Title:
Trough
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A trough in which samples, such as core samples, are stored. The trough is open topped and shaped at its base to be generally complementary in shape and dimension to a core sample to be stored therein. A plurality of the troughs with core samples therein can be stored or transported in an improved core box.



Inventors:
Field, Adrian Bruce (Christchurch, NZ)
Brown, Lewis Kenneth (Christchurch, NZ)
Application Number:
10/956331
Publication Date:
05/19/2005
Filing Date:
10/04/2004
Assignee:
FIELD ADRIAN B.
BROWN LEWIS K.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
206/321
International Classes:
B65D1/34; B65D5/22; B65D5/66; B65D21/02; B65D85/46; G01N1/08; (IPC1-7): B65D85/46
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Primary Examiner:
BUI, LUAN KIM
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JACOBSON HOLMAN PLLC (Washington, DC, US)
Claims:
1. A trough for storing samples such as core samples, the trough being open topped and shaped at its base to be generally complementary in shape and dimension to a core sample to be stored therein.

2. A trough as claimed in claim 1 wherein the trough includes means for providing stability thereto when it is resting on a generally flat and horizontal surface.

3. A trough as claimed in claim 2 wherein the stabilizing means can be lugs or legs incorporated in the base of the trough, the lugs or legs being positioned so that with a core sample in the trough it is stable and cannot roll over.

4. A trough as claimed in claim 3 wherein the cross sectional shape and dimensions of the trough are selected to be of sufficient size to hold a full core sample even if it gets broken up or crumbles over time.

5. A trough as claimed in claim 4 wherein the trough is generally U-shaped in section.

6. A trough as claimed in claim 5 wherein the trough is regularly curved, V-shaped or multi-faceted such as the shape of half an octagon or hexagon in cross section.

7. A trough as claimed in claim 6 wherein the trough is made stackable.

8. A trough as claimed in claim 7 wherein the trough is stacked by providing stepped sections on both sides of the open top.

9. A trough as claimed in claim 6 wherein the trough is an extrusion formed from a rigid plastics material or is manufactured, folded, pressed, extruded, vacuum formed, injection moulded or otherwise produced from any suitable material such as a plastics material, metal or timber veneer or plywood.

10. A core box for a plurality of the troughs as claimed in claim 1.

11. A core box formed from a blank manufactured from a fluted board manufactured from a plastics material.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to a trough for a sample such as a core sample produced for geological or other research purposes.

BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION

Core samples produced for geological purposes are currently stored for long periods in boxes which have for years been manufactured from timber, metal sheet, waxed cardboard and more recently from fluted plastics board materials. Typically the core samples are of a particular diameter and a plurality of the core samples are stored side by side in a core box. The core samples themselves are drilled from rock or other material and as they are not always stable they can over time crumble and deteriorate. In such situations a folded sheet of fluted board has been used to try and keep the separate samples apart for use in analysis at a later date if need be. Unfortunately the existing storage systems are not entirely satisfactory.

An object of the invention is to provide a trough for holding a core sample which overcomes problems in known storage techniques at the same time as providing a useful alternative choice.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description which is given by way of example only.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to the invention there is provided a trough for storing samples such as core samples, the trough being open topped and shaped at its base to be generally complementary in shape and dimension to a core sample to be stored therein.

The trough can include means for providing stability thereto when it is resting on a generally flat and horizontal surface. The stabilizing means can be lugs or legs incorporated in the base of the trough, the lugs or legs being positioned so that with a core sample in the trough it is stable and cannot roll over.

The cross sectional shape and dimensions of the trough are selected to be of sufficient size to hold a full core sample even if it gets broken up or crumbles over time.

The trough can be generally U-shaped in section and it is to be appreciated that it can be regularly curved, V-shaped or multi-faceted such as the shape of half an octagon or hexagon in cross section.

Preferably the trough is made stackable for example by providing stepped sections on both sides of the open top.

The trough can be an extrusion formed from a rigid plastics material or can be manufactured, folded, pressed, extruded, vacuum formed, injection moulded or otherwise produced from any suitable material such as a plastics material, metal or timber veneer or plywood.

According to another aspect of the present invention there is provided a core box in which a plurality of the troughs as hereinbefore described can be stored.

The core box can be formed from a blank manufactured from a fluted board manufactured from a plastics material.

Further aspects of the invention will become apparent from the following description, which is given by way of example only.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Examples of the invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 shows a section through an example of trough in the form of an extrusion;

FIG. 2 shows a plurality of similar troughs stacked for transportation;

FIG. 3 shows a blank for forming an example of core box according to the invention;

FIG. 4 shows a detail of an end of the blank showing how it is folded to form an end of the core box;

FIG. 5 shows a detail of the end shown in FIG. 4 being formed into the end of a core box;

FIG. 6 shows in a series of drawings the method of engaging a top of the core box to the formed base.

DESCRIPTION OF THE EXAMPLES

In FIG. 1 is shown an example of trough in the form of an extrusion 1 which is generally U-shaped in section with an open top 2. The dimension X is selected to suit the cross sectional dimension of a drill core barrel from which the sample core (not shown) is removed. The height Y of the trough is selected to again suit the drill core barrel. For example the dimension X may be 62 mm and the height Y may be 57 mm.

The trough 1 can include means for stabilizing it on a surface. The stabilizing means can be lugs 3 which stop the trough from rolling over when the trough is placed on a surface. The lugs or stabilizing means can be formed integrally with the trough or can be fitted thereto during a manufacturing process. The lugs can be of a similar wall thickness as the trough as in the accompanying drawings or can resemble strut or leg like extrusions or extensions extending on both sides of the trough to a horizontal surface thus providing stability to the trough.

The trough can also include stepped sides at points 4, 5 on either side of the open top 2. The stepped sides enable a plurality of similar troughs to be stacked for transportation as shown in FIG. 2.

In use a core sample is placed in the trough when the two parts of a drill core barrel are taken apart. An upper part of the barrel is removed and a trough positioned in its place. The other part of the barrel is removed after the trough has been inverted. The trough now holds the sample. The trough is then carried for immediate analysis or placed in a sample box for transportation to storage or a laboratory for analysis.

An advantage of the invention is that if manufactured as an extrusion it can be cut to any suitable length to suit a box in which geological rock or other samples are held for transportation and storage.

A further advantage is that the stepped open mouth of the trough is sufficient to hold a sample even when the sample is broken up and/or the sample crumbles.

Another advantage is that the shape and construction selected for the trough is such that the inherent strength of an extrusion when placed in a core box adds strength to the box. At the same time the extrusion itself is strong enough so that it can be handled separately. This allows a sample to be removed from a core box for sub sampling sections of the core for example as is required for coal analysis.

Another advantage is that the lugs constitute channels, which assist drainage of liquid from within the sample.

Yet another advantage is that the sides of the stepped regions being flat enable a number of troughs to nest or rest adjacent each other and to fit tightly together into a core sample box.

In FIGS. 3 to 6 is shown a core box in which a plurality of the troughs shown in FIG. 1 can be placed for long periods of time while transported or stored.

The core box is manufactured from a fluted plastics board which is resistant to any moisture which is frequently associated with core sampling.

In FIG. 3 is shown a blank generally indicated by arrow 6 which is folded to form the core box. The blank 6 includes a floor section 7, locking lid section 8, side wall sections 9, 10 and front and rear wall sections 11, 12. The lines between adjacent sections are creased to form fold lines and the ends of some of the sections as described below are formed as tabs used to erect and form the core box.

In FIGS. 4 and 5 is shown the steps of erecting an end of the core box. Both ends are erected in a similar way. The sections 11, 12 which form the front and rear walls are folded along the fold lines 13, 14 respectively. The edge 15 of the section 11 forms the top of the front edge of the core box and the fold line 13 forms the front of the front wall and floor section 7. The fold line 14 forms the back of the floor section and base of the rear wall of the core box. Tabs 16, 17 formed on the ends of the sections 11, 12 are then folded inward to be along the fold lines 19 between the floor section 7 and the side wall sections 10. In this position the side wall section 10 is folded in the direction of the arrow 20 (FIG. 5) until the sections 10 is in juxtaposition with the tabs 16, 17. The outer portion 21 of side wall section 10 is then folded about line 22 so that tabs 23 slide into engagement with locking/drainage slots 24 in the floor section 7.

In FIG. 6 is shown one end of the formed core box and this shows how the locking lid 8 closes. The locking lid 8 includes an extension 25 (FIG. 3) with tabs 26. The fold line 27 between the locking lid 8 and the extension 25 constitutes the front edge of the lid shown in FIG. 6. The lid 8 is closed in the direction of arrow 28 (FIG. 6). The ends 29 of the lid 8 are folded down so that as the lid 8 closes in the direction of arrow 28 the ends 29 slide inside the box against the inside of side walls 9 and 10. The tabs 26 are moved into alignment with the space between the tabs 16, 17 and the sections 9, 10 into which space they are engaged to lock the lid 8 in place with the extension 25 alongside the front wall 11 of the core box.

In use the formed core box has placed therein a plurality of the troughs. Any moisture in a core in the trough is free to escape from the core box through the drainage slots. The plastics material from which the core box is manufactured results in the creation of a long life stable storage medium for cores in the troughs.

Where in the description particular materials and or processes are mentioned it is envisaged that their equivalents may be substituted as if they were set forth herein.

Particular examples of the invention have been described and it is envisaged that improvements and modifications can take place without departing from the scope of the attached claims.





 
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