Title:
Gemstone cut
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A new method of cutting a gemstone known as the “Riemer” cut is provided. The gemstone has a crown portion, a pavilion portion characterized by having four main pavilion facets and a culet base and girdle portion provided between the crown portion and pavilion portion. The main pavilion facets are integrally formed with the culet base thereby creating a pavilion facet base. The “Riemer” cut is applicable to all shapes of stones including round, square, oval, marquise, pear-shaped and rectangular diamonds.



Inventors:
Riemer, Yair (Tel-Aviv, IL)
Application Number:
10/919527
Publication Date:
04/21/2005
Filing Date:
08/17/2004
Assignee:
RIEMER YAIR
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A44C17/00; (IPC1-7): A44C17/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
RODRIGUEZ, RUTH C
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Daniel J. Swirsky (Beit Shemesh, IL)
Claims:
1. 1-48. (canceled)

49. A gemstone comprising: a crown portion; a pavilion portion characterized by comprising four main pavilion facets and a culet base; and a girdle portion provided between the crown portion and pavilion portion; wherein said main pavilion facets are integrally formed with the culet base thereby creating a pavilion facet base.

50. The gemstone according to claim 49, wherein said completed gemstone is configured to comprise 66-77% of the material of the rough stone from which it is formed.

51. The gemstone according to claim 49, further comprising: a plurality of lower pavilion facets, each lower pavilion facet abutting a corresponding main pavilion facet at a one end thereof; and wherein each lower pavilion facet has one of a group of shapes including a substantially triangular and a substantially trapezoidal shape.

52. The gemstone according to claim 49, further comprising: a plurality of lower girdle facets.

53. The gemstone according to claim 52, further comprising: a plurality of half facets abutting each of the corresponding lower girdle facets; and wherein each of said half facet has one of a group of shapes including a substantially triangular shape.

54. The gemstone according to claim 49, wherein said gemstone is a round stone and wherein the crown portion comprises a plurality of (16) upper girdle facets, a plurality of (8) star facets, a plurality of (8) bezel facets and a table facet.

55. The gemstone according to claim 49, wherein said gemstone is any of group including a precious gemstone and a semi-precious gemstone.

56. The gemstone according to claim 55, wherein said precious gemstone is a diamond.

57. The gemstone according to claim 57, wherein said diamond has a generally round shape having a design comprising one of a group including symmetrical and asymmetrical designs.

58. The gemstone according to claim 49, further comprising: four central star pavilion facets extending from the culet to the girdle; and a plurality of pavilion side facets on the sides of each central star pavilion facet.

59. The gemstone according to claim 58, wherein the planar face of each of said central star pavilion facets forms an angle of 22½ degrees relative to the planar face of each of said corresponding main pavilion facets.

60. The gemstone according to claim 58, wherein said gemstone is a round stone and wherein the crown portion comprises a plurality of facets comprising one of a group including star crown and side facets.

61. The gemstone according to claim 60, wherein said side facets comprises comprising one of a group including substantially rhomboidal facets and substantially triangular star facets.

62. The gemstone according to claim 58, wherein said gemstone is a round stone and wherein the crown portion comprises a plurality of crown facets, each having a first edge and a plurality of crown facets, each having a second edge, wherein said first edge is adjacent said second edge.

63. The gemstone according to claim 62, wherein said first edge and said second edge are substantially equal in length.

64. The gemstone according to claim 57, wherein said diamond is a one of a group of stones including a square stone, a rectangular stone, said diamond having a generally princess cut and wherein the corners of said square stone have a generally curved shape.

65. The gemstone according to claim 57, wherein said diamond is a rectangular stone having a cut comprising one of a group including a generally radian cut and a generally emerald cut, wherein the corners of said diamond have a generally curved shape.

66. The gemstone according to claim 57, wherein said diamond is an oval stone comprising a pavilion having one of a group of cuts including a generally radian cut and a generally princess cut, wherein said pavilion further comprises a plurality of secondary star facets.

67. The gemstone according to claim 57, wherein said diamond comprises one of a group of stones including an oval stone and a pear shaped stone, said diamond comprising: a crown portion having a generally princess cut; a pavilion portion having one of a group of cuts including a generally radian cut and a generally princess cut; and wherein said pavilion portion further comprises a plurality of secondary star facets.

68. The gemstone according to claim 67, further comprising a plurality of half star facets.

69. The gemstone according to claim 67, wherein said pear shaped stone has a generally round or square base whose corners have a generally curved shape.

70. The gemstone according to claim 57, wherein said diamond is a marquise stone comprising: a pavilion portion having a generally radian cut comprising four edges, four main pavilion facets and a cutlet base; and wherein each of said four edges has an angle greater than 60°.

71. The gemstone according to claim 70, further comprising a plurality of secondary star or half star facets.

72. A medallion comprising: a first element; and at least one gemstone attached to said first element, wherein said at least one gemstone comprises: a crown portion; a pavilion portion characterized by comprising four main pavilion facets and a culet base; and a girdle portion provided between the crown portion and pavilion portion; wherein said main pavilion facets are integrally formed with the culet base thereby creating a pavilion facet base.

73. A medallion comprising: a first element; and a plurality of gemstones attached to said first element, wherein at least one of said plurality of gemstones has a first shape and at least one of said plurality of gemstones has a second shape, said first shape being different from said second shape.

74. The gemstone according to claim 73, wherein at least one of said plurality of gemstones comprises: a crown portion; a pavilion portion characterized by comprising four main pavilion facets and a culet base; and a girdle portion provided between the crown portion and pavilion portion; wherein said main pavilion facets are integrally formed with the culet base thereby creating a pavilion facet base.

75. The gemstone according to claim 49, wherein said gemstone comprises one of a group including a round diamond and a square diamond, wherein said gemstones further comprises four secondary pavilion facets integrally formed with the culet base.

76. The gemstone according to claim 75, wherein said diamond is a square stone comprising a pavilion portion having generally princess cut.

77. The gemstone according to claim 49, further comprising a plurality of shaped facets integrally formed on the main pavilion facets, said shaped facets comprising one of group including pairs of heart-shaped facets and arrow-shaped facets.

78. A method for cutting a gemstone comprising the steps of: a first cutting of the pavilion portion of the gemstone thereby creating a fan having four edges cut symmetrically in pairs about each ridge; a first cutting of the crown portion of the gemstone in stages thereby creating a crown having a plurality of upper girdle facets, a plurality of star facets, a plurality of bezel facets and a table facet; providing a girdle portion between the crown portion and pavilion portion; a second cutting of the crown portion of the gemstone to create a plurality of secondary star facets, each secondary star facet shaped as a pyramid whose base has common face with the corresponding star facet; and a second cutting of the pavilion portion to provide four main pavilion facets integrally formed with a culet base thereby creating a pavilion facet base.

79. The method according to claim 78, further comprising the step of: providing a plurality of lower girdle facets adjacent said four main pavilion facets.

80. A method for cutting a gemstone comprising the steps of: a first cutting of the pavilion portion of the gemstone thereby creating a fan having four edges cut symmetrically in pairs about each ridge; a second cutting of the pavilion portion of the gemstone to provide four main pavilion facets integrally formed with a culet base thereby creating a pavilion facet base; providing a plurality of facets forming a crown portion; providing a girdle portion between the crown portion and pavilion portion; and a third cutting of the pavilion portion of the gemstone to provide four extra pavilion facets integrally formed with the culet base.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to gemstones such as diamonds and more particularly to the cut of the gemstone.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The value of a diamond is determined by several parameters including clarity, weight, shape, color, and polish. The cut of the gemstone is generally chosen to maximize the fire of the diamond.

However, in order to produce a brilliant cut diamond having good reflection and refraction (light dispersion), a relative large amount of the diamond raw material is wasted. Currently, 50%-80% of a diamond is wasted during the cutting process. Thus in order to obtain a one carat stone, it is not unusual for the diamond cutter to start with a rough stone weighing 1.7 carat, for example. Since the price per carat increases exponentially in proportion to the carat weight, it is highly desirable to reduce the waste and increase the yield from a rough stone.

Yields may be increased during the faceting process by expert cutting which attempts to achieve a high quality light dispersion while retaining more of the rough stone. Previously, the traditional practice was to limit the angle of the base facets to less than 43% to obtain an acceptable reflection and refraction, which limited the potential saving and the consequent increase in yield.

Various attempts have been made to increase the diamond yield, such as utilizing a greater table spread (the ratio of the table diameter to the girdle diameter). However, the quality and fire of the stone suffered. Other attempts include a mixed-cut square gemstone having a two-step crown, a girdle, and a pavilion (U.S. Pat. No. 5,970,744 to Greeff) and a diamond having a pavilion formed of seventy-two facets and a total of one hundred and six overall (U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,286,486 and 3,585,764 to Huisman et al). However, since many of the facets are added after the bottom pavilion facets have already been cut, there is in fact no improvement in yield.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a new way of cutting gemstones and diamonds, which provides diamonds, which are have brilliance comparable with and even greater than conventional or hybrid diamonds and which produce a better yield than conventional cut diamonds. The new cut known as the “Riemer” cuts provides an improved yield of approximately 30% compared with conventional diamond cuts. The “Riemer” cut is applicable to all shapes of stones including round, square, oval, marquise, pear-shaped and rectangular stones. The “Riemer” cut may be utilized with different diamond cuts such as Princess and Radian cut.

There is thus provided, according to an embodiment of the invention, a gemstone having a crown portion, a pavilion portion characterized by having four main pavilion facets and a culet base and girdle portion provided between the crown portion and pavilion portion. The main pavilion facets are integrally formed with the culet base thereby creating a pavilion facet base.

The gemstone may be any of group of stones including a precious gemstone such as a diamond and a semi-precious gemstone.

Furthermore, according to an embodiment of the invention, the gemstone may further include a plurality of lower pavilion facets, each lower pavilion facet abutting a corresponding main pavilion facet at a one end thereof. The lower pavilion facet may have a substantially triangular or trapezoidal shape. The gemstone further may include a plurality of lower girdle facets, which may also include a plurality of half facets abutting each of the corresponding lower girdle facets. The half facets may have a substantially triangular shape.

Furthermore, according to an embodiment of the invention, the gemstone further may be a round stone wherein the crown portion includes a plurality of (16) upper girdle facets, a plurality of (8) star facets, a plurality of (8) bezel facets and a table facet. In addition, the crown portion may include a plurality of star crown facets and/or a plurality of side facets. The star crown facets and side facets may be substantially rhomboidal or substantially triangular shaped.

Furthermore, according to an embodiment of the invention, the gemstone may have be a generally princess cut pavilion which further includes four central star pavilion facets extending from the culet to the girdle and a plurality of pavilion side facets on the sides of each central star pavilion facet. The planar face of each of the central star pavilion facets may form an angle of 22½ degrees relative to the planar face of each of the corresponding main pavilion facets.

Furthermore, according to an embodiment of the invention, the gemstone may be a square diamond having a generally princess cut whose corners have a generally curved shape.

Furthermore, according to an embodiment of the invention, the gemstone may be a rectangular diamond having a generally princess cut, radian or emerald cut whose corners have a generally curved shape.

Furthermore, according to an embodiment of the invention, the gemstone may be an oval diamond having a pavilion base having one of a group of cuts including a generally radian cut and a generally princess cut, wherein the pavilion further includes a plurality of secondary star facets.

Furthermore, according to an embodiment of the invention, the gemstone may be an oval diamond having a crown portion having a generally princess cut, and a pavilion portion having one of a group of cuts including a generally radian cut and a generally princess cut. The pavilion portion further may include a plurality of secondary star facets and/or a plurality of half star facets.

Furthermore, according to an embodiment of the invention, the gemstone may be a pear shaped diamond which includes a crown portion having a princess cut and a pavilion portion having one of a group of cuts including a generally radian cut and a generally princess cut. The pavilion portion may further include a plurality of secondary star facets and/or a plurality of half star facets.

In addition, according to an embodiment of the invention, the gemstone may be a pear shaped diamond having a generally round or square base whose corners have a generally curved shape. The pavilion portion may further include a plurality of secondary star facets and/or a plurality of half star facets.

According to an embodiment of the invention, the gemstone may be a marquise diamond which includes a pavilion portion having a generally radian cut comprising four edges, four main pavilion facets and a cutlet base, and wherein each of the four edges has an angle greater than 60°. The pavilion portion may further include a plurality of secondary star facets and/or a plurality of half star facets.

There is also provided according to an embodiment of the invention, a medallion, which includes a first element and at least one gemstone attached to the first element, The gemstone may includes a crown portion, a pavilion portion characterized by four main pavilion facets and a culet base and a girdle portion provided between the crown portion and pavilion portion. The main pavilion facets may be integrally formed with the culet base thereby creating a pavilion facet base.

There is also provided according to an embodiment of the invention, a medallion, which includes a first element and a plurality of gemstones attached to the first element, wherein at least one of the plurality of gemstones has a first shape and at least one of the plurality of gemstones has a second shape, the first shape being different from the second shape. The gemstone may be a round diamond which includes four secondary pavilion facets integrally formed with the culet base.

Furthermore, the gemstone may include a plurality of shaped facets integrally formed on the main pavilion facets, the shaped facets includes one of group including pairs of heart-shaped facets and arrow-shaped facets.

Additionally, there is also provided according to an embodiment of the invention, a method for cutting a gemstone. The method includes the steps of:

a first cutting of the pavilion portion of the gemstone thereby creating a fan having four edges cut symmetrically in pairs about each ridge;

a first cutting of the crown portion of the gemstone in stages thereby creating a crown having a plurality of upper girdle facets, a plurality of star facets, a plurality of bezel facets and a table facet;

providing a girdle portion between the crown portion and pavilion portion;

a second cutting of the crown portion of the gemstone to create a plurality of secondary star facets, each secondary star facet shaped as a pyramid whose base has common face with the corresponding star facet; and

a second cutting of the pavilion portion to provide four main pavilion facets integrally formed with a culet base thereby creating a pavilion facet base.

Additionally, there is also provided, according to an embodiment of the invention, a method for cutting a gemstone. The method includes the steps of:

a first cutting of the pavilion portion of the gemstone thereby creating a fan having four edges cut symmetrically in pairs about each ridge;

a second cutting of the pavilion portion of the gemstone to provide four main pavilion facets integrally formed with a culet base thereby creating a pavilion facet base;

providing a plurality of facets forming a crown portion;

providing a girdle portion between the crown portion and pavilion portion; and

a third cutting of the pavilion portion of the gemstone to provide four extra pavilion facets integrally formed with the culet base.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a better understanding, the invention will now be described, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings in which like numerals designate like components throughout the application, and in which:

FIGS. 1A-1H illustrate top and bottom views, showing the “Riemer” cut of a round diamond according to an embodiment of the invention in various stages of cutting;

FIGS. 1J-1K illustrates external views of the diamond cut according to FIGS. 1A-1H;

FIGS. 2-3 illustrate an alternative embodiment showing the cut of a round diamond;

FIGS. 4A-4E illustrate the production of a “Riemer” cut for a round stone according to an embodiment of the invention;

FIGS. 5, 6A-6C, 7 and 8 illustrate alternative embodiments of the invention showing the “Riemer” cut for a round diamond;

FIGS. 9 and 9A illustrate embodiments of the invention showing a princess cut for a square stone;

FIGS. 10 and 10A-C illustrate alternative embodiments of the invention showing the cut of a rectangular stone;

FIGS. 11-13 illustrate alternative embodiments of the invention showing the cut of a rectangular stone;

FIGS. 14A-14B, 15A-15B and 16 illustrate alternative embodiments of the invention showing cuts of an oval stone;

FIGS. 17A-17C and 18-19 illustrate alternatives embodiments of the invention showing the cut of a teardrop stone;

FIGS. 20A-20B and 21A-21B illustrate alternatives embodiments of the invention showing the cut of a marquise stone;

FIGS. 22A-22D illustrate top, bottom and two alternative composite views of an oval shaped stone according to an alternative embodiment of the invention;

FIGS. 23A-23D illustrate top, bottom and two alternative composite views of a tear drop stone according to an alternative embodiment of the invention;

FIGS. 24A-24d illustrate top, bottom and two alternative composite views of a marquise stone according to an alternative embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 25 illustrates a medallion having a plurality of diamonds cut according to embodiments of the present invention;

FIGS. 26A-26E illustrate bottom and composite views, showing the cut of a round diamond according to an alternative embodiment of the invention in various stages of cutting;

FIGS. 27A-27C illustrate top and composite views, showing the cut of a round diamond according to the embodiment of FIGS. 1C-1E;

FIGS. 28A-28D illustrate an alternative embodiment of the “Riemer” cut according to the invention for a square stone; and

FIGS. 29A-29B illustrate an alternative embodiment of the “Riemer” cut with addition of heart and arrow facets.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a new method of cutting a gemstone which increases the yield while achieving a achieving a brilliance and having light dispersion.

The accepted theory in the gem industry that the optimal angle of the base facets is roughly 41 degrees and that even small deviations from this figure will affect the brilliance of the stone has unduly limited the development of other methods of cutting stones. The inventor has realized that, contrary to standard practice, by cutting the base with fewer pavilions there will be a substantially increase in the yield. Thus, for example, a one carat brilliant cut stone may be produced from a rough stone weighing approximately 1.3-1.4 carat, compared with standard cuts which use a rough stone weighing approximately 1.7 to 2 carats to achieve a one carat stone. As will be appreciated such an improvement in yield (of approximately 30%) is especially significant in the diamond industry, where stones are relatively very expensive.

The new cut of the diamond, hereinafter referred to as the “Riemer” cut, achieves a greater yield than conventional cuts while emphasizing the diamond's brilliance.

The present invention is described, by way of example only, to FIGS. 1-29, which illustrate different embodiments of the invention with respect to different types and shapes of diamonds. It will be appreciated by persons knowledgeable in the art that though the examples refer to diamonds the same principles also apply to other gemstones.

Reference is now made to FIGS. 1A-1G, which illustrate the cutting of a round diamond, using the inventive “Riemer” cut according to an embodiment of the invention. As best seen in profile views of FIGS. 1J and 1K, a diamond comprises three sections, the crown (top) 1, girdle 2 and pavilion (base) 3.

In a first step (FIG. 1A), the base (pavilion) 3 is cut with a fan of four edges cut symmetrically in pairs about each ridge 10. Alternatively, the base 3 may be cut with four main pavilions 12, as shown in FIG. 1B. The breaks between the main pavilions 12 define ridges 14. To improve the yield and save raw material, the forming of the facets are carried out during “brilliantizing”, as described hereinbelow.

FIGS. 1C-1D illustrate the traditional cutting of the table and crown of the diamond (stages I and II). As shown in the top view of FIG. 1E, the crown of the brilliant-cut diamond has 16 upper Girdle facets 112, 8 Star facets 114, 8 Bezel facets 116 and a Table facet 110. During “brilliantizing” (the formation of facets), the edges 15 and half the length of the edges 16 ‘disappear’ and are replaced by edges 17, 18 and 19, as shown.

FIG. 1F illustrates the second further stage of cutting the base (pavilion) of the diamond and the formation of facets 20, 22 according to the “Riemer” cut. As shown in FIG. 1F, the base (pavilion) 3 of the diamond comprises 16 Lower Girdle facets 20 and 4 Main Pavilion facets 22 (formed from initial pavilion cut 12) and a Culet 28 (best seen in side views of FIGS. 1J and 1K, to which reference is also now made).

In contrast to traditional pavilions, the culet 28 is not merely a point at the bottom tip of the pavilion or even a culet line, but comprises a “pavilion facet base” containing a much larger proportion of stone than in traditional diamond cuts. The main pavilion facets 22 are delineated (best seen in profile view of FIG. 1K) by edges 26, 27 and culet 28, which indicate the “extra” material remaining in a “Riemer” cut diamond.

FIG. 1G illustrates the completed “Riemer” cut diamond showing the facets of the top (table of the crown) 1 of the diamond overlaying the base (pavilion) 3.

FIG. 1H, to which reference is also now made, illustrates an alternative embodiment of diamond based on the “Riemer” cut diamond of FIGS. 1A-1G. The stone of FIG. 1H is similar to the stone of FIG. 1F with the additions of extra facets 23, 24 and 25 which may be added and either abut the Main Pavilion 22 or lower Girdle 20 to create alternative brilliant cuts. For clarity, only one example of each additional facet is shown though for symmetry the same facet may be added to each of the main pavilion and girdle facets. Non-limiting examples include a triangular facet 23 abutting Girdle 20, a trapezoidal facet 24 abutting Main Pavilion facet 22 and a triangular facet 23 abutting Main Pavilion facet 22.

FIGS. 1L-1M illustrate side (profile) views of varying alternative stones having a “Riemer” cut, formed from a round stone in accordance with the embodiments of the invention. For clarity, the crown facets in FIGS. 1L and 1M (similar to FIGS. 1J and 1K) are not shown. As shown in the embodiment of FIG. 1L, the cutting of 4 main pavilion facets give an increased yield illustrated and delineated by edges 29, 30 and 31. Similarly, as shown in the embodiment of FIG. 1M, the increased yield is illustrated and delineated by edges 32, 33, 34 and 35 forming the pavilion facets.

FIG. 2 illustrates another alternative embodiment of a round stone based on the “Riemer” cut diamond of FIGS. 1A-1M, with the addition of extra facets 36, abutting the Upper Girdle facets 112 on the crown 1 of the diamond.

FIGS. 3, 4A-4E and 5 illustrate the inventive “Riemer” cut for a round stone diamond, generally designated 40, according to a further embodiment of the invention. FIG. 3 illustrates the completed “Riemer” cut diamond showing the facets of the crown of the diamond overlaying the base (pavilion). The crown of diamond is similar to the diamond of FIGS. 1A-1M, and will not be further described. A feature of the invention is use of a “princess” type cut, which is conventionally used for square and rectangular diamonds, for forming the base (a pavilion) of a round stone.

FIGS. 4A-4E illustrate the cutting of the round diamond 40 in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. The base is cut with a fan of four main pavilions 42 cut symmetrically (FIG. 4A). Then, the main pavilion facets forming the princess cut are formed (FIG. 4B). The main pavilion facets comprise side pavilion facets, generally designated 44, and four central star pavilion facets 45. The four central star shaped pavilion facets 450 extend from the culet to the girdle. On the sides 410 of each of the central star shaped pavilion facets are at least three sets of pavilion side facets 420, 430 and 440.

As shown in top view of FIG. 4C, additional half facets (also known as “halvekes”) 46 may be added to the crown. FIGS. 4D-4E are composite top and bottom views of the completed round stone 40 having a traditional crown and a princess cut pavilion.

FIG. 5, to which reference is also now made, illustrates the method of cutting to achieve the princess cut of FIGS. 4A-4E. After the four main star shaped pavilions 450 have been cut, the stone is rotated at an angle of approximately 22½° (marked “X”) and the sets of star pavilion facets 420, 430, 440 are then cut onto the pavilion base so that they are effectively asymmetrical and “eccentric” in relation to the main star shaped pavilions 450.

It will be appreciated by persons knowledgeable in the art that additional sets of star facets may be added to further enhance the brilliance of the stone.

FIGS. 6A-6C are composite illustrative views of yet other embodiments of the invention for a round stone wherein each stone comprises a princess cut pavilion and a crown which may comprise either star crown facets 64 and 66 and/or side facets 62. The crown facets may comprise substantially rhomboidal facets 62 (FIG. 6A) and/or triangular star facets 64, 66 (FIGS. 6B and 6C).

FIGS. 7 and 8 illustrate yet other embodiments of a round stone having a princess cut pavilion. FIG. 7 illustrates an “asymmetric” design, illustrated by the addition of four “large” facets 72 and four “small” facets 74 to the crown of the stone. In the design illustrated in FIG. 8, crown facets 76 are shown as equidistant at an angle of 45 degrees relative to the star facets 78 of the pavilion. It will be appreciated by persons knowledgeable in the art that these facets may be equal or non-equal shapes.

The “Riemer” cut has been described hereinabove with reference to a round stone but, as will now be described below, is applicable to all types of stones including square, rectangular, oval, pear-shaped and marquise, for example.

FIGS. 9 and 9A illustrate embodiments of a cut of a square stone 90 having a princess cut with rounded corners 92 instead of the traditional edged corners. As shown in the example of FIG. 9A, the “Riemer” cut diamond utilizes a larger percentage of the raw material (illustrated by side facets 94), compared with FIG. 9, while at the same time enhancing the brilliance of the diamond.

FIGS. 10 and 10A-10C illustrate embodiments of a cut of a rectangular stone. FIG. 10 illustrates the traditional prior art princess cut on a rectangular stone having traditional square corners. FIGS. 10A-10C illustrate alternative embodiments of the invention wherein the corners of the rectangular stone have been rounded, thus saving raw material as well as effecting a princess cut design having a high briliance. By rounding the corners 96 (FIG. 10C), there is an increased utilization of material (compared with FIG. 10), schematically illustrated by side facet 98. In the alternative embodiment of FIG. 10A, rounding the corners 100 (FIG. 10A), increases the utilization of material (compared with FIG. 10), schematically illustrated by side facet 102. Similarly, FIG. 10B illustrates a further design of a higher yielding rectangular stone having rounded corners 104.

FIG. 11 is an example of an alternative embodiment of the invention illustrating a higher yielding rectangular stone having a radian cut and rounded corners 110. Schematically, side facets 112 illustrate the additional material being utilized.

Similarly, FIG. 12 is an example of an alternative embodiment of the invention illustrating a higher yielding rectangular stone having an emerald cut and rounded corners 120.

FIG. 13 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the invention applicable to a square stone, having a cut similar to an emerald cut with have been rounded corners 124.

The embodiments of FIGS. 11-13 illustrate the improvement of yield for different cuts, such as emerald and radian, for example, compared with the prior art.

FIGS. 14A-14C illustrate an alternative embodiment of the invention applicable to an oval shaped stone having a standard cut on the table of the crown (FIG. 14), as illustrated above with respect to FIG. 1E, and having a radian cut on the base (pavilion). FIG. 14B shows the formation of four main pavilions 130 on the base of the stone. FIG. 14C shows the four main pavilions 130 together with side facets 132.

FIGS. 15A and 15B illustrate composite top and bottom views and side view, respectively of an alternative embodiment of the invention for an oval stone. In this embodiment, the crown of the stone may have a standard oval cut or alternatively a princess cut with facets on the edges and corners 140 and/or stars as shown. The pavilion of the oval stone may have a princess cut having facets 142, 144, 146 and 148, as best seen in the side view of FIG. 15B.

FIG. 16 is yet another alternative embodiment of the invention for an oval stone 150, similar to the embodiment of FIGS. 15A-B, but with the addition of extra “halvekes” (half facets) 152 on the crown.

FIG. 17A illustrates the standard prior art cut of the crown for a pear shaped stone. FIGS. 17B-17C illustrate an alternative embodiment of the invention for a pear shaped (tear drop) stone 160 in accordance with the invention. In this embodiment, the pavilion is formed with a radian cut on its base (FIG. 17B). Additional facets may be added to the base in the spaces “Y” shown if desired. FIG. 17C illustrates the pear shaped stone having a princess cut formed on the base. Additional facets may also be added to the princess cut pavilion.

FIG. 18 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the invention for a pear shaped stone 180 having rounded shoulders 182 on a round or square base 182.

FIG. 19 illustrates an alternative embodiment of the invention for a pear shaped stone, similar to FIG. 17C with the addition of extra “halvekes” (half) facets 162, as shown.

FIG. 20A illustrates the base of a standard prior art marquise stone having six edges (A), preferably having an angle greater than 60°, four pavilions (B) and a radian cut. The top of the stone may have a standard brilliant cut.

FIG. 20B illustrates an alternative embodiment of the invention utilizing the “Riemer” cut applicable to a marquise cut stone 188. The alternative embodiment comprises a pavilion having four edges (C), preferably having an angle greater than 60°. The culet 189 at the base of the stone is formed from four pavilions B. The crown of the stone may have a standard cut, for example.

FIGS. 21A-21B illustrate composite and side views, respectively, for an alternative “Riemer” cut applicable to a marquise cut stone 190, in accordance with the invention. The marquise cut stone 190 comprises four main pavilion facets 192 and additional facets 191 an 194, as shown.

FIGS. 22A-22C illustrate top, bottom and composite views of an oval shaped stone utilizing a “Riemer” cut according to an alternative embodiment of the invention.

FIGS. 23A-23C illustrate top, bottom and composite views of a pear shaped stone utilizing a “Riemer” cut according to an alternative embodiment of the invention.

FIGS. 24A-24C illustrate top, bottom and composite views of a marquise stone utilizing a “Riemer” cut according to an alternative embodiment of the invention.

It will be appreciated by persons knowledgeable in the art that the above examples are non-limiting and that variations may be made to the cut of a stone without detracting from the “Riemer” cut of the invention. For example, the cut of the stone may be varied by the addition or subtraction of facets, such as half facets as shown in the composite views of FIGS. 22D, 23D and 24D for oval shaped, pear shaped and marquise stones respectively.

Reference is now made to FIG. 25, which illustrates one application for the cut diamonds of the above embodiments. In the example shown, a medallion 100 is illustrated having a design representing a flower. Medallion 100 comprises a stem 102 having one or more stones 104, 106, 108 attached thereto. The stones represent flower petals and a feature of the medallion is that the stones may be of any suitable design including “Riemer” cut diamonds.

It will be appreciated that different cut stones may be used and that the design possibilities are limitless.

Reference is now made to FIGS. 26A-26F and 27A-27C, which illustrate the method of cutting the pavilion and crown, respectively, of a round diamond, generally designated 300, according to the “Riemer” cut.

In a first step (FIG. 26A), the base (pavilion) is cut with a fan of four edges 310 cut symmetrically in pairs about each ridge. The base is then cut with four main pavilion facets 320, as shown in FIG. 26B which gives the “Riemer” cut its specific appearance. Four secondary pavilion facets 330 may be added (FIG. 26C) as well as 16 lower girdle facets 332 (FIG. 26D).

FIGS. 27A-27C (which are similar to FIGS. 1C-1E) illustrate the cutting of the crown of the diamond according to a standard brilliant cut, that is having 16 upper Girdle facets 340, 8 Star facets 342, 8 Bezel facets 344 and a Table facet 346. It will be appreciated that the crown may be cut differently without deviating from the invention, as described hereinabove.

Composite and side views of the round diamond cut according to the “Riemer” cut are shown in FIGS. 26E and 26F, respectively. Thus, the diamond may be formed according the “Riemer” cut comprising the same number of facets as a traditional cut round diamond while simultaneously achieving a greater yield than conventional cut diamond.

FIGS. 28A-28D, illustrate an alternative embodiment of the “Riemer” cut according to the invention applicable for a square stone, generally designated 200. FIG. 28A shows the pavilion of the stone having four main pavilion facets 202 formed thereon. FIG. 28B illustrates the completed cut of the base including four main pavilion facets 210, four secondary pavilion facets 208 and 16 lower girdle facets 206.

The crown of stone 200 may be formed according to the princess cut, for example. FIGS. 28C and 28D illustrate examples of alternative composites view of square stones 220 and 230, respectively, formed according to the “Riemer” cut.

FIGS. 29A-29B illustrate “Riemer” cut round diamonds 240 and 250, respectively, formed according to the invention having additional facets added. In the example of FIG. 29A, four pairs of heart-shaped facets 242 have been added to the pavilion fan, while in the example of FIG. 29B, four arrow-shaped facets 252 have been added to each of the main pavilion facets.

It will be appreciated by persons knowledgeable in the art that variations may be made to the cut of a stone without detracting from the “Riemer” cut of the invention. For example, the cut of the stone may be varied by the addition or subtraction of facets, such as half facets and shaped facets. Furthermore, the “Riemer” cut is applicable to all shapes, sizes and types of stones.