Title:
Golf ball marker
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A golf ball marker includes a marker portion and a shank portion extending from the marker portion for anchoring the golf ball marker into the ground. The marker portion includes first and second directional arrows. The directional arrows preferably extend in generally opposite directions.



Inventors:
Barouh, Victor (Old Westbury, NY, US)
Application Number:
10/631802
Publication Date:
02/03/2005
Filing Date:
08/01/2003
Assignee:
BAROUH VICTOR
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B57/00; A63B69/36; (IPC1-7): A63B57/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
WONG, STEVEN B
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Law Office - Dinesh Agarwal, P.C. (Alexandria, VA, US)
Claims:
1. A golf ball marker, comprising: a) a marker portion; b) a shank portion extending from said marker portion for anchoring the golf ball marker into the ground; c) said marker portion including first and second directional arrows.

2. The golf ball marker of claim 1, wherein: a) said directional arrows extend in generally opposite directions.

3. The golf ball marker of claim 2, wherein: a) said directional arrows are embossed in said marker portion.

4. The golf ball marker of claim 2, wherein: a) said directional arrows are inlaid in said marker portion.

5. The golf ball marker of claim 2, wherein: a) said marker portion comprises a generally round disc.

6. The golf ball marker of claim 5, wherein: a) said directional arrows extend beyond the perimeter of said disc.

7. The golf ball marker of claim 6, wherein: a) said directional arrows and said disc comprise a generally coplanar upper surface.

8. The golf ball marker of claim 5, wherein: a) said directional arrows extend upto the perimeter of said disc.

9. The golf ball marker of claim 8, wherein: a) said directional arrows are embossed in said disc.

10. The golf ball marker of claim 8, wherein: a) said directional arrows are inlaid in said disc.

11. The golf ball marker of claim 1, wherein: a) said marker portion is molded from a rubber, plastic, metal, wood, or foam material.

12. A golf ball marker, comprising: a) a generally round marker portion; b) a shank portion extending from said marker portion for anchoring the golf ball marker into the ground; and c) said marker portion including first and second directional arrows extending in generally opposite directions.

13. The golf ball marker of claim 12, wherein: a) said directional arrows extend beyond the perimeter of said marker portion.

14. The golf ball marker of claim 12, wherein: a) said directional arrows are embossed in said marker portion.

15. The golf ball marker of claim 14, wherein: a) said directional arrows extend upto the perimeter of said marker portion.

16. The golf ball marker of claim 12, wherein: a) said directional arrows are inlaid in said marker portion.

17. The golf ball marker of claim 16, wherein: a) said directional arrows extend upto the perimeter of said marker portion.

18. The golf ball marker of claim 13, wherein: a) said directional arrows and said marker portion comprise a generally coplanar upper surface.

19. The golf ball marker of claim 14, wherein: a) said marker portion is molded from a rubber, plastic, metal, wood, or foam material.

20. The golf ball marker of claim 16, wherein: a) said marker portion is molded from a rubber, plastic, metal, wood, or foam material.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is generally directed to golf-related accessories, and more particularly to a golf ball marker with directional arrows.

It is often said that you master the game of golf by driving, chipping, and putting a ball. In other words, a hole should be finished in these three types of strokes. Although the last stroke —putting —seems rather simple, it is probably the most carefully observed and calculated by many golfers. It is not uncommon to see professional golfers bend down on their knees to gauge the terrain of the green and align the ball with the hole for a smooth (and complete) putt. However, miscalculation occurs in observing and aligning the ball with the hole on the green from one angle (by bending down directly in front of the hole) and then standing up and putting the ball to the left towards the hole (for a right-hand golfer) by observing from above. This often leads to an incomplete putt.

Further, while aiming at an intended direction in either archery or tennis, the participant's body typically faces the target before the swing or release of the arrow. In golf, however, a player's body, shoulders, legs and hips are at an angle to the intended target, making the alignment far more difficult.

In order to align to the target in golf, some golfers align the golf ball with the printing on the ball. For example, the name Titleist®, straight towards the preferred target, or a line drawn around the center of the ball.

Examples of various golf tees and other accessories are disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 1,553,561; 1,625,911; 1,638,448; 2,700,788; 3,079,158; 3,114,557; 3,203,700; 3,408,079; 3,883,144; 5,052,689; 5,240,254; 5,356,146; 5,569,102; 5,672,122; 5,720,677; 5,890,976; 6,475,107 B1; Des. 293,261; Des. 360,006; Des. 411,276; and Des. 428,954.

In view of the above, there is a need in the industry for a golf ball marker which assists a golfer in selecting a best course of line of travel when putting a ball.

OBJECTS AND BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a golf ball marker which assists a golfer in locating placement for the golf ball, as well as selecting a best line for smooth club movement during putting.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a golf ball marker which includes directional arrows extending in generally opposite directions.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a golf ball marker which includes directional arrows that may be used as a guide for a smooth, firm putt.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide a golf ball marker which includes directional arrows that assist a golfer in selecting a best line of travel for the ball before the ball is picked-up and its location marked with the golf ball marker. In other words, the golf ball marker of the present invention assists a golfer in locating the position of the ball on the green, as well as finding and selecting a best line for a smooth club movement when putting the ball.

In summary, the main object of the present invention is to provide a golf ball marker which assists a golfer in marking the position of his/her ball on the green, as well as determining and selecting a best line of travel for smooth club movement during putting.

At least one of the above objects is met, in part, by the present invention, which in once aspect includes a golf ball marker that includes a marker portion and a shank portion extending from the marker portion for anchoring the golf ball marker into the ground. The marker portion includes first and second directional arrows. The directional arrows preferably extend in generally opposite directions.

Another aspect of the present invention includes a golf ball marker, which includes a generally round marker portion and a shank portion extending from the marker portion for anchoring the golf ball marker into the ground. The marker portion includes first and second directional arrows extending in generally opposite directions.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The above and other objects, novel features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiment(s) invention, as illustrated in the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a golf ball marker in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a second embodiment of a golf ball marker in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a third embodiment of a golf ball marker in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged sectional view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is an elevational view of the golf ball marker of FIG. 1, shown anchored in the ground; and

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the golf ball marker of FIG. 1, shown in use on a green.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S) OF THE INVENTION

As best shown in FIGS. 1 and 6, the golf ball marker GBM of the present invention includes a marker portion 10 including upper and lower surfaces 12 and 14, and a shank portion 16 extending generally longitudinally from the lower surface 14. Preferably, the marker portion 10 has the configuration of a generally round disc 18. Two directional arrows 20 and 22 extend from the disc 18 in preferably generally opposite directions. As shown in FIG. 1, the arrows 20 and 22 extend beyond the perimeter 24 of the disc 18. The upper surfaces 26 of the arrows 20 and 22, and the upper surface 12 of the marker portion 10 are preferably generally coplanar to provide a smooth generally continuous surface 28 (FIG. 6).

The shank portion 16 includes a lower tapered portion 17 for inserting into the ground GD to anchor the golf ball marker GBM therein (FIG. 6).

FIGS. 2 and 4 illustrate a second embodiment of the golf ball marker GBM2, which is similar to the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 and 6, except that the directional arrows are raised or embossed.

As best shown in FIG. 2, the golf ball marker GBM2 preferably includes a generally round marker portion 30 with upper and lower surfaces 32 and 34. A shank portion 36 (similar to the shank portion 16, shown above in FIGS. 1 and 6) extends generally longitudinally from the lower surface 34 of the marker 30. The marker portion 30 has the configuration of a generally round disc 44. Two directional arrows 38 and 40 are raised or embossed above the upper surface 32 of the marker 30, and preferably extend in generally opposite directions. In this embodiment, it is preferred that the arrows 38 and 40 extend up to the perimeter 42 of the disc 44. Preferably, the marker portion 30 is integral with the shank portion 36. As best shown in FIG. 4, the upper surfaces 39 of the arrows 38 and 40 extend above the upper surface 32 of the marker portion 30.

FIGS. 3 and 5 illustrate a third embodiment of the golf ball marker GBM3, which is similar to the embodiment shown in FIGS. 2 and 4, except that the directional arrows are engraved or inlaid.

As best shown in FIG. 3, the golf ball marker GBM3 includes a marker portion 46 with upper and lower surfaces 48 and 50. A shank portion 52 (similar to shank portions 16 and 36) extends generally longitudinally from the lower surface 50 of the marker portion 46. The marker portion 46 has the configuration of a generally round disc 54 that is integral with the shank portion 52. Two directional arrows 56 and 58 are inlaid or engraved into the upper surface 48 of the marker portion 46. The generally coplanar surface 60 of the arrows 56 and 58, extends below the upper surface 48 of the marker portion 46.

The golf ball markers GBM, GBM2, and GBM3 illustrated in FIGS. 1-6, are preferably molded as one piece from a suitable rubber, plastic, metal, wood, or foam material, and may be painted in two colors such that the directional arrows stand out from their corresponding marker portions. Likewise, the directional arrows 20, 22 (38, 40 and 56, 58) may be provided with additional suitable indicia, such as numbers, to further assist a golfer in identifying his/her marker. Along the same lines, the marker portions 10, 30, and 46, may also contain other preferred or suitable indicia, as desired. For example, a golf club's name/logo or a golfer's name may be engraved or written on either the marker portions 10, 30, and 46, or the directional arrows 20, 22, 38, 40, 56, and 58.

FIG. 6 shows the golf ball marker GBM of FIG. 1 anchored in the ground GD. As shown, the shank portion 16 is inserted into the ground GD such that the marker portion 10 comes to rest on the grass GR. Golf ball markers GBM2 and GBM3 may also be anchored in the like manner.

FIG. 7 illustrates the use of the golf ball marker GBM on a green GN. As shown, the marker GBM is placed behind the golf ball GB to align the ball to be putted to the hole H. In this regard, the golfer would first determine, for example, if the green GN from the position of the hole H would require a straight putt, a left to right putt, or a right to left putt. After making this determination, the golfer would then place the marker GBM behind the ball GB with the arrows 20 and 22 in line with the intended line for putting. The ball GB would then be picked-up with the marker GBM in place. Before the putt is made, the ball GB would be placed in front of the marker centering the ball with the arrows 20 and 22. Then the arrows 20 and 22 may be used as a guide for a smooth, firm putt. Golf ball makers GBM2 and GBM3 may also be used in the like manner.

It is noted herewith that it is within the scope of this invention to provide other embodiments of the marker portions 10, 30, and 46, wherein the corresponding arrows 20 and 22, 38 and 40, and 56 and 58 extend at an angle to each other. For example, the two arrows 20 and 22 (or 38 and 40, or 56 and 58) may extend at right angle to each other, or at 120° relative to each other, etc.

While this invention has been described as having preferred sequences, ranges, steps, materials, structures, features, or designs, it is understood that it is capable of further modifications, uses and/or adaptations of the invention following in general the principle of the invention, and including such departures from the present disclosure as those come within the known or customary practice in the art to which the invention pertains, and as may be applied to the central features hereinbefore set forth, and fall within the scope of the invention and of the limits of the appended claims.