second portion having a first attachment surface, the first and second portions being longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis; b) forming a plurality of struts having a first attachment portion and a second attachment portion; c) attaching the first attachment portion of each of the plurality of struts to the first attachment surface of the tie rod so that it extends away from the tie rod in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis; d) forming an attachment member; e) locating the attachment member on the longitudinal axis; and f) attaching the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts to the attachment member.

19. The method of claim 18, wherein each strut in the plurality of struts has an individual first attachment portion and an individual second attachment portion.

20. The method of claim 18, wherein the attachment member is an internally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

21. The method of claim 20, wherein the internally threaded element is a wire coil.

22. The method of claim 18, wherein the attachment member is an externally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

23. The method of claim 18, further including the steps of: g) forming a fixed-point attachment member; h) forming a longitudinal extension member; i) connecting the extension member to the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts along the longitudinal axis; and j) connecting the extension member to the fixed-point attachment member.

24. The method of claim 23, wherein the longitudinal extension member is a threaded rod.

25. The method of claim 24, wherein the fixed-point attachment member is taken from the class including an anchor, a toggle tie, or direct epoxy attachment.

26. The method of claim 18, wherein the elongated tie rod has a second attachment surface longitudinally displaced from the first and second portions in the direction away from the first portion.

27. A method for making a wall tie assembly for holding two form walls in a stationary position relative to one another, comprising the steps of: a) forming two wall ties, comprising, for each wall tie, the steps of: a1) forming an elongated tie rod having a longitudinal axis, the tie rod having a first portion and a second portion, the first portion being adapted for placement through the form wall and the second portion having a first attachment surface, the first and second portions being longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis; a2) forming a plurality of struts having a first attachment portion and a second attachment portion; a3) attaching the first attachment portion to the first attachment surface of the tie rod so that it extends away from the tie rod in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis; a4) forming an attachment member; a5) locating the attachment member on the longitudinal axis; and a6) attaching the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts to the attachment member; and b) placing the two wall ties in opposition to one another along the longitudinal axis; c) forming a longitudinal extension member; and d) connecting the extension member to the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts of each of the wall ties.

28. The method of claim 27, wherein each strut in both pluralities of struts has an individual first attachment portion and an individual second attachment portion.

29. The method of claim 27, wherein each of the attachment members is an internally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

30. The method of claim 29, wherein each of the internally threaded elements is a wire coil.

31. The method of claim 27, wherein each of the attachment members is an externally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

32. A wall tie for holding a form wall in a stationary position relative to a fixed point, comprising: an elongated tie rod means having a longitudinal axis, the tie rod means having a first portion for placing through the form wall and a second portion for attachment to a surface, the first and second portions being longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis; a plurality of strut means having a first attachment portion for attaching each of the plurality of struts to the first attachment surface of the tie rod means so that it extends away from the tie rod in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis; an attachment member means located on the longitudinal axis for attaching the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts to the attachment member means.

33. The wall tie of claim 32, wherein each strut in the plurality of strut means has an individual first attachment portion and an individual second attachment portion.

34. The wall tie of claim 32, wherein the attachment member means is an internally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

35. The wall tie of claim 34, wherein the internally threaded element is a wire coil.

36. The wall tie of claim 32, wherein the attachment member means is an externally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

37. The wall tie of claim 32, further including: a fixed point attachment member means for attaching to a fixed point; and a longitudinal extension member means for connecting to the second attachment portion of the plurality of strut means along the longitudinal axis and for connecting the extension member means to the fixed-point attachment member means.

38. The wall tie of claim 37, wherein the longitudinal extension member is a threaded rod.

39. The wall tie of claim 38, wherein the fixed-point attachment member is taken from the class including an anchor, a toggle tie, or direct epoxy attachment.

40. The wall tie of claim 32, wherein the elongated tie rod means has a second attachment surface longitudinally displaced from the first and second portions in the direction away from the first portion.

41. A wall tie assembly for holding two form walls in a stationary position relative to one another, comprising: two wall ties, each wall tie comprising: an elongated tie rod means having a longitudinal axis, the tie rod means having a first portion and a second portion, the first portion for placing through the form wall and the second portion having a first attachment surface, the first and second portions being longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis; a plurality of strut means having a first attachment portion and a second attachment portion for attaching the first attachment portion to the first attachment surface of the tie rod means so that it extends away from the tie rod means in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis; an attachment member means for locating the attachment member means on the longitudinal axis and for attaching the second attachment portion of the plurality of strut means to the attachment member means, the two wall ties being placed in opposition to one another along the longitudinal axis; and a longitudinal extension member for connecting the extension member to the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts of each of the wall ties.

42. The wall tie assembly of claim 41, wherein each strut means in both pluralities of strut means has an individual first attachment portion and an individual second attachment portion.

43. The wall tie assembly of claim 41, wherein each of the attachment member means is an internally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

44. The wall tie assembly of claim 43, wherein each of the internally threaded elements is a wire coil.

45. The wall tie assembly of claim 41, wherein each of the attachment member means is an externally threaded element adapted to receive a threaded member.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to concrete form systems, and more particularly, to concrete form system wall ties and methods for making and using the same.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Concrete form systems have been well known in the prior art for a considerable period of time. Typically, such systems are used to form concrete into desired shapes and in desired locations by holding concrete stable while it cures. These systems are particularly useful in forming walls, whether freestanding or placed adjacent another surface, such as a land cut.

Generally, concrete form systems use pre-formed surfaces, such as planar surfaces or specifically curved surfaces that are held in stable position, and against the hydrostatic pressure of the concrete, by means of a variety of fixtures to mold the concrete during the curing process.

Included in these fixture are objects called concrete form ties, which are tension members used to connect opposing mold surfaces (such as form panels) and resist the hydraulic pressure of the liquid concrete during pouring. Concrete form ties are also sometimes required to hold form panels apart during erection. Concrete form ties are usually made from medium- or high-carbon steel, although there are also some fiberglass concrete form ties.

There are a great variety of form panels in use. The oldest and simplest type is simply a sheet of plywood (of standard dimensions or cut down to convenient size), with holes drilled at appropriate intervals in its length and breadth for ties to pass through. In one form, wire ties with loops formed on the ends are passed through the drilled holes; steel rods are threaded through the loops of a row of ties, transferring the hydrostatic load to the ties and stiffening the plywood between adjacent ties.

In another variation, wales may be used to stiffen the plywood and spread the load. These are often 2×4 or 2×6 pieces of lumber. The use of wales can reduce the number of ties required for a given area of form, with a consequent increase in the tensile load per tie. The ties in this variation often take the form of round wire rods, with upset ends and are commonly called “snap ties”, or “button-head” ties. They may be secured to a double set of walers by a slotted wedge or to a single waler by a slotted flat cam arrangement mounted on a bracket. The tensile load rating for these ties is typically from 2250 to 3350 lbs.

Systems were developed to minimize the use of wales and provide a convenient way to erect and connect form panels on the job site. One type, such as that made by the Symons Corporation of Des Plaines, Ill., uses a thin ({fraction (1/2)}-inch) plywood panel reinforced by a rolled steel framework. The ties pass through notches cut into the surrounding framework and usually take the form of round wire rods with the ends formed into loops with tensile load ratings typically from 2250 to 3000 lbs., or flat strips of sheet steel with tensile load ratings typically from 3000 to 3500 lbs.

In another common system (the so-called “1-{fraction (1/8)}” plywood system), thicker plywood (typically 1-{fraction (1/8)} inches thick) is used and the steel framework is replaced by horizontal flat bars of steel, typically {fraction (1/4)} inch by 2 inches. These flat bars have attached pivoting latches for interconnecting the form panels and securing the ties. The ties for this system are typically flattened wire with notches pressed into the wire near the ends to engage the swinging latches and other hardware and have tensile load ratings of about 2500 lbs.

In yet another system, an entire panel is fabricated from aluminum, and the ties take the form of flat strips of carbon steel with a tensile load rating of about 3750 lbs.

In all of these form systems, the tie becomes embedded in the concrete wall that is being formed. After the concrete has set, the means of attachment to the tie are removed (rod, wedge, latch, or whatever) and the form panels removed. This leaves a portion of the tie protruding from the surface of the cured concrete. The ties are usually designed to be broken at “breakbacks”, by bending or twisting, either flush with the surface of the wall, or at some point below the surface.

There is still another type of tie that is made from an interchangeable set of components attached to each other by threaded connections. The elements around which these tie assemblies are built are commonly called “coil ties”, and are made by joining 2 or more wire rods to tightly-wound wire coils on either end. These coils are therefore capable of threading onto to specially made threaded rod. This design allows for a great deal of versatility in making connections to a variety of form panels, waler configurations, anchors, weld-on attachments, and so forth.

For instance, to attach a single form panel to an existing wall (for a “one-sided” pour) an anchor can be placed in a drilled hole in the wall. A length of coil rod is threaded into the anchor and a coil tie then threaded onto the rod. Alternatively, a length of coil rod can be epoxied into the hole, or a conventional toggle tie can be used. Into the other end of the coil tie is threaded an element which is appropriate for the type of form panel, or the means of attachment desired. Similarly, a tie of any length can be constructed (and field-adjusted) by varying the length of coil rod, coil tie, or both. The tensile load rating of the coil ties depends largely on the size of the coil rod and varies from about 4500 lbs. to 18,000 lbs.

However, this versatility has come at the expense of economy, and, in some cases, ease-of-use. For some applications, it is more economical and/or more convenient, to use a tie element that in one piece combines a form-connection element (usually of the breakable kind) with a coil-tie element (for connection to the whole range of elements standard to that system). In the case of one-sided forming, the convenience of using a standard breakable tie end to engage the form panels is often desirable.

The case of creating an adjustable-length tie from standard parts in a conventional system illustrates this point. Form-connection elements that are made from pieces of threaded rod having flattened, slotted ends make the connection to the form panels. Each of these form-connection elements is connected to an individual coil tie and a length of coil rod holds the two coil ties together with the appropriate spacing. For ease of removal, the form-connection elements must be greased before the concrete is poured. They are then removed by unscrewing with a wrench after the forms have been stripped, leaving a large hole in the concrete wall that must be filled.

Another wall tie that is used in the industry is the coil combination tie, such as that made by the Universal Form Clamp Company, of Chicago, Ill. The coil combination tie combines a form-connection element (such as a button head or a loop) at one end with a wire coil at the other end. The form-connection element is attached directly to one side of the wire coil, while a shorter piece of rod connects between the form-connection element and the opposite side of the wire coil. While the coil combination tie reduces the complexity of the hardware needed to form an adjustable tie, it is difficult to use in practice when doing one-sided pours because of its asymmetry since the hole for the anchor must be placed off-center relative to the location of the hole in the form. In addition, the asymmetry leads to an imbalance in the tension on the two opposing sides of the wire coil.

It is, therefore, desirable to have a form system wall tie that symmetrically combines a form-connection element at one end with a wire coil at the other end.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with a first aspect, the invention is a wall tie for holding a form wall in a stationary position relative to a fixed point. The wall tie includes an elongated tie rod, a plurality of struts, and an attachment member. The elongated tie rod has a longitudinal axis and a first portion and a second portion. The first portion is adapted for placement through the form wall and the second portion has a first attachment surface. The first and second portions are longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis.

The plurality of struts have a first attachment portion and a second attachment portion, the first attachment portion is attached to the first attachment surface of the tie rod and extends away from the tie rod in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis. The attachment member is located on the longitudinal axis. The second attachment portion of the plurality of struts is attached to the attachment member.

According to a second aspect, the invention is a wall tie assembly for holding two form walls in a stationary position relative to one another. The wall tie assembly includes two wall ties. Each wall tie includes an elongated tie rod, a plurality of struts and an attachment member. The elongated tie rod has a longitudinal axis and a first portion and a second portion. The first portion is adapted for placement through the form wall and the second portion has a first attachment surface. The first and second portions are longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis. The plurality of struts has a first attachment portion and a second attachment portion. The first attachment portion is attached to the first attachment surface of the tie rod and extends away from the tie rod in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis. The attachment member is located on the longitudinal axis. The second attachment portion of the plurality of struts are attached to the attachment member.

The two wall ties are placed in opposition to one another along the longitudinal axis.

The wall tie assembly also includes a longitudinal extension member that is connected to the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts of each of the wall ties.

According to a third aspect, the invention is a method for making a wall tie for holding a form wall in a stationary position relative to a fixed point. The method includes the steps of a) forming an elongated tie rod having a longitudinal axis. The tie rod has a first portion and a second portion. The first portion is adapted for placement through the form wall and the second portion has a first attachment surface. The first and second portions are longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis.

The method also includes the steps of b) forming a plurality of struts having a first attachment portion and a second attachment portion and c) attaching the first attachment portion of each of the plurality of struts to the first attachment surface of the tie rod so that it extends away from the tie rod in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis.

The method further includes the steps of d) forming an attachment member, e) locating the attachment member on the longitudinal axis, and f) attaching the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts to the attachment member.

According to a fourth aspect, the invention is a method for making a wall tie assembly for holding two form walls in a stationary position relative to one another. The method includes the step of a) forming two wall ties, including, for each wall tie, the step of a1) forming an elongated tie rod having a longitudinal axis. The tie rod has a first portion and a second portion. The first portion is adapted for placement through the form wall. The second portion has a first attachment surface. The first and second portions are longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis. Step a) further includes the steps of a2) forming a plurality of struts having a first attachment portion and a second attachment portion, a3) attaching the first attachment portion to the first attachment surface of the tie rod so that it extends away from the tie rod in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis, a4) forming an attachment member, a5) locating the attachment member on the longitudinal axis, and a6) attaching the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts to the attachment member.

The method further includes the steps of b) placing the two wall ties in opposition to one another along the longitudinal axis, c) forming a longitudinal extension member, and d) connecting the extension member to the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts of each of the wall ties.

According to a fifth aspect, the invention is a wall tie for holding a form wall in a stationary position relative to a fixed point. The wall tie includes an elongated tie rod means, a plurality of strut means, and an attachment member means.

The elongated tie rod means has a longitudinal axis, a first portion for placing through the form wall and a second portion for attachment to a surface. The first and second portions are longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis.

The plurality of strut means has a first attachment portion for attaching each of the plurality of struts to the first attachment surface of the tie rod means so that it extends away from the tie rod means in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis.

The attachment member means is located on the longitudinal axis for attaching the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts to the attachment member means.

According to a sixth aspect, the invention is a wall tie assembly for holding two form walls in a stationary position relative to one another. The wall tie assembly includes two wall ties. Each wall tie includes an elongated tie rod means, a plurality of strut means, and an attachment member means.

The elongated tie rod means has a longitudinal axis and a first portion and a second portion. The first portion is for placing through the form wall and the second portion has a first attachment surface. The first and second portions are longitudinally displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis.

The plurality of strut means has a first attachment portion and a second attachment portion for attaching the first attachment portion to the first attachment surface of the tie rod means so that it extends away from the tie rod means in a direction that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis.

The attachment member means is for locating the attachment member means on the longitudinal axis and for attaching the second attachment portion of the plurality of strut means to the attachment member means.

The two wall ties are placed in opposition to one another along the longitudinal axis.

The wall tie assembly also includes a longitudinal extension member for connecting the extension member to the second attachment portion of the plurality of struts of each of the wall ties.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a view of a first embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a view, from the same perspective as the view of FIG. 1, showing copies of the first embodiment of the invention after they have been installed.

FIG. 3 is a view of copies of a second embodiment of the invention after they have been installed.

FIG. 4 is a view of a third embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5 is a view, from the same perspective as the view of FIG. 4, of copies of a fourth embodiment of the invention after they have been installed.

FIG. 6 is a diagram showing the assembly of the first embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7 is a diagram showing the assembly of the second embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a diagram showing the assembly of a third embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 9 is a diagram showing the assembly of a fourth embodiment of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 is a view of a first embodiment of the invention. The wall tie 20 includes an elongated tie rod 22, a plurality of struts 24, and an attachment member 26. The tie rod 22, the plurality of struts 24 and the attachment member 26 are made from materials that can be permanently attached to each other, for example, by welding, although other method of attachment known to those skilled in the relevant arts could also be used. As shown in FIG. 1, the elongated tie rod 22 is a loop tie that has a longitudinal axis 28, a first portion 30 intended for placement through a form wall, and a second portion 32 having a first attachment surface 34. The first and second portions 30 and 32 are displaced from one another along the longitudinal axis 28.

Each of the plurality of struts 24 has a first attachment portion 36 and a second attachment portion 38. The first attachment portion 36 is attached to the first attachment surface 34 of the tie rod 22, and extends away from the tie rod 22 in a direction 40 that is generally parallel to the longitudinal axis 28.

The attachment member 26 is located on the longitudinal axis 28 and the second attachment portion 38 of the plurality of struts 24 is attached to the attachment member 26. As illustrated in FIG. 1, the attachment member 26 takes the form of a coil formed from wire. If desired, each strut 24 in the plurality of struts can be separately attached to the elongated tie rod 22 and/or the attachment member 26. Alternatively, all of the struts 24 could be attached to a piece that is, in turn, attached to either the tie rod 22 and/or the attachment member 26.

Alternatively, the attachment member 26 can be a length of externally threaded rod.

As also shown in FIG. 1, the attachment member 26 is receiving a threaded member 42 that, in turn, is attached to an anchor 44.

FIG. 2 is a view, from the same perspective as the view of FIG. 1, showing copies of the first embodiment of the invention after they have been installed. The tie rods 22 of the wall ties 20 are placed through respective holes 50 in the framework 52 that is intended to hold the concrete in place as it cures between the framework 52 and an already-existing structure 54, such as a retaining wall. The anchors 44 have been placed and fixed in the holes 56 that have been formed in the structure 54, in alignment with the holes 50 in the framework 52. The anchors 44 serve as fixed points relative to which the framework 52 is held stationary. After fixing the anchors 44 in the holes 56, the threaded members 42 are threaded into the anchors 44. Then wall ties 20 are threaded onto the threaded members 42 and adjusted so that the framework 52 is held in the desired position relative to the structure 54.

After the concrete has set, the framework 52 is removed.

FIG. 3 is a view of copies of a second embodiment of the invention after they have been installed. The second embodiment is similar to the first embodiment, except that the tie rods 22 are snap ties, as will be understood by those skilled in the relevant arts.

FIG. 4 is a view of a third embodiment of the invention. In this embodiment, a wall tie assembly 60 consists of two copies of the wall tie as described above in connection with FIG. 1 and a longitudinal extension member 62 that threadably engages the two attachment members 26.

FIG. 5 is a view, from the same perspective as the view of FIG. 4, of copies of a fourth embodiment of the invention after they have been installed. The tie rods 22 of the wall tie assemblies 60 extend through holes 64 that are formed in the two forms 66 that are being held in relative position by the wall tie assemblies 60. The wall tie assemblies 60 have been individually adjusted to hold the forms 66 in the desired position. After the concrete has set, the framework 52 is removed and the tie rods 22 are broken off.

FIG. 6 is a diagram showing the assembly of the first embodiment of the invention. The struts 22 are bent to an offset shape so that, after assembly, they will touch both the tie rod 22 (a loop tie) and the attachment member 26 before they are attached to the tie rod 22 and the attachment member 26.

FIG. 7 is a diagram showing the assembly of the second embodiment of the invention. As above, the struts 22 are bent to an offset shape so that, after assembly, they will touch both the tie rod 22 (a snap tie) and the attachment member 26 before they are attached to the tie rod 22 and the attachment member 26.

FIG. 8 is a diagram showing the assembly of a third embodiment of the invention. As above, the struts 22 are bent to an offset shape so that, after assembly, they will touch both the tie rod 22 (a button-head tie) and the attachment member 26 before they are attached to the tie rod 22 and the attachment member 26.

FIG. 9 is a diagram showing the assembly of a fourth embodiment of the invention. In this case, the wall tie 68 is shown to include a conventional strut 22, a modified strut 70 and an attachment member 26. Strut 70 has been modified by merging the shape of a conventional strut 22 with the shape of a tie rod (here, shown as a snap tie). Both the conventional strut 22 and the modified strut 70 are offset. The modified strut 70 is offset so that the centerline of the tie rod portion is aligned with the longitudinal axis 72 while the other end of the modified strut 70 is touching the attachment member 26. The strut 22 is offset so that it can simultaneously touch both the tie rod end of the modified strut 70 and the attachment member 26. After all of the pieces have been placed in touching abutment, they are welded.

While the foregoing is a detailed description of the preferred embodiment of the invention, there are many alternative embodiments of the invention that would occur to those skilled in the art and which are within the scope of the present invention. Accordingly, the present invention is to be determined by the following claims.