Title:
Method and apparatus for crimping an exterior corner bead for drywall panels
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A corner crimper allows a person to crimp a corner bead to drywall at a beam. The corner crimper has a driving member mounted on a corner plate. The corner plate has a first flat substantially rectangular surface that can be positioned over a first surface of the corner bead (attached to the first panel of drywall), and a second flat substantially rectangular surface that can be positioned over a second surface of the corner bead (attached to the second panel of drywall). The driving member is then driven by a power source and impelled toward the corner bead to crimp the corner bead, driving blades or nails or screws or staples into the drywall.



Inventors:
Ward, Russell Allen (Pflugerville, TX, US)
Application Number:
10/464409
Publication Date:
12/23/2004
Filing Date:
06/18/2003
Assignee:
WARD RUSSELL ALLEN
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B25B27/14; E04F21/00; (IPC1-7): E04G21/14
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
CRANE, DANIEL C
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DICKE, BILLIG & CZAJA (MINNEAPOLIS, MN, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A coiner crimper, for crimping a corner bead to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam, comprising: a corner plate, operative to be positioned over the corner bead, the corner plate having: a first flat substantially rectangular surface operative to be positioned over a first surface of the corner bead attached to the first panel of drywall, and a second flat substantially rectangular surface, substantially perpendicular to the first flat substantially rectangular surface, operative to be positioned over a second surface of the corner bead attached to the second panel of drywall; a driving member, mounted on the corner plate, operative to be impelled toward the coiner bead to crimp the corner bead to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam; and a power source operative to drive the driving member.

2. The corner crimper of claim 1 wherein: the power source includes: a trigger mechanism; a coil, coupled to the corner plate, for inductively generating a large magnetic field in response to a large electric current; and a battery operatively coupled to briefly drive the large electric current through the coil in response to the trigger mechanism; and wherein the driving member is a magnetic member operative to be impelled toward the corner bead in response to the large magnetic field.

3. The corner crimper of claim 1 wherein: the power source includes a trigger mechanism; a coil, coupled to the corner plate, for inductively generating a large magnetic field in response to a large electric current; and a power line operative to receive an alternating current of approximately a standard line voltage, the power line operatively coupled to briefly drive the large electric current through the coil in response to the trigger mechanism; and wherein the driving member is a magnetic member operative to be impelled toward the corner bead in response to the large magnetic field.

4. The corner crimper of claim 1 wherein: the power source includes a reservoir of compressed air; a valve operative to release a predetermined quantity of compressed air from the reservoir of compressed air; and the driving member is operatively coupled to impelled toward the corner bead in response to the release of the predetermined quantity of compressed air from the reservoir of compressed air.

5. The corner crimper of claim 1 further comprising at least two blades operative to pierce the corner bead and to drive into the first panel of drywall and into the second panel of drywall in response to the driving member.

6. The corner crimper of claim 1 further comprising a hammer mechanism operative to drive a first nail into the first panel of drywall and a second nail into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the driving member.

7. The corner crimper of claim 1 further comprising a screwdriver mechanism operative to drive a first screw into the first panel of drywall and a second screw into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the driving member.

8. The corner crimper of claim 1 further comprising a stapler mechanism operative to drive a first staple into the first panel of drywall and a second staple into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the driving member.

9. The corner crimper of claim 1, wherein the corner plate is adjustable, such that an angle between the first flat substantially rectangular surface and the second flat substantially rectangular surface is adjustable to a non-perpendicular angle.

10. A method for crimping a corner bead to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam, comprising a step of triggering a power source to impel a driving member toward the corner bead to crimp the corner bead to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam.

11. The method of claim 10 wherein the step of triggering the power source includes steps of: triggering a battery to briefly drive a large electric current through a coil in response to the trigger mechanism; and inductively generating a large magnetic field in the coil response to the large electric current; and driving the driving member in response to the large magnetic field.

12. The method of claim 10 wherein the step of triggering the power source includes steps of: receiving an alternating current of approximately a standard line voltage; in response to a trigger mechanism and in response to the step of receiving an alternating current of approximately a standard line voltage, briefly driving a large electric current through a coil; and in response to the step of briefly driving the large electric current through a coil, inductively generating a large magnetic field in the coil; and in response to the step of inductively generating a large magnetic field in the coil, driving the driving member to crimp the corner bead to the first panel of drywall and to the second panel of drywall at the beam.

13. The method of claim 10 wherein the step of triggering the power source includes steps of: in response to a trigger mechanism, releasing a predetermined quantity of compressed air from a reservoir of compressed air; and in response to the release of the predetermined quantity of compressed air from the reservoir of compressed air, driving the driving member to crimp the corner bead to the first panel of drywall and to the second panel of drywall at the beam.

14. The method of claim 10 further comprising a step of driving at least two blades to pierce the corner bead in response to the step of driving the driving member.

15. The method of claim 14 further comprising a step of adjusting an angle between a first flat substantially rectangular surface and a second flat substantially rectangular surface to a non-perpendicular angle, wherein the at least two blades are at the non-perpendicular angle.

16. The method of claim 10 further comprising a step of driving at a first nail into the first panel of drywall and a second nail into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the step of driving the driving member.

17. The method of claim 14 further comprising a step of adjusting an angle between a first flat substantially rectangular surface and a second flat substantially rectangular surface to a non-perpendicular angle, wherein the at least two nails are at the non-perpendicular angle.

18. The method of claim 10 further comprising a step of driving at a first screw into the first panel of drywall and a second screw into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the step of driving the driving member.

19. The method of claim 14 further comprising a step of adjusting an angle between a first flat substantially rectangular surface and a second flat substantially rectangular surface to a non-perpendicular angle, wherein the at least two nails are at the non-perpendicular angle.

20. The method of claim 10 further comprising a step of driving at a first staple into the first panel of drywall and a second staple into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the step of driving the driving member.

21. The method of claim 19 further comprising a step of adjusting an angle between a first flat substantially rectangular surface and a second flat substantially rectangular surface to a non-perpendicular angle, wherein the at least two staples are at the non-perpendicular angle.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention relates generally to building construction and, more particularly, to installation of drywall panels.

[0003] 2. Description of Related Art

[0004] Nearly every building constructed in the United States and in other industrialized countries, whether residential or commercial, contains drywall. Beams or studs, made of wood or other material into which nails may be driven, define a frame of a building. Drywall is generally installed on the beams or studs by nailing or screwing or stapling the drywall into the wood beams.

[0005] At exterior corners, however, the drywall panels might not meet precisely. Drywall panels generally have edges that are often cut roughly with a knife. Although precise measurement and cutting of drywall panels is theoretically possible, it is generally more cost effective to use drywall panels that are slightly longer than necessary and then to cut the drywall panels into place at the construction site with a knife or cutter.

[0006] Since the edges of drywall panels are rough and not precisely straight, drywall panels are ordinarily covered with a corner bead at exterior corners. The corner bead covers the rough edges of the drywall panels with a smooth edge.

[0007] Many types of corner beads are currently available on the market. The corner bead is essentially a long narrow strip of metal or plastic or vinyl, approximately two inches wide and several inches long, that has been bent along a central line that is parallel to its length. The corner bead thus may be regarded as having a first surface that covers the first drywall panel and a second surface that covers the second drywall panel. The first surface and the second surface of the corner bead are each approximately one inch wide and several inches long, and meet at an angle that is approximately perpendicular, since at the outside corner the drywall panels are approximately perpendicular.

[0008] The corner bead is generally nailed or crimped into the drywall panels. Crimping is accomplished with a corner crimper. A corner crimper has two narrow plates that are joined together at essentially a right angle along a long edge. The corner crimper can thus be placed over the exterior corner, coving the corner bead. The corner bead, in turn, covers about an inch of each drywall panel that meet at the exterior corner.

[0009] The two narrow plates of the corner crimper have small holes. A mechanism mounted on the two narrow plates of the corner crimper drives a pair of pincers through the holes and shallowly into the corner bead and drywall panels. Each of the pincers breaks a shard of the corner bead and drives the shard into the drywall panels, locking the corner bead into the drywall panels.

[0010] The corner crimper has a cylinder, containing a piston, that extends from the two narrow plates. The cylinder is essentially perpendicular to the long edge at which the two narrow plates are joined together. A user “crimps” the corner bead by placing the corner crimper over the corner bead and striking the piston with a mallet. Striking the piston drives the piston along the cylinder to the mechanism that drives the pair of pincers through the holes and shallowly into the corner bead and drywall panels.

[0011] Crimping corner beads can thus be a physically exhausting process for many in the construction industry. Each exterior corner is generally crimped every few inches along the edge at which the two drywall panels meet, and thus each exterior corner can require dozens of crimps. Each crimp can require one or more blows with the mallet. A builder often must stoop down to crimp near a floor, and often must reach to crimp near a ceiling.

[0012] Crimping corner beads can also be a physically dangerous process. Exterior corners are not always vertical, and are not always reachable by a person standing on a solid floor. When a ceiling is being drywalled, a builder often must stand on a ladder or, in some cases, hang from a rafter or ceiling beam or joist while crimping the drywall. Swinging a mallet while standing on a ladder is particularly dangerous, since the ladder can topple over and injure the person.

[0013] Crimping drywall while hanging from a rafter or ceiling beam or joist is not only dangerous and exhausting, but is also nearly impossible. Crimping is traditionally a two-handed process; the corner crimper is held in one hand, and the mallet in the other hand. The builder attempting to crimp a ceiling, or attempting to crimp near a high ceiling, must use ropes or scaffolding to suspend from the rafter or ceiling beam or joist while keeping both hands free to crimp the drywall. Since the builder may also be required to extend and to twist his/her body to reach the place that requires crimping, the ergonomics of drywall crimping are particularly hazardous.

[0014] Therefore, while the corner crimper described above fulfills its respective, particular objectives and requirements, the difficulties and dangers of the traditional corner crimper create a need for a new and improved method and apparatus for crimping an exterior corner bead for drywall panels.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0015] The present invention addresses these needs by providing a new and improved method and apparatus for crimping an exterior corner bead for drywall panels. The present invention fulfills the need for a corner crimper that substantially departs from the conventional concepts and designs of the prior art, and in doing so provides an apparatus primarily developed for the purpose of safely and easily crimping drywall corners.

[0016] In view of the foregoing disadvantages inherent in the known types of corner crimpers for crimping drywall corners now present in the prior art, the present invention provides an improved corner crimper for crimping drywall corners, and overcomes the above-mentioned disadvantages and drawbacks of the prior art. As such, the general purpose of the present invention, which will be described subsequently in greater detail, is to provide a new and improved corner crimper for crimping drywall corners which has advantages of the prior art mentioned heretofore and many novel features that result in corner crimpers for crimping drywall corners which is not anticipated, rendered obvious, suggested, or even implied by the prior art, either alone or in any combination thereof.

[0017] There has thus been outlined, rather broadly, the more important features of the invention in order that the detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood and in order that the present contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are, of course, additional features of the invention that will be described hereinafter and which will form the subject matter of the claims attached.

[0018] Numerous objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be readily apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art upon a reading of the following detailed description of presently preferred, but nonetheless illustrative, embodiments of the present invention when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. In this respect, before explaining the current embodiment of the invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and to the arrangements of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein are for the purpose of descriptions and should not be regarded as limiting.

[0019] As such, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception, upon which this disclosure is based, may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures, methods and systems for carrying out the several purposes of the present invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent constructions insofar as they do not depart from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

[0020] These together with other objects of the invention, along with the various features of novelty that characterize the invention, are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this disclosure. For a better understanding of the invention, its operating advantages and the specific objects attained by its uses, reference should be had to the accompanying drawings and descriptive matter in which there is illustrated preferred embodiments of the invention.

[0021] Any feature or combination of features described herein are included within the scope of the present invention provided that the features included in any such combination are not mutually inconsistent as will be apparent from the context, this specification, and the knowledge of one of ordinary skill in the art. For purposes of summarizing the present invention, certain aspects, advantages and novel features of the present invention have been described herein. Of course, it is to be understood that not necessarily all such aspects, advantages or features will be embodied in any particular embodiment of the present invention. Additional advantages and aspects of the present invention are apparent in the following detailed description and claims.

BRIEF DESCIRPTION OF THE FIGURES

[0022] The invention will be better understood and objects other than those set forth above will become apparent when consideration is given to the following detailed description thereof. Such description makes reference to the annexed drawings wherein:

[0023] FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a traditional corner crimper in accordance with a well-known configuration;

[0024] FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of a battery pack corner crimper, in accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention;

[0025] FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a pneumatic CO2 electric crimper having a pneumatic system, in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention;

[0026] FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of an electric 110-volt corner crimper, in accordance with a third embodiment of the present invention;

[0027] FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of a pneumatic corner crimper having an airline pneumatic system, in accordance with a fourth embodiment of the present invention;

[0028] FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of the battery operated palm held corner crimper, in accordance with a fifth embodiment of the present invention;

[0029] FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of the electric palm held corner crimper, in accordance with a sixth embodiment of the present invention;

[0030] FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of a pneumatic CO2 palm held corner crimper, in accordance with the seventh embodiment of the present invention;

[0031] FIGS. 9A, 9B, and 9C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of a pneumatic air palm held corner crimper having an air pneumatic system, in accordance with a eighth embodiment of the present invention;

[0032] FIG. 10 is a schematic diagram of a cross section of an electric drive, in accordance with a ninth embodiment of the present invention;

[0033] FIG. 11 is a schematic diagram of a cross section of a pneumatic drive, in accordance with a tenth embodiment of the present invention;

[0034] FIG. 12 is a schematic diagram of a cross section of a pneumatic drive blade system, in accordance with the embodiment of the present invention described with respect to FIG. 11;

[0035] FIG. 13 is a flowchart of a method for crimping a corner bead to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam, in accordance with an eleventh exemplary embodiment of the present invention;

[0036] FIG. 14 is a schematic diagram of a heat glue corner crimper, in accordance with a twelfth embodiment of the present invention;

[0037] FIG. 15 is a schematic diagram of a double heat glue corner crimper, in accordance with a thirteenth embodiment of the present invention;

[0038] FIGS. 16A, 16B, and 16C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of a palm held heat glue corner crimper, in accordance with the thirteenth embodiment of the present invention;

[0039] FIGS. 17A, 17B, and 17C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of a palm held heat glue corner crimper, in accordance with the fourteenth embodiment of the present invention; and

[0040] FIG. 18 is a schematic diagram of a cross section of a cam-driven electric drive, in accordance with a fifteenth embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EXEMPLARY EMBODIMENTS

[0041] Reference will now be made in detail to the presently preferred embodiments of the invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Wherever possible, the same or similar reference numbers are used in the drawings and the description to refer to the same or like parts. It should be noted that the drawings are in simplified form and are not to precise scale. In reference to the disclosure herein, for purposes of convenience and clarity only, directional terms, such as, top, bottom, left, right, up, down, over, above, below, beneath, rear, and front, are used with respect to the accompanying drawings. Such directional terms should not be construed to limit the scope of the invention in any manner.

[0042] Although the disclosure herein refers to certain illustrated embodiments, it is to be understood that these embodiments are presented by way of example and not by way of limitation. The intent of the following detailed description, although discussing exemplary embodiments, is to be construed to cover all modifications, alternatives, and equivalents of the embodiments as may fall within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims. It is to be understood and appreciated that the process steps and structures described herein do not cover a complete process flow for the manufacture of a new and improved corner crimper for crimping drywall corners. The present invention may be practiced in conjunction with various construction techniques that are conventionally used in the art and only so much of the commonly practiced process steps are included herein as are necessary to provide an understanding of the present invention. The present invention has applicability in the field of construction in general. For illustrative purposes, however, the following description pertains to corner crimpers for crimping drywall corners.

[0043] Various embodiments of the present invention provide a new and improved corner crimper for crimping drywall corners that has all or many of the advantages of the prior art and few or none of the disadvantages, overcoining some of the disadvantages normally associated therewith, that may be easily and efficiently manufactured and marketed, that has a low cost of manufacture with regard to both materials and labor, and which accordingly is then susceptible of low prices of sale to the consuming public.

[0044] FIG. 1: Traditional Corner Crimper

[0045] FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a traditional corner crimper in accordance with a well-known configuration. A wooden frame consisting of several wooden beams is constructed to form an interior of a building. According to a desired floor plan for the interior of the building, one of the wooden beams is selected as an outside corner beam for an outside corner. An outside corner is, for example, a corner where two walls meet interior to a room.

[0046] A first section of drywall is placed vertically against several vertical wooden beams (including the outside corner beam) and nailed into place to form a first sheetrocked wall. Any excess portion of the first substantially rectangular section of drywall that extends beyond the outside corner beam is cut away using a utility knife. Then, a second section of drywall is placed vertically against several vertical wooden beams (including the outside corner beam) and nailed into place to form a second sheetrocked wall that is perpendicular to the first sheetrocked wall. The outside corner beam is the only vertical beam to which both sections of drywall are nailed. Any excess portion of the second section of drywall that extends beyond the outside corner beam is cut away using the utility knife.

[0047] Since each of the first section of drywall and the second section of drywall generally may be expected to have a rough edge, a corner bead 32 is used. The corner bead 32 is generally formed of two one-inch wide strips of plastic, vinyl, or metal, each of which is several inches or feet long, that join along a long edge to form a 90-degree angle. One of the strips of the corner bead 32 is placed over the first section of drywall and covers the rough edge of the first section of drywall. The other of the strips is placed over the second section of drywall and covers the rough edge of the second section of drywall.

[0048] A corner crimper, in accordance with the well-known design depicted in FIG. 1, is then placed over the corner bead 32. The corner crimper has a corner plate 34 that has two long, narrow surfaces joined along a long edge at a 90-degree angle. The corner crimper also has a blade apparatus 36 and a hammer plate 38.

[0049] If a hammer or mallet is swung forcefully and strikes the hammer plate 38 with sufficient force, the hammer plate 38 drives the blade apparatus 36 a short distance into the corner bead 32. A first blade of the blade apparatus 36 pierces the corner bead 32 and drives a first shard of the corner bead 32 through the first section of drywall and into the outside corner beam, and a second blade of the blade apparatus 36 pierces the corner bead 32 and drives a second shard of the corner bead 32 through the second section of drywall and into the outside corner beam.

[0050] The corner crimper is then removed, leaving the corner bead 32 mounted onto both the first section of drywall and the second section of drywall, mounting both the first section of drywall and the second section of drywall onto the outside corner beam. The corner bead 32 may then be smoothed against the first section of drywall and the second section of drywall and painted or covered with wallpaper.

[0051] FIG. 2: Battery Pack Corner Crimper

[0052] FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of a battery pack corner crimper, in accordance with a first embodiment of the present invention. The battery pack corner crimper includes a corner plate 52, a battery pack 56, an electric drive 58 having air vents 60, and a ribbed handle 62 having a trigger 64.

[0053] The corner plate 52 is fabricated of aluminum, and has two long, narrow surfaces joined along a long edge at a 90-degree angle. In accordance with various other embodiments of the present invention, the corner plate 52 is fabricated of polypropylene, high impact plastic, carbon fiber, and pot metal, respectively.

[0054] If desired, the two long, narrow surfaces that are joined to form the coiner plate 52 may be hinged to allow outside corners of any angle to be crimped using the battery pack corner crimper. The corner plate 52 may adjustable, allowing other angles to be implemented. For example, if two panels of drywall join at an angle greater than 90-degrees, at an outside corner, the corner plate 52 may be adjusted such that an angle between the first flat substantially rectangular surface and the second flat substantially rectangular surface has a non-perpendicular angle greater than 90-degrees.

[0055] The battery pack 56 is mounted on the corner plate 52. The battery pack 56 contains one or more batteries. The battery pack 56 contains one 12-volt battery. In various embodiments, batteries of different voltages are used. For example, in various other embodiments, the battery pack 56 contains a 14-volt battery, a 16-volt battery, and an 18-volt battery, respectively.

[0056] The electric drive 58 is operative to drive a sharp blade (for example, sharp blade 262 shown in FIG. 10 or sharp blade 426 shown in FIG. 18) into a corner bead 54 to crimp the corner bead 54 to an outside corner of drywall (not shown in the figure).

[0057] The ribbed handle 62 is rigidly mounted on the electric drive 58 and on the battery pack 56, which are both rigidly mounted on the corner plate 52. The ribbed handle 62 allows the battery pack corner crimper to be grasped easily without slipping. If desired, the ribbed handle 62 may be coated with a non-slip surface such as a rubberized material.

[0058] The ribbed handle 62 has a trigger 64. The trigger 64 allows electric power to be provided from the battery pack 56 to the electric drive 58 by briefly connecting a circuit that includes a battery of the battery pack 56 to a coil (for example, the coil 242 shown in FIG. 10) or to a cam-drive electric motor (for example, the motor capable of driving the cam 422 shown in FIG. 18). The electric power continues to be provided to the electric drive 58 while the trigger 64 remains actuated. If desired, a relay (not shown in the figure) may also be provided to disconnect the electric power from the electric drive 58 after power has been provided to the electric drive 58 for a sufficient duration.

[0059] FIG. 3: Pneumatic CO2 Electric Crimper Having A Pneumatic System

[0060] FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a pneumatic CO2 electric crimper having a pneumatic system, in accordance with a second embodiment of the present invention. The pneumatic CO2 electric crimper includes a corner plate 72, a pneumatic drive 74 having air vents 76, and a ribbed handle 78 having a trigger 80.

[0061] The corner plate 72 is fabricated of aluminum, and has two long, narrow surfaces joined along a long edge at a 90-degree angle. In accordance with various other embodiments of the present invention, the corner plate 72 is fabricated of polypropylene, high impact plastic, carbon fiber, and pot metal, respectively.

[0062] If desired, the two long, narrow surfaces that are joined to form the corner plate 72 may be hinged to allow outside corners of any angle to be crimped using the battery pack corner crimper. The corner plate 72 may be adjustable, allowing other angles to be implemented. For example, if two panels of drywall join at an angle greater than 90-degrees, at an outside corner, the corner plate 72 may be adjusted such that an angle between the first flat substantially rectangular surface and the second flat substantially rectangular surface has a non-perpendicular angle greater than 90-degrees.

[0063] The pneumatic drive 74 is operative to drive a sharp blade (for example, the sharpened blade tip 214 shown FIG. 12) into a corner bead 68 to crimp the corner bead 68 to an outside corner of drywall. The pneumatic system contains a cartridge chamber 90, a puncture needle 84, an air passage 86, and a screw cap 82. A CO2 cartridge 88 containing compressed carbon dioxide resides within the cartridge chamber 90. A sliding door 92 allows a battery pack to be stored. A battery (not shown) facilitates triggering the CO2 cartridge 88.

[0064] The ribbed handle 78 is rigidly mounted on the pneumatic drive 74 and on the corner plate 72. The ribbed handle 78 allows the battery pack corner crimper to be grasped easily without slipping. If desired, the ribbed handle 78 may be coated with a non-slip surface such as a rubberized material.

[0065] The ribbed handle 78 has a trigger 80. The trigger 80 releases a predetermined quantity of compressed carbon dioxide from the CO2 cartridge 88 into the air passage 86. In response to the trigger 80 being actuated, a mechanical mechanism (not shown) causes the CO2 cartridge 88 to press against the puncture needle 84. In response to the trigger 80 being released, the mechanical mechanism relaxes, allowing either a recoil of the CO2 cartridge 88 or a spring (not shown in the figures) to stop the release of further carbon dioxide from the CO2 cartridge 88. The trigger 80 allows carbon dioxide to be released into the air passage 86 while the trigger 80 remains actuated. If desired, a valve may be added within the air passage 86 such that only a predetermined amount of compressed carbon dioxide is released regardless of how long the trigger 80 remains actuated. A first Allen screw 94 and a second Allen screw 96 are provided to maintain the pneumatic drive 74 mounted on the corner plate 72.

[0066] FIG. 4: Electric 110-volt Corner Crimper

[0067] FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of an electric 110-volt corner crimper, in accordance with a third embodiment of the present invention. The electric 110-volt corner crimper includes an electric drive 102 having air vents 104, a ribbed handle 106 having a trigger 108, a 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 that may be plugged into a standard wall power outlet, and a corner plate 112. The 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 is, for example, ten inches in length. The electric drive 102 is operative to drive a sharp blade (for example, sharp blade 262 shown in FIG. 10 or sharp blade 426 shown in FIG. 18) into a corner bead 114 to crimp the corner bead 114 to an outside corner of drywall (not shown in the figure).

[0068] The corner plate 112 is fabricated of aluminum, and has two long, narrow surfaces joined along a long edge at a 90-degree angle. In accordance with various other embodiments of the present invention, the coiner plate 112 is fabricated of polypropylene, high impact plastic, carbon fiber, and pot metal, respectively.

[0069] If desired, the two long, narrow surfaces that are joined to form the corner plate 112 may be hinged to allow outside corners of any angle to be crimped using the battery pack corner crimper. The corner plate 112 may adjustable, allowing other angles to be implemented. For example, if two panels of drywall join at an angle greater than 90-degrees, at an outside corner, the corner plate 112 may be adjusted such that an angle between the first flat substantially rectangular surface and the second flat substantially rectangular surface has a non-perpendicular angle greater than 90-degrees.

[0070] The electric 110-volt corner crimper has a 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 that may be electrically connected to receive an alternating current of approximately a standard line voltage. In other words, the electric 110-volt corner crimper may simply be plugged into a standard wall outlet. The alternating current is thus a large electric current. The power line is, for example, a 110-volt power line such as is commonly found in residential electric systems. In another embodiment of the present invention (not shown), a rectifier is included to convert the alternating current to a direct current. The large electric current is thus a rectified representation of the alternating current.

[0071] The electric drive 102 is operative to drive a sharp blade (for example, sharp blade 262 shown in FIG. 10 sharp blade 426 shown in FIG. 18) into a corner bead 114 to crimp the corner bead 114 to an outside corner of drywall (not shown in the figure).

[0072] The ribbed handle 106 is rigidly mounted on the electric drive 102 and on the corner plate 112. The ribbed handle 106 allows the electric 110-volt corner crimper to be grasped easily without slipping. If desired, the ribbed handle 106 may be coated with a non-slip surface such as a rubberized material.

[0073] The ribbed handle 106 has a trigger 108. The trigger 108 allows electric power to be provided from the 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 to the electric drive 102 by briefly connecting a circuit that includes the 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 to a coil (for example, the coil 242 shown in FIG. 10) or to a cam-drive electric motor (for example, the motor capable of driving the cam 422 shown in FIG. 18). The electric power continues to be provided to the electric drive 102 while the trigger 108 remains actuated. If desired, a relay (not shown in the figure) may also be provided to disconnect the electric power from the electric drive 102 after power has been provided to the electric drive 102 for a sufficient duration.

[0074] In yet another embodiment of the present invention, the power line receives an alternating current of approximately 220-volts, a voltage that is found in many industrial applications. In still other embodiments of the present invention, the power line receives an alternating current of other industrial voltages. In still other embodiments of the present invention, the power line receives an alternating current in accordance with a European standard and/or an Asian or Latin American standard. Use of other voltages will, of course, be readily apparent to one of ordinary skill upon review of the present disclosure.

[0075] FIG. 5: Pneumatic Corner Crimper

[0076] FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram of a pneumatic corner crimper having an airline pneumatic system, in accordance with a fourth embodiment of the present invention. The pneumatic corner crimper includes a corner plate 120, a pneumatic drive 122 having air vents 124, and a ribbed handle 126 having a trigger 128, an air passage 130, and an air inlet 132. The pneumatic drive 122 is operative to drive a sharp blade (not shown in the figure) into a corner bead 134 to crimp the corner bead 134 to an outside corner of drywall.

[0077] The corner plate 120 is fabricated of aluminum, and has two long, narrow surfaces joined along a long edge at a 90-degree angle. In accordance with various other embodiments of the present invention, the corner plate 120 is fabricated of polypropylene, high impact plastic, carbon fiber, and pot metal, respectively.

[0078] If desired, the two long, narrow surfaces that are joined to form the corner plate 120 may be hinged to allow outside corners of any angle to be crimped using the battery pack corner crimper. The corner plate 120 may adjustable, allowing other angles to be implemented. For example, if two panels of drywall join at an angle greater than 90-degrees, at an outside corner, the corner plate 120 may be adjusted such that an angle between the first flat substantially rectangular surface and the second flat substantially rectangular surface has a non-perpendicular angle greater than 90-degrees.

[0079] The pneumatic drive 122 is operative to drive a sharp blade (for example, the sharpened blade tip 312 shown FIG. 12) into a corner bead 134 to crimp the corner bead 134 to an outside corner of drywall. The air vents 124 allow air to escape from exhaust outlets (for example, the first exhaust outlet 278 and the second exhaust outlet 280 shown in FIG. 11).

[0080] The ribbed handle 126 is rigidly mounted on the pneumatic drive 122 and on the corner plate 120. The ribbed handle 126 allows the pneumatic corner crimper to be grasped easily without slipping. If desired, the ribbed handle 126 may be coated with a non-slip surface such as a rubberized material.

[0081] The ribbed handle 126 has an air inlet 132 and an air passage 130. The air inlet 132 may be coupled to receive a flow of compressed air. If desired, the air inlet 132 may be coupled to receive a flow of any fluid that is under pressure. The air inlet 132 is coupled to provide the compressed air to the air passage 130.

[0082] The ribbed handle 126 has a trigger 128, coupled to actuate a valve (not shown) of the air passage 130. The trigger 128 allows a predetermined quantity of compressed air to pass from the external source through the air passage 130 into the pneumatic drive 122. The predetermined quantity of compressed air passes into an air passage of the pneumatic drive (for example, air passage 272 shown in FIG. 11).

[0083] In response to the trigger 128 being released, the mechanical mechanism relaxes, allowing either a recoil of the compressed air or a spring (not shown in the figures) to stop the release of compressed air from the external source via the air inlet 132 to pass into the pneumatic drive 122. The trigger 128 allows compressed air to be released into the air passage 130 while the trigger 128 remains actuated.

[0084] If desired, an automatic shutoff valve may be added within the air passage 130 such that only a predetermined amount of compressed air is released regardless of how long the trigger 128 remains actuated.

[0085] A first Allen screw 136 and a second Allen screw 138 are provided to maintain the pneumatic drive 122 mounted on the corner plate 120.

[0086] FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C: Battery Operated Palm Held Corner Crimper

[0087] FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of the battery operated palm held corner crimper, in accordance with a fifth embodiment of the present invention. FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C are herein discussed collectively. The battery operated palm held corner crimper includes an electric drive 140 having air vents 142 and an Electric Drive Blade System 144, a ribbed casing 146 having a recessed thumb guide 148 and an activation trigger 150 (the recessed thumb guide 148 and the activation trigger 150 are shown in FIG. 6B), and a sliding battery pack chamber door 152 concealing a battery back (hidden in the figure).

[0088] The ribbed casing 146 provides an easily graspable package containing all of the components of the battery operated palm held corner crimper. If desired, the ribbed casing 146 may be coated with a rubberized material. The battery operated palm held corner crimper is sufficiently small and has a sufficiently small weight to be held in only one hand. Air vents 142 allow a circulation of cooling air to flow through the battery-operated palm held corner crimper.

[0089] The activation trigger 150 (shown in FIG. 6B) is a button that may be pressed by the user with a finger of the hand that is used to grasp the corner crimper. The activation trigger 150 allows electric power to be provided from the battery pack (hidden by the sliding battery pack chamber door 152) to the electric drive 140. The electric power continues to be provided to the electric drive 140 while the activation trigger 150 remains actuated. If desired, a relay (not shown in the figure) may also be provided to disconnect the electric power from the electric drive 140 after power has been provided to the electric drive 140 for a sufficient duration.

[0090] The electric drive 140 is operative to drive a sharp blade of an Electric Drive Blade System 144 (shown in dashed lines to indicate that the Electric Drive Blade System 144 is internal to the battery operated palm held corner crimper) into a corner bead (also not shown in the figure) to crimp the corner bead to an outside corner of drywall (also not shown in the figure). The electric drive blade system is an electric drive (for example the electric drive of FIG. 10 or the sharp blade 426 shown in FIG. 18).

[0091] FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C: Electric Palm Held Corner Crimper

[0092] FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of the electric palm held corner crimper, in accordance with a sixth embodiment of the present invention. FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C are herein discussed collectively. The battery operated palm held corner crimper includes an electric drive 160 having air vents 162 and an electric drive blade system 164, a ribbed casing 166 having a recessed thumb guide 168 and an activation trigger 170 (the recessed thumb guide 168 and an activation trigger 170 are shown in FIG. 7B), and a 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 that may be plugged into a standard wall power outlet. The 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 is, for example, ten inches in length. The electric drive 160 is operative to drive a sharp blade (for example, sharp blade 262 shown in FIG. 10 the sharp blade 426 shown in FIG. 18) into a corner bead (not shown in the figure) to crimp the corner bead to an outside corner of drywall (also not shown in the figure).

[0093] The electric palm held corner crimper has a 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 that may be electrically connected to receive an alternating current of approximately a standard line voltage. In other words, the electric 110-volt corner crimper may simply be plugged into a standard wall outlet. The alternating current is thus a large electric current. The power line is, for example, a 110-volt power line such as is commonly found in residential electric systems. In another embodiment of the present invention (not shown), a rectifier is included to convert the alternating current to a direct current. The large electric current is thus a rectified representation of the alternating current.

[0094] The ribbed casing 166 provides an easily graspable package containing all of the components of the battery operated palm held corner crimper. If desired, the ribbed casing 166 may be coated with a rubberized material. The battery operated palm held corner crimper is sufficiently small and has a sufficiently small weight to be held in only one hand. Air vents 164 allow a circulation of cooling air to flow through the battery-operated palm held corner crimper.

[0095] The activation trigger 170 (shown in FIG. 7B) is a button that may be pressed by the user with a finger of the hand that is used to grasp the corner crimper 42. The activation trigger 170 allows electric power to be provided from the 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 to the electric drive 160. The electric power continues to be provided to the electric drive 160 while the activation trigger 170 remains actuated. If desired, a relay (not shown in the figure) may also be provided to disconnect the electric power from the electric drive 160 after power has been provided to the electric drive 160 for a sufficient duration.

[0096] The electric drive 160 is operative to drive a sharp blade of an electric drive blade system 164 (shown in dashed lines to indicate that the electric drive blade system 164 is internal to the battery operated palm held corner crimper) into a corner bead (also not shown in the figure) to crimp the corner bead to an outside corner of drywall (also not shown in the figure). The electric drive blade system is an electric drive (for example the electric drive of FIG. 10 or the cam-driven electric drive of FIG. 18).

[0097] The electric drive 160 is operative to drive a sharp blade of an electric drive blade system 164 (shown in dashed lines to indicate that the electric drive blade system 164 is internal to the electric palm held corner crimper) into a corner bead (also not shown in the figure) to crimp the corner bead to an outside corner of drywall (also not shown in the figure). The activation trigger 170 allows electric power to be provided from the 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 to the electric drive 160. In accordance with the sixth embodiment of the present invention shown in FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C, the electric power continues to be provided to the electric drive 160 while the activation trigger 170 remains actuated. If desired, a relay (not shown in the figure) may also be provided to disconnect the electric power from the electric drive 160 after power has been provided to the electric drive 160 for a sufficient duration.

[0098] FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C: Pneumatic CO2 Palm Held Corner Crimper Having A CO2 Pneumatic System

[0099] FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of a pneumatic CO2 palm held corner crimper, in accordance with the seventh embodiment of the present invention. FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C are herein discussed collectively. The pneumatic CO2 palm held corner crimper having a CO2 pneumatic system includes a pneumatic drive 182 having air vents 184 and a pneumatic drive blade system 194, a ribbed casing 186 having a recessed thumb guide 188 and an activation trigger 190 (the recessed thumb guide 188 and the activation trigger 190 are shown in FIG. 5B), and a pneumatic CO2 storage system containing a cartridge chamber 192 in which a CO2 cartridge 200 resides and a screw cap 198 that encloses the CO2 cartridge 200 within the cartridge chamber 192.

[0100] The ribbed casing 186 provides an easily graspable package containing all of the components of the pneumatic CO2 palm held corner crimper. If desired, the ribbed casing 186 may be coated with a rubberized material. The pneumatic CO2 palm held corner crimper is sufficiently small and has a sufficiently small weight to be held in only one hand. Air vents 184 allow the pneumatic CO2 palm held corner crimper to expel used carbon dioxide.

[0101] The activation trigger 190 allows a predetermined quantity of compressed carbon dioxide from the CO2 cartridge 200 to be released into the air passage 196. In response to the activation trigger 190, a mechanical mechanism (not shown) causes the CO2 cartridge 200 to press against the puncture needle 202, and allows a recoil of the CO2 cartridge 200 from the puncture needle 202 to stop the release of further carbon dioxide from the CO2 cartridge 200. If desired, a valve may be added within the air passage 216 such that the activation trigger 190 allows carbon dioxide to be released into the air passage 196 while the activation trigger 190 remains actuated In response to the activation trigger 190 being released, the mechanical mechanism relaxes, allowing either a recoil of the CO2 cartridge 200 or a spring (not shown in the figures) to stop the release of further carbon dioxide from the CO2 cartridge 200. The activation trigger 190 allows carbon dioxide to be released into the air passage 196 while the activation trigger 190 remains actuated. If desired, a valve may be added within the air passage 196 such that only a predetermined amount of compressed carbon dioxide is released regardless of how long the activation trigger 190 remains actuated.

[0102] The pneumatic drive 182 is operative to drive a sharp blade (for example, the sharpened blade tip 312 shown FIG. 12) of a pneumatic drive blade system 194 (shown in dashed lines to indicate that the pneumatic drive blade system 194 is internal to the pneumatic CO2 palm held corner crimper) into a corner bead (also not shown in the figure) to crimp the corner bead to an outside corner of drywall (also not shown in the figure). The pneumatic drive blade system is a pneumatic drive (for example the pneumatic drive of FIG. 11). The activation trigger 190 allows pneumatic power to be provided from the pneumatic CO2 storage system to the pneumatic drive 182. The pneumatic power continues to be provided to the pneumatic drive 182 while the activation trigger 190 remains actuated.

[0103] FIG. FIGS. 9A, 9B, and 9C: Palm Held Corner Crimper Having a Pneumatic System

[0104] FIGS. 9A, 9B, and 9C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of a pneumatic air palm held corner crimper having an air pneumatic system, in accordance with a eighth embodiment of the present invention. FIGS. 9A, 9B, and 9C are herein discussed collectively.

[0105] The pneumatic air palm held corner crimper having an air pneumatic system includes a pneumatic drive 220 having air vents 222 and a pneumatic drive blade system 224, a ribbed casing 226 having a recessed thumb guide 228 and an activation trigger 230 (the recessed thumb guide 228 and the activation trigger 230 are shown in FIG. 7B), and an air inlet 232 leading to an air passage 234.

[0106] The ribbed casing 226 provides an easily graspable package containing all of the components of the pneumatic air palm held corner crimper. If desired, the ribbed casing 226 may be coated with a rubberized material. The pneumatic air palm held corner crimper is sufficiently small and has a sufficiently small weight to be held in only one hand. Air vents 222 allow the pneumatic air palm held corner crimper to expel used carbon dioxide.

[0107] The activation trigger 230 allows a predetermined quantity of pressurized air, compressed air from an external storage tank (not shown), or other fluid from the air inlet 232 to be released into the air passage 234. In response to the activation trigger 230, a mechanical mechanism (not shown) causes the air inlet 232 to press abruptly against the pneumatic drive blade system 224 and allows a recoil of the pneumatic drive blade system 224 to stop the release of further pressurized air, compressed air from an external storage tank (not shown), or other fluid from the air inlet 232. If desired, a valve may be added within the air passage 234 such that the activation trigger 230 allows pressurized air, compressed air from an external storage tank (not shown), or other fluid to be released into the air passage 234 while the activation trigger 230 remains actuated.

[0108] In response to the activation trigger 230 being released, the mechanical mechanism relaxes, allowing either a recoil of the air inlet 232 or a spring (not shown in the figures) to stop the release of further carbon dioxide from the air inlet 232. The activation trigger 230 allows carbon dioxide to be released into the air passage 234 while the activation trigger 230 remains actuated. If desired, a valve may be added within the air passage 234 such that only a predetermined amount of compressed carbon dioxide is released regardless of how long the activation trigger 230 remains actuated.

[0109] The pneumatic drive 220 is operative to drive a sharp blade (for example, the sharpened blade tip 312 shown FIG. 12) of a pneumatic drive blade system 224 (shown in dashed lines to indicate that the pneumatic drive blade system 224 is internal to the pneumatic air palm held corner crimper) into a corner bead (also not shown in the figure) to crimp the corner bead to an outside corner of drywall (also not shown in the figure). The pneumatic drive blade system is a pneumatic drive (for example the pneumatic drive of FIG. 11). The activation trigger 230 allows pneumatic power to be provided from the pneumatic air storage system to the pneumatic drive 220. The pneumatic power continues to be provided to the pneumatic drive 220 while the activation trigger 230 remains actuated.

[0110] FIG. 10: Electric Drive

[0111] FIG. 10 is a schematic diagram of a cross section of an electric drive, in accordance with a ninth embodiment of the present invention. It will be appreciated that the electric drive of FIG. 10 is compatible with the battery pack corner crimper of FIG. 2, and may be used in place of the electric drive 58. Similarly, it will be appreciated that the electric drive of FIG. 10 is compatible with the electric 110-volt corner crimper of FIG. 4, and may be used in place of the electric drive 102. The electric drive of FIG. 10 is also compatible with the battery-operated palm-held corner crimper of FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C, and may be used in place of the electric drive 140. The electric drive of FIG. 10 is also compatible with the electric palm-held corner crimper of FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C, and may be used in place of the electric drive 160.

[0112] The electric drive depicted in FIG. 10 includes a casing 240 (of the electric drive) approximately 1¼ inches long that houses a drive blade system. The casing has an axis and is cylindrically symmetric about the axis.

[0113] The casing 240 contains a coil 242 of conductive wire that is capable of creating an electromagnet in response to a current through the conductive wire. The coil 242 is coupled to receive a large electric current (for example, the electric current obtained from the battery pack 56 of FIG. 2 in response to the trigger 64 of FIG. 2, or the electric current obtained from the 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 in response to the trigger 108 of FIG. 4, or the electric current obtained from the battery hidden behind the sliding battery pack chamber door 152 in response to the activation trigger 150 of FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C, or the electric current obtained from the 10-inch 110-volt electric cord 172 in response to the activation trigger 170 of FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C). In response to the large electric current, the coil 242 inductively generates a large magnetic field.

[0114] The electric drive also includes a driving member such as a piston 244. The piston 244 is fabricated of steel (or other ferromagnetic material) slidably mounted on a shaft that that is free to slide a short distance within the casing 240. The piston 244 has a cylindrical metal upper portion approximately one-half inch long and ¼ inch in diameter that is composed of a ferromagnetic material responsive to the electromagnetic field created by the coil 242, and a cylindrical central portion approximately one inch long and ⅛ inch in diameter that is enclosed within a plastic sheath 246.

[0115] The piston 244 is connected by a threaded joint 264 to a sharp blade 262 having a first sharpened blade tip 248 and a second sharpened blade tip 250. Using a threaded joint 264 allows the piston to be manufactured easily, and allows the sharp blade 262 (and, consequently, the first sharpened blade tip 248 and the second sharpened blade tip 250) to be removed for sharpening or replaced with another sharp blade when/if the first sharpened blade tip 248 and the second sharpened blade tip 250 become dull.

[0116] Since the piston 244 is free to slide along the axis of the electric drive and since the piston 244 is fabricated of a material that is responsive to magnetic fields, the piston 244 slides downward along the axis of the electric drive in response to a magnetic field generated by the coil 242. The driving member is forcefully and briefly impelled by the large magnetic field toward the corner bead (not shown in FIG. 10). In response thereto, a first sharpened blade tip 248 and a second sharpened blade tip 250 emerge from the casing of the electric drive to crimp the corner bead (not shown in FIG. 10). A rubber stopper 252 prevents the piston 244 from being damaged from striking the casing 240.

[0117] As the piston 244 slides downward along the axis of the electric drive in response to a magnetic field generated by the coil, the first sharpened blade tip 248 and the second sharpened blade tip 250 emerge from a first blade opening 254 and a second blade opening 256. The first sharpened blade tip 248 and the second sharpened blade tip 250 are pulled with great momentum, since the coil is capable of generating a large magnetic field.

[0118] At least two blades, pivotally and/or hingeably mounted to the piston 244 and to the corner plate, pierce the corner bead and to drive into the first panel of drywall and into the second panel of drywall in response to the piston 244. The blades are made of high quality steel. In various other embodiments, the blades are made of stainless steel, hardened steel, cobalt steel, and black oxide steel, respectively.

[0119] In accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, not shown in the figures, the piston 244 is forcefully and briefly impelled by the large magnetic field toward the corner bead. In response thereto, the piston 244 causes the first sharpened blade tip 248 and the second sharpened blade tip 250 to crimp the corner bead. A hammer mechanism drives a first nail into the first panel of drywall and a second nail into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the piston 244.

[0120] In accordance with yet another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, the piston 244 is forcefully and briefly impelled by the large magnetic field toward the corner bead. In response thereto, the piston 244 causes the first sharpened blade tip 248 and the second sharpened blade tip 250 to crimp the corner bead. A screwdriver mechanism (not shown in the figures) drives a first screw into the first panel of drywall and a second screw into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the driving member.

[0121] In accordance with yet another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, the piston 244 is forcefully and briefly impelled by the large magnetic field toward the corner bead. In response thereto, the piston 244 causes the first sharpened blade tip 248 and the second sharpened blade tip 250 to crimp the corner bead. A first staple (not shown in the figures) is driven into the first panel of drywall and a second staple into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the driving member.

[0122] The casing 240 also includes a spring 258. The driving member (that is, the piston 244) is displaceably maintained at one end of the casing 240 by the spring 258. When little or no current flows through the conductive wire of the coil 242, the coil 242 of conductive wire does not substantially create an electromagnet. When the coil 242 does not receive a large electric current (for example, when the trigger 64 of FIG. 2 is released, or when the trigger 108 of FIG. 4 is released, or when the activation trigger 150 of FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C is released, or when the activation trigger 170 of FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C is released), little or no magnetic field is generated in response thereto.

[0123] The spring 258 within the casing 240 restores the driving member (that is, the piston 244) to the end of casing 240 that is more distant from the corner bead. A hardened steel pin 260 prevents the piston 244 from moving too far as the spring 258 restores the piston 244 to its original resting position.

[0124] FIG. 11: Pneumatic Drive

[0125] FIG. 11 is a schematic diagram of a cross section of a pneumatic drive, in accordance with a tenth embodiment of the present invention. It will be appreciated that the pneumatic drive of FIG. 11 is compatible with the pneumatic CO2 electric corner crimper of FIG. 3, and may be used in place of the pneumatic drive 74 of FIG. 3. Similarly, it will be appreciated that the electric drive of FIG. 11 is compatible with the pneumatic corner crimper of FIG. 5, and may be used in place of the pneumatic drive 122 of FIG. 5. The electric drive of FIG. 11 is also compatible with the pneumatic CO2 palm held corner crimper of FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C, and may be used in place of the pneumatic drive 182 of FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C.

[0126] The pneumatic drive of FIG. 11 is enclosed in a casing 270. As shown in FIG. 11, a fluid, for example compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air, is forced down an air passage 272. The fluid may be further compressed by a contraction of cross sectional area as the fluid passes along the air passage 272. If desired, two or more air passages may be used. When the pneumatic drive of FIG. 11 is used in place of the pneumatic drive 74 of FIG. 3, the fluid is compressed carbon dioxide obtained from the air passage 272. When the pneumatic drive of FIG. 11 is used in place of the pneumatic drive 122 of FIG. 5, the fluid is compressed air obtained from air passage 272. When the pneumatic drive of FIG. 11 is used in place of the pneumatic drive 182 of FIGS. 5A, 8B, and 8C, the fluid is compressed carbon dioxide obtained from the air passage 272.

[0127] As shall be explained in greater detail below with respect to FIG. 12, the pneumatic drive of FIG. 11 has two pneumatic drive blade systems (i.e., a first pneumatic drive blade system 274 and a second pneumatic drive blade system 276). In other embodiments, additional pneumatic drive blade systems are also included. The air passage 272 is divided as necessary to provide each pneumatic drive blade system with a pressurized stream of compressed fluid, for example compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air.

[0128] Each of the pneumatic drive blade systems is pressed from a quiescent (that is, resting) position into an extended position in response to the compressed fluid. The pneumatic drive blade systems extend into an extended position to crimp a corner bead into one or more sections of drywall. A first exhaust outlet 278 and a second exhaust outlet 280 release the compressed fluid after the pneumatic drive blade systems have been actuated.

[0129] FIG. 12: The Pneumatic Drive Blade System

[0130] FIG. 12 is a schematic diagram of a cross section of a pneumatic drive blade system, in accordance with the embodiment of the present invention described with respect to FIG. 11. The pneumatic drive blade system of FIG. 12 is not the only embodiment of a pneumatic drive blade system that is compatible with the pneumatic drive of FIG. 11, nor is the pneumatic drive of FIG. 11 the only embodiment of a pneumatic drive that is compatible with the pneumatic drive blade system of FIG. 12. However, the pneumatic drive blade system of FIG. 12 is useful for illustrating an example of an embodiment of a pneumatic drive blade system that is compatible with the pneumatic drive of FIG. 11.

[0131] The pneumatic drive depicted in FIG. 12 includes a casing 302 (which may be a portion of the casing 270 of the pneumatic drive shown in FIG. 11). The casing 302 is approximately 1¼ inches long and has an axis and is cylindrically symmetric about an axis. The casing 302 defines an air passage 304 that is, for example, a portion of the air passage 304 described with respect to FIG. 11.

[0132] The pneumatic drive also includes a driving member (for example, a piston 306) that is situated within the casing 302 at a lower end of the air passage 304. The piston 306 is approximately one inch long and ⅛ inch in diameter and is fabricated of steel or other hardened material such as black oxide, and is slidably mounted on a shaft that that is free to slide a short distance within the casing 302. The piston 306 has an upper surface on which an O-ring 308 and a hardened steel pin 310 are mounted, and a lower end at which a sharpened blade tip 312 is mounted.

[0133] As described with respect to FIG. 3, FIG. 5, and FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C, a predetermined quantity of compressed carbon dioxide or a predetermined quantity of compressed air may be released in response to a trigger or in response to an activation trigger. As described with respect to FIG. 11, the predetermined quantity of compressed carbon dioxide or a predetermined quantity of compressed air may flow into an upper end of air passage 304 and provide each pneumatic drive blade system with a pressurized stream of compressed fluid, for example compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air.

[0134] As shown in FIG. 12, the piston 306 responds to the pressurized stream of compressed fluid, for example compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air, by sliding downward within the casing 302. An influx of a compressed fluid such as compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air presses an upper surface of the piston 306. The O-ring 308 (mounted on the upper surface of the piston 306) that creates a substantially airtight seal around the upper surface of the piston 306.

[0135] An abrupt, sudden and forceful influx of compressed fluid such as compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air creates an abrupt, sudden and forceful thrusting of the piston 306 downward causing the sharpened blade tip 312, which is mounted on the piston 306, to extend from inside the casing. The sharpened blade tip 312 is made of high quality steel. In various other embodiments, the blades are made of stainless steel, hardened steel cobalt steel, and black oxide steel, respectively.

[0136] The abrupt, sudden and forceful extension of the sharpened blade tip 312 from inside the casing 302 strikes a corner bead (not shown in the figure) and crimps the corner bead to at least one section of drywall. A relief outlet 314 provides a safe release for the compressed fluid. A muffler (optional and not shown in the figures) may also be added to help reduce noise.

[0137] The casing 302 also includes a spring 316. The driving member (that is, the piston 306) is displaceably maintained at one end of the casing 302 by the spring 316. When little or no compressed fluid such as compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air enters the air passage 304 within the casing 302, the spring 316 within the casing 302 restores the driving member (that is, the piston 306) to the end of casing 302 that is more distant from the corner bead. The hardened steel pin 310 prevents the O-ring 308 from being crushed or otherwise damaged as the spring 316 restores the piston 306 to its original resting position.

[0138] The rapid and high-pressure release of the predetermined quantity of compressed fluid such as compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air displaces the driving member (that is, the piston 306) from an end of the casing 302 to which it is maintained by the spring 316. Like a bullet fired from a muzzle of a gun by a rapid expansion of compressed gasses, the driving member is actuated from the end of the cylinder to which it is maintained by the spring by the rapid and high-pressure release of the predetermined quantity of compressed air. The driving member is forcefully and briefly impelled toward the corner bead. In response thereto, the driving member causes the corner crimper to crimp the corner bead. The spring within the cylinder then restores the driving member to the end of cylinder that is more distant from the corner bead.

[0139] In accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, not shown in the figures, the piston is forcefully and briefly impelled toward the corner bead by the abrupt, sudden and forceful influx of compressed fluid such as compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air. In response thereto, the piston causes the first blade tip to crimp the corner bead. A hammer mechanism drives a first nail into the first panel of drywall and a second nail into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the piston.

[0140] In accordance with yet another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, not shown in the figures, the piston is forcefully and briefly impelled toward the corner bead by the abrupt, sudden and forceful influx of compressed fluid such as compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air. In response thereto, the piston causes the first blade tip to crimp the corner bead. A screwdriver mechanism drives a first screw into the first panel of drywall and a second screw into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the driving member.

[0141] In accordance with yet another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, not shown in the figures, the piston is forcefully and briefly impelled toward the corner bead by the abrupt, sudden and forceful influx of compressed fluid such as compressed carbon dioxide or compressed air. In response thereto, the piston causes the first blade tip to crimp the corner bead. A first staple is driven into the first panel of drywall and a second staple into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the driving member.

[0142] FIG. 13: Flowchart of a Method for Crimping a Corner Bead

[0143] FIG. 13 is a flowchart of a method for crimping a corner bead to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam, in accordance with an eleventh exemplary embodiment of the present invention.

[0144] The method for crimping a corner bead to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam includes a step 320 of adjusting an angle between a first flat substantially rectangular surface and a second flat substantially rectangular surface to an angle between a first panel of drywall and the second panel of drywall.

[0145] The method for crimping a corner bead to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam also includes a step 322 of triggering a power source. The step 322 of triggering the power source includes a step 324 of triggering a battery to briefly drive a large electric current through a coil in response to the trigger mechanism. The step 322 of triggering the power source includes a step 328 of driving the driving member in response to the large magnetic field.

[0146] The step 322 of triggering the power source also includes a step 326 of inductively generating a large magnetic field in the coil in response to the large electric current. At a step 328, a driving member is impelled toward the corner bead. If desired, the step 328 of impelling the driving member toward the corner bead includes a step of driving at least two blades to pierce the corner bead. In a similar embodiment not shown in the figures, the step 328 of impelling the driving member toward the corner bead includes a step driving at a first nail into the first panel of drywall and a second nail into the second panel of drywall at a beam. At a step 330, the corner bead is crimped to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam.

[0147] In another similar embodiment also not shown in the figures, the step 328 of impelling the driving member toward the corner bead includes a step of driving at a first screw into the first panel of drywall and a second screw into the second panel of drywall at a beam. In yet another similar embodiment also not shown in the figures, the step 328 of impelling the driving member toward the corner bead includes a step of driving at a first staple into the first panel of drywall and a second staple into the second panel of drywall at a beam.

[0148] In accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, not shown in the figures, a method for crimping a corner bead to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam includes a step of triggering a power source. The step of triggering the power source includes steps of (a) receiving an alternating current of approximately a standard line voltage, (b) briefly driving a large electric current through a coil in response to a trigger mechanism and in response to the step of receiving an alternating current of approximately a standard line voltage, (c) inductively generating a large magnetic field in the coil in response to the step of briefly driving the large electric current through a coil, and (d) driving the driving member to crimp the corner bead to the first panel of drywall and to the second panel of drywall at the beam in response to the step of inductively generating a large magnetic field in the coil.

[0149] In accordance with yet another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, not shown in the figures, a method for crimping a corner bead to a first panel of drywall and to a second panel of drywall at a beam includes a step of triggering a power source. The step of triggering the power source includes steps of (a) releasing a predetermined quantity of compressed air from a reservoir of compressed air in response to a trigger mechanism, and (b) driving the driving member to crimp the corner bead to the first panel of drywall and to the second panel of drywall at the beam in response to the release of the predetermined quantity of compressed air from the reservoir of compressed air.

[0150] FIG. 14: Heat Glue Corner Crimper

[0151] FIG. 14 is a schematic diagram of a heat glue corner crimper, in accordance with a twelfth embodiment of the present invention. The heat glue corner crimper includes a 110-volt power cord 340 that may be plugged into a standard wall power outlet, a pair of heating pads 342 that can achieve extremely high temperatures when an electric current is provided to the pair of heating pads 342, and a ribbed handle 344 having a trigger 346 operative to connect electric current from the 110-volt power cord 340 to the pair of heating pads 342.

[0152] The 110-volt power cord 340 is, for example, ten inches in length. If desired, power cords capable of providing other voltages, such as 220-volts, voltages commonly found in European nations or in Asian nations, may be used instead of 110-volts.

[0153] The pair of heating pads 342 can achieve extremely high temperatures when an electric current is provided to the pair of heating pads 342. For example, the pair of heating pads 342 may achieve a temperature sufficiently high to melt a particular variety of glue. If desired, a knob or other switching mechanism may be added to allow a user to select a particular temperature corresponding to a particular variety of glue.

[0154] The ribbed handle 344 is hingeably mounted by a roll pin 348 on a corner plate 350. In other words, like a standard desk stapler, the ribbed handle 344 may be pressed toward a corner plate 350. When the ribbed handle 344 is pressed toward the corner plate 350, the ribbed handle 344 is in an active position in which the pair of heating pads 342 protrude from holes (shown in the Front View) in the bottom of the corner plate 350. When the ribbed handle 344 is in the active position, the pair of heating pads 342 is operative to heat a quantity of heat-sensitive glue 352. A spring 354 restores the ribbed handle 344 to an inactive position, in which the pair of heating pads 342 does not protrude from the holes in the bottom of the corner plate 350.

[0155] If desired, as a safety feature, when the ribbed handle 344 is in the inactive position for a period of time established by a timer (not shown), the pair of heating pads 342 may be electrically disconnected from the 110-volt power cord 340. For example, a small capacitor (not shown) may be included that is charged while the ribbed handle 344 is in the active position in which the pair of heating pads 342 protrude from the holes in the bottom of the corner plate 350, and that is discharged via a resistor (not shown) when while the ribbed handle 344 is in the inactive position. When discharged, the capacitor may be operative to prevent the pair of heating pads 342 from receiving electric power from the 110-volt power cord 340 and thus from heating.

[0156] The ribbed handle 344 and the corner plate 350 may be fabricated of a thermally insulating material that prevents heat from the pair of heating pads 342 from reaching any portion of a user's body. Specifically, the user's hand, which is in physical contact with the ribbed handle 344, is protected from the heat of the pair of heating pads 342 by the thermally insulating material.

[0157] The quantity of heat-sensitive glue 352 is located on a reverse side of the corner bead 356, and may be covered with small pieces of paper until a user peals off the small pieces of paper. A user thus may attach the corner bead 356 by (a) pealing off the small pieces of paper, (b) placing the corner bead 356 in a desired location, (c) placing the heat glue corner crimper over the corner bead 356, covering the corner bead 356 with the corner plate 350, (d) pressing the ribbed handle 344 toward the corner plate 350 to force the pair of heating pads 342 outward through the holes in the corner plate 350, (e) activating the trigger 346 to begin heating the pair of heating pads 342, and (f) after waiting a moment for the quantity of heat-sensitive glue 352 to melt, removing the heat glue corner crimper from the corner bead 356 which is thus mounted in the desired location.

[0158] FIG. 15: Double Heat Glue Corner Crimper

[0159] FIG. 15 is a schematic diagram of a double heat glue corner crimper, in accordance with a thirteenth embodiment of the present invention. The double heat glue corner crimper includes a 110-volt power cord 360 that may be plugged into a standard wall power outlet, a first pair of heating pads 362a and a second pair of heating pads 362b that can achieve extremely high temperatures when an electric current is provided to the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b, a ribbed handle 366 having a trigger 368 operative to connect electric current from the 110-volt power cord 360 to the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b.

[0160] The 110-volt power cord 360 is, for example, ten inches in length. If desired, power cords capable of providing other voltages, such as 220-volts, voltages commonly found in European nations or in Asian nations, may be used instead of 110-volts.

[0161] The double heat glue corner crimper has four heating pads. In the side view depicted in FIG. 15, one heating pad of each of pair is shown, the other heating pad of each pair being hidden by the heating pads that are shown. In the front view depicted in FIG. 15, the first pair of heating pads 362a is shown, the second pair of heating pads 362b being hidden by the first pair of heating pads 362a.

[0162] The first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b can achieve extremely high temperatures when an electric current is provided to the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b. For example, the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b may achieve a temperature sufficiently high to melt a particular variety of glue. If desired, a knob or other switching mechanism may be added to allow a user to select a particular temperature corresponding to a particular variety of glue.

[0163] Unlike the heat glue corner crimper of FIG. 14, the double heat glue corner crimper of FIG. 15 may be used to attach the corner bead 364 at more than two points simultaneously. At a first location along the corner bead 364, a first quantity of heat-sensitive glue is melted by the first pair of heating pads 362a, and at a second location along the corner bead 364, a second quantity of heat-sensitive glue is melted by the second pair of heating pads 362b.

[0164] The ribbed handle 366 is slidably mounted on pair of first screw 370a and a first screw 370b so that the ribbed handle 366 can slide when pressed downward toward the corner plate 372 (and toward the corner bead 364). In other words, the ribbed handle 366 may be pressed toward the corner plate 372 to an active position in which the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b protrude from holes (shown in the Front View) in the bottom of the corner plate 372. When the ribbed handle 366 is in the active position, the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b are operative to heat a quantity of heat-sensitive glue 374. A pair of springs (a first spring 368a and a second spring 368b) restores the ribbed handle 366 to an inactive position, in which the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b do not protrude from the holes in the bottom of the corner plate 372.

[0165] If desired, as a safety feature, when the ribbed handle 366 is in the inactive position for a period of time established by a timer (not shown), the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b may be electrically disconnected from the 110-volt power cord 360. For example, a small capacitor (not shown) may be included that is charged while the ribbed handle 366 is in the active position in which the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b protrude from the holes in the bottom of the corner plate 372, and that is discharged via a resistor (not shown) when while the ribbed handle 366 is in the inactive position. When discharged, the capacitor may be operative to prevent the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b from receiving electric power from the 110-volt power cord 360 and thus from heating.

[0166] The ribbed handle 366 and the corner plate 372 may be fabricated of a thermally insulating material that prevents heat from the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b from reaching any portion of a user's body. Specifically, the user's hand, which is in physical contact with the ribbed handle 366, is protected from the heat of the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b by the thermally insulating material.

[0167] The quantity of heat-sensitive glue 374 is located on a reverse side of the corner bead 364, and may be covered with small pieces of paper until a user peals off the small pieces of paper. A user thus may attach the corner bead 364 by (a) pealing off the small pieces of paper, (b) placing the corner bead 364 in a desired location, (c) placing the double heat glue corner crimper over the corner bead 364, covering the corner bead 364 with the corner plate 372, (d) pressing the ribbed handle 366 toward the corner plate 372 to force the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b outward through the holes in the corner plate 372, (e) activating the trigger 368 to begin heating the first pair of heating pads 362a and the second pair of heating pads 362b, and (f) after waiting a moment for the quantity of heat-sensitive glue 374 to melt removing the double heat glue corner crimper from the corner bead 364 which is thus mounted in the desired location.

[0168] FIGS. 16A, 16B, and 16C: Palm Held Heat Glue Corner Crimper

[0169] FIGS. 16A, 16B, and 16C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of a palm held heat glue corner crimper, in accordance with the thirteenth embodiment of the present invention. FIGS. 16A, 16B, and 16C are herein discussed collectively. The heat glue corner crimper includes a 110-volt power cord 380 that may be plugged into a standard wall power outlet, a pair of heating pads 382 that can achieve extremely high temperatures when an electric current is provided to the pair of heating pads 382, a ribbed casing 384 having a activation trigger 386 (located at a recessed thumb guide 388) operative to connect electric current from the 110-volt power cord 380 to the pair of heating pads 382.

[0170] The 110-volt power cord 380 is, for example, ten inches in length. If desired, power cords capable of providing other voltages, such as 220-volts, voltages commonly found in European nations or in Asian nations, may be used instead of 110-volts.

[0171] The pair of heating pads 382 can achieve extremely high temperatures when an electric current is provided to the pair of heating pads 382. For example, the pair of heating pads 382 may achieve a temperature sufficiently high to melt a particular variety of glue. If desired, a knob or other switching mechanism may be added to allow a user to select a particular temperature corresponding to a particular variety of glue.

[0172] A spring (not shown) restores the heat glue coiner crimper to an inactive position, in which the pair of heating pads 382 does not protrude from the holes in the bottom of the ribbed casing 384. If desired, as a safety feature, when the heat glue corner crimper is in the inactive position for a period of time established by a timer (not shown), the pair of heating pads 382 may be electrically disconnected from the 110-volt power cord 380. For example, a small capacitor (not shown) may be included that is charged while the ribbed casing 384 is in the active position in which the pair of heating pads 382 protrude from the holes in the bottom of the ribbed casing 384, and that is discharged via a resistor (not shown) when while the heat glue corner crimper is in the inactive position. When discharged, the capacitor may be operative to prevent the pair of heating pads 382 from receiving electric power from the 110-volt power cord 380 and thus from heating.

[0173] The ribbed casing 384 may be fabricated of a thermally insulating material that prevents heat from the pair of heating pads 382 from reaching any portion of a user's body. Specifically, the user's hand, which is in physical contact with the ribbed casing 384, is protected from the heat of the pair of heating pads 382 by the thermally insulating material.

[0174] The heat-sensitive glue is located on a reverse side of the corner bead, and may be covered with small pieces of paper until a user peals off the small pieces of paper. A user thus may attach the corner bead by (a) pealing off the small pieces of paper, (b) placing the corner bead in a desired location, (c) placing the heat glue corner crimper over the corner bead, covering the corner bead with the heat glue corner crimper, (d) pressing the heat glue corner crimper toward the corner bead, to force the pair of heating pads 382 outward through the holes in the ribbed casing 384, (e) activating the activation trigger 386 to begin heating the pair of heating pads 382, and (f) after waiting a moment for the quantity of heat-sensitive glue to melt, removing the heat glue corner crimper from the corner bead which is thus mounted in the desired location.

[0175] FIGS. 17A, 17B, and 17C: Battery-Operated Palm Held Heat Glue Corner Crimper

[0176] FIGS. 17A, 17B, and 17C are schematic diagrams of a side view, front view, and back view, respectively, of a palm held heat glue corner crimper, in accordance with the fourteenth embodiment of the present invention. FIGS. 17A, 17B, and 17C are herein discussed collectively. The heat glue corner crimper includes a battery 400, a pair of heating pads 402 that can achieve extremely high temperatures when an electric current is provided to the pair of heating pads 402, a ribbed casing 404 having an activation trigger 406 operative to connect electric current from the battery 400 to the pair of heating pads 402.

[0177] The battery 400 is, for example, a 12-volt battery. In various embodiments, batteries of different voltages are used. For example, in various other embodiments, the battery pack contains a 14-volt battery, a 16-volt battery, and an 18-volt battery, respectively.

[0178] The pair of heating pads 402 can achieve extremely high temperatures when an electric current is provided to the pair of heating pads 402. For example, the pair of heating pads 402 may achieve a temperature sufficiently high to melt a particular variety of glue. If desired, a knob or other switching mechanism may be added to allow a user to select a particular temperature corresponding to a particular variety of glue.

[0179] A spring (not shown) restores the heat glue corner crimper to an inactive position, in which the pair of heating pads 402 does not protrude from the holes in the bottom of the ribbed casing 404. If desired, as a safety feature, when the heat glue corner crimper is m the inactive position for a period of time established by a timer (not shown), the pair of heating pads 402 may be electrically disconnected from the battery 400. For example, a small capacitor (not shown) may be included that is charged while the ribbed casing 404 is in the active position in which the pair of heating pads 402 protrude from the holes in the bottom of the ribbed casing 404, and that is discharged via a resistor (not shown) when while the heat glue corner crimper is in the inactive position. When discharged, the capacitor may be operative to prevent the pair of heating pads 402 from receiving electric power from the battery 400 and thus from heating.

[0180] The ribbed casing 404 may be fabricated of a thermally insulating material that prevents heat from the pair of heating pads 402 from reaching any portion of a user's body. Specifically, the user's hand, which is in physical contact with the ribbed casing 404, is protected from the heat of the pair of heating pads 402 by the thermally insulating material.

[0181] The heat-sensitive glue is located on a reverse side of the corner bead, and may be covered with small pieces of paper until a user peals off the small pieces of paper. A user thus may attach the corner bead by (a) pealing off the small pieces of paper, (b) placing the corner bead in a desired location, (c) placing the heat glue corner crimper over the corner bead, covering the corner bead with the heat glue corner crimper, (d) pressing the heat glue corner crimper toward the corner bead, to force the pair of heating pads 402 outward through the holes in the ribbed casing 404, (e) activating the activation trigger 386 to begin heating the pair of heating pads 402, and (f) after waiting a moment for the quantity of heat-sensitive glue to melt, removing the heat glue corner crimper from the corner bead which is thus mounted in the desired location.

[0182] FIG. 18: Cam-Driven Electric Drive

[0183] FIG. 18 is a schematic diagram of a cross section of a cam-driven electric drive, in accordance with a fifteenth embodiment of the present invention. It will be appreciated that the cam-driven electric drive of FIG. 18 is compatible with the battery pack corner crimper of FIG. 2, and may be used in place of the electric drive 58. Similarly, it will be appreciated that the cam-driven electric drive of FIG. 18 is compatible with the electric 118-volt corner crimper of FIG. 4, and may be used in place of the electric drive 182. The cam-driven electric drive of FIG. 18 is also compatible with the battery-operated palm-held corner crimper of FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C, and may be used in place of the electric drive 140. The cam-driven electric drive of FIG. 18 is also compatible with the electric palm-held corner crimper of FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C, and may be used in place of the electric drive 160.

[0184] The cam-driven electric drive depicted in FIG. 18 includes a casing 410 (of the cam-driven electric drive) approximately 1¼ inches long that houses a drive blade system. The casing has an axis and is cylindrically symmetric about the axis.

[0185] The cam-driven electric drive depicted in FIG. 18 includes an electric motor (not shown in the figure) that is operative to spin an axis 424 in response to a large electric current (for example, the electric current obtained from the battery pack 56 of FIG. 2 in response to the trigger 64 of FIG. 2, or the electric current obtained from the 18-inch 118-volt electric cord 172 in response to the trigger 188 of FIG. 4, or the electric current obtained from the battery hidden behind the sliding battery pack chamber door 152 in response to the activation trigger 150 of FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C, or the electric current obtained from the 18-inch 118-volt electric cord 172 in response to the activation trigger 170 of FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C). In response to the large electric current, the cam 422 is spun about the axis 424.

[0186] The cam-driven electric drive also includes a driving member such as a piston 426. The piston 426 is fabricated of steel (or other rigid/hardened material) slidably mounted on a shaft that that is free to slide a short distance within the casing 420. The piston 426 has a cylindrical metal upper portion approximately one-half inch long and ¼ inch in diameter, and a cylindrical central portion approximately one inch long and ⅛ inch in diameter.

[0187] The piston 426 also has a hardened steel tip 428 that is sufficiently close to the cam 422 and to the axis 424 that when the cam 422 is spun about the axis 424, an outer edge of the cam 422 strikes the hardened steel tip 428. The outer edge of the cam 422 strikes the hardened steel tip 428 with such force that the piston 426 is driven forcefully and abruptly downward along the axis of the cam-driven electric drive in response to the outer edge of the cam 422 striking the hardened steel tip 428. The piston 426 is forcefully and briefly impelled toward the corner bead (not shown in FIG. 18) by the outer edge of the cam 422 striking the hardened steel tip 428.

[0188] The piston 426 is connected to a sharp blade 428 having a first sharpened blade tip 430 and a second sharpened blade tip 432. A first sharpened blade tip 430 and a second sharpened blade tip 432 emerge from the casing of the cam-driven electric drive to crimp the corner bead (not shown in FIG. 18). The first sharpened blade tip 430 and the second sharpened blade tip 432 emerge from a first blade opening 254 and a second blade opening 256. The first sharpened blade tip 430 and the second sharpened blade tip 432 are pulled with great momentum, since the cam 422 is capable of striking the hardened steel pin 428 with great force. A rubber stopper 434 prevents the piston 426 from being damaged from striking the casing 420.

[0189] At least two blades (e.g. the First Sharpened Blade Tip 430 and the Second Sharpened Blade Tip 432) pierce the corner bead and to drive into the first panel of drywall and into the second panel of drywall. The blades are made of high quality steel. In various other embodiments, the blades are made of stainless steel, hardened steel, cobalt steel, and black oxide steel, respectively.

[0190] In accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, not shown in the figures, a hammer mechanism drives a first nail into the first panel of drywall and a second nail into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the piston 426. In accordance with yet another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, a screwdriver mechanism (not shown in the figures) drives a first screw into the first panel of drywall and a second screw into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the driving member. In accordance with yet another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, a first staple (not shown in the figures) is driven into the first panel of drywall and a second staple into the second panel of drywall at a beam in response to the driving member.

[0191] The casing 420 also includes a spring 436. The driving member (that is, the piston 426) is displaceably maintained at one end of the casing 420 by the spring 436. When the cam 422 is not being spun (for example, when the trigger 64 of FIG. 2 is released, or when the trigger 188 of FIG. 4 is released, or when the activation trigger 150 of FIGS. 6A, 6B, and 6C is released, or when the activation trigger 170 of FIGS. 7A, 7B, and 7C is released), the spring 436 within the casing 420 restores the driving member (that is, the piston 426) to the end of casing 420 that is more distant from the corner bead. The hardened steel pin 260 prevents the piston 426 from moving too far as the spring 436 restores the piston 426 to its original resting position.

CONCLUSION

[0192] While a preferred embodiment of the corner crimper has been described in detail, it should be apparent that modifications and variations thereto are possible, all of which fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention. With respect to the above description then, it is to be realized that the optimum dimensional relationships for the parts of the invention, to include variations in size, materials, shape, form, function and manner of operation, assembly and use, are deemed readily apparent and obvious to one skilled in the art, and all equivalent relationships to those illustrated in the drawings and described in the specification are intended to be encompassed by the present invention. For example, any suitable sturdy material may be used instead of the material described.

[0193] Therefore, the foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.

[0194] In view of the foregoing, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the methods of the present invention can facilitate formation of construction tools for working with one hand, and in particular corner crimpers for crimping drywall corners. The above-described embodiments have been provided by way of example, and the present invention is not limited to these examples. Multiple variations and modification to the disclosed embodiments will occur, to the extent not mutually exclusive, to those skilled in the alt upon consideration of the foregoing description. Additionally, other combinations, omissions, substitutions and modifications will be apparent to the skilled artisan in view of the disclosure herein. Accordingly, the present invention is not intended to be limited by the disclosed embodiments, but is to be defined by reference to the appended claims.