Title:
System for training the mental golfing skills of a golf player
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method of training mental golfing skills is disclosed, by which the player in a structured manner plays a golf course following a set of instructions containing directions of a mental exercise, i.e. an exercise to train mental golfing skills, to be performed when playing most of or all holes. The player attempts to follow the instructions and perform the mental exercise, evaluates his or hers degree of success in following the instructions and assigns a score for that hole accordingly. When the player has finished playing the holes of the golf course, a total score may be calculated and compared to previous and future scores. Thus, a systematic method of training a player's mental golfing skills and providing a systematically obtained grade or total score for the outcome of the training effort is provided. Furthermore is disclosed a golf scorecard for assisting golf players in training their mental golfing skills while playing a round on a golf course, a method of providing such golf scorecard, and a method as well as an automatic system for estimating the mental golfing skills of a golf player.



Inventors:
Havaleschka, Finn (Skoedstrup, DK)
Application Number:
10/631699
Publication Date:
02/03/2005
Filing Date:
07/30/2003
Assignee:
Garuda A/S
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B71/00; A63B69/36; A63B71/06; (IPC1-7): A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
FRISBY, KESHA
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CANTOR COLBURN LLP (Hartford, CT, US)
Claims:
1. A method of training the mental golfing skills of a golf player, comprising the successive steps of: a) presenting to the golf player a golf scorecard comprising for each of a majority of the holes of the golf course instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course, the scorecard being adapted for receiving indicia of a score for each of said majority of holes of the golf course, and b) for each of said majority of holes of the golf course, causing the golf player to: perceive said instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the hole in question, attempt to perform said mental exercise, play the hole, evaluate the degree of success of the attempt to perform said mental exercise and assign a score for the hole accordingly, and apply indicia of said score to the scorecard.

2. A method according to claim 1, wherein said golf scorecard comprises for each of a majority of the holes of a golf course a visual presentation associating the number of the hole with a textual instruction box as well as a score recording box, which textual instruction box comprises an indicia selected from a group consisting of: textual instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course, and a reference to such contents of another textual instruction box of the golf scorecard, the scorecard being suited to receive indicia of a score for each hole of the golf course and to present said score in said score recording box.

3. A method according to claim 2, wherein said golf scorecard comprises a sheet material on which a number of rows corresponding to the number of holes of the golf course are printed, each of the rows comprising a box with the number of the hole, a textual instruction box and a score recording box, the sheet material being suited to receive said indicia in said score recording boxes.

4. A method according to claim 3, wherein a majority of said rows comprises a box colored with a color selected from a set of easily distinguishable colors forming a color code set, the color of the box in a given row indicate to the player a category of the mental golfing skills that are trained by the mental exercise comprised in the textual instruction box of that row.

5. A method according to claim 4, wherein said color code set indicates the categories of Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation.

6. A golf scorecard for assisting a golf player in training the player's mental golfing skills, the scorecard comprising for each of a majority of the holes of a golf course a perceivable presentation associating the number of the hole with instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course as well as a recordation element for said score.

7. A golf scorecard according to claim 6 and comprising for each of a majority of the holes of a golf course a visual presentation associating the number of the hole with a textual instruction box as well as a score recording box, which textual instruction box comprises an indicia selected from a group consisting of: textual instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course, and a reference to such contents of another textual instruction box of the golf scorecard, the scorecard being suited to receive indicia of a score for each hole of the golf course and to present said score in said score recording box.

8. A golf scorecard according to claim 7, comprising a sheet material on which a number of rows corresponding to the number of holes of the golf course are printed, each of the rows comprising a box with the number of the hole, a textual instruction box and a score recording box, the sheet material being suitable to receive said indicia in said score recording boxes.

9. A golf scorecard according to claim 8, wherein a majority of said rows comprises a box colored with a color selected from a set of easily distinguishable colors forming a color code set, the color of the box in a given row indicate to the player a category of the mental golfing skills that are trained by the mental exercise comprised in the textual instruction box of that row.

10. A golf scorecard according to claim 9, wherein said color code set indicates the categories of Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation.

11. A method for providing a golf scorecard for assisting a golf player in training the player's mental golfing skills, the method comprising: a) presenting a plurality of predetermined golfing related questions to the golf player, b) causing the golf player to indicate an answer to each of said questions, c) analyzing the answers according to a predetermined set of rules and providing a mental golfer profile of the player based thereon, d) providing, based on said mental golfer profile, a golf scorecard comprising for each of a majority of the holes of a golf course a perceivable presentation associating the number of the hole with instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course as well as a recordation element for said score.

12. A method according to claim 11, wherein the step of analyzing the answers according to a predetermined set of rules and providing a mental golfer profile of the player based thereon, comprises the steps of: 1) determining from the analysis a score of the mental golfing skills of the golf player in the four categories of: Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation, and 2) providing a mental golfer profile of the player, comprising at least said determined scores.

13. A method according to claim 11, wherein the scorecard comprises for each of a majority of the holes of a golf course a visual presentation associating the number of the hole with a textual instruction box as well as a score recording box, which textual instruction box comprises an indicia selected from a group consisting of: textual instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course, and a reference to such contents of another textual instruction box of the golf scorecard, the scorecard being suited to receive indicia of a score for each hole of the golf course and to present said score in said score recording box.

14. A method according to claim 13, wherein the scorecard comprises a sheet material on which a plurality of rows are printed, one row for each hole of the golf course, each of the rows comprising a box with the number of the hole, a textual instruction box and a score recording box, the sheet material being suited to receive said indicia in said score recording boxes.

15. A method according to claim 14, wherein a majority of said rows comprises a box colored with a color selected from a set of easily distinguishable colors forming a color code set, the color of the box in a given row indicate to the player a category of the mental golfing skills that are trained by the mental exercise comprised in the textual instruction box of that row.

16. A method according to claim 15, wherein said color code set indicates the categories of Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation.

17. A method for estimating the mental golfing skills of a golf player and generating a mental golfer profile of the player, the method comprising the steps of: a) presenting a plurality of predetermined golfing related questions to the golf player, b) causing the golf player to indicate an answer to each of said questions, c) analyzing the answers according to a predetermined set of rules, d) determining from the analysis a score of the mental golfing skills of the golf player in the four categories of: Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation, and e) providing a mental golfer profile of the player, comprising at least said determined scores.

18. A method according to claim 17, comprising the steps of further determining from said analysis scores in said four categories of the mental golfing skills of the golf player when acting under mental stress, and including said further scores into the mental golfer profile.

19. A method according to claim 17, comprising the step of providing a graphical presentation of said scores in a diagram, where the magnitude of the score for Social Integration is depicted opposing the magnitude of the score for Result-Orientation, and the magnitude of the score for Foundation is depicted opposing the magnitude of the score for Development.

20. An automatic system for estimating the mental golfing skills of a golf player and providing an output accordingly, the system comprising: a computer having input to receive indications of answers to each of a plurality of predetermined golfing related questions, an analysis element responsive to the answers according to a predetermined set of rules and determining from the analysis a score of the mental golfing skills of the golf player in the four categories of: Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation, a profile output to provide a mental golfer profile comprising at least said determined scores.

21. An automatic system according to claim 20, wherein the analysis element furthermore may determine from said analysis scores in said four categories of the mental golfing skills of the golf player when acting under mental stress, and the profile output will provide a mental golfer profile that includes said further scores.

22. An automatic system according to claim 20, wherein the profile output provides a graphical presentation of said scores in a diagram, where the magnitude of the score for Social Integration is depicted opposing the magnitude of the score for Result-Orientation, and the magnitude of the score for Foundation is depicted opposing the magnitude of the score for Development.

23. An automatic system according to claim 20, further comprising scorecard output, which based on said determined scores is arranged for providing a golf scorecard to assist a golf player in training the player's mental golfing skills, the scorecard comprising for each of a majority of the holes of a golf course a perceivable presentation associating the number of the hole with instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course as well as a recordation element for said score.

24. An automatic system according to claim 23, wherein the scorecard comprises for each of a majority of the holes of a golf course a visual presentation associating the number of the hole with a textual instruction box as well as a score recording box, which textual instruction box comprises an indicia selected from a group consisting of: textual instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course, and a reference to such contents of another textual instruction box of the golf scorecard, the scorecard being suited to receive indicia of a score for each hole of the golf course and to present said score in said score recording box.

25. An automatic system according to claim 24, wherein the scorecard comprises a sheet material on which a number of rows corresponding to the number of holes of the golf course are printed, each of the rows comprising a box with the number of the hole, a textual instruction box and a score recording box, the sheet material being suitable for receiving said indicia in said score recording boxes.

26. An automatic system according to claim 25, wherein a majority of said rows of said scorecard comprises a box colored with a color selected from a set of easily distinguishable colors forming a color code set, the color of the box in a given row indicate to the player a category of the mental golfing skills that are trained by the mental exercise comprised in the textual instruction box of that row.

27. An automatic system according to claim 25, wherein said color code set indicates the categories of Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation.

Description:

The present invention relates to a method of training the mental golfing skills of a golf player by using a golf scorecard with instructions for mental exercise, to a golf scorecard for assisting golf players in training their mental golfing skills while playing a round on a golf course, to a method of providing such golf scorecard, and to a method as well as an automatic system for estimating the mental golfing skills of a golf player. Naturally, this invention could be applied to other sports or physical activities as one skilled in the art would readily appreciate.

BACKGROUND OF THE PRESENT INVENTION

Training of golf players normally focus on improving the technical skills of the player, and a vast plurality of devices have over the years been described to assist the training of such skills. The mental golfing skills of the golf player are also generally recognized as being important for the player's achievements on the golf course, and training of the mental golfing skills is the subject of many books, articles and training courses.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved method of systematic training of the mental golfing skills of golf players.

The present invention relates to a method of training mental golfing skills, which includes that the player in a structured manner plays the holes of a golf course following a set of instructions that is provided to the player and contains for each of a majority of the holes of the golf course directions of a mental exercise, i.e. an exercise to train mental golfing skills, to be performed when playing that hole. The player attempts to follow the instructions and perform the mental exercise, evaluates his or hers degree of success in following the instructions and assigns a score for that hole accordingly. When the player has finished playing the holes of the golf course, a total score may be calculated and compared to previous and future scores. Thus, a systematic method of training a player's mental golfing skills and providing a systematically obtained grade or total score for the outcome of the training effort is provided.

The instructions are provided for at least a majority of the holes of the golf course and possibly for all holes. An instruction may be applied to a plurality of the holes, such as three or four consecutive holes, so that the round of golf on the course is played according to e.g. three, four or five different instructions.

Another object of the present invention is to provide an instrument or tool for assisting a golf player in systematic training of the player's mental golfing skills.

A key instrument for performing the above method of training mental golfing skills is to provide the golf player with a particular mental golf scorecard that is designed to assist the golf player in training the player's mental golfing skills. Such scorecard is an important aspect of the present invention and comprises, in the preferred form, for each of a majority of the holes of the golf course, instructions for mental exercises to be performed in connection with playing that hole as well as a means for recording, or a recordation element, involving the score the player has assigned for that hole.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a method of producing such golf scorecard for assisting a golf player in systematic training of the player's mental golfing skills.

Such method for providing a golf scorecard based on a mental golfer profile of the player is a further aspect of the present invention, according to which the scorecard is produced by analyzing the player's answers to a plurality of golfing related questions. The questions are designed to provide a score in each of the four categories of: Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation, and the mental profile comprise these scores.

Thus, the present invention relates to a method of training the mental golfing skills of a golf player, comprising the successive steps, perhaps, including steps such as:

  • a) providing a golf course having a plurality of holes,
  • b) providing the golf player,
  • c) presenting to the golf player a golf scorecard comprising for each of a majority of the holes of the golf course instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course, the scorecard being adapted for receiving indicia of a score for each of said majority of holes of the golf course,
  • d) for each of said majority of holes of the golf course, causing the golf player to: perceive said instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the hole in question, attempt to perform said mental exercise, play the hole, evaluate the degree of success of the attempt to perform said mental exercise and assign a score for the hole accordingly, and apply indicia of said score to the scorecard.

A standard golf course has eighteen holes, and the golf scorecard has preferably instructions associated with at least ten of the holes, such as twelve or sixteen holes, the remaining holes being played by the choice of the player. The scorecard may be presented electronically or by electronic means as well as on a sheet material, and the instructions may be given by visual means or audio means or even a combination thereof. The indicia may be written on the scorecard with a pen if the card is printed on a sheet material or be entered as data in case the scorecard is presented electronically or by electronic means.

In particular, it is preferred that the golf scorecard use visual means and comprises for each of a majority of the holes of a golf course a visual presentation associating the number of the hole with a textual instruction box as well as a score recording box, which textual instruction box either comprises textual instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course, or refers to such contents of another textual instruction box of the golf scorecard, the scorecard being suited for receiving indicia of a score for each hole of the golf course and presenting said score in said score recording box.

The same instruction will often be applied to more than one hole of the golf course and may therefore when provided visually or by visual means be given in its full extent associated with one hole, and the remaining holes will then only have an indication pointing to said instruction.

Although electronic presentation or means for presenting the golf scorecard is within the scope of the present invention, it is preferred that the scorecard comprises a sheet material on which a number of rows corresponding to the number of holes of the golf course are printed, each of the rows comprising a box with the number of the hole, a textual instruction box and a score recording box, the sheet material being suitable for receiving said indicia in said score recording boxes. A majority of the rows may furthermore comprise a box colored with a color selected from a set of easily distinguishable colors forming a color code set, the color of the box in a given row indicate to the player a category or group, e.g. as described below, of the mental golfing skills that are trained, i.e. enhanced or weakened, by the mental exercise comprised in the textual instruction box of that row. In a preferred embodiment, the color code set indicates the categories of Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation, which are exemplified in details below.

The present invention also relates to such golf scorecard for assisting a golf player in training the player's mental golfing skills, the scorecard comprising for each of a majority of the holes of a golf course a perceivable presentation associating the number of the hole with instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course as well as a recordation element or means for recording a score. The golf scorecard may comprise the above-disclosed features.

The present invention furthermore relates to a method for providing a golf scorecard as the one discussed above for assisting a golf player in training the player's mental golfing skills, the method comprising

  • a) presenting a plurality of predetermined golfing related questions to the golf player,
  • b) causing the golf player to indicate an answer to each of said questions,
  • c) analyzing the answers according to a predetermined set of rules and providing a mental golfer profile of the player based thereon,
  • d) providing, based on said mental golfer profile, a golf scorecard comprising for each of a majority of the holes of a golf course a perceivable presentation associating the number of the hole with instructions for mental exercise to be performed in connection with playing the associated hole of the golf course as well as a recordation element or means for recording a score.

The step of analyzing the answers according to a predetermined set of rules and providing a mental golfer profile of the player based thereon, may in particular comprise the steps of:

  • 1) determining from the analysis a score of the mental golfing skills of the golf player in any permutation or combination of perhaps the four categories of: Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation, and
  • 2) providing a mental golfer profile of the player, comprising at least said determined scores.

The present invention furthermore relates to a method for estimating the mental golfing skills of a golf player and generating a mental golfer profile of the player, the method comprising the steps of:

  • a) presenting a plurality of predetermined golfing related questions to the golf player,
  • b) causing the golf player to indicate an answer to each of said questions,
  • c) analyzing the answers according to a predetermined set of rules,
  • d) determining from the analysis a score of the mental golfing skills of the golf player in any permutation or combination of perhaps the four categories of: Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation, and
  • e) providing a mental golfer profile of the player, comprising at least said determined scores.

The method may in addition comprise the steps of further determining from said analysis scores in said four categories of the mental golfing skills of the golf player when acting under mental stress, and including said further scores into the mental golfer profile.

It is preferred that the method additionally or alternatively comprises the step of providing a graphical presentation of said scores in a diagram, where the magnitude of the score for Social Integration is depicted opposing the magnitude of the score for Result-Orientation, and the magnitude of the score for Foundation is depicted opposing the magnitude of the score for Development.

Further objects of the present invention are to provide a suitable method for estimating the mental golfing skills of a golf player as well as an automatic system for estimating the mental golfing skills of a golf player, which system preferably also may provide a mental scorecard.

Finally, the present invention relates to an automatic system for estimating the mental golfing skills of a golf player in accordance with the method discussed above and providing an output accordingly, the system comprising a computer or computer means having an answer input or input means for receiving indications of answers to each of a plurality of predetermined golfing related questions, an analysis element or analysis means for the answers according to a predetermined set of rules and determining from the analysis a score of the mental golfing skills of the golf player in any permutation or combination of perhaps in the four categories of: Social Integration, Development, Foundation and Result-Orientation, a profile output or profile output means for providing a mental golfer profile comprising at least said determined scores.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

An example of the present invention is given below with reference to the enclosed drawing, of which,

FIG. 1 is a diagram for the mental golfer's profile, showing the focus areas or key words characterizing the four groups of mental golfer skills.

FIG. 2 shows an example of the mental golfer's profile of a Baser golfer with the key words selected in the questionnaire.

FIG. 3 shows the profile of FIG. 2 with the key words rejected in the questionnaire.

FIG. 4 shows the profile of FIG. 2 together with the mental profile of the golfer under pressure.

FIG. 5 shows an example of the mental golfer's profile of a Result-Oriented golfer with the key words selected in the questionnaire.

FIG. 6 shows an example of the mental golfer's profile of an Integration golfer with the key words selected in the questionnaire.

FIG. 7 shows an example of the mental golfer's profile of a Development golfer with the key words selected in the questionnaire.

FIG. 8 is an example of a mental scorecard for a Result-Oriented golfer.

FIG. 9 is a conceptual diagram of a computer system according to one embodiment of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The following descriptions are provided to list elements and describe some of the embodiments of the present invention. These elements are listed with initial embodiments, however it should be understood that they may be combined in any manner and in any number to create additional embodiments. The variously described examples and preferred embodiments should not be construed to limit the present invention to only the explicitly described systems, techniques, and applications. Further, this description should further be understood to support and encompass descriptions and claims of all the various embodiments, systems, techniques, methods, devices, and applications with any number of the disclosed elements, with each element alone, and also with any and all various permutations and combinations of all elements in this or any subsequent application.

In the following, a preferred embodiment of the present invention is described. It will be clear to the skilled person that many of the specific steps, features and definitions of the embodiment may be replaced or adjusted within the scope of the present invention.

In order to design a systematic approach of organizing the analysis of the golfer's mental golfing skills and designing the mental scorecard, which is used for the training method, it has been found to be expedient to categorize the skills into four distinct groups:

Social Integration skills are primarily characterizing Integration golfers, and the color Blue is assigned to this category. The integration golfer focus on social and mental aspects of the game and on how the players react to the reactions and expectations of others. Integration golfers are highly aware of and sensitive to the behavior and expectations of other golf players. Skills or key words characterizing the skills within the social integration category are: social adjustment, being together, avoiding conflicts, cheering up, adjustment, consensus, sensitive, attentive, comfort, positive, passive, patient and social.

Foundation skills are primarily characterizing Baser golfers, and the color Gray is assigned to this category. The baser golfer focus on technique: grip, swing, practicing of pre-shot routines—all the basic skills a golfer needs to play at a desired level. The baser golfer is typically a thorough and careful player who keeps his or hers temper under control and is on top of the details. Skills or key words characterizing the skills within the foundation category are: planning, statistics, fixture list, preparation, order-clean, taking time, follow rules, systematic, thoughtfulness, well-organized, well-considered, training routines, pre-shot routines and practiced routines.

Development skills are primarily characterizing Development golfers, and the color Green is assigned to this category. The development golfer focus on experimenting, testing the limits of what you can and cannot do with the golf ball. Development golfers are typically more visionary, philosophical and imaginative, it is easy for them to stop taking the game too seriously, and they like to cross the boundaries for what one is allowed to do. Skills or key words characterizing the skills within the development category are: idea-exchange, development, ideas-advice, fascination, imagination, impatience, inspiration, variation, intuition, visions, change, temper and news.

Result-Orientation skills are primarily characterizing Result golfers, and the color Red is assigned to this category. The result golfers focus on the score, to hit farther and to be better than everyone else. Result golfers hate to loose, are typically quick in making decisions, willing to take risks and are impatient. Skills or key words characterizing the skills within the foundation category are: press, betting, results, impatient, ambitions, high goals, fast game, the unsure, fast results, goal orientation, performance, devil-may-care, taking changes and to be willing to take risks.

The four groups are illustrated on the diagram of FIG. 1 for drafting the mental golfer's profile, showing the focus areas or key words characterizing the four groups of mental golfer skills.

The mental skills of the individual golfer may be characterized as a given composition of the four groups given above and is used to draw the mental golfer profile of the individual golfer. The golfer is presented with a questionnaire with plurality of questions or statements relating to the relevant golfing skills or keywords associated with the four groups as presented above. Examples of statements relating to foundation skills are:

    • In general I see myself as a well-considered player with a fine self-control.
    • It is not so important for me to have a lot of time to warm up and practice before a match.
    • I am not the kind of person who keeps accurate statistics with my golf rounds.
    • I always take the necessary time for my pre-shot routines before I make a shot.
    • Course management and pre-shot routines do not really match my temper
    • It doesn't bother me to come directly from the parking lot into the 1st tee and then start the game.

The positive, negative or graduated answers to the questionnaire are used to assign a grade to each of the four groups for the individual golfer, from which a mental golfer profile is drawn. Examples of diagrams, in which the profile is drawn, are shown in FIGS. 2 and 5-7 for four golfer with each one predominantly direction or golfer type. The key words selected by the golfer are shown, and the ones with the highest rating given in the answers to the questionnaire are emphasized. A diagram for a Baser golfer in which the key words rejected in the questionnaire are shown is given in FIG. 3. The score of each group from the answers to the questionnaire are indicated in the respective corners, i.e. the Baser golfer had according to FIG. 2 a score of −15 in Integration, −3 in Development, 28 in Baser and −2 in Result-Orientation. The ellipse indicated on the diagrams designates the zero or neutral level.

The answers to the questionnaire may also be employed to draw up a mental profile of the golfer under pressure or mental stress by applying a weighting of the questions, so that the questions relating to how the golfer reacts under stress are given more weight in the computation of the scores. Furthermore, the questionnaire may be answered by a fellow golfer on behalf of the golfer to create an indication of how the mental skills of the individual golfer is experienced by other and to draw up a mirror profile similar to the golfer's mental profile.

The mental profile of the golfer under pressure corresponding to the standard mental profile of FIG. 2 is shown in FIG. 4 in wide line together with the standard mental profile of FIG. 2 in narrow line.

The golfer's mental profile, and preferably also the mental profile under pressure and the mirror profile may be employed to match the individual golfer with other golfers to form teams of golfers that from their individual profiles can be foreseen to comprise the desirable combination of mental skills to support and supplement each other within the team. A preferred use of the mental profiles is to provide a mental scorecard to the golfer to assist in developing the mental skills of the golfer as well as to monitor the development of the mental skills of the golfer during the training of the mental golfing skills of the golf player, e.g. by means of the mental golf scorecard.

The answers to the questionnaire may be given by the individual golfer on a paper copy of the questionnaire and be processed manually, but it is preferred to process the questionnaire, compute the scores and provide the graphical outputs of the golfer's mental profile by means of a computer (4) having an analysis element (2), perhaps a computer program product installed thereon, which is suitable for instructing the computer to perform the required tasks, the computer being a general purpose computer, an application specific computer or computing means having input (1) or input means, e.g. a keyboard, a pointing device, such as a computer mouse, or a digital input or means for inputting digital data, an output (3) or output means, e.g. a display, a printer or printing means and an output or means for outputting digital data, a memory or memory means for storage of data and a data processor or data processing means for processing data from an input or an input means and a memory or memory means. It is particularly preferred that the questions of the questionnaire are given on a display or display means of the computer to the golfer and that the golfer may indicate the answers to the questions by means of a keyboard and/or a pointing device.

The golfer's mental scorecard (5) may in accordance with the present invention be provided purely from the coach's personal knowledge of the individual golfer, but it is advantageous to employ the mental profiles drawn up to tailor the mental scorecard to the determined mental golfing skills of the individual golfer. A computer program product is provided according to the present invention, which automatically generates a mental scorecard for the individual golfer based on the scores computed from the answers given to the questionnaire.

The purpose of the golfer's mental scorecard is to assist the individual golfer in training the mental golfing skills, by providing some instructions, perhaps a visual presentation (6), to the golfer for mental exercises, i.e. exercises that produce a change in the mental golfing skills, to be performed in connection with playing each of a plurality of the holes of the golf course, so as to train and improve the mental golfing skills which from the answers to the questionnaire attracted a lower score and optionally also to weaken or unlearn a too dominating tendency to play a particular type of golf according to the above-given four groups of mental golfing skills or to particular key words related thereto. Example of a golfer's mental scorecard for a Result-Oriented golfer is given in FIG. 8. On hole 1-4, the golfer is training to improve the gray skills, on hole 6-9, the golfer is training to improve the blue skills, on holes 11-14, the golfer is training to unlearn red skills and on hole 15-18, the golfer is training to improve the green skills.

Thus, instructions to train the skills within social integration or blue golfing may be:

    • Focus on shot length. Key word is inner voice. Pre-shot routine: before making any choice, ask your inner self what the best choice is for you in this situation. Does it feel right?
    • Focus on independent choices. Key word is mental calmness. Pre-shot routine: visualize your self standing inside your own comfort zone. Feel calmness and quietness. It is from in here you make your choices. Do it prior to each stroke.
    • Focus on harmony. Key word is joy. Pre-stroke routine: visualize for your inner eye a picture of piece and harmony. Use colors, pictures, situations that give you an experience of joy. A child smiling, a heart, the sky, the nature. Call forward this picture before, after and between each stroke. Remember that the score is non-essential; it is the joy that gives the score.

Instructions to train the mental skills within foundation or gray golfing may be:

    • Focus on the sweet spot. Key word is precision. Pre-stroke routine: Before all strokes and putts, visualize the contact between the sweet spot on the wood or iron and the place on the ball you want to hit. Visualize a beam of red energy going from the ball to the sweet spot. The result, length, direction and score are completely irrelevant.
    • Focus on a calm swing. Key word is slow motion. Pre-shot routine: Visualize your swing in slow-motion prior to each stroke. See e.g. for your inner eye the needle of the speedometer of a car moving from 160 to 120 km/h. Do practice swings with the sense of 120 km/h. Feel the low velocity by practice swings before you shoot.
    • Focus on play line. Key word is precision. Pre-stroke routine: Stand behind the ball prior to each stroke and visualize the play line, the path of the ball. Take a deep breath and, when exhaling, se the exhaled air forming the line you have chosen. Do this for each strokes and putts.

Instructions to train the mental skills within development or green golfing may be:

    • Focus on what you haven't tried yet. Key word is to see what you can do. Pre-stroke routine: Visualize your pre-prepared mental image of stance and swing for the two types of strokes. From woods to 5 iron, alternate between trying to make draws and fades.
    • Focus on creative choices. Key word is novel thinking. Pre-stroke routine: Before each stroke where you have chosen the length of the stroke and which club to use, you stop and make a different choice. Thus, do not make your ordinary choice, except on the greens. Find an inner picture of calmness and accept of the unconventional choice.
    • Focus on experiments. Key word is play. Pre-stroke routine: Visualize your inner child, a child playing freely. See the child shoot funny strokes, high balls and low balls, stop each ball within 100 meter from the green.
    • Focus on serious game. Key word is acceptance of the destiny. Pre-stroke routine: your partner makes every choice, except in the green, of the stroke you are about to make and which club to use. It is your task, when the partner has made the choice, to visualize the stroke, the swing and the ball path that will provide the best result possible.
    • Focus on the untried. Key word is to see what you can do. Pre-stroke routine: Visualize trained mental pictures of stance and swing for draws and fades. From the woods to the 5 iron, you should try to alternate between doing draws and fades.

Instructions to train the mental skills within result-orientation or red golfing may be:

    • Focus on your ego. Key word is I can. Pre-stroke routines: Visualize a powerful harmonic swing. Visualize your usual landing area but choose always a wood or an iron, which is one number shorter than the one you normally choose for the visualized distance. Make one or more powerful training swing while standing behind the ball and visually hold on to the chosen landing area.
    • Focus on length. Keyword is power. Pre-stroke routine: Visualize the landing are being 20 meter ahead of your normal distance. See before your inner eye a harmonic, powerful swing and see the ball land in the visualized area.

Following the above examples of instructions to train the mental skills within the four previously defined groups and the lists of key words given for the groups, a plurality of other instructions for training the mental skills within the four groups can easily be constructed.

As examples of instructions to weaken or unlearn dominating mental skills within result-orientation or red golfing are the following provided:

    • Focus on safe choices. Pre-stroke routine: Prepare in advance a plan for playing the hole or holes. The plan should be made with the purpose of playing each hole one stroke above than your handicap. Thus, if you have one stroke on a pair 4 hole, you should plan to play the hole in 6 and not in 5.
    • Focus on stroke length. Pre-stroke routine: Visualize a slow, harmonic swing. Always choose an iron or wood longer than you think the length of the stroke requires.

Again, similar instructions to weaken or unlearn dominating mental skills within the four groups may easily be constructed.

Thus, the mental scorecard is individually tailored for the golfer and may comprise instructions or a presentation for all holes of the golf course or only for a majority thereof. The instructions may be for training to improve or to weaken particular mental golfing skills or a combination thereof. It is preferred as shown in the example in the figures that the same instructions are used for a number of subsequent holes, e.g. three or four holes, followed by one to three holes played by the golfer's own choice, and then a new series of holes with a new instruction. One preferred combination to be used on an 18 hole golf course is four series of four holes with the same instruction, with one hole to be played by choice between the first and the second series and between the third and the fourth series. A second combination is three series of four holes with three holes to be played by choice between the series. However, all series are not necessarily of identical length within a mental scorecard.

For each hole with an instruction associated therewith, the golfer attempts to perform the mental exercise described in the instructions when playing the hole, i.e. before, during and/or after the actual strokes. The golfer evaluates the degree of success in following the instructions and assigns a score of plus or minus 2 for the hole and notes the score in the boxes (7) to the right on the scorecard. When the full round of holes of the golf course is played, the total score is compared to the ideal score, i.e. 2 points for each hole with an instruction assigned thereto, and the difference between the total score and the ideal score constitutes a handicap for the training of the mental golfing skills. An example of the assignment of scores is shown on the scorecard of FIG. 8.

As can be easily understood from the foregoing, the basic concepts of the present invention may be embodied in a variety of ways. It involves both training techniques as well as devices to accomplish the appropriate training. In this application, the instructional techniques are disclosed as part of the results shown to be achieved by the various devices described and as steps that are inherent to utilization. They are simply the natural result of utilizing the devices as intended and described. In addition, while some devices are disclosed, it should be understood that these not only accomplish certain methods but also can be varied in a number of ways. Importantly, as to all of the foregoing, all of these facets should be understood to be encompassed by this disclosure.

The discussion included in this application is intended to serve as a basic description. The reader should be aware that the specific discussion may not explicitly describe all embodiments possible; many alternatives are implicit. It also may not fully explain the generic nature of the invention and may not explicitly show how each feature or element can actually be representative of a broader function or of a great variety of alternative or equivalent elements. Again, these are implicitly included in this disclosure.

Further, each of the various elements of the invention and claims may also be achieved in a variety of manners. This disclosure should be understood to encompass each such variation, be it a variation of an embodiment of any apparatus embodiment, a method or process embodiment, or even merely a variation of any element of these. Particularly, it should be understood that as the disclosure relates to elements of the invention, the words for each element may be expressed by equivalent apparatus terms or method terms—even if only the function or result is the same. Such equivalent, broader, or even more generic terms should be considered to be encompassed in the description of each element or action. Such terms can be substituted where desired to make explicit the implicitly broad coverage to which this invention is entitled. As but one example, it should be understood that all actions may be expressed as a means for taking that action or as an element which causes that action. Similarly, each physical element disclosed should be understood to encompass a disclosure of the action which that physical element facilitates. Regarding this last aspect, as but one example, the disclosure of an “input” should be understood to encompass disclosure of the act of “inputting”—whether explicitly discussed or not—and, conversely, were there effectively disclosure of the act of “inputting”, such a disclosure should be understood to encompass disclosure of an “input” and even a “means for inputting” Such changes and alternative terms are to be understood to be explicitly included in the description.

In addition, as to each term used it should be understood that unless its utilization in this application is inconsistent with such interpretation, common dictionary definitions should be understood as incorporated for each term and all definitions, alternative terms, and synonyms such as contained in the Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, second edition are hereby incorporated by reference, however, as to each of the above, to the extent that such information or statements incorporated by reference might be considered inconsistent with the patenting of this/these invention(s) such statements are expressly not to be considered as made by the applicant(s).

Thus, the applicant(s) should be understood to have support to claim and make a statement of invention to at least: i) each of the training devices as herein disclosed and described, ii) the related methods disclosed and described, iii) similar, equivalent, and even implicit variations of each of these devices and methods, iv) those alternative designs which accomplish each of the functions shown as are disclosed and described, v) those alternative designs and methods which accomplish each of the functions shown as are implicit to accomplish that which is disclosed and described, vi) each feature, component, and step shown as separate and independent inventions, vii) the applications enhanced by the various systems or components disclosed, viii) the resulting products produced by such systems or components, ix) each system, method, and element shown or described as now applied to any specific field or devices mentioned, x) methods and apparatuses substantially as described hereinbefore and with reference to any of the accompanying examples, xi) the various combinations and permutations of each of the elements disclosed, and xii) each potentially dependent claim or concept as a dependency on each and every one of the independent claims or concepts presented.

In addition and as to computer aspects and each aspect amenable to programming or other electronic automation, the applicant(s) should be understood to have support to claim and make a statement of invention to at least: xiii) processes performed with the aid of or on a computer as described throughout the above discussion, xiv) a programmable apparatus as described throughout the above discussion, xv) a computer readable memory encoded with data to direct a computer comprising means or elements which function as described throughout the above discussion, xvi) a computer configured as herein disclosed and described, xvii) individual or combined subroutines and programs as herein disclosed and described, xviii) the related methods disclosed and described, xix) similar, equivalent, and even implicit variations of each of these systems and methods, xx) those alternative designs which accomplish each of the functions shown as are disclosed and described, xxi) those alternative designs and methods which accomplish each of the functions shown as are implicit to accomplish that which is disclosed and described, xxii) each feature, component, and step shown as separate and independent inventions, and xxiii) the various combinations and permutations of each of the above.

With regard to claims whether now or later presented for examination, it should be understood that for practical reasons and so as to avoid great expansion of the examination burden, the applicant may at any time present only initial claims or perhaps only initial claims with only initial dependencies. Support should be understood to exist to the degree required under new matter laws—including but not limited to European Patent Convention Article 123(2) and United States Patent Law 35 USC 132 or other such laws—to permit the addition of any of the various dependencies or other elements presented under one independent claim or concept as dependencies or elements under any other independent claim or concept. In drafting any claims at any time whether in this application or in any subsequent application, it should also be understood that the applicant has intended to capture as full and broad a scope of coverage as legally available. To the extent that insubstantial substitutes are made, to the extent that the applicant did not in fact draft any claim so as to literally encompass any particular embodiment, and to the extent otherwise applicable, the applicant should not be understood to have in any way intended to or actually relinquished such coverage as the applicant simply may not have been able to anticipate all eventualities; one skilled in the art, should not be reasonably expected to have drafted a claim that would have literally encompassed such alternative embodiments.

Further, if or when used, the use of the transitional phrase “comprising” is used to maintain the “open-end” claims herein, according to traditional claim interpretation. Thus, unless the context requires otherwise, it should be understood that the term “comprise” or variations such as “comprises” or “comprising”, are intended to imply the inclusion of a stated element or step or group of elements or steps but not the exclusion of any other element or step or group of elements or steps. Such terms should be interpreted in their most expansive form so as to afford the applicant the broadest coverage legally permissible.

Finally, any claims set forth at any time are hereby incorporated by reference as part of this description of the invention, and the applicant expressly reserves the right to use all of or a portion of such incorporated content of such claims as additional description to support any of or all of the claims or any element or component thereof, and the applicant further expressly reserves the right to move any portion of or all of the incorporated content of such claims or any element or component thereof from the description into the claims or vice-versa as necessary to define the matter for which protection is sought by this application or by any subsequent continuation, division, or continuation-in-part application thereof, or to obtain any benefit of, reduction in fees pursuant to, or to comply with the patent laws, rules, or regulations of any country or treaty, and such content incorporated by reference shall survive during the entire pendency of this application including any subsequent continuation, division, or continuation-in-part application thereof or any reissue or extension thereon.