Title:
Internal contour foam mattress
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Disclosed is a mattress for supporting a reclining body with low body pressure and in alignment. The mattress, extends in a lateral direction from side to side and extends in a longitudinal direction from a mattress head to a mattress foot where the mattress includes a head part, a shoulder part, a waist part, a hip part and a leg part. The reclining body has a displacement profile that causes the mattress to undergo differing vertical displacements when supporting the reclining body. The mattress core has displacement parameters established by internal contour interfaces varying to match the displacement profile of the reclining body while supporting the reclining body with low body pressure. The core has a plurality of regions where the vertical displacement in one or more of the regions varies to match the displacement profile of the reclining body to maintain the reclining body in alignment.



Inventors:
Torbet, Philip Alan (San Rafael, CA, US)
Lovejoy, David Eugene (Tiburon, CA, US)
Application Number:
10/973051
Publication Date:
06/02/2005
Filing Date:
10/25/2004
Assignee:
TORBET PHILIP A.
LOVEJOY DAVID E.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
5/710, 5/713, 5/730
International Classes:
A47C27/10; A47C27/18; A47C31/12; (IPC1-7): A47C27/10
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GROSZ, ALEXANDER
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DAVID E. LOVEJOY (Novato, CA, US)
Claims:
1. A mattress, extending in a lateral direction from side to side and extending in a longitudinal direction from a mattress head to a mattress foot, for supporting a reclining body, said mattress including a head part, a shoulder part, a waist part, a hip part and a leg part, said reclining body having a displacement profile, said mattress comprising, core means extending in said longitudinal direction and in said lateral direction, said core means for undergoing differing vertical displacements when supporting the reclining body, said core means having displacement parameters varying to match the displacement profile of the reclining body whereby the reclining body is supported by low body pressure, said core means having a plurality of regions where the vertical displacement in one or more of the regions varies to match the displacement profile of the reclining body to maintain the reclining body in alignment, said core means including a foam member having contour-cut structural modification where the foam member at different longitudinal positions exhibits different displacement parameters to support the reclining body with low body pressure and exhibits different vertical displacements to maintain the reclining body in alignment.

2. A mattress, extending in a lateral direction from side to side and extending in a longitudinal direction from a mattress head to a mattress foot, for supporting a reclining body, said mattress including a head part, a shoulder part, a waist part, a hip part and a leg part, said reclining body having a displacement profile, said mattress comprising, core means extending in said longitudinal direction and in said lateral direction, said core means for undergoing differing vertical displacements when supporting the reclining body, said core means having displacement parameters varying to match the displacement profile of the reclining body whereby the reclining body is supported by low body pressure, said core means having a plurality of regions where the vertical displacement in one or more of the regions varies to match the displacement profile of the reclining body to maintain the reclining body in alignment, said core means including a foam member having structural modification formed by contour-cuts forming slots in the foam member where the foam member at different longitudinal positions exhibits different displacement parameters to support the reclining body with low body pressure and exhibits different vertical displacements to maintain the reclining body in alignment.

3. The mattress as in claim 2 wherein said core means includes first and second foam members having contour-cuts where said contour cuts mate to form a uniform interface.

4. A mattress, extending in a lateral direction from side to side and extending in a longitudinal direction from a mattress head to a mattress foot, for supporting a reclining body, said mattress including a head part, a shoulder part, a waist part, a hip part and a leg part, said reclining body having a displacement profile, said mattress comprising, core means extending in said longitudinal direction and in said lateral direction, said core means for undergoing differing vertical displacements when supporting the reclining body, said core means having displacement parameters varying to match the displacement profile of the reclining body whereby the reclining body is supported by low body pressure, said core means having a plurality of regions where the vertical displacement in one or more of the regions varies to match the displacement profile of the reclining body to maintain the reclining body in alignment, said core means including a foam member having structural modification formed by continuous wave contour-cuts in the foam member where the foam member at different longitudinal positions exhibits different displacement parameters to support the reclining body with low body pressure and exhibits different vertical displacements to maintain the reclining body in alignment.

5. The mattress as in claim 4 wherein said core means includes first and second foam members having contour-cuts where said contour cuts mate to form a uniform interface.

6. The mattress as in claim 1, 2 or 4 wherein said core means includes head, center and leg regions wherein said head region is for establishing head vertical elevations for supporting said head part, said center region is for establishing center vertical elevations for supporting said shoulder part, waist part and hip part, and said leg region is for establishing leg vertical elevations for supporting said leg part and wherein said center vertical elevations vary relative to said head vertical elevations and said leg vertical elevations to establish body alignment.

7. The mattress as in claim 6 wherein said core means has a flat top in the absence of a reclining body.

8. The mattress as in claim 6 wherein a high gradient exists in a body profile between said head part and said shoulder part and wherein said core means has a change in displacement parameters between said head region and said shoulder region that accommodates said high gradient to maintain low body pressure and body alignment.

9. The mattress as in claim 6 wherein said core means includes a first core beside a second core for supporting side-by-side reclining bodies.

10. The mattress as in claim 6 wherein said body alignment is substantially straight.

11. The mattress as in claim 6 wherein said low body pressure is below a low pressure threshold.

12. The mattress as in claim 11 wherein said threshold is below an ischemic pressure threshold.

13. mattress as in claim 1, 2 or wherein said core means includes head, center and leg regions wherein said head region is for establishing head vertical elevations, said center region is for establishing center vertical elevations, and said leg region is for establishing leg vertical elevations, said center region including a shoulder region, a waist region and a hip region.

14. The mattress as in claim 13 wherein said head region includes a first foam member having a first ILD displacement parameter and includes a second foam member having a second ILD displacement parameter, said first foam member above said second foam member with the first ILD displacement parameter greater than said second ILD displacement parameter.

15. The mattress as in claim 13 wherein said center region includes a first foam member having a first ILD displacement parameter and includes a second foam member having a second ILD displacement parameter, said first foam member above said second foam member with the first ILD displacement parameter greater than said second ILD displacement parameter.

16. The mattress as in claim 13 wherein said center region includes a first foam member above a second foam member and wherein said leg region includes a foam member that has an ILD displacement parameter greater than ILD displacement parameters for said first foam member and for said second foam member.

17. The mattress as in claim 13 wherein said core means includes a foam member having structural modification where the foam member at different longitudinal positions exhibits different displacement parameters to support the reclining body with low body pressure and exhibits different vertical displacements to maintain the reclining body in alignment.

18. The mattress as in claim 13 wherein said core means includes one or more tension relief slots for avoiding tension forces in said foam members as a result of displacement caused by said reclining body.

19. A method of manufacturing a core for a mattress comprising, storing contour-cutting parameters into a database, said contour-cutting parameters defining the internal contour surfaces of foam members with vertical displacements in one or more of regions of a core to match the displacement profile of a reclining body on the mattress, accessing the contour-cutting parameters from the database to control a contour controller to cut a foam bun to produce the core.

20. The method of claim 19 wherein said contour-cutting parameters are stored in pairs whereby core members are cut in pairs.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to beds and, more particularly, to improved mattresses for beds that enhance the quality of sleep.

Normally, everyone spends a large percentage of everyday sleeping and the quality of sleep is important to a person's good health and enjoyment of life. Comfortable mattresses are important in establishing restful sleep. During sleep, a healthy person typically passes through five levels of sleep which include stages I-IV and which additionally includes a REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep stage. Stages I and II are the lightest sleep and stages III and IV are the deepest. The REM stage is that level in which sleepers dream and receive the mental health benefits attendant to dreaming. All levels of sleep are important, but stages III and IV are the deepest and most physically restful sleep, when, for example, human growth hormone is secreted. Normal sleep is cyclic passing through the stages from I to IV and back from IV to I and into and out of REM. This sleep cycle is repeated a number of times over a normal sleep period, but can be disrupted due, for example, to body discomfort.

Restfulness and the quality of sleep are dependent upon the comfort of sleepers. When sleepers become uncomfortable, they move to relieve the discomfort and the resulting moves are a normal part of sleep. When sleepers move, they frequently change to lighter levels of sleep (stage I or II) or awaken. The more discomfort sleepers feel, the more they will move and the more time they will spend in lighter and less restful sleep. Good sleeping is normally associated with a low number of body shifts during the sleep period. Bed-induced shifts due to discomfort caused by the bed are a significant cause of poor sleep quality. On conventional mattresses (including feather beds, inner spring mattresses, orthopedic mattresses, waterbeds and the like), most people experience about forty major postural body shifts in the course of a night's sleep. Poor sleepers experience about sixty percent more major shifts than good sleepers. While some shifts during a sleep period are sixty percent more major shifts than good sleepers. While some shifts during a sleep period are beneficial, the quality of sleep can be greatly improved for many by reducing the number of bed-induced shifts.

There are two major causes of bed-induced shifting that cause poor sleep. The first major cause of shifting is the buildup of pressures on parts of the body and the second major cause of shifting is poor body alignment. Considering the first major cause of shifting, the buildup of pressures results from prolonged lying in the same position. On conventional mattresses, the pressure tends to be greatest on the body's protrusions (such as shoulders and hips) where body tissues are put in high compression against the mattress. High compression tends to restrict capillary blood flow which is recognized by the body, after a period of time, as discomfort. The amount of pressure which causes a discontinuance of capillary blood flow is called the ischemic pressure. The ischemic pressure threshold is normally considered to be approximately thirty mmHg. The discontinuance of capillary blood flow is observable as a red spot on the skin. After pressure is applied, a red spot on the skin is a precursor to tissue damage. When parts of the body (usually shoulders and hips in conventional mattresses) are subjected to pressures above the ischemic threshold, discomfort results and, hence, a person shifts to remove the discomfort and threat to tissue damage.

Considering the second major cause of shifting, poor body alignment results from lateral bending of the vertebral column of the body, particularly for a person in a side-sleeping position. Such lateral bending is typically caused by mattresses that allow sagging of the body. Conventional mattresses allow such sagging regardless of the hardness or the softness of the mattress but the sagging effect tends to be more pronounced on soft mattresses. A sagging mattress allows the waist to drop relative to the rib cage and hips and results in stress to muscles, tendons and ligaments. The stress from a sagging mattress frequently manifests as discomfort or even pain in the lumbar region of the back. Such discomfort causes the sleeper to shift in order to relieve the discomfort.

In U.S. Pat. No. 4,662,012 invented by Torbet, one of the inventors herein, an air mattress is disclosed for supporting a person in a reclining position while maintaining spinal alignment and while maintaining low supporting body surface pressure. The Torbet mattress utilized zones running laterally across the width of the mattress with differing air pressures in the zones longitudinally along the length of the mattress. The Torbet mattress has proved to be ideal for supporting sleepers while minimizing supporting body surface pressure and maintaining spinal alignment.

While the Torbet mattress has established a standard of comfort that has not been achieved by conventional mattresses, the Torbet mattress has not been distributed as widely as possible because of its high cost of manufacture. The superior benefits of the Torbet mattress have generally been available only to those, such as hospitals, sleep clinics and the wealthy, willing to pay a high price.

For the Torbet mattress and mattresses in general, persons of greater body weight tend to sink farther into and depress the mattress more than persons of lower body weight. Body protrusions (such as shoulders and hips) cause the highest depression of the mattress and need to be accommodated. The shoulder of a heavy body resting atop the mattress in a side-lying position should not bottom out, that is, the shoulder should not depress the mattress to the extent that an underlying hard supporting surface is felt.

Mattresses using foam and spring sections have been proposed to reduce the cost of the Torbet mattress. Foam or spring sections alone in mattresses, because of the vertical displacement properties of conventional foams and springs, have not satisfactorily achieved simultaneously spinal alignment and uniform low supporting body surface pressure along the interface between the mattress and the body.

An ideal mattress has a resiliency over the length of a body reclining on the mattress to support the body in spinal alignment, without allowing any part of the body to bottom out, and also has a low surface body pressure over all or most parts of the body in contact with the mattress. Since a reclining body has both varying density and varying contour in the longitudinal direction, the ideal mattress must conform to these variations. With such variations, in order to achieve spinal alignment, the supporting forces in the mattress, under load from the reclining body, must vary along the body to match the varying body density and shape. Also, when the body is in spinal alignment, for an ideal mattress, the supporting pressures in the mattress against the skin must be low. The preferred pressure against the skin of a person in bed for an ideal mattress is generally below the ischemic threshold. The preferred side-lying spinal alignment for a person in bed is generally defined as that alignment in which the spine is straight and on the same center line as the legs and head.

While the general principles of an ideal mattress have been recognized since the Torbet mattress, actual embodiments of mattresses that approach the properties of an ideal mattress at reasonable costs not have been forthcoming. Lateral zones, with varying compression in the longitudinal direction, of springs in spring mattresses are capable of achieving spinal alignment if the mattress is of sufficient depth to allow the shoulders and hips to sink into the mattress to a depth that maintains spinal alignment without bottoming out. However spring mattresses generally do not achieve spinal alignment for the primary reason that the compression forces in springs vary as a function of the vertical depression of the springs in compression. The taller the spring in the relaxed state, the greater is the vertical depression and compression of the spring before the force increases to balance the weight of the part of the body lying on the spring. Thus, a body can sink farther into a tall, weak spring before the weight of the body is balanced than it can sink into a short, firm spring. Although tall, weak compression springs are desirable for reducing body pressure, they tend to have intolerable lateral instability and other problems that result in uncomfortable mattresses.

Conventional single-layer spring mattresses with uniform springs are generally unable to provide the qualities necessary for an ideal mattress. In a two-layer structure, the spring compression rate is decreased if one compression spring in one layer is mounted atop another compression spring in another layer. U.S. Pat. No. 5,231,717 used the two-layer structure in multiple zones extending laterally, with different firmness in zones in the longitudinal direction, to provide bedding systems customized for each person in order to provide spinal alignment for each person's particular size and body density. However, such mattresses with different firmness sections in the top supporting layer (the supporting layer closest to the body) provide an irregular firmness that tends to disturb persons in bed.

While substitutes for the Torbet mattress have been attempted, conventional mattresses having zones made from springs and foam do not have the same properties as the air zones in the Torbet mattress. In a Torbet mattress, the force distribution in a zone as a result of vertical depression (caused by a body part such as a shoulder) tends to be distributed and averaged laterally over the entire zone. Because air is fluid, air pressure in a Torbet mattress tends to be averaged and equally distributed in a zone. By way of distinction, the lateral and longitudinal distribution of forces due to a body part depression (for example, from a shoulder) into foam is more local, more complex and is a function of the displacement properties of the particular foam material used. Simple foam and spring mattresses in single or multiple layers have not provided the comfort and other benefits of the Torbet mattress.

The physical properties of mattress materials include among others Density, Hardness, Tensile Strength, Indentation Load Deflection, Compression Load Deflection, Initial Softness Ratio, Resilience (Elasticity), Compression Modulus, Hysteresis and Durability/Lifetime. These physical properties are described as follows.

Hardness is the resistance against pressure.

Density is the mass per unit volume. Hardness and density are interrelated. When density increases, hardness tends to increase. Generally for lower density materials, a growing loss in hardness arises after repeated loading.

Tensile Strength is the measure of the resistance against stretching and changes in tensile strength are measured as Tensile % and changes in length after applying a tensile force are measured as Elongation %.

Indentation Load Deflection (ILD) is a hardness measurement defined in the ISO 2439 standard. ILD in the standard is defined as the force that is required to compress material a percentage of its original thickness, that is, compressed 25%, 40% and 60% from its original thickness (using in the standard a circular plate of 322 cm2). These ILD's are designated ILD25%, ILD40% and ILD60%

Compression Load Deflection (CLD) is a hardness measurement defined in the ISO 3386 standard. CLD is defined as the counter pressure (force per surface) in Pascal when the core material is pressed in 25% with a stamp where 1 kPA (kilopascal) equals 10 g/cm2 (grams per square centimeter), Compression Set 75%.

Initial Softness Ratio (ISR) is a hardness measurement defined as the ratio of ILD65%/ILD5%. This measurement somewhat correlates to the initial perception of a person about the comfort of a mattress.

Resilience (Elasticity) is an elasticity measurement defined in the ASTM 3574 standard. Resilience/Elasticity is measured by the “ball-rebound” test where a steel ball is dropped from a height onto the mattress core and the rebound of the ball is measured as a % of a predetermined height.

Compression Modulus (Sag Factor) is a compression measurement defined in the ISO 2439 standard. This sag factor is defined as the ratio of ILD65% to ILD25%. The sag factor somewhat correlates with the perception of a person as to whether the mattress supports the body with more uniform alignment.

Hysteresis is a measurement of the load deformation curve of the load surface. The hysteresis curve is determined by loading and de-loading of a mattress core. A circular plate of 355 mm diameter is used to gradually build a force up to a maximum of 1000 Newtons. The hysteresis represents the amount of energy that is absorbed by the material during loading/de-loading. The higher the absorption of energy by a mattress core, the more strength/energy is required by a person to change position on the mattress. Mattress cores which are too soft, have a low hysteresis which results in higher energy requirements for a person changing position on the mattress core. A low hysteresis value generally results in poor sleeping quality.

Durability/Lifetime is a measurement defined in one method by the EN 1957 standard. In this method, a weight of 1400 Newton is rolled 30,000 times up and down on the mattress core. Afterwards the height (Elevation), hardness, ILD and elasticity of the core are measured. This process is repeated once again and the results are compared with the original values and recorded as a as a % retention. The average incline of the hardness is determined at 210 N, 275 N and 340 N in the load deformation curve. Another measurement is defined by the ISO 3385 (DIN 5374) standard. In this method, a foam sample of 40×40 cm forced with a weight of 750 N for 80,000 times at 70 strokes per minute. Afterwards, the loss of height and the hardness are compared with the original values again as a % retention. Tear is another durability parameter measured in pounds per linear inch (pli) and indicates the energy required to pull a sample apart.

In addition to the technical parameters of ideal mattresses described above, many purchasers and merchants have come to expect beds to have other “standard properties”. For example, an expectation is that mattresses will have standard sizes such as King, Queen, Double and so forth with dimensions that match existing fitted-sheet sizes, frame sizes and other bedding equipment sizes. Further, an expectation is that a mattress will be compatible with a two-part bed formed of a foundation and a mattress which together are suitable for use with standard frames, such as “Hollywood” or “Harvard” frames. Purchasers and merchants expect that a bed when made-up with sheets and blankets will appear flat and uniform. The public expects that a bed will have the support and rigidity suitable for a person to sit on the edge for tying shoes or to sit on the edge for other purposes. While these “standard properties” generally do not add to the suitability of the bed for sleeping, they are nonetheless important for widespread commercial acceptance of mattresses.

A number of additional “attributes” are also important for commercial acceptance of mattresses. A mattress design desirably meets the needs of a large percentage of the population. The greatest demand is for beds that sleep two people side by side where typically, one of the two is larger than the other. Mattress sizes desirably accommodate a large percentage of pairs of people (for example, a large man and a smaller woman) in the population. A large percentage of the population is between the measurements for a 97.5 percentile male Caucasian and a 2.5 percentile female Caucasian. While other ethnic body types may be larger or otherwise different in measurement, most of the size differences for different body types are manifested in the length of legs so that, for purposes of mattress sizing, the ethnic size differences of people tend not to be significant. Mattresses are desirably available as a single integrated package easily installed as part of a bed without need for many separate or custom parts that require tailoring or otherwise increase the complexity of bed distribution and assembly. The number of stock keeping units (SKU's) required for a mattress product line is desirably low so that distribution and sale is efficient. Typically, mattresses are marketable in a family of three consumer prices ranges, namely high, medium and low and it is commercially desirable to have a mattress line that is marketable in those different price ranges.

Developments in the parameters of and manufacturing capabilities for foam and other materials have provided new components for mattresses that can be used to better approach the technical parameters required for an ideal mattress at economical costs and which can be manufactured with expected “standard properties” and with the “attributes” for mattresses that are desired by the public.

In consideration of the above background, there is a need for improved mattresses that better approach the properties of ideal mattresses and that can be economically manufactured while satisfying the public expectations and demands for mattresses.

SUMMARY

The present invention is a mattress for supporting a reclining body with low body pressure and in alignment. The mattress, extends in a lateral direction from side to side and extends in a longitudinal direction from a mattress head to a mattress foot where the mattress includes a head part, a shoulder part, a waist part, a hip part and a leg part. The reclining body has a displacement profile that causes the mattress to undergo differing vertical displacements when supporting the reclining body. The mattress core has displacement parameters established by internal contour interfaces varying to match the displacement profile of the reclining body while supporting the reclining body with low body pressure. The core has a plurality of regions where the vertical displacement in one or more of the regions varies to match the displacement profile of the reclining body to maintain the reclining body in alignment.

In certain preferred embodiments, the internal contour interfaces of foam members are manufactured using foam contour cutters that are programed with digital data in a database.

In an embodiment, the core includes a plurality of foam members arrayed in layers where the foam members at different positions exhibit different displacement parameters to support the reclining body with low body pressure and exhibit different vertical displacements to maintain the reclining body in alignment.

In an embodiment, the core includes a foam member having structural modification where the foam member at different longitudinal positions exhibits different displacement parameters to support the reclining body with low body pressure and exhibits different vertical displacements to maintain the reclining body in alignment.

In an embodiment, the core includes an adjustable lift for adjusting vertical displacement.

In an embodiment, the core includes one or more foam members and includes a tension relief slot for avoiding tension forces in the one or more foam members as a result of displacement caused by the reclining body.

In an embodiment where the core includes one or more foam members and one or more tension relief slots the core is within a cover that includes an opening on a top side of the mattress revealing the tension relief slot.

In an embodiment, the core includes one or more foam members and a spring supporting the foam members.

The foregoing and other objects, features and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description in conjunction with the drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 depicts an isometric view of a bed having a mattress with a top member supported by resilient support means having variable displacement parameters.

FIG. 2 depicts an isometric view of a mattress core used in one embodiment of the bed of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 depicts a front view of a mattress core of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 depicts a front view of further details of the mattress core of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 depicts a front view of two top members, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 3, mated in the manner manufactured using a contour cutter.

FIG. 6 depicts a front view of two bottom members, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 3, mated in the manner manufactured using a contour cutter.

FIG. 7 depicts a side view of a 74 inch tall male body reclining on his side on a mattress core of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type.

FIG. 8 depicts a side view of a 57 inch tall female body reclining on her side on a mattress core of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type.

FIG. 9 depicts a top view of a 74 inch tall male body and a 57 inch tall female body reclining side-by-side on their backs on a mattress core of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type.

FIG. 10 depicts a side view of a 74 inch tall male body reclining on his back on a mattress core of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type.

FIG. 11 depicts a top view of a 74 inch tall male body and a 57 inch tall female body reclining side-by-side on their sides on a mattress core of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type.

FIG. 12 depicts a side view of a 57 inch tall female body reclining on her back on a mattress core of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type.

FIG. 13 depicts a side view of a mattress having a single top layer over two mating and variable thickness members designed for body alignment and low contact pressure of an average female.

FIG. 14 depicts a side view of the mattress of FIG. 13 together with an average female reclining on her side.

FIG. 15 depicts a side view of a mattress having a single top layer over two mating and variable thickness members.

FIG. 16 depicts a side view of the mattress of FIG. 15 together with an average male reclining on his side.

FIG. 17 depicts a front view of details of the an alternate embodiment of a mattress core similar to that of FIG. 3.

FIG. 18 depicts a front view of two top members, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 17, mated in the manner manufactured using a contour cutter.

FIG. 19 depicts a front view of two bottom members, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 17, mated in the manner manufactured using a contour cutter.

FIG. 20 depicts a side view of a 57 inch tall female body reclining on her side on a mattress core of the FIG. 17 type.

FIG. 21 depicts a front view of an alternate bottom member, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 17, where the contour cutting from the bottom.

FIG. 22 depicts a front view of an alternate bottom member, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 17, where the contour cuts are of varying heights with generally uniform widths.

FIG. 23 depicts a front view of an alternate bottom member, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 17, where the contour cuts are of varying widths with generally uniform heights.

FIG. 24 depicts a front view of an alternate bottom member, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 17, where the contour cuts are of varying shapes with generally uniform heights.

FIG. 25 depicts a front view of details of the an alternate embodiment of a mattress core of FIG. 17 measuring about 2134 mm in length (King Size-84 inches).

FIG. 26 depicts a front view of details of the an alternate embodiment of a mattress core of FIG. 17 measuring about 1880 mm in length (Standard Size-74 inches).

FIG. 27 depicts a front view of details of the an alternate embodiment of a mattress core similar to that of FIG. 3.

FIG. 28 depicts a front view of two top members, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 27, mated in the manner manufactured using a contour cutter.

FIG. 29 depicts a front view of two bottom members, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 27, mated in the manner manufactured using a contour cutter.

FIG. 30 depicts an isometric view of a contour cutter cutting a foam bun into layers of the FIGS. 5, 6, 28 or 29 type.

FIG. 31 depicts an isometric view of an alternate embodiment of a mattress core used in one embodiment of the bed of FIG. 1.

FIG. 32 depicts an isometric view of a bed, with a side-lying reclining body, and having the core of FIG. 31.

FIG. 33 depicts a three stage assembly process for the core of FIG. 31.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 depicts a front view of a bed 1 having a mattress 11 which is capable of supporting a reclining body (not shown) where the reclining body is supported by low body pressure and where the reclining body is maintained in alignment. The terminology low body pressure means a pressure which is below a pressure threshold (typically the ischemic threshold) for comfortable sleep and of a level which materially reduces causes of bed-induced shifting. The terminology maintained in alignment means an alignment from head to foot of a body that avoids or reduces lateral bending of the vertebral column of the body, particularly for a person in a side-sleeping position, and that eliminates or reduces sagging of the body.

FIG. 1 depicts an isometric view of a bed 1 having a mattress 1, supported by a foundation 26 and a supporting frame 21. The foundation 26 is a box spring, firm box, board or other conventional mattress support. The supporting frame 21 may be any frame and typically is a conventional “Hollywood” or “Harvard” style of bed frame that is made from right-angled channels and is supported by legs 6 having casters. The bed 1 and mattress 1, extend in the longitudinal direction (X-axis direction) from a mattress head 5-1′ at bed head 5-1 to a mattress foot 5-2′ at bed foot 5-2. The bed 1 and mattress 11 also extend in the lateral direction (Y-axis direction) normal to the X-axis and in the vertical direction (Z-axis direction) normal to the plane formed by the X-axis and the Y-axis.

The mattress 11 is for supporting a reclining person (see reclining persons in FIG. 7 through FIG. 16, for example) where a person's reclining body includes a head part, a shoulder part, a waist part, a hip part and a leg part. The mattress 11 supports a reclining body positioned in the longitudinal direction with the head part toward the mattress head 5-1′ and the leg part toward the mattress foot 5-2′. A body reclining on mattress 11 depresses portions of the mattress causing the mattress to compress in the vertical direction (Z-axis direction) normal to the XY plane (formed by the X-axis and the Y-axis).

The mattress 1, is formed of a core 2 formed, for example, of resilient members 221, 231 and 241 and has a top side 4-1 and a bottom side 4-2. In the FIG. 1 embodiment, the members 221, 231 and 241 are formed by one or more layers of foam having displacement parameters for providing a uniform supporting surface pressure to a reclining body. The term “displacement parameters” refers to any and all the properties and characteristics of materials that determine the static and dynamic tension and compression properties of a mattress. The mattress 1, includes an outer cover 3 that encloses the inner members 221, 231 and 241. The cover 3 typically includes a tape edge 16 formed around the outside top of the mattress 11. Typically the top portion of the cover 2 includes a soft foam layer that is quilted with an ornamental design.

The resilient members 221, 231 and 241 are formed of materials that extend in the lateral direction (Y-axis direction) and that extend in the longitudinal direction (X-axis direction) to establish displacement parameters that vary in a least the vertical (Z-axis) direction as a function of the longitudinal position (X-axis position). The resilient members 221, 231 and 241 undergo different vertical compressions as a function of the longitudinal position (X-axis position) in order to follow the curvature of a reclining so as to establish alignment of the shoulder, waist and hip parts of a reclining body and so as to establish uniform low supporting surface pressure on the reclining body.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the resilient members 221, 231 and 241 have different displacement parameters that determine the compression that occurs in the mattress 11 in response to a reclining body. The resilient members 221, 231 and 241 have structural and displacement parameters that function to divide the mattress11 into 1ST, 2ND and 3RD regions. The 1ST region is established toward the head of the mattress 5-1′ and the 1ST region is for location beneath the head and shoulder parts of a reclining body. The 2ND region is established beneath the waist part of a body. The 3RD region is established toward the foot of the mattress 5-2′ and the 3RD region is for location beneath the hip and leg parts of a reclining body. The members 221, 231 and 241 have different displacement parameters that help establish the different compressions that occurs in each of the 1ST, 2ND and 3RD regions, respectively, in order to achieve alignment of a reclining body with low supporting body pressure. The first and second foam members 221 and 231 have contour-cuts that mate to form a uniform interface between the members 221 and 231.

The mattress 11 includes a cover 3 formed, on the top portion, by a stretch filling which in its uncompressed condition is typically about 1½ inches thick at the top side 4-1 of the mattress 11. The cover 3 is about {fraction (1/16)} inch thick extending along the sides and along the bottom side 4-2 of the mattress 11. The cover 3 functions to cover and contain the inner members of the mattress and the cover 3 has displacement parameters that provide a soft surface without interfering with the displacement parameters of the inner members of the mattress. The inner members of the mattress function when undergoing vertical compression to comfortably support a reclining body on top of the mattress 11.

FIG. 2 depicts an isometric view of a mattress core 2 that is one embodiment of the core of the mattress 11 of FIG. 1. In the FIG. 2 embodiment, the top member 221 has different thicknesses in the vertical direction (Z-axis direction) as a function of the longitudinal direction (X-axis direction). Also, the top member 221 has different slots 10-1, 10-2, 10-3 and 10-4 having heights in the vertical direction (Z-axis direction) and widths in the longitudinal direction (X-axis direction), extending entirely across the member 231 in the lateral direction (Y-axis direction) and locate at different positions in the longitudinal direction (X-axis direction). The core 2 also includes slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, 11-4, 12-1, 12-2, 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 in the member 231 of varying dimensions. Together, the variable thicknesses of the top member 221 and the varying dimensions and locations of the slots in the members 221 and 231 establish the variable “displacement parameters” in the core 2 in order to achieve alignment of a reclining body with low supporting body pressure.

The slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, 11-4, 12-1, 12-2, 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 extend entirely across the member 231 in the lateral direction (Y-axis direction), have varying widths in the longitudinal direction (X-axis direction) and have varying heights in the vertical direction (Z-axis direction) to establish displacement parameters that vary in a least the vertical direction (Z-axis direction) as a function of the longitudinal position (X-axis position) of core 22. The members 221 and 231 undergo different vertical compressions to follow the curvature of a reclining body. Cooperatively, the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, 11-4, 12-1, 12-2, 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 together with the remaining material in the members 221 establish varying displacement parameters for the core member 221.

FIG. 3 depicts a front view of a mattress core of FIG. 2. In FIG. 3, the portions of the core in the region of the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3 and 11-4, in the region of the slots 12-1 and 12-2, and in the region of slots 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 function to divide the core 2 in the longitudinal direction into different lateral-extending regions. The 1ST region is established by of the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3 and 11-4 that are located beneath head and shoulder regions of a reclining body. The 2ND region is established by slots 12-1 and 12-2 that are located beneath the waist part of a reclining body. The 3RD region is established by the slots 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 that are located beneath the hip and leg parts of a reclining body.

When the core 2 of FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 is placed in the mattress 11 of FIG. 1, the resilient supporting Core members extend generally in the XY-plane (parallel to the page of the drawing) to establish different displacement parameters that determine vertical (Z-axis) mattress compression as a function of longitudinal (X-axis) position to achieve alignment of the head, shoulder, waist, hip and leg parts of a reclining body while maintaining low supporting body surface pressure.

In FIG. 3, the mattress core 2 is typical of a queen size and has overall dimensions of about 80 inches in the longitudinal (X-axis) direction and 60 inches in the lateral (Y-axis).

FIG. 4 depicts a front view of further details of the mattress core of FIG. 3. Dimensions of the mattress core 2 are in millimeters where the head is at the bottom of the page and the foot is at the top. The top member 221 mates with the bottom member 231.

FIG. 5 depicts a front view of two top members 221-1 and 221-2 in an inverted mating arrangement in the position that they are manufactured using a foam contour cutter. The shaded member 221-1 is separated from the other member in FIG. 5 and combined to form the mattress core 2 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 depicts a front view of two bottom members 231-1 and 231-2 in an inverted mating arrangement in the position that they are manufactured using a foam contour cutter. The shaded member 231-1 is separated from the other member in FIG. 6 and combined to form the mattress core 2 of FIG. 4.

FIG. 7 depicts a side view of a 74 inch tall male body reclining on his side on a mattress core 2 of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type. In FIG. 7, the portions of the core in the region of the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3 and 11-4, in the region of the slots 12-1 and 12-2, and in the region of slots 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 function to divide the core 2 in the longitudinal direction into different lateral-extending regions which match those of the profile of a reclining body. The 1ST region is established by of the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3 and 11-4 that support the head and shoulder regions of a reclining body 35 where the shoulder region has the greatest penetration. The 2ND region is established by slots 12-1 and 12-2 support the waist part of the reclining body 35 where the waist has less penetration than the shoulders and the hips. The 3RD region is established by the slots 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 support the hip and leg parts of the reclining body 35 where the hips have a grater penetration than the waist or leg regions.

FIG. 8 depicts a side view of a 57 inch tall female body reclining on her side on a mattress core 2 of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type.

FIG. 8 depicts a front view of a mattress core 2 of FIG. 2. In FIG. 8, the portions of the core in the region of the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3 and 11-4, in the region of the slots 12-1 and 12-2, and in the region of slots 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 function to divide the core 2 in the longitudinal direction into different lateral-extending regions. The 1ST region is established by of the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3 and 11-4 support the head and shoulder regions of a reclining body 36. The 2ND region is established by slots 12-1 and 12-2 support the waist part of the reclining body 36. The 3RD region is established by the slots 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 support the hip and leg parts of the reclining body 36.

When the core 2 of FIG. 2 and FIG. 8 is placed in the mattress 11 of FIG. 1, the resilient supporting core members extend generally in the XY-plane (parallel to the page of the drawing) to establish different displacement parameters that determine vertical (Z-axis) mattress compression as a function of longitudinal (X-axis) position to achieve alignment of the head, shoulder, waist, hip and leg parts of a reclining body while maintaining low supporting body surface pressure.

In FIG. 8, the mattress core 2 is typical of a queen size and has overall dimensions of about 80 inches in the longitudinal (X-axis) direction and 60 inches in the lateral (Y-axis).

FIG. 9 depicts a top view of a 74 inch tall male body 35 and a 57 inch tall female body 36 reclining side-by-side on their backs on a mattress core 2 of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type. In FIG. 9, the portions of the core 2 in the region of the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3 and 11-4, in the region of the slots 12-1 and 12-2, and in the region of slots 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 function to divide the core 2 in the longitudinal direction into different lateral-extending regions. The 1ST region is established by of the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3 and 11-4 that support the head and shoulder regions of a reclining bodies 35 and 36. The 2ND region is established by slots 12-1 and 12-2 support the waist part of bodies 35 and 36. The 3RD region is established by the slots 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 support the hip and leg parts of the bodies 35 and 36.

FIG. 10 depicts a side view of a 74 inch tall male body reclining on his back on a mattress core of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type.

FIG. 11 depicts a top view of a 74 inch tall male body and a 57 inch tall female body reclining side-by-side on their sides on a mattress core of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type. In FIG. 11, the portions of the core 2 in the region of the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3 and 11-4, in the region of the slots 12-1 and 12-2, and in the region of slots 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 function to divide the core 2 in the longitudinal direction into different lateral-extending regions. The 1ST region is established by of the slots 11-1, 11-2, 11-3 and 11-4 that support the head and shoulder regions of a reclining bodies 35 and 36. The 2ND region is established by slots 12-1 and 12-2 support the waist part of bodies 35 and 36. The 3RD region is established by the slots 13-1, 13-2, 13-3, and 13-4 support the hip and leg parts of the bodies 35 and 36.

FIG. 12 depicts a side view of a 57 inch tall female body reclining on her back on a mattress core of the FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 type.

FIG. 13 depicts a side view of a core 213 having a uniform resilient top member 50-1 over a resilient supporting means 2313 formed of two mating and variable thickness members 50-2 and 50-3. The core 213 has a uniformly flat top surface 4-1 and a uniformly flat bottom surface 4-2. The core 213 is designed for body alignment and low contact pressure of a typical female body.

In FIG. 13, the core 213 is typically supported by a conventional foundation, such as foundation 26 in FIG. 1, on bottom surface 4-2. In the FIG. 13 embodiment, the resilient top member 50-1 constitutes a uniform top region below the top surface 4-1 for supporting and distributing the weight of a reclining body in cooperation with resilient supporting means 2313. The top member 50-1 is formed, for example, by one or more layers of foam having uniform displacement parameters for providing a uniform supporting surface pressure to a reclining body. In one embodiment, the members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 have ILD's of 15R, 6R and 28HR, respectively, so that the members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 are medium, soft and firm, respectively.

In FIG. 13, the core 213 is formed of multiple members that extend in the XY-plane (a plane normal to the page of the drawing) to establish different displacement parameters that help determine the core compression in the longitudinal direction for alignment of the head, shoulder, waist, hip and leg parts of a reclining body at low supporting body surface pressure.

In one embodiment, the resilient top member 50-1 and the resilient supporting means 233 have a lateral slot 15′″ that extends through top member 50-1 from the top surface 4-1 to and partially through the resilient supporting means 233 to the top of bottom member 50-3. The slot 15′″ extends laterally across (in a direction normal to the page in FIG.) the core 213. The slot 15′″ functions to relieve tension forces that would otherwise be created by shoulder depression into members 50-1 and 50-2 of the core 213.

In FIG. 13, the members 50-2 and 50-3 with irregular internal surfaces are manufactured, for example, by contour cutting regular constant thickness foam members. Techniques for contour cutting of foam are well known.

FIG. 14 depicts a side view of the mattress of FIG. 13 together with a female body 36 reclining on her side.

In FIG. 14, the resilient top member 50-1 has a top surface 4-1 that has been depressed by the body 36 so that it follows the curvature of the body. The top member 50-1 is in contact with the body (through a cover like cover 3 in FIG. 3) and functions to support and distribute the weight of the body in cooperation with resilient supporting means 2313. The top member 50-1 is formed, for example, by one layer of constant thickness foam having uniform displacement parameters for providing a uniform supporting surface pressure to the reclining body 36. A pillow 20 is positioned under the head of body 36.

In the 1ST region, the head section includes the foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 for supporting the head part of reclining body 36 where the firmer member 50-3 is the thickest and members 50-1 and 50-2 are about the same thickness in the uncompressed state (see FIG. 13). The foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 undergo only a small compression in the head section and provide appropriate displacement parameters for the head part of the side-lying female body 36. The shoulder section includes the foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 where in the uncompressed state (see FIG. 13) the softer member 50-2 is the thickest. The foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 are substantially compressed by the shoulder of the reclining body 36. Together, in the shoulder region, the foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 provide appropriate displacement parameters for the shoulder part of the side-lying female body 36.

In the 2ND region, the waist section includes the foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 for supporting the waist part of reclining body 36 where the softer member 50-2 is the thinnest and where the firmer member 50-3 is the thickest. Together, in the waist region, the foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 provide appropriate displacement parameters for the waist part of the side-lying female body 36.

In the 3RD region, the hip section includes foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 for supporting the hip part of the reclining body 36 where, in the uncompressed state (see FIG. 13), the firmer member 50-3 is the thickest and members 50-1 and 50-2 are about the same thickness. Together, in the hip section, foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 provide appropriate displacement parameters for the hip part of the side-lying female body 36. In the leg section, foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 are for supporting the leg part of the reclining body 36 where, in the uncompressed state (see FIG. 13), the firmer member 50-3 is the thickest and members 50-1 and 50-2 are about the same thickness. Together, in the leg section, foam members 50-1, 50-2 and 50-3 provide appropriate displacement parameters for the leg part of the side-lying female body 36.

In FIG. 14, the shoulders have an alignment line 1714-1, the waist has an alignment line 1714-2, the hips have an alignment line 1714-3, the legs have an alignment line 1714-4 and the spine has an alignment line 1814. In FIG. 14, the waist of the body is straight so the spine alignment line 1814 is straight. The surface pressures T1, T2, T3 and T4 at the shoulder alignment line 1714-1, the waist alignment line 1714-2, the hip alignment line 1714-3 and the leg alignment line 1714-4 are typically low and below a low pressure threshold. For a bed made of properly selected foams and other materials, the low pressure threshold is below the ischemic pressure of about 30 mmHg.

FIG. 15 depicts a side view of a mattress core 2 having a single top layer over two mating and variable thickness members. The core 215 has a uniform resilient top member 81-1 over a resilient supporting means 2315 formed of two mating and variable thickness members 81-2 and 81-3. The core 215 has a uniformly flat top surface 4-1 and a uniformly flat bottom surface 4-2. The core 215 is designed for body alignment and low contact pressure of typical male body.

In FIG. 15, the core 215 is typically supported by a conventional foundation, like foundation 26 in FIG. 1, on bottom surface 4-2. In the FIG. 15 embodiment, the resilient top member 81-1 constitutes a uniform top region below the top surface 4-1 for supporting and distributing the weight of a reclining body in cooperation with resilient supporting means 2315. The top member 81-1 is formed, for example, by one or more layers of foam having uniform displacement parameters for providing a uniform supporting surface pressure to a reclining body. In one embodiment, the members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 have ILD's of 13R, 15R and 28HR, respectively, so that the members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 are firm, soft and firm, respectively.

In FIG. 15, the core 215 is formed of multiple members that extend in the XY-plane (a plane normal to the page of the drawing) to establish different displacement parameters that help determine the core compression in the longitudinal direction for alignment of the head, shoulder, waist, hip and leg parts of a reclining body at low supporting body surface pressure.

In one embodiment, the top member 81-1 and the resilient supporting means 2315 have a lateral slot 15′″ that extends through top member 81-1 from the top surface 4-1 to and partially through the resilient supporting means 2315 to the top of a bottom member 81-3. The slot 15′″ extends laterally across (in a direction normal to the page in FIG. 15) the core 215. The slot 15′″ functions to relieve tension forces in members 81-1 and 81-2 that would otherwise be created by shoulder depression into the core 215.

FIG. 16 depicts a side view of the mattress core 215 of FIG. 15 together with an average male 35 reclining on his side. The mattress core 215 includes a resilient top member 81-1 that has a top surface 4-1 that has been depressed by the body 35 so that it follows the curvature of the body. The top member 81-1 is in contact with the body (through a cover material not shown like cover material 3 in FIG. 1) and functions to support and distribute the weight of the body in cooperation with resilient supporting means 2315. The top member 81-1 is formed, for example, by one layer of constant thickness foam having uniform displacement parameters for providing a uniform supporting surface pressure to the reclining body 35. A pillow 20 is positioned under the head of body 35.

In a 1ST region of core 215, the head section includes the foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 for supporting the head part of reclining body 35 where, in the uncompressed state (see FIG. 15), the firmer member 81-3 is the thickest and members 81-1 and 81-2 are about the same thickness. The foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 undergo only a small compression and provide appropriate displacement parameters for the head part of the side-lying male body 35. The shoulder section includes the foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 where, in the uncompressed state (see FIG. 15), the softer member 81-2 is the thickest. The foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 are substantially compressed by the shoulder of the reclining body 35. Together, in the shoulder region, the foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 provide appropriate displacement parameters for the shoulder part of the side-lying male body 35.

In a 2ND region of core 215, the waist section includes the foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 for supporting the waist part of reclining body 35 where the softer member 81-2 is the thinnest and where, in the uncompressed state (see FIG. 15), the firmer member 81-3 is the thickest. Together, in the waist region, the foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 provide appropriate displacement parameters for the waist part of the side-lying male body 35.

In a 3RD region of core 215, the hip section includes foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 for supporting the hip part of the reclining body 35 where, in the uncompressed state (see FIG. 15), the firmer member 81-3 is the thickest and members 81-1 and 81-2 are about the same thickness. Together, in the hip section, foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 provide appropriate displacement parameters for the hip part of the side-lying male body 35. In the leg section, foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 are for supporting the leg part of the reclining body 35 where, in the uncompressed state (see FIG. 15), the firmer member 81-3 is the thickest and members 81-1 and 81-2 are about the same thickness. Together, in the leg section, foam members 81-1, 81-2 and 81-3 provide appropriate displacement parameters for the leg part of the side-lying male body 35.

In FIG. 16, the shoulders have an alignment line 1727-1, the waist has an alignment line 1727-2, the hips have an alignment line 1727-3, the legs have an alignment line 1727-4 and the spine has an alignment line 1827. In FIG. 16, the waist of the body is straight so the spine alignment line 1827 is straight. The surface pressures between the body and the core at the shoulder alignment line 1727-1 the waist alignment line 1727-2, the hip alignment line 1727-3 and the leg alignment line 1727-4 are typically low and below a low pressure threshold. For a bed made of properly selected foams and other materials, the low pressure threshold is below the ischemic pressure of about 30 mmHg.

FIG. 17 depicts a front view of details of the an alternate embodiment of a mattress core 217 similar to the mattress core 2 that of FIG. 4. Dimensions of the mattress core 217 are in millimeters where the head is at the bottom of the page and the foot is at the top. The top member 2217 mates with the bottom member 2317.

FIG. 18 depicts a front view of two top members 2217-1 and 2217-2 of a mattress core 217 in an inverted mating arrangement in the position that they are manufactured using a foam contour cutter. The shaded member 2217-1 is separated from the other member 2217-2 in FIG. 18 and combined to form the mattress core 217 of FIG. 17.

FIG. 19 depicts a front view of two bottom members 2317-1 and 2317-2 of a mattress core 217 in an inverted mating arrangement in the position that they are manufactured using a foam contour cutter. The shaded member 2317-1 is separated from the other member 2317-2 in FIG. 18 and combined to form the mattress core 217 of FIG. 17.

FIG. 20 depicts a side view of a 57 inch tall female body reclining on her side on a mattress core 220 having members 2220, 2320 and 2420 similar to the members 2217, 2317 and 2417 of FIG. 17.

FIG. 21 depicts a front view of an alternate bottom member 232, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 17 where the cuts to form the slots 441, 442, 443, . . . , 4410, 4411, are made from the bottom side 4-2. The slots 441, 442, 443, . . . , 4410, 4411, have variable height and width to determine the displacement parameters of the core.

FIG. 22 depicts a front view of an alternate bottom member 2322 of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 17 where the cuts to form the slots 451, 452, 453, . . . , 4515, 4516 are made from the bottom side 4-2. The slots 451, 452, 453, . . . , 4515, 4516 have variable heights with generally uniform widths and are designed with height and spacing to match the displacement profile of the core to the profile of a reclining body.

FIG. 23 depicts a front view of an alternate bottom member 2323 of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 17 where the cuts to form the slots 461, 462, 463, . . . , 4621, 4622 are made from the bottom side 4-2. The slots 461, 462, 463, . . . , 4621, 4622 have generally uniform heights and are designed with variable widths and spacing to match the displacement profile of the core to the profile of a reclining body.

FIG. 24 depicts a front view of an alternate bottom member 2324 of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 17 where the cuts to form the slots 471, 472, 473, . . . , 4721, 4722 are made from the bottom side 4-2. The slots 471, 472, 473, . . . , 4721, 4722 have generally uniform heights and are designed with variable shapes and spacing to match the displacement profile of the core to the profile of a reclining body.

FIG. 25 depicts a front view of details of the an alternate embodiment of a mattress core of FIG. 17 measuring about 2134 mm in length (King Size-84 inches).

FIG. 26 depicts a front view of details of the an alternate embodiment of a mattress core of FIG. 17 measuring about 1880 mm in length (Standard Size-74 inches).

FIG. 27 depicts a front view of details of the an alternate embodiment of a mattress core 227 similar to that of FIG. 3.

FIG. 28 depicts a front view of two top members 2227-1 and 2227-2, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 27, mated in the manner manufactured using a contour cutter.

FIG. 29 depicts a front view of two bottom members 2327-1 and 2327-2, of the type employed in the mattress core of FIG. 27, mated in the manner manufactured using a contour cutter.

FIG. 30 depicts an isometric view of a contour cutter used for cutting a foam bun into layers of the FIGS. 5 and 6, FIGS. 18 and 19 or FIG. 28 or 29 type. In FIG. 30, the foam contour cutter 53 includes a base 56 including a left translation track 56L and a right translation track 56R for cutting movement in the X-axis direction. The left translation track 56L and right translation track 56R support a blade guide 57 that houses a blade 55. The blade guide 57 moves the blade 55 in the Z-axis direction. The blade 55 is moved at high speed around the blade guide 57 and passes through and cuts the foam bun 50. The blade 55 is digital commanded to move back and forth by translation of the blade 55 and blade guide 57 in the X-axis direction and to translate up and down in the Z-axis direction. The digital commands are stored in the contour database 51 and in response to the stored commands, the contour controller 52 controls the contour cutter to cut the foam bun. In a preferred embodiment, the bun 50 is cut in nested pairs. In the example of FIG. 30, six pairs 50-1, 50-2, . . . , 50-6 of mattress members are shown. The pairs 50-1, 50-2, . . . , 50-6 are, for example, the top member pairs as showns in FIGS. 5, 18 or 28 or the bottom member pairs as shown in FIGS. 6, 19 or 29. By cutting the members in nested pairs, the amount of waste foam from the bun 50 is reduced or minimized.

The code listing stored in the Contour Database 51 of FIG. 30 for cutting the base members 2327-1 and 2327-2 of FIG. 28 are shown in the following TABLE 1.

TABLE 1
Member 2327-1Member 2327-2
001860180
01801860325
1601801821325
160351821180
199351716180
1991801716335
3041801677335
304251677180
343251572180
3431801572335
4481801533335
448251533180
487251428180
4871801428303
5921801390303
592571390180
630571343180
6301801343230
6771801338230
6771301338180
6821301295180
6821801295300
7251801290300
725601290180
730601240165
73018001190180
78019501190325
8301801180325
830351180180
840351080180
8401801080335
9401801070335
940251070180
95025970180
950180970335
1050180960335
105025960180
106025860180
1060180860325
1160180850325
116035850180
117035830180
1170180780195
11901800750190
12401650750303
1270170740303
127057740186
128057730180
128017400180
129018000360
20201802020360
20200
00

FIG. 31 depicts an isometric view of an alternate embodiment of a mattress core 231 used in embodiment of the bed of FIG. 1. The core 23, includes a top member 223, which is typically 2 or three inches thick and typically is 3 or 5 pound Visco elastic or similar Resilitex™ foam. The bottom layer is continuous wave members 23-131, 23-231 and 23-331. Members 23-131, 23-231 and 23-331 typically are Reflex or HR foam. In one embodiment, members 23-131 and 23-331 have ILDs or 40 and member 23-331 has an ILD of 21.

FIG. 32 depicts an isometric view of a bed 132, with a side-lying reclining body, and having the core 231 of FIG. 31 type. 1.The core 231 includes the top member 2231 and the bottom layer formed of continuous wave members 23-131, 23-231 and 23-331. The member 23-331 can be a single piece or two pieces as shown in FIG. 33. The first and second foam members 23-131 and 23-231 have continuous wave contour-cuts that mate to form a uniform interface between the members 23-131 and 23-231.

FIG. 33 depicts a three stage assembly process for the core 231 of FIG. 31. Typically, the continuous wave members 23-131, 23-231 and 23-331 are manufactured separately with a contour cutter as shown and described in connection with FIG. 30.

The code listing stored in the Contour Database 51 of FIG. 30 for cutting the base members 23-231 and 23-131 of core 23, are shown in the following TABLE 2.

TABLE 2
Member 23-231Member 23-131
X-axisY-axisX-axisY-axis
mminchmminchmminchmminch
00000000
001797.047001797.047
1335.2361797.047331.2991797.047
1355.3151204.7240351.3781204.7240
1606.299652.5590602.362652.5590
2208.661401.57501204.724401.5750
32012.598431.69302208.661431.6930
42016.535572.244032012.598572.2440
48018.898752.953038014.961752.9530
53020.866953.74043016.929953.740
57022.4411104.331047018.5041104.3310
60023.6221184.64653020.8661244.882
60023.622602.36254021.261254.9210
61024.016602.36260023.6221285.0390
61024.0161204.724068026.7721305.1180
63024.8031244.882072028.3461204.7240
70027.5591285.039075029.52889.53.5240
74029.1341295.07978030.709592.3230
74029.134602.36282032.283491.9290
75029.528602.36290035.433512.008
75029.5281295.079092036.2251.52.0280
78030.7091305.118097038.189552.1650
82032.2831204.7240103040.551692.7170
85033.46589.53.5240107042.126843.3070
88034.646592.3230112044.0941044.0940
92036.22491.9290118046.4571224.8030
95037.402501.969128050.3941365.3540
95037.4021194.685138054.3311395.4720
96037.7951194.685144056.6931144.4880
96037.795501.9690146557.677592.323
100039.37512.0080146757.75600
107042.126552.1650150059.05500
109042.913592.323150059.0551797.047
109042.9131194.685138054.3311797.047
110043.3071194.685138054.3311395.472
110043.307612.4020138054.3311797.047
113044.488692.717034013.3861797.047
117046.063843.307034013.386903.543
122048.0311044.094033012.992903.543
128050.3941224.803033012.9921797.047
138054.3311365.35402108.2681797.047
148058.2681395.4722108.268702.756
148058.268002007.874702.756
148058.2681395.47202007.8741797.047
154060.631144.4880903.5431797.047
156561.614592.323903.543803.15
156761.69300803.15803.15
170066.92900803.151797.047
170066.9291797.047001797.047
001797.04778030.7091797.047
2208.6611797.04778030.709893.504
2208.661401.57579031.102893.504
2208.6611797.04779031.1021797.047
170066.9291797.04796037.7951797.047
170066.9290096037.795893.504
00T0097038.189893.504
97038.1891797.047
150059.0551797.047
150059.05500
142055.90500
142055.905993.898
141055.512993.898
141055.51200
130051.18100
130051.1811094.291
129050.7871094.291
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117046.06300
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72028.34600
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53020.86600
1204.72400
1204.724401.575
1204.72400
00T00T

While the invention has been particularly shown and described with reference to preferred embodiments thereof it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes in form and details amy be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention.