Title:
Hull suspension technology (HST)
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention is Hull Suspension Technology (HST), a specific technology which incorporates mechanics and hydrodynamics to allow the bottom rear part of the vessel hull to fluctuate up and down to counter water surface and stabilize vessel movement while the vessel is in operation. HST also utilizes hinges to mount the stern and bow hulls together efficiently, and implements shock absorbers in its design, which dampen the impact of outside factors and streamline the overall movement of the vessel during operations.



Inventors:
Amraly, Stefan (New York, NY, US)
Application Number:
10/888698
Publication Date:
02/17/2005
Filing Date:
07/09/2004
Assignee:
AMRALY STEFAN
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B63B1/14; B63B1/22; B63B39/00; B63H21/30; B63B1/08; (IPC1-7): B63B1/22
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
OLSON, LARS A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Stefan Amraly (New York, NY, US)
Claims:
1. What I claim as my invention is hull suspension technology, a specific technology that allows the bottom rear part of the vessel hull to fluctuate up and down to counter the water surface and the vessel movement:

2. What I claim as my invention is using hinges to mount the stem and the bow hulls together in a vessel utilizing Hull Suspension Technology.

3. What I claim as my invention is using shock absorbers to dampen the impact and movement of the vessel during operations, for vessels utilizing Hull Suspension Technology.

Description:

This application is cross-referenced to provisional utility patent No. 60/486872 filed on Jul. 11, 20003. This invention obtained no research or development aid through federal sponsorship.

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

This invention pertains to marine vessel hydrodynamic technology. The invention focuses on hull technology, performance, and comfort of vessels of all sizes.

Currently vessel performance faces limitations that cannot be overcome with traditional hull technology:

    • Sea surface condition changes (waves and sea depressions)
    • Engine continues to push the vessel out of the water as the hull generates lift due to speed, which causes the vessel to move up and down in an inefficient manner
    • Short engine life due to excessive variation in torque demand
    • High fuel consumption due to performance inefficiency
    • Short vessel life due to vibration and water surface impacts, resulting in hull cracks and metal fatigue
    • Vessel turning control is limited due to the fact that current hulls slide inefficiently across the water surface in high-speed turns

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Hull Suspension Technology (HST) modifies the hull of a vessel to act as a shock absorbing system.

HST is a system that allows the stem of the hull (last 30%) to move upwards to counter the ocean surface movement when the vessel is moving at speed.

The hull is made of two major components: first, the bow hull that is about 70% of the vessel; and second, the power plant hull, or the stem, that makes up the remaining 30% of the vessel.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING VIEWS

There are 8 drawings included with this application; the drawings are an example of a 26′ vessel with HST.

Drawing 1 represents a vessel designed with an HST hull with the stem hull in the up-most position; the view is from the vessel's 7 o'clock low.

Drawing 2 represents a vessel designed with a HST hull without the decks and engine bay cover. This drawing is intended to show the position of the shock absorbers, engine location and fuel tanks. The view is from vessel's 5 o'clock high.

Drawing 3 represents a vessel designed with a Hull Suspension Technology hull without the decks and the stem hull. This drawing is intended to show the position of the stem hull and the ease of repair function in removing the stem hull. The view is from vessel's 5 o'clock high.

Drawing 4 represents a vessel designed with a Hull Suspension Technology hull without the decks and the stern hull. This drawing is intended to show the position of the stem hull; also, the drawing is showing the location of the hull's mount hinges. The view is from vessel's 5 o'clock low.

Drawing 5, figure (A) represents a forward dimensional view of the stem hull. The figure shows the hull's mount hinge mount points.

Drawing 5, figure (B) represents a side dimensional view of the stem hull empty.

Drawing 5, figure (C) represents an upper dimensional view of the stem hull empty.

Drawing 6, figure (A) represents an upper dimensional view of an empty bow hull. The figure shows the empty bay for the stem hull.

Drawing 6, figure (B) represents a 5 o'clock high dimensional view of an empty bow hull. The figure shows the empty bay for the stem hull.

Drawing 7, figure (A) represents an 8 o'clock view of the bow support extension; the bow extension is designed to the mount point for the suspension parts between the bow and the stem hulls, this is in addition to the main hinges which directly mount between the stem and bow hulls.

Drawing 7, figure (B) represents a side dimensional view of the bow support extension; the figure shows the shock absorber mount hole and housing.

Drawing 7, figure (C) represents an upper dimensional view of the bow support extension.

Drawing 7, figure (D) represents a front dimensional view of the bow support extension.

Drawing 8, figure (A) represents an upper dimensional view of the hull's mount hinge; the hinge connects the bow and the stem hulls together at the bottom of the vessel.

Drawing 8, figure (B) represents a side dimensional view of the hull's mount hinge; the hinge connects the bow and the stem hulls together at the bottom of the vessel.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Hull Suspension Technology modifies the hull of a vessel to act as a shock-absorbing system.

HST is a system that allows the stem of the hull (last 30%) to move upwards to counter the ocean surface movement when the vessel is moving at speed (please see Drawing 1).

The hull is made of two major components: first, the bow hull that is about 70% of the vessel; second, the power plant hull or the stem that takes up the remaining 30% of the vessel (please see Drawings 1 and 2).

Both hulls are completely independent and watertight; power plant support and control comes through flexible hoses and connectors (please see Drawings 2 and 3).

The two hulls are connected at the bottom via dual hinges and connect at the top via dual shock absorbers. These connections will allow the stem hull to flex upwards in a semi-circular motion to counter ocean surface movements and engine torque (please see drawings 3, 4, and 8).

The two main hinges are the main mounting points between the two hulls; the hinges are made of aluminum alloy for strength and light weight; carbon steel can be used for large vessels.

Due to the large diameter of the hinges, the hinges will require minimum maintenance and will show very limited wear after long-term usage.

The hinges are limited in range based on the vessel size and type.

The bow hull overlaps the stem hull from the top and the sides, therefore the vessel will appear similar to any non-HST vessel above the waterline (please see Drawings 1-4).

Main hinges are made of 1.5 cm thick steel for vessels 22′-36′ long; they include ball bearings and a rubber cover for protection from sea corrosion (please see Drawing 8).

Bow hull overlaps the stem hull from the bottom by about 80 mm for vessels between 22′ and 36′; this will allow for smooth travel in the water.

Overlap flap covers the gap between the bow hull and the stem hull at the bottom for a seamless hydrodynamic effect on the vessel movement; it mounts to the bow hull. The overlap flap is made of flexible lightweight plastic to enhance the hydrodynamics of the hull.

ASSEMBLY OF THE INVENTION

Assembling the bow and stem hull together requires the following steps:

1—Finish the Pre-Assembly preparation process

2—From the back of the boat, move the stem hull forward until it reaches the bow hull

3—Lift the stem hull upwards until the hinges mate

4—Insert the hinge pins from the inside of the hull to the outside

5—Tighten the nuts on the pins

6—Secure the shocks to the stem hull and tighten the nuts

7—Plug in the two main electrical connectors

8—If fuel tanks are external connect the fuel lines

9—Connect the air intake extension hose

10—Connect A/C hoses if available

11—Connect hydraulic hoses for the SAU optional electronically-controlled units

12—Test the hinge mount nuts for fastening pressure

13—Lock the hinge boot in place and fill with lubricant

14—Insure that the shock absorber is tightened to the proper pressure

15—Lubricate the shock absorber rod

16—Lock the shock boot in place (do not fill with lubricant)

17—Install the overlap flap in place

18—Seal the overlap flap screw holes

PURPOSE OF HST

Revolutionary ride comfort and smoothness

Minimize structure stress on the hull

Minimize the engine noise

Minimize ocean surface impact noise

Increase performance

Stabilize velocity on open water

Improve all kinds of vessels, including super-large vessels