Title:
Golf training apparatus
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A golf training apparatus is formed of a body of a typically rigid material and includes a head portion corresponding in shape and dimensions to that of a regulation golf ball, and a stem portion, extending from the head portion. Adhesive is placed on a side of the body at the head and the stem portions, allowing the stem portion to attach the body to a support member, while the remaining portion of the body, including the head portion, extends upward and stands unsupported. A golf club can now be brought into contact with the body, and if contact is made between the club head and the first portion, the body will separate from the support member and the first portion will adhere to the club head, indicating the location on the club head where it contacted the golf ball. Based on this information, the golfer can adjust his swing, such that contact with a golf ball will be made at the desired “sweet spot” or other location on the club head.



Inventors:
Gagne, Robert M. (Leawood, KS, US)
Application Number:
10/854456
Publication Date:
03/03/2005
Filing Date:
05/26/2004
Assignee:
GAGNE ROBERT M.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/237
International Classes:
A63B69/36; (IPC1-7): A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
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20020055404Arrowhead tip with a cutting edgeMay, 2002Victor II
20060148582Pool cue chalk with rougherJuly, 2006Brownell
20040097297Golf swinging training toolMay, 2004Strite
20040018899Athletic glove for racquet sportsJanuary, 2004Thiruppathi
20090131197Putter face and golf putter having putter face insertedMay, 2009Miyamichi
20080039241Bunt masterFebruary, 2008Pope
20080268976Putting stroke trainer and method of useOctober, 2008Tischler
20050096148Golf club head with shaft locating deviceMay, 2005Noble et al.
20080102991Athlete Reaction Training SystemMay, 2008Hawkins
20060199681Ball play racketSeptember, 2006Schwenger



Primary Examiner:
PASSANITI, SEBASTIANO
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
POLSINELLI PC (KANSAS CITY, MO, US)
Claims:
1. A golf training apparatus comprising: a first portion having at least a portion for at least temporarily attaching to the head of a golf club; a second portion in communication with the first portion for supporting the first portion, the second portion including a base for at least temporarily attaching to a support; and the first portion and the second portion are configured for standing unsupported when the base is temporarily attached to a support.

2. The golf training apparatus of claim 1, wherein the first portion is circular with a diameter at least substantially the diameter of a regulation golf ball.

3. The golf training apparatus of claim 2, additionally comprising: at least one indicia on the second portion, the at least one indicia proximate to the base of the second portion.

4. The golf training apparatus of claim 3, wherein the first portion and the second portion define an integral member having a first side and a second side.

5. The golf training apparatus of claim 4, wherein the integral member includes a metal foil that defines at least the first side of the integral member.

6. The golf training apparatus of claim 5, wherein at least a portion of the second side at the base and at the first portion includes adhesive.

7. The golf training apparatus of claim 6, wherein the second side includes adhesive.

8. The golf training apparatus of claim 3, wherein the at least one indicia includes at least one score.

9. The golf training apparatus of claim 8, wherein the at least one score includes two scores oppositely disposed with respect to each other at the edges of the second portion.

10. The golf training apparatus of claim 2, wherein the first portion extends beyond the edges of the second portion.

11. The golf training apparatus of claim 10, wherein the first portion attaches to the second portion in a substantially coaxial alignment.

12. The golf training apparatus of claim 3, wherein the second portion includes a stem attached to the base and the at least one indicia serve as a border between the stem and the base.

13. The golf training apparatus of claim 12, wherein the stem is substantially rectangular in shape.

14. The golf training apparatus of claim 12, wherein the base is substantially triangular in shape.

15. A golf training apparatus comprising: a body including, a first portion for at least temporarily attaching to the head of a golf club, and a second portion in communication with the first portion for supporting the first portion, the second portion including a base; and the body configured for standing unsupported when the base is temporarily attached to a support.

16. The golf training apparatus of claim 15, wherein the first portion is circular with a diameter at least substantially the diameter of a regulation golf ball.

17. The golf training apparatus of claim 15, wherein the body includes a metal foil layer defining a first side.

18. The golf training apparatus of claim 17, wherein the body includes an adhesive layer defining a second side.

19. The golf training apparatus of claim 18, wherein the body includes at least one indicia proximate to the base of the second portion.

20. A golf training apparatus comprising: a body having a first side and a second side, the first side of a metal foil layer and the second side of at least a partial layer of adhesive, the body including, a first portion for at least temporarily attaching to the head of a golf club, and a second portion in communication with the first portion, the second portion including a base for at least temporarily attaching to a support; and the body configured for standing unsupported when the base is temporarily attached to a support.

21. The golf training apparatus of claim 20, wherein the first portion is circular with a diameter at least substantially the diameter of a regulation golf ball.

22. The golf training apparatus of claim 20, wherein the at least a partial layer of adhesive includes a layer of adhesive covering at least substantially all of the body.

23. The apparatus of claim 20, wherein the body is an integral member.

24. The apparatus of claim 21, wherein the second portion is of a width less than the diameter of the first portion and is coaxial with the first portion.

25. The apparatus of claim 23, wherein the second portion includes a stem, the stem intermediate the first portion and the base.

26. A golf training apparatus comprising: a body including, a first portion of a planar dimension at least substantially the diameter of a regulation golf ball for at least temporarily attaching to the head of a golf club, a second portion in communication with the first portion for supporting the first portion, the second portion including a base for at least temporarily attaching to a support, and the body configured for standing unsupported when the base is temporarily attached to a support.

27. The golf training apparatus of claim 26, wherein the body includes a first side and a second side, the second side including at least one adhesive portion on at least the first portion and the base.

28. The apparatus of claim 26, wherein the body is an integral member.

29. The apparatus of claim 27, wherein the first side includes a metal foil.

30. The apparatus of claim 26, wherein the second portion is of a width less than the diameter of the first portion and is coaxial with the first portion.

31. The apparatus of claim 30, wherein the second portion includes a stem, the stem intermediate the first portion and the base.

32. A method for determining the location on a golf club where the golf club contacts a golf ball comprising: providing an apparatus including a body comprising a first portion of a shape corresponding to the shape of a regulation golf ball, and a second portion extending from the first portion, the body of a rigid material and including a first side having adhesive on at least part of the first portion and at least part of the second portion; attaching the second portion of the body to a support member to cause at least a part of the body to stand unsupported; and bringing a golf club head into contact with the apparatus such that at least some of the adhesive on the first side at the first portion adheres the apparatus to the golf club head.

33. The method of claim 32, wherein attaching the second portion of the body to a support member includes folding the second portion to form at least a substantially right angle, and attaching part of the second portion to a support member, such that the other part of the second portion and the first portion extend upward.

34. The method of claim 32, wherein the bringing the golf club head into contact with the apparatus includes breaking the attachment of the second portion of the body to a support member.

35. The method of claim 34, additionally comprising, separating the apparatus from the golf club head.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCES TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This patent application is related to and claims priority from: 1. U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/499,932, filed on Sep. 2, 2003; and, 2. U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/508,021, entitled: GOLF TRAINING APPARATUS, filed Oct. 2, 2003. U.S. Provisional Patent Applications Ser. No. 60/499,932 and Ser. No. 60/508,021 are incorporated by reference herein.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention is related to a golf training apparatus, and in particular, to a golf training apparatus for visually indicating the location on the face of the golf club head where contact with a golf ball was made.

BACKGROUND

Golf is a sport whose popularity continues to grow. As the golfing population grows, so does the desire among its players to improve their shots, for example, drives, fairway shots, chips, pitches, hazard shots and putts. To improve one's shot, the ball should be struck with the club at the “sweet spot”, in order that the maximum energy and proper trajectory be placed on the ball. Contacting the ball at the “sweet spot” of the club head also reduces or eliminates side spins on the ball, allowing the ball to move in a controlled trajectory to the desired target, without hooking or slicing.

Golfers spend large amounts of money on various shot improvement mechanisms, in order that they make contact with the ball at the “sweet spot” of the club head. Many of these mechanisms are expensive, and yet, there is no way to tell the actual location on the club face where the ball was contacted, with respect to that particular golfer's “sweet spot” on the club head. This is because the “sweet spot” for most golfers is preset in the club head by the manufacturer.

However, the “sweet spot” of a club head for some advanced and expert golfers, such as those on the professional tours, may be at a slightly different location that the manufacturer set “sweet spot”. This alternate “sweet spot” is typically worn into the club head. By knowing the actual location of the contact between the club face and the golf ball, the golfer can adjust his swing and positioning associated with it, to achieve contact with the golf ball at the desired “sweet spot”.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention improves on contemporary golf training devices as it provides a visual indication of the actual location on the face of a clubhead of a golf club, where the ball has been contacted. By knowing the actual location (position) of ball contact on the clubhead (also known as the point of contact), the golfer can adjust his swing, including his swing positioning as well as the angle at which the clubhead is striking the ball, such that contact with the ball is made at the desired location on the club head. This location is typically the manufacturer set “sweet spot” on the club head, or an alternate “sweet spot” on the club head, that becomes worn into the club head by the user over time.

The present invention is compact, simple to use, and may be of a single piece (part). It is also economical, as each piece is of very low cost and can be reused. It can also be used in a small area, and does not involve separate parts, eliminating the need to set up and adjust components.

The present invention also allows the user to use his own golf clubs in their present state, absent any modifications or treatments. Additionally, no special golf clubs or other custom equipment are needed for use with the apparatus and components of the present invention.

An embodiment of the invention is directed to a golf training apparatus with a first portion having at least a portion for at least temporarily attaching to the head of a golf club, and a second portion coupled to the first portion for supporting the first portion. The second portion has a base for at least temporarily attaching to a support. The first portion and the second portion are such that they can stand unsupported when the base is temporarily attached to a support. The first portion simulates a golf ball, as it is typically circular with a diameter at least substantially, and may be exactly, the diameter of a regulation golf ball. The first portion and the second portion define a main body, having a first or smooth side, and a second or sticky (adhesive) side.

In an exemplary operation, the golf club addresses the apparatus (main body) at the second or sticky (adhesive) side. Contact between the golf club and the apparatus is such that the apparatus adheres to the golf club (upon contact with the club head), providing the golfer with a visual indication of the actual point of contact between the first or ball portion of the apparatus and the club face. This visual indication is indicative of the location on the club head where the actual contact would be made between the club head and an actual golf ball.

An embodiment of the invention is directed to a golf training apparatus. The apparatus has a first portion having at least a portion for at least temporarily attaching to the head of a golf club. This first portion is typically in a cross-sectional, two-dimensional shape of a regulation golf ball having a diameter that may be the diameter of a regulation golf ball. The apparatus also has a second portion, typically extending from the first portion, for supporting the first portion. The second portion has a base for at least temporarily attaching to a support. The first portion and the second portion are such that they can stand unsupported when the base is temporarily attached to a support.

Another embodiment of the invention is directed to a golf training apparatus. The apparatus includes a body having a first portion, for example, in the cross-sectional (two-dimensional) shape and dimensions of a regulation golf ball, for at least temporarily attaching to the head of a golf club, and a second portion, typically joined to the first portion for supporting the first portion. The second portion includes a base, and the body is such that it can stand unsupported when the base is temporarily attached to a support.

Another embodiment of the invention is directed to a golf training apparatus having a body with a first side and a second side. The first side is of a metal foil layer and the second side is of at least a partial layer of adhesive. The body includes a first portion for at least temporarily attaching to the head of a golf club, and a second portion, typically coupled to the first portion. The second portion includes a base for at least temporarily attaching to a support, and the body is typically such that it can stand unsupported when the base is temporarily attached to a support.

Another embodiment of the invention is directed to a golf training apparatus with a body having a first portion of a planar dimension at least substantially the diameter of a regulation golf ball for at least temporarily attaching to the head of a golf club. The body also has a second portion, typically coupled with the first portion, for supporting the first portion. The second portion includes a base for at least temporarily attaching to a support, and the body is such that it can stand unsupported when the base is temporarily attached to a support.

Another embodiment includes a method for determining the location on a golf club where the golf club contacts a golf ball. The method includes, providing an apparatus including a body having a first portion of a shape corresponding to the shape of a regulation golf ball, and a second portion extending from the first portion. The body is of a rigid material and includes a first side having adhesive on at least part of the first portion and at least part of the second portion. The second portion of the body is attached to a support member to cause at least a part of the body to stand unsupported. A golf club head is then brought into contact with the apparatus such that at least some of the adhesive on the first side at the first portion adheres the apparatus to the golf club head. The contact is typically through a golf club swing, and once the swing is complete, the point of contact between the first portion and the golf club head is visible, by the first portion being stuck on the club head. The apparatus can now be peeled off of the golf club head. Once removed and separated from the golf club, the apparatus can be reused and the method can be repeated.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Attention is now directed to the drawings, where like numerals and characters indicate like or corresponding components. In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a front view of an apparatus of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a rear view of the apparatus of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the invention as shown during packaging or prior to actual use;

FIG. 4A shows the apparatus in a “straight” position in an exemplary operation;

FIG. 4B shows the apparatus with its ball portion in an alternate bent or curved position for the exemplary operation of FIG. 4A;

FIG. 4C is a side view of the apparatus in the position of FIG. 4B;

FIGS. 4D and 4E show the remainder of the exemplary operation of the apparatus of FIG. 4A;

FIG. 5 shows an alternate embodiment of the apparatus of the present invention;

FIG. 6 shows the apparatus of FIG. 5 in an exemplary operation; and

FIG. 7 shows the apparatus of FIGS. 1-3 in another exemplary operation with a golf tee, in an outdoor or driving range setting.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGS. 1 and 2 show the apparatus 20 of the invention. The apparatus 20 is typically defined by a main body 22. Throughout this document, the apparatus 20 and main body 22 are used interchangeably, except where the apparatus 20 is in a pre-use, packaging or storage state, when the main body 22 is attached to a release layer 50 or other holding or storage structure (as shown in FIG. 3 and described below).

The main body 22 is formed of a first or ball portion 24 and a second or support portion 26. The first or ball portion 24 is typically concentric and coaxial (along the axis 25) with the second or support portion 26, such that the apparatus 20 (and main body 22) is symmetric, simulating a teed up or other suitably addressable golf ball.

The main body 22 is typically an integral, one-piece member, such that the first (ball) portion 24 and second (stem) portion 26, have a common first side 30 and a common second side 31. The first side 30 is for example, a smooth or non-adhesive side, while the second side 31 is, for example, a sticky or adhesive side. The first, smooth or non-adhesive side 30 can have its first or ball portion 24 decorated like that of an actual golf ball, so as to make it visually distinguishable from the second, sticky or adhesive side 31. However, the first portion 24 and the second portion 26 can be formed from multiple pieces joined together.

The first portion 24 is typically rounded, and in particular, circular in shape, to typically define a golf ball. The first portion 24 is typically of planar (two-dimensional) dimensions corresponding to a regulation golf ball, that is approximately, and typically, the diameter of 1.680 inches (42.67 mm), the maximum diameter of a regulation golf ball. For example, the first (ball) portion may be of a diameter “D”, that is 1.680 inches (42.67 mm), in conformance with the diameter of a regulation golf ball.

The second portion 26 joins to the first portion 24 and is typically of a width “W” less than the diameter “D” of the first portion 24, so as to be of a shape and dimensions corresponding to a support, such as a tee, platform or the like, for a golf ball. This second portion 26 typically includes a stem 42 and a base 44. Indicia 46, single, as shown here, or multiple (FIG. 5), such as scorings (cuts), weakness lines, or marks, on either side 30, 31 or both sides 30, 31 of the main body 22, typically serve as a boundary, between the stem 42 and the base 44.

These indicia 46 serve to facilitate or guide bending and/or folding of the base 44 with respect to the stem 42, at the indicia 46 locations. Folding is typically such that the base 44 is at least substantially perpendicular to the stem 42 (and typically also the first or ball portion 24), as detailed below. The base 44 can be triangular in shape, but can also be any other shape suitable for providing sufficient surface area for the adhesive (on the second side 31 of the base 44) to hold, at least temporarily, the apparatus 20 to supports, support members or structures, such as floors, the ground, blocks, mats, golf tees, or other suitable supports.

While the indicia 46 typically serve as facilitators or guides for folding the apparatus 20 (main body 22), the apparatus 20 may be folded anywhere along the stem 42 or the base 44, provided there is sufficient adhesive on the second side 31 at the stem 42 and/or base 44, for adhering the apparatus 20 to the floor, ground or other support. This would allow the user to practice shots where the ball was at other heights, corresponding to fairway, rough and sand, bunker and other hazard shots, pitches and chips.

The main body 22, including the first portion 24 and the second portion 26, is typically made of a material(s), such as a foil or a heavyweight metallic paper with a sticky (adhesive) backing. For example, sticky (adhesive) backed metal foils suitable for use as the main body 22 may include Material No. 81 available from Tabco, Inc., of 1323 South 59th Street, Kansas City, Kans. 66106, and Bright Silver Laminated Foil AP151, 3.2 Mil SLF L-3, Item # 15134 from Technicote, 222 Mound Avenue, Miamisburg, Ohio 45342. This adhesive backed foil material, is such that it imparts rigidity, stiffness and flatness to the main body 22 of the apparatus 20, such that, when in use, the apparatus 20 can stand unsupported, with the stem 42 and first (ball) portion 24 at least substantially coplanar, while being resistant to bends, sags and other deformities (unless, for example, a bend is placed into the ball portion 24 by the physical force of a user, as detailed below and shown in FIGS. 4B and 4C). Other material(s) for the main body 22 should also possess the aforementioned qualities.

The apparatus 20 is such that the main body 22 is typically formed from adhesive backed foils, attached to a release layer 50 in a pre-use, packaging or storage state. These adhesive backed foils are, for example, formed of single or multiple foil layers (for example, of metal foil), defining the first side 30 of the main body 22, and single or multiple adhesive layers, defining the second side 31 of the main body 22. As shown in FIG. 3, the apparatus 20 is stored (and packaged) prior to use, such that its main body 22 is on a release layer 50, with the second or sticky side 31 of the main body 22 in contact with the release layer 50. This release layer 50 is, for example, a silicon coated bleached kraft liner. Each apparatus 20 (main body 22) can be removed from the release layer 50, with minimal manual force, by peeling the main body 22 off of the release layer 50 when use is desired.

The foil layer or layers are typically of a metal foil. This metal foil (in its single or multiple layers) is typically of a thickness to impart all of the rigidity, stiffness and deformation resistance to the apparatus 20 (main body 22) as detailed above. The metal or metallic nature of the foil layer(s), produces a “metallic click”, when the first or ball portion 24 of the apparatus 20 (main body 22) is struck with a golf club, so as to provide the user of the apparatus 20 with the feel of a “firm” or “sold” contact between the first or ball portion 24 and the golf club, as with an actual golf shot.

The adhesive layer or layers are, for example, of a pressure sensitive adhesive, such as a rubber based adhesive. The adhesive is such that it will facilitate temporary attachment of the main body 22 to release layers, woods, metals and other materials of golf clubs, carpets, mats and other conventional flooring materials. The adhesive is of a strength that the main body 22 will stick to, but remain inert from, the release layer 50 (FIG. 3), and will also be easily removable from the aforementioned materials, without damage to the apparatus 20 (main body 22) or the surface where it was temporarily adhered to. This allows the apparatus 20 to be reusable, as it can be peeled off of a golf club head and remain intact, so as to be reattached to a support structure for subsequent uses.

This apparatus 20 (main body 22) may be an integral one-piece member. It can be cut, stamped or the like, from a single piece of material. It can also be formed from multiple pieces. The adhesive or adhesive layer(s) can be placed on the member prior to its being cut or stamped or after the cutting or stamping operation has occurred. The adhesive or adhesive layer(s) can be placed onto the member or piece or pieces from which it is formed by numerous coating techniques, such as deposition, or coating techniques, or the like.

While adhesive is shown as an adhesive layer on the entire second side 31 of the main body 22, alternate adhesive arrangements are also permissible. For example, adhesive need only be applied to portions of the first portion 24 and either the stem 42 or the base 44, or portions thereof, of the second portion 26, on the second side 31 of the main body 22. Application of adhesive should be such that the apparatus 20 (main body 22) will suitably adhere to the club head (upon contact therewith) and there will be sufficient adherence of the apparatus 20 to a support, prior to a golf club contacting the apparatus 20.

Turning also to FIGS. 4A-4E, there is shown the apparatus 20 (main body 22) in an exemplary operation. Initially, an apparatus 20 (main body 22) is removed from the release layer 50 (FIG. 3), typically by peeling it from the release layer 50, to separate it therefrom. The base 44 is now folded, for example, along the indicia 46, with the adhesive or second side 31 down, so as to contact the floor 60 or other support surface. This folding is such that the base 44 is at least substantially perpendicular, and typically perpendicular, to the stem 42 and the first portion 24, that stand coplanar and unsupported by other structures.

The sticky (adhesive) side 31 of the base 44 is now attached to ground 60, as shown in FIG. 4A. Alternately, as shown in FIGS. 4B and 4C, the user can push the first or ball portion 24 of the apparatus 20 (main body 22) in on itself, to create a slight bend or curvature in this first portion 24, resulting in a three-dimensionally appearing golf ball. The material for the apparatus 20, and at least at the first or ball portion 24 is such that it will be of sufficient rigidity to sustain the bend or curvature, for at least a short time period (for example, at least a few minutes, from placement until contacted by a swinging club). The bend can be made, for example, by pinching along the axis 25 (FIG. 1) (top to bottom of the first or ball portion 24) or by pinching at the sides of the first or ball portion 24. Alternately, for example, the bend can be made by pinching the first or ball portion 24, where the pinch points are approximately a diameter length from each other. Here, for example, the first or ball portion 24 can be just slightly of a diameter larger than that of a regulation golf ball to compensate for the bend or curvature.

The golfer, represented by hands 72 and 74, as shown in FIG. 4D, now assumes his normal stance, such that the club head 66 of the golf club 68 faces the adhesive or sticky side 31 of the apparatus 20 (main body 22). The golfer then makes his swing (illustrated by the arrow 75) from a first position (hands 72), where the club head 66 is about to contact the first or ball portion 24 of the apparatus 20, positioned in accordance with FIG. 4A, to a second position (hands 74). The apparatus 20, as shown in FIGS. 4B and 4C, would operate similarly.

In moving from this first position to the second position, the club head 66 has contacted the ball or first portion 24 of the apparatus 20, and the adhesive on the base 44 has yielded, such that the first or ball portion 24 of the apparatus 20 now adheres to the club face 76 of the club head 66, by virtue of the adhesive on the second or sticky side 31 of the apparatus 20.

Turning to FIG. 4E, the first or ball portion 24 of the apparatus 20 (main body 22) is now stuck to the club head 66 on the club face 76, providing the golfer with a visual indication of the actual location of the contact between the club face 76 and ball portion 24. This location is indicative of the actual location of the contact (or point of contact) between this golf club 68 and an actual regulation golf ball.

The apparatus 20 (main body 22) can now be released from the golf club 68, typically by being peeled off of the club face 76 (shown by hands 80). The apparatus 20 is now suitable for reuse (but if torn, frayed or the adhesive is no longer sticky, can be disposed of). Based on the position of the first or ball portion 24 of the apparatus 20 on the golf club face 76, the golfer can take steps to adjust his swing and the golf club positioning associated therewith, so that the point of contact will be at the desired “sweet spot” on the club head 66, resulting in improved shots or strokes.

Turning now to FIG. 5, there is detailed an alternate embodiment of the apparatus 120. This alternate apparatus 120 is similar in all aspects of construction and arrangement to the apparatus 20 and its main body 22, detailed above (and similar components are indicated with similar numerals or characters), except that it includes secondary indicia 146. These indicia 146 are similar in all aspects to the indicia 46 for the apparatus 20, except they are placed on the stem 42 so it can be folded proximate these indicia 146 for putting. The primary indicia 46 may be removed if desired. The distance “dd” between the lowest point of the first or ball portion 24, represented by the tangent line 150, and the indicia 146, compensates for the portion of the golf ball that would normally protrude from the second or sticky (adhesive) side 31 of the first or ball portion 24 (if using a three-dimensional golf ball).

FIG. 6 shows this second embodiment apparatus 120 in use with a putter 170, in accordance with a conventional putting stroke. Once the putting stroke (indicated by the arrow 171) is complete, the first or ball portion 24 will be stuck to the putter face 172, providing the golfer with a visual indication, corresponding to where the putter face 172 would have contacted an actual golf ball. All other operational steps are similar to those for the apparatus 20 and the golf club 68 detailed above.

Turning now to FIG. 7, there is shown the apparatus 20 in use with a conventional golf tee 200. The apparatus 20 (and its main body 22) is used similar to that described above, except that the second portion 26, typically at the stem 42, is attached to the tee 200 in a stick on manner. The base 44 (and in some cases a portion of the stem 42) can also be removed, as is shown here, for example, by cutting or tearing from the indicia 46 or other location of the second portion 26. Alternately, portions or all of the stem 42 and base 44, respectively, if present, can attach to the tee 200 in a wrap-around manner, allowing for additional securement.

Attachment of the apparatus 20 (main body 22) can be, for example, such that the lowest point of the first or ball portion 24 (represented by tangent line 204) rests along or at least proximate to the lowest point of the tee 200 (represented by the tangent line 205). (Here, the tangent lines 204 and 205 are coincident). The golfer then swings the club 68 as detailed above (as represented by the arrow 212), such that the first or ball portion 24 sticks to the club face 76, indicating the point of contact for the tee shot.

There has been shown and described at least one preferred embodiment of a golf training apparatus. It is apparent to those skilled in the art, however, that many changes, variations, modifications, and other uses and applications for the apparatus and its components are possible, and also such changes, variations, modifications, and other uses and applications which do not depart from the spirit and scope of the invention are deemed to be covered by the invention, which is limited only by the claims which follow.





 
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