Title:
Mass producable golf practice pointers
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable golf practice swing pointer device for use with rubber tees at golf ball driving ranges may be massed produced in a linear array with the point end of one mating with and cut simultaneously with the tail end of the next.



Inventors:
Isabell, Richard C. (Central Point, OR, US)
Application Number:
10/617474
Publication Date:
01/13/2005
Filing Date:
07/11/2003
Assignee:
ISABELL RICHARD C.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/268
International Classes:
A63B69/36; (IPC1-7): A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
WONG, STEVEN B
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Donald W. Meeker (Newport Beach, CA, US)
Claims:
1. A golf practice swing pointer device for use with rubber tees at golf ball driving ranges, the device comprising: an elongated pointer formed from a strip of flat material, the pointer comprising a protruding point on a front end and a mating recessed tail on a tail end and an opening through the material between the front end and the tail end, the opening sufficiently large to admit a rubber golf ball tee of a golf ball driving range through the opening, the pointer being capable of mass production from an elongated strip of material with each cut between pointers forming both the point and the tail simultaneously.

2. The device of claim 1 wherein the point is rounded to prevent piercing external objects and be less susceptible to breaking off.

3. The device of claim 2 wherein a pair of tail points are flat to prevent piercing external objects and be less susceptible to breaking off and the point is recessed from the sides of the pointer by a flat portion on each side which forms the flat tail points.

4. The device of claim 1 wherein the pointer is fabricated of a rubberized material capable of receiving heavy blows from a golf club without damage to either the pointer or the golf club and create a high friction surface for engaging a rubber mat at a golf ball driving range to prevent movement of the pointer when struck by a golf club.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to golf practice aids and in particular to a portable golf swing direction pointers to be applied to rubber golf tees at golf ball driving ranges, which pointers may be massed produced in a linear array with a point end of one mating with a tail end of another.

2. Description of the Prior Art

In learning to play golf, there is a major problem involved in swinging at the ball based on the fact that the golfer is instructed to watch the ball while swinging rather than watching where the ball should go toward the green. While a number of prior art devices have provided pointers for use in association with conventional golf tees, none have focused specifically on golf swing pointers for rubber golf tees at golf ball driving ranges, and on the mass production of such pointers.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,181,311, issued Jan. 1, 1980 to Lawlor, provides an improved golf tee device that incorporates a body member constructed of metallic wire surrounded by a protective elastomeric coating and generally describing a uniformly spaced concentric spiral. A golf ball supporting portion extends from one end of the body member and an insertion portion extends from the other end. The body member cooperates with a separate and attached line-of-flight indicating member incorporating a generally triangular planar surface with a bore therethrough adjacent the midpoint of a base of said triangle. The spiral body member passes through the bore and slidably engages the indicating member such that axial rotation of the body member results in translation of the indicating member along the axis of said body member.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,494,796, issued Dec. 17, 2002 to Echaves, shows a tee tether that includes a retaining clip for fastening to a golf tee, an anchoring peg for insertion into the ground remote from the clip, and a flexible cord connecting the clip and the peg. The retaining clip includes a lower member having a receptacle at its outer end with a conical aperture for snugly receiving the head of a golf tee and a first retaining arm extending from the receptacle. An upper member has a cap normally positioned above the receptacle and a second retaining arm extending from the cap substantially parallel to the first retaining arm. The cap has a concavity in its top for receiving and supporting a golf ball. The golf tee tether can be employed as either a stance aid by assisting a golfer in positioning his feet at the optimal distance from the ball or a sighting aid by permitting a golfer to better aim a shot at a desired target.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,240,254, issued Aug. 31, 1993 to Adlam, claims a device for attachment to a golf tee. The device comprises a first marker to be aligned with the intended direction of travel of a golf ball. The device further comprises a second marker that lies generally normal to the first marker, which is intended to be aligned with the face of a golf club with which a golf ball supported by the tee is to be struck. The device includes an aperture through which the shank of a golf tee can pass to enable the device to be selectively attached to the golf tee.

U.S. Pat. No. D385,939, issued Nov. 4, 1997 to Suk, discloses the ornamental design for a golf tee attachment that is used as an aiming device.

U.S. Pat. No. D439,944, issued Apr. 3, 2001 to Graham, puts forth the ornamental design for a golf tee that has an aiming device molded as a part of the tee during the manufacturing process.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,437,448, issued Aug. 1, 1995 to Balson, concerns a sight for mounting on a golf tee that has a target arm to be pointed at the target by the golfer when he places the tee on the ground. The sight also has a club face alignment arm fixed to the target arm, which extends outwardly on opposite sides thereof and is spaced forward of the ball when the ball is on the tee. The device can be clearly seen by the golfer so that the golfer then can position the club to set up the club face parallel to the alignment arm and thereby to be set up normal to the intended flight path of the ball.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,347,551, issued Oct. 17, 1967 to Dreyfus, illustrates a directional pointer that is adapted to be mounted on any conventional golf tee. The pointer aids the golfer in lining up the shot for driving the golf ball in the direction desired.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,899,179, issued Aug. 12, 1975 to Vlach, is for a golf swing guide that comprises a tee receiver, which has a tee-receiving opening therethrough. The receiver has flight direction indicator lines and a foot position indicator line on it. The adapter is designed to cling to the tee shank. There is a foot positioning string that extends from the receiver.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,165,479, issued Jul. 11, 1939 to Hallberg, provides a flat tee off arrow formed of thin and flat stock. The arrow is of the same thickness throughout, with its rear portion widened. The rear portion has a longitudinally extending series of holes, which are capable of receiving a tee with a tapered shank. The holes are of different sizes, thereby regulating how far the tapered shank of the tee is driven into the ground.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,883,144, issued May 13, 1975 to Lazow, shows a golf tee that includes horizontal arms for locating the ball-receiving portion at a selected level with respect to the ground, upon insertion of the tee into the ground. The horizontal arms are further adapted to maintain the tee in a true vertical position and to provide visual indicators for directing the proper location of the player's stance or driving position.

U.S. Pat. No. D161,283, issued Dec. 19, 1950 to Rogers, claims a the ornamental design of a golf tee that is provided aim indicating arrows.

U.S. Pat. No. 1,596,110, issued Aug. 17, 1926 to Lynch, describes a golf tee with visual indicators for showing the travel of the ball and directing the proper location of the player's stance or driving position.

U.S. Pat. No. 1,484,064, issued Feb. 19, 1924 to Erickson, discloses a tee plate that is made in the form of an arrow or otherwise formed with marks or lines which serve as points that may be directed towards the next hole.

U.S. Pat. No. 1,761,532, issued Jun. 3, 1930 to Morris, indicates a golf tee with a base provided with a pointer, which may be directed towards a distant hole. The tee also has an aligning device, at right angles to the pointer, which serves as a guide to the player in their efforts to ensure that the club is at the desired angle.

What is needed is a swing direction indicator for rubber cup golf tees at driving ranges with a method of mass producing golf swing direction indicators in a linear array with a cutting process producing the front of the pointer and the back of the pointer in one cut.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An object of the present invention is to provide a swing direction indicator for rubber cup golf tees at driving ranges which can be produced by a method of mass production in a linear array with a cutting process producing the front of the pointer and the back of the pointer in one cut.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a golf swing direction indicator that is structured for specific use to practice at golf ball driving ranges with a center hole to accommodate a rubber tee found at the ranges.

One more object of the present invention is to provide a portable golf swing indicator device that is structured with rounded points for carrying safely in a golf club bag.

An additional object of the present invention is to provide a pointer that is fabricated of a rubberized material, which can receive heavy blows from a golf club without damage to either the pointer or the golf club.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a pointer that is fabricated of a rubberized material, which can create a high friction surface for engaging a rubber mat at a golf ball driving range to prevent movement of the pointer when struck by a golf club.

In brief, a golf practice swing pointer device for use with rubber tees at golf ball driving ranges, which comprises an elongated pointer formed from a strip of flat material. The pointer comprises a protruding point on a front end, a mating recessed tail on a tail end and an opening through the material between the front end and the tail end. The opening is sufficiently large to admit a rubber golf ball tee of a golf ball driving range through the opening. The pointer can be mass-produced from an elongated strip of material with each cut between the pointers forming both the point and the tail simultaneously. The point is rounded to prevent piercing external objects and be less susceptible to breaking off. The point is recessed from the sides of the pointer by a flat portion on each side, which forms the flat tail points. The pair of tail points are flat to prevent piercing external objects and be less susceptible to breaking off.

The pointer is fabricated of a rubberized material, which can receive heavy blows from a golf club without damage to either the pointer or the golf club. The rubberized material of the pointer creates a high friction surface for engaging a rubber mat at a golf ball driving range to prevent movement of the pointer when struck by a golf club.

An advantage of the present invention is that it can be mass-produced.

Another advantage of the present invention is that it is inexpensive to manufacture.

An additional advantage of the present invention is that it can be carried safely in a golf club bag.

One more advantage of the present invention is that it is easy to use.

Yet another advantage of the present invention is that is can be used with the rubber golf tees found at driving ranges.

Still another advantage of the present invention is that it resists movement when struck by a golf club.

A final advantage of the present invention is that it can receive heavy blows from a golf club without damage to either the pointer or the golf club.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

These and other details of my invention will be described in connection with the accompanying drawings, which are furnished only by way of illustration and not in limitation of the invention, and in which drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the golf practice swing pointer for rubber tees at golf ball driving ranges;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of a linear array of the golf practice swing pointers of FIG. 1 as they are cut from a long strip in the manufacturing process;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the golf practice swing pointer of FIG. 1 in use on a rubber tee on a mat at a golf ball driving range.

BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION

In FIGS. 1-3, a golf practice swing pointer device 20 for use with rubber tees 60 at golf ball driving ranges comprises an elongated pointer 20 formed from a strip of flat material. The pointer 20 comprises a protruding point 21 on the front end, a mating recessed tail 22 on the tail end and an opening 23 through the material between the front end and the tail end. The opening 23 is sufficiently large to admit a rubber golf ball tee 60 of a golf ball driving range through the opening 23, as shown in FIG. 3. The pointer 20 may be of mass-produced from an elongated strip of material with each cut between the pointers 20 forming both the point 21 and the tail 22 simultaneously, as shown in FIG. 2.

The point 21 is rounded to prevent piercing external objects and be less susceptible to breaking off. The point 21 is recessed from the sides of the pointer 20 by a flat portion 24 on each side, which forms the flat tail points 25. The pair of tail points 25 are flat to prevent piercing external objects and be less susceptible to breaking off.

The pointer 20 is fabricated of a rubberized material that is structured to receive heavy blows from a golf club 40 without damage to either the pointer 20 or the golf club 40. The rubberized material of the pointer 20 creates a high friction surface for engaging a rubber mat 50 at a golf ball driving range to prevent movement of the pointer 20 when struck by a golf club 40.

In practice, the golf practice swing pointer device 20 would be used with the rubber tees 60 at golf ball driving ranges. The user would slide the opening 23 located in the center of the pointer 20 over the rubber tee 60, until the bottom surface of the pointer 20 comes to rest on the top surface of the rubber mat 50. The user would then line the point 21 up with the target that they would like to aim the golf ball 30 towards, then place the golf ball 30 on top of the rubber tee 60. Next, the user would assume their normal golfing stance with the club 40 located near the tail point 22 end of the pointer 20, as shown in FIG. 3. The swing of the golf club 40 should follow the line indicated by the pointer 20, moving from the tail point 22 end toward the front point 21 end.

It is understood that the preceding description is given merely by way of illustration and not in limitation of the invention and that various modifications may be made thereto without departing from the spirit of the invention as claimed.





 
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