Title:
Little remodeler playhouse
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A playhouse kit which includes a building constructed of melamine, white board or a wood or plastic product that when completely finished leaves a paintable outside surface and a clean, slick, nonporous inside surface. The kit also includes two cans of water color paint, a paintbrush, paint roller and paint tray, allowing the child to paint the playhouse. It comes with plain paper with no design, stamps, and stamp pad(s) so that the child can make their own wallpaper which has an adhesive already sprayed on one side, giving the wallpaper the ability to be applied, taken down and reapplied repeatedly. The kit also comes with elongated plastic pieces made to resemble brick and elongated plastic pieces made to resemble cedar wood panels to be added to the front of the playhouse. Plastic materials with a shake roof appearance, being rough, uneven and wooden in appearance are also included to be added to the plastic roof. Plastic, stone look squares are included to be added to the plastic floor completing the remodeling of the playhouse.



Inventors:
Smith, Jeannette Louise (Boise, ID, US)
Application Number:
10/706428
Publication Date:
05/19/2005
Filing Date:
11/13/2003
Assignee:
SMITH JEANNETTE L.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63H33/00; (IPC1-7): A63H3/52
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
FRANCIS, FAYE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Jeannette L. Smith (Boise, ID, US)
Claims:
1. A playhouse kit being made preferably of melamine, white board or of a wood or plastic material when completely finished leaves a paintable outside surface and a clean, slick, nonporous inside surface, comprised of at least four walls, one side including a window (FIG. 1C) and one side including a doorway (FIG. 1A), a back wall (1B) and a side wall (1D) with no windows or doors, with the said back wall and said side walls of said playhouse being connected with elongated plastic pieces (3A) having two sections connected at a 90 degree angel, each said section having one slot which enables said walls to slide in at a 90 degree angel, said side walls and said front wall being connected with an elongated plastic piece (3B) which is comprised of two sections, one with one slot for the insertion of said side walls at a 90 degree angle and one section with two slots, one for the insertion of said front wall at a 90 degree angle and the other slot allowing for the insertion of additional materials which slide in over the top of said front wall and are used to alter the appearance of said playhouse, said additional materials being elongated pieces of plastic (5A) and 5B) part of which are approximately 6″ wide and the length of the corner piece to the door opening and part being 6″ wide and the length of said front wall of said playhouse, part being made to resemble brick and part being made to resemble cedar wood slates, and also including a roof which may be made of four pieces being connected with tabs and slots or being made of one piece (4A, 4B, 4C and 4D), having elongated plastic pieces on both sides (3D) of the longer section of said roof, each containing a groove or slot which allows for the insertion of another material over the top of said roof and also having an elongated piece of plastic (3E) on the bottom of each longer section of said roof, allowing for said material to butt up against it after being inserted, holding it in place on said roof, said material being plastic elongated pieces (5C) being approximately 6″ wide and the length of the longer portion of said roof, being made to resemble shake roofing material, being raised, uneven and wooden in appearance and a floor member (2A) being made of plastic and being the correct size to fit said playhouse and also containing at least 2 cans of water color paint (6A), a small paint brush (6B), small paint roller (6C) and a small paint tray (6D)

2. A playhouse kit as mentioned in claim one which includes a colored stamp pad (6E) or pads and stamps (6F), being preferably but not limited to the likeness of flowers, toys, animals, trucks, cars and cartoon figures and also including sheets of plain white paper (6G) the length of the inside walls of said playhouse and approximately twelve inches wide, being enough in quantity to completely cover the inside walls of said playhouse and having a light adhesive on one side, said paper being separated by sheets of wax paper (6H), being the same in number as said plain pieces of paper and also including square plastic tile look pieces (5D) which are approximately 12″ by 12″ in dimension and are placed over the existing said plastic floor unit.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Many other playhouses have been designed and patented in the past, allowing the child to play and exercise a degree of imagination. There have been houses that allow the child to play house, school and a variety of other things. There are playhouses with telephones, ovens, sinks, and various other items. Some, such as Chase (U.S. Pat. No. 4,883,443, date of patent Nov. 28, 1989) have pivotable panels defining the floors and walls which may be adorned with appropriate indica on the surfaces to represent different structures, but they do not come with additional materials to alter the appearance of said panels and do not allow for the altering of other areas of the playhouse, such as the roof and does not come with materials needed for remodeling such as paint and brushes or the supplies needed to make wallpaper. Others such as Peat (U.S. Pat. No. 5,069,623, date of patent Dec. 3, 1991) have panels made from fabric with attachments in the shapes of numerals and geometric shapes as well as the shapes of every day items, but it does not come with extra materials needed to actually remodel the home and does not come with paint, paint brushes, or stamps, stamp pads and paper. Ojeda (U.S. Pat. No. 6,065,253 date of patent May 23, 2000) is constructed with magnetic materials and accessories, which enable some altering as well as markers and magnetic wallpaper. However, such wallpaper is pre-designed and does not allow a child to make their own wallpaper. Because Ojeda does not for remodeling purposes, it does not allow for painting and does not come with materials such as brick look or cedar wood look pieces or stone look tiles that are specifically designed to mimic remodeling materials. The roof is not designed to be altered. Carter (U.S. Pat. No. 5,827,103, date of patent Oct. 27, 1998) allows for a dollhouse activity book with pages that depict different rooms, but does not allow for the altering of said rooms. Payton (U.S. Pat. No. 3,955,307, date of patent May 11, 1976) has magnetically responsive panels with printed surfaces illustrating interior rooms and other scenes but does not come with paint, brushes, rollers stamps, stamp pads or paper and the roof cannot be altered and it is not designed to be remodeled. Dodge (U.S. Pat. No. 4,978,301, date of patent Dec. 18, 1990) comes with removable constructions pieces having various shapes and colors and patterns. All of these are pre-designed and it does not come with the stamps, stamp pads and paper necessary for the child to make their own wallpaper. It is also not intended to be painted and does not come with the supplies needed to accomplish painting. Ryan (U.S. Pat. No. 3,363,360, date of patent, date of patent Jan. 16, 1968) allows for altering the look to a different type of home by swinging the walls to different positions and has a lip that can be unfastened allowing a member to form an alternate floor such as a rug or the like. However, it does not include materials mimicking true building materials to allow the child to alter the appearance of the playhouse by remodeling and does not include paint or painting supplies, nor does it allow for the making of wallpaper. Although an alternate floor can be chosen, because remodeling was not it's aim, it does not allow the child to remodel said floor, which could have been provided by including true rug material and imitation tack strips or linoleum and glue or tiles. The roof is also not designed to be altered. Feinberg (U.S. Pat. No. 5,011,446, date of patent Apr. 30, 1991) has transparent walls and ceiling, enabling the child to insert his or her own drawings for display, however it is not a paintable structure and does not include paint, paint brushes or roller and does not have a roof designed to be altered. Because it's purpose was not to remodel it does not have materials that actually imitate remodeling materials such as the stone tile flooring or materials that look like actual bricks or paneling. The child is able to display their artwork and imagination but is unable to imitate the art of remodeling and unable to use actual materials that imitate said art. Because Feinberg's main concern was for the displaying of the child's artwork and not in teaching about remodeling, it is highly unlikely that they would anticipate the use of such materials in their design. Rowland (U.S. Pat. No. 6,527,609, date of patent Mar. 4, 2003) has panels allowing for different surfaces to be installed to alter the appearance but does not allow for actual remodeling. It does not contain paint or painting materials. The inside allows for wallpaper to be used but does not furnish the materials needed to make said wallpaper. Therefore the child is not allowed to use their imagination to the full. The floor panel is one pre-designed panel and does not have the material needed to simulate the actual remodeling of the floor, which can be attained by providing either rug material with actual tack strips, linoleum and glue, or pieces mimicking tiles. The unit has two ceiling panels but does not have a roof designed to be altered and has no additional materials to do so. Because the intention of Rowland was simply to allow for the altering of the appearance and not to teach or allow for the art of remodeling it is unlikely that the adding of any of these items would be anticipated. Grooves and slots are a part of Walmer (U.S. Pat. No. 4,018,001 date of patent Apr. 19, 1977) as well as panels, however these panels are not designed to be painted, there are no additional materials to alter said panels, there are no materials for the making of wallpaper and the roof member is not designed to be altered. Winston ((2001/0025579A1, date of patent Oct. 4, 2001) is a stamping system containing stamps and stamp pads, however it does not contain a four walled unit, nor does it contain any other materials needed to remodel. Zimmer (U.S. Pat. No. 4,946,414, date of patent Aug. 7, 1990) is a changeable book structure that has slots and tabs, however it does not allow for the altering of its appearance. Szekely (U.S. Pat. No. 5,318,171, date of patent Jun. 7, 1994) is a watercolor painting apparatus containing various art supplies, however it does not include the basic playhouse structure or the materials needed for remodeling.

As will be shown, the present invention provides all of the materials necessary for the child to experience the act of totally remodeling their own playhouse. The child has the freedom to choose designs of their own making for interior walls and has a variety of choices concerning the appearance of the exterior walls, including the color of their home. They are also allowed to remodel the roof and the floor, making the remodeling of their home complete.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF INVENTION

A playhouse designed for children to remodel, which is made out of preferably white board, melamine, or a wood or plastic material, which will have a paintable outside surface and a clean, slick, nonporous inside surface, also including water color paint, a paint brush, paint roller and roller tray, allowing the child to paint the outside of said playhouse and plain paper with no design, stamps, and stamp pad(s) which allows the child to make their own wallpaper, also including plastic pieces resembling cedar or brick that can be added to the front, plastic elongated materials designed to resemble shake roofing materials to be added to the plain plastic roof and plastic square tile look pieces that are added to the floor unit all of which are intended to alter the appearance of said playhouse.

DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A: Front and sides of playhouse, showing the door opening and additional plastic elongated strips added to the door openings (3C), forming a slot which allows for the inserting of brick or cedar look slats (5A, 5B) over the wall panel. Also showing corner plastic elongated pieces at each front corner (3B) made of two sections, one section having one slot providing for the insertion of the side wall unit at a 90 degree angle and one section with two slots, one for the insertion of the front wall unit at a 90 degree angle and the other slot for the insertion of additional materials over said front wall unit.

FIG. 1B: The back of the playhouse having plastic elongated corner pieces (3A) made of two sections, one section having one slot which allows for the insertion of the back wall panel at a 90 degree angle and the other section with one slot allowing for the insertion of the side wall panels at a 90 degree angle.

FIG. 1C: Side of playhouse showing the window and one plastic elongated corner piece (3A) with two sections, each having one slot which allows for the insertion of a side wall panel at a 90 degree angle and the insertion of the back wall unit at a 90 degree angle, and one plastic elongated corner piece (3B) with two sections, one with one slot which allows for the insertion of a side wall panel at a 90 degree angle and one section with two slots, one for insertion the front wall panel and one slot for brick or cedar look panels (5A, 5B) to be inserted over said front wall panel.

FIG. 1D: Side wall with no window or door opening showing one plastic elongated corner piece (3A) with two sections, each section having a single slot, one section which will allow for the insertion of a back wall panel at a 90 degree angle and one section which allows for the insertion of the side wall unit at a 90 degree angle, and one plastic elongated corner piece (3B) with two sections, one containing one slot for the insertion of the side wall panel at a 90 degree angle and one section with two slots, one allowing for the insertion of the front wall unit at a 90 degree angle and one slot allowing for the insertion of brick or cedar look panels (5A, 5B) over said wall unit.

2A: A simple square plastic floor, sized to fit the playhouse.

3A: The corner piece, containing a slot used to connect back (1B) and side wall panels (IC and ID), having only one slot for each wall unit.

3B: Elongated plastic corner piece used to connect the front wall unit (1A) to the side wall units (1C and 1D), having two sections, one containing one slot for the side wall panels and one section containing two slots, one for the insertion of the front wall panel and one slot for the insertion of additional materials to slide over the top of said front wall panel, which are to be added to alter the appearance of the playhouse.

3C: The elongated plastic piece added to both sides of the door openings (shown in 3C) which when added makes a slot which allows for the insertion of additional materials over the wall panel to alter the appearance of the front of the playhouse.

3D: Extra elongated plastic piece added to the sides of the longer section of the roof (4C) which when added makes a groove or slot which allows for the insertion of shake look roof material, being rough, uneven and wooden in appearance, to alter the look of the roof.

3E: The elongated plastic piece added to the bottom of both longer sides of the roof (4C), which when added makes a groove or slot which will hold the added material in place when inserted on top of the roof.

4A: The side of the roof if said roof is designed in four pieces, showing slots for tabs (shown in 4B) to be inserted into to hold the roof together.

4B: The front and back of the roof if the roof is to be made in four pieces, showing the tabs which will be inserted into the slots (shown in 4A), connecting the roof together.

4C: The entire roof unit if made of one piece.

4D: The roof unit if made of four units (4A and 4B) when connected together, showing the plastic elongated piece (3D) that was added to the side sections and the plastic elongated piece (3E) which was added to the bottom, allowing for the additional shake look material, which is uneven, rough and wooden in appearance.

5A: Six to twelve plastic elongated strips preferably two to six inches tall and being the same length as the measurement from one corner of the front of the house to the door opening and six to eighteen plastic elongated strips preferably two to six inches tall, being the length of the entire front wall panel of said house, the width being approximately {fraction (1/4)} inch, all having a brick look appearance.

5B: Six to twelve plastic elongated strips being preferably two to six inches tall and being the same length as the distance from one corner of the front of the house to the door opening, and six to eighteen plastic elongated strips being two to six inches tall and being the length of the entire front wall panel of said house the width being approximately {fraction (1/4)} inch made to resemble narrow cedar wood panels.

5C: Plastic shake look material, uneven, rough and wooden in appearance, resembling the shakes found on the roofs of some homes, preferably six to ten inches tall, having the length of the longer sides of the roof, being preferably ¼ to ½ inch in width.

5D: Plastic square stone look tiles, being a little less than 12″ by 12″, designed to be laid on top of the large flooring unit.

6A: Two small paint cans, being made preferably of plastic, having plastic handles. Cans to contain watercolor paints of two different colors.

6B: Small paintbrush, being either bristle or sponge with a plastic handle.

6C: Small sponge paint roller with a plastic handle.

6D: Small plastic paint tray, preferably, approximately 12″×6″ in dimension.

6E: Stamp pad, containing one or more colors.

6F: Any number of small stamps, approximately, 1½″ by 1½″, preferably being in the shape of animals, insects, trucks, cars, toys, or plants.

6G: Plain paper with no design, approximately 12″ by 4′ in dimension. Paper to be covered on one side with a light adhesive material.

6H: Wax paper. To be used to separate sheets of plain paper. Is approximately 4′ by 12″ in dimension.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A playhouse kit, which includes a building constructed of preferably white board, melamine, or a wooden or plastic material which when completely finished leaves a paintable outside surface and an inside surface with a clean, slick, nonporous finish. Said playhouse has a front wall with a door opening (1A), at least one side wall, having no door or window opening (11B), at least one wall having a window opening (1C), and a back wall having no opening (1D). Said playhouse is connected using corner pieces (3A) which allows for the easy insertion of wall panels, fitting together at 90 degree angles and corner pieces (3B) used at the front corners, connecting wall units to the front of the playhouse at a 90 degree angle and also allowing for the insertion of additional materials to alter the appearance of the front of the playhouse. Additional corner pieces (3C) have been added to the door openings, having a slot, allowing for the additional material to be added to the front of the house, sliding in between the corner of the house and the door opening. Said playhouse kit also includes a roof, which can be made as one piece or four pieces joined together with tabs and slots (4A, 4B, 4C) and floor (2A) being the correct size to fit properly with the playhouse. The roof of said playhouse is also designed to allow for additional materials (5C) to be added, altering its appearance. Said roof has elongated plastic pieces (3D) on each side of the longer sections of said roof containing slots, which allows for the insertion of additional materials over said roof. Said roof also has elongated plastic pieces (3E) on the bottom of both longer sections of said roof which holds the additional materials in place when inserted over said roof. Said additional materials are shake look pieces (5C), which are wooden, rough and uneven in appearance made to resemble the shake roofing materials used on house, and are the length of the roof. The front of the house can be changed, by sliding in plastic brick look (5A) or cedar look (5B) pieces, which can be included in the kit. The kit also includes plastic stone look tiles (5D) to be added to the floor to give it an alternate appearance. Said kit also includes two small cans of watercolor paint, (6A) a paintbrush (6B), small roller (6C) and small paint tray (6D), allowing the child to paint the outside of the playhouse. Said playhouse also comes with plain paper (6G) with no design, cut to the length of the inside of the walls, approximately 4′ by 12″ in dimension, stamp pad(s) (6E) and stamps (6F) allowing the child to make their own wallpaper. Said wallpaper comes with a temporary adhesive substance on one side and is separated by wax type paper (6H).

Exemplary Mode for Carrying Out the Invention

It can be seen from the description of this invention that a child's desire to learn the things that their parents do with their own home will be fulfilled with this invention. The child can assemble the playhouse, younger children with the assistance of their parents, first by laying the flooring down on the ground and standing up the wall sections one at a time, inserting walls into the slots formed at each corner piece, fitting the roof together with tabs and slots, if made in separate pieces, or simply setting the roof on top of the walls if made in one piece. The child would then be able to enjoy the versatility of the playhouse by choosing one or more paint colors and painting the house. They may either use a paintbrush or roller (preferably child size) teaching them painting skills. They may decide to slide in cedar wood or brick look pieces into the extra slots provided in the corners of the front wall. Then they may design and make their own wallpaper by laying out the individual sheets of paper on a table, placing any of the stamps onto the stamp pad(s) provided and then stamping the paper with it. When finished they would simply separate the paper from the wax paper and apply the paper to the inner walls of the playhouse. Because they can remove the wallpaper and reapply it, if their first try is crooked, they may correct this, teaching them the art of wallpapering. Additional wallpaper kits will be available to purchase so the child can continue to make different wallpaper when they choose. The shake look roof is rough, uneven and wood in appearance and is easily applied by sliding it into the slots in the elongated plastic pieces on both sides and bottom of the roof, altering its appearance. They may also simply lay the stone look plastic flooring pieces over the existing floor giving it a modern stone look appearance. All of this will enhance their interest in remodeling and decorating as well as instruct them in the art and entertain them as well.