Title:
Method for expedited construction of affordable housing
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method for expedited construction of an affordable building structure is disclosed, including securing an internal structure to a foundation at a first time, securing a plurality of preformed panel members to the foundation at a second time, and securing at least one roof member to the internal structure and the plurality of preformed panel members at a third time.



Inventors:
Bishop, Brian (Venice, FL, US)
Application Number:
10/872803
Publication Date:
12/23/2004
Filing Date:
06/21/2004
Assignee:
BISHOP BRIAN
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/745.19
International Classes:
E04B1/14; E04B1/61; (IPC1-7): E04G23/00
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Primary Examiner:
ADAMOS, THEODORE V
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Johnson & Martin, P.A. (Fort Lauderdale, FL, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A method for expedited construction of an affordable building structure, comprising: securing an internal structure to a foundation at a first time; securing a plurality of preformed panel members to said foundation at a second time; and securing at least one roof member to said internal structure and said plurality of preformed panel members at a third time.

2. The method according to claim 1 wherein said time is a day.

3. The method according to claim 1 wherein said first time and said second time are completed in a first day.

4. The method according to claim 1 wherein said second time and said third time are completed in a second day.

5. The method according to claim 1 wherein said internal structure is tubing.

6. The method according to claim 1 wherein said plurality of preformed panel members interlock with one another.

7. The method according to claim 6 wherein said interlocking is accomplished with at least one spline.

8. The method according to claim 1 wherein said at least one roof member is secured to said internal structure through a ridge beam.

9. A wall panel for use in a building structure, comprising: a first board forming a first side of said wall panel; a second board forming a second side of said wall panel; a foam sheet positioned between said first board and said second board; and wherein said first board and said second board are affixed to said foam sheet.

10. The wall panel according to claim 9 wherein said first board is cement.

11. The wall panel according to claim 9 wherein said second board is cement.

12. The wall panel according to claim 9 wherein said foam sheet is polystyrene.

13. A building structure, comprising: a foundation having at least one embed; tubing secured to said at least one embed; a ridge beam supported by said tubing; a plurality of roof panels secured to said ridge beam; and wherein each roof panel of said plurality of roof panels is secured to a wall panel, said wall panel secured to said foundation.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This Application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/480,372, filed on Jun. 20, 2003, entitled METHOD AND SYSTEM FOR EXPEDITED CONSTRUCTION OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING.

TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention relates to an integrated home construction method. More specifically, the present invention relates to the design, fabrication and construction of homes, garages, storage buildings and other similar structures.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Buying a home is one of the most significant investments a consumer can make. Homebuyers often prefer to reside in a modern home with most, if not all, of the presently available amenities and conveniences. Unfortunately, purchasing a home similar to the one a buyer generally envisions, with all the desired features, amenities and conveniences, is all too often cost-prohibitive. Thus, many homebuyers must settle for homes providing fewer preferred features, and with which they are not content.

[0004] Past attempts have been made at decreasing the costs associated with home construction by prefabricating certain portions of the home off-site. However, known modular house units have failed to provide an equivalent finished home as compared to homes that are built completely on-site. Known prefabricated home units, which may have resulted in initial cost savings, are relatively simple units that do not portray any unique architectural features with respect to other units. Additionally, these known modular units are not constructed with the equivalent structural integrity and quality as the more traditionally built homes.

[0005] Thus there is a need for an affordable home construction method that eliminates the above-mentioned difficulties.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0006] The present invention provides a method for expediting the construction of affordable housing and other similar structures.

[0007] In accordance with the present invention, a method for expedited construction of affordable building structure is disclosed including the steps of securing an internal structure to a foundation at a first time; securing a plurality of preformed panel members to the internal structure at a second time; and securing at least one roof member to the internal structure and the plurality of preformed panel members at a third time.

[0008] Additionally, in further accordance with the present invention, preformed panel members are disclosed including a foam core having a first surface and a second surface, a first panel affixed to the first surface of the foam core, and a second panel affixed to the second surface of the foam core. The foam has a density sufficient to withstand high environmental forces.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0009] FIG. 1 is a front view illustration of a home built in accordance with the present invention.

[0010] FIG. 2 is a side view illustration of a plurality of interlocked wall panels in accordance with the present invention.

[0011] FIG. 3a is a side view cross-section illustration of a wall panel construction of FIG. 2.

[0012] FIG. 3b is an alternative side view cross-section illustration of a wall panel construction of FIG. 3.

[0013] FIG. 3c is another alternative side view cross-section illustration of a wall panel construction of FIG. 3.

[0014] FIG. 4a is a top view illustration of the wall panel construction of FIG. 2.

[0015] FIG. 4b is a top view illustration of a corner wall panel joint construction in accordance with the present invention.

[0016] FIG. 5 is a side view illustration of roof panels secured to one tube of the interior frame construction in accordance with the present invention.

[0017] FIG. 6 is a top view illustration of the interior frame construction of FIG. 5.

[0018] FIG. 7 is an isometric view illustration of “z” flash construction in accordance with the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0019] A home built according to the present method, although very conventional in appearance, is fully integrated home construction system that provides superior quality, strength, reduced construction times, and substantial cost savings for both the builder, and the purchaser.

[0020] In accordance with the present method, approximately three days are required, upon completion of the concrete slab base, for a small crew with no special equipment or tools to fully assemble the exterior structure of the home. First day activities can include steel tubing erection and wall panel installation. Second and third day activities can include roof installation and waterproofing. Such assembly includes board concrete paneled walls (such as Hardie™ panels, manufactured by James Hardie & Co. of New South Wales, Australia), roof with finished ceilings, and installation of all windows and doors.

[0021] All homes built according to the present method are designed to meet or exceed the building codes that were put in place after the impact of hurricane Andrew. These codes are among the most stringent in the nation. The panelized home structure system of the present invention has been tested in a wind tunnel operated for over 9000 cycles at hurricane-force wind speeds of with no failures. It takes approximately 7000 pounds of pressure to break a single 4′×8′ wall panel. The structures built according to the present invention have been fully tested to various ASTM (American Society of Testing Materials) protocols.

[0022] The structures built according to the method of the present invention have resulted in very energy efficient, low maintenance, and wood free homes for consumers.

[0023] Homes built according to the method of the present invention can be finished and detailed depending on the end user market requirements.

[0024] The method of the present invention allows complete “dry in” of a home in approximately three days from completion of the floor slab with a small crew, and no special tools are required. This construction includes walls, windows, and roof, as detailed below. This method provides an attractive, durable and low maintenance home, with the benefit of cutting construction times up to at least 75%. In addition to the time saved, a home built according to the present invention requires fewer subcontractors to hire and manage. By way of example, there are no insulators, roofers, block masons, and truss installers required for the method of the present invention. As detailed further below, interior framing is done with steel studs, and a sheet rock contractor typically does framing. Since there is no wood in a home built according to the present invention, none of the problems associated with insect or water damage are possible.

[0025] A typical erection process consists of securing a steel wind frame assembly to a foundation or base on a first day. The foundation or base is preferably previously laid and capable of receiving the steel wind frame assembly. Erection of the exterior walls is accomplished on a second day, and placement of the roof panels is completed on a third day. Alternatively, the activities of the first and second days and/or the second and third days can be combined. The exterior walls are secured to the foundation as well, and are preferably interlocked with one another, as detailed below. The roof panels are secured to the steel wind frame and the exterior walls, as further detailed below. Since the windows are pre-installed into the wall panels, the home is preferably lockable at the end of day three. Further cosmetic finishing of the facia trim and the roof ridge cap, glass block insertion (if used), caulking and other finishing details typically take a four-man crew about 1-2 days beyond the 3-day erection process to make the home stucco or paint ready finished.

[0026] There are numerous benefits in using the present method for panelized home construction, including, but not limited to:

[0027] faster construction times and lower costs—approximately three days to “dry in,” and overall building time cut up to at least 75%;

[0028] high minimum “R” Values—Walls are R-20, and ceilings are R 30;

[0029] reduced number of subcontractors required;

[0030] no wood is used in the home construction;

[0031] homes are designed to the Miami-Dade County Protocol, the strictest building standard in the United States;

[0032] doors, and windows are factory installed in panels eliminating onsite fitting and installation time;

[0033] reduced waste on site. Most sites do not require a dumpster;

[0034] no special tools or skills required to construct the home; and

[0035] high strength, long-term durability, and low maintenance.

[0036] Referring now to FIG. 1, a home 10 constructed according to the method of the present invention is illustrated. Home 10 includes wall panels 12, roof panels 14, windows 16, and doors 18.

[0037] Wall Panels

[0038] Referring now to FIGS. 2, 3a, 4a, and 4b, wall panels 12 consist of two sheets of Hardie™ {fraction (5/16)}″ thick cement board 20 preferably laminated to a 4″ thick polystyrene foam sheet 22. This creates an extremely strong, impact resistant structure with a breaking strength of approximately 7000 pounds, and an insulation R value of 20. The Hardie™ panels are pre-primed on both the interior and exterior sides making them paint or stucco ready. Wall panels 12 arrive at the construction site pre-drilled for all required fasteners and connectors 13. All windows 16, doors 18, and wire chases 21 (shown in FIGS. 3a and 3b) are pre-installed. Wall panels 12 are joined with heavy galvanized sheet metal splines, such as spline 24a of FIG. 4a, that slide in between each wall panel 12 in factory cut slots 26. As shown in FIG. 4b, spline 24b is used to join wall panels 12 at a corner joint. Stainless steel self-tapping screws 28 are used to bond splines 24a and 24b to wall panels 12. As is illustrated in FIG. 3a, a “U” channel 30 attached to foundation or base 34 with cast in place “J” bolts 32 allows attachment of wall panel 12 with self-taping stainless steel screws 28. Alternatively, as is illustrated in FIG. 3b, a block wall support 39a can be used to support wall panel 12, block wall support 39a affixed to foundation or base 34 by “J” bolts 32. Alternatively, as illustrated in FIG. 3c a “Simpson” anchor 32a may be used instead of “J” bolt 32. Preferably, when block wall support 39a is used, polystyrene foam sheet 22 is formed so as to provide space to accommodate block wall support 39a, thereby permitting attachment of wall panel 12 to block wall support 39a with self-taping stainless steel screws 28.

[0039] As is further shown in FIG. 3a, an aluminum extrusion cap 36 can be positioned on top of wall panel 12 and is used to provide the appropriate angle to match the pitch of roof panel 14. Alternatively, as is illustrated in FIG. 3b, a shim 37 can be positioned on top of wall panel 12 and is also used to provide the appropriate angle to match the pitch of roof panel 14. When shim 37 is employed, a block roof support 39b is also used. Preferably, when block roof support 39b is used, polystyrene foam sheet 22 is formed so as to provide space to accommodate block roof support 39b, thereby permitting attachment of wall panel 12 to block roof support 39b with self-taping stainless steel screws 28. As is further illustrated in FIG. 3b, a screw 60 is used to secure roof panel 14 (discussed in detail with reference to FIG. 5) to shim 37 and block roof support 39b. The passage of screw 60 through roof panel 14 and shim 37, and into block roof support 39b, provides a secure attachment point to maintain the engagement between wall panel 12 and roof panel 14.

[0040] Roof Panels

[0041] Referring now to FIG. 5, roof panels 14 are factory finished polystyrene panels 38, preferably laminated to heavy aluminum skins 40. Roof panels 14 are capable of interlocking with each other and are preferably bolted to a ridge beam 42 by screws 60, and wall extrusion caps 36. Roof seams 52 are preferably filled with caulk or, alternatively, an expandable foam, such as polystyrene, and can be covered with a waterproof tape (not shown), then further covered by cap plate 56. Screws 60 preferably pass through and secure cap plate 56 to roof panels 12, further passing through roof panels 12 and into ridge beam 42. The roof can be left as applied, or may be further detailed with shingles or other roofing materials attached to provide a cosmetic finish appropriate for the locale.

[0042] Interior Wind Frame

[0043] Referring now to FIGS. 5 and 6, a steel interior frame of tubes 50 provides exceptional stiffness and is used as a support for “U” channel 44 surrounding a portion of ridge beam 42 of the roof system. This system of steel columns or tubes 50 attach to steel embeds 54 in foundation or base 34 at their bottom ends and secured at their top ends to a “U” channel support 46 that is affixed to “U” channel 44. Preferably, “U” channel support 46 is welded to both “U” channel 44 and cap 48, while tube 50 is preferably welded to embed 54. Tubes 50 are preferably shipped as separate modules that are cut to length and are assembled on top of foundation or base 34. The components are light enough that no special material handling equipment such as cranes are required, and assembly is typically done in one day with a four-man crew. The relationship between tubes 50, embeds 54, roof panels 14, and wall panels 12 allow home 10 to withstand winds of up to at least 200 MPH without structural damage.

[0044] Referring now to FIG. 7, a Z-flash 58 may be incorporated into a slot, such as slot 26, formed in wall panel 12 so as to create a better seal between wall panels 12 and foundation or base 34.

[0045] In operation, with respect to FIGS. 3, 5, and 6, the method of the present invention generally includes securing tubing 50 to a foundation or base 34 at embeds 54 on a first day of construction. The securement of tubing 50 to embeds 54 is preferably accomplished by welding. Once tubing 50 is secured to embeds 54, “U” channel support 46 is secured, as detailed above, to tubing 50. A “U” channel 44 is further supported in “U” channel support 46, with “U” channel 44 accommodating ridge beam 42. Additionally, wall panels 12 are secured to foundation or base 34 and interlocked with one another, as discussed in detail above, on a second construction day. Ridge beam 42 is then utilized as a securement structure for roof panels 14, as detailed above, with roof panels 14 secured to ridge beam 42 and to extrusion caps 36 on wall panels 12 on a third construction day. This method forms a complete housing structure in three days.

[0046] Homes built in accordance with the present method have been extensively designed and tested to exceed standards set after the impact of hurricane Andrew. Wall panels 12 and roof panels 14 have been tested in a wind tunnel and survived 9000 wind cycles with hurricane-force wind speeds with no damage after three missile impacts. Other testing included beam load tests, static wind loading (ASTM E 330), and large missile impact tests (SSTD 12-99). The structure was unaffected by such testing, and passed the ASTM protocols that are among the most stringent in the United States.

[0047] The homes built using the method of the present invention have very high insulation values and very low energy costs. All ducting for heat and air conditioning preferably pass through climate controlled interior areas eliminating losses from extremely hot or cold attic spaces. Additionally, it is preferred that the homes of the present invention use recyclable materials in their construction.

[0048] It is preferred that the exteriors of wall panels 12 be pre-primed. The joints between wall panels 12 are preferably caulked flush. The exteriors can then be finished with paints, elastomeric stuccos, or spraycreted, as desired. Roof panels 14 can have cosmetic shingles or other types of roofing material attached with adhesives.

[0049] By way of further example, a typical construction package in accordance with the present invention consists of the following items:

[0050] Complete building plans, engineering data required for permitting, and assembly instructions. Included are panel layout drawings, exterior electrical wire pull diagrams, foundation details with embed plate, and bottom plate details;

[0051] Steel wind frame (tubes 50), complete with concrete embeds 54, and all fasteners;

[0052] All metal connections including any slab tracks, Z-flashing 58, corner splines 24b, regular splines 24a, cap plate 56 and any gable roof trim;

[0053] Wall panels 12 cut to shape with wiring chases, and all windows 16 and doors 18 installed;

[0054] All required fasteners 13 including anchor bolts, stainless steel self-taping screws 28 for panels 12 and 14, matching color TEK fasteners for facia and trim, and roof panel bolts 60. Preferably, all fasteners are stainless steel with the exception of anchor bolts and facia fasteners;

[0055] All required waterproofing materials including caulks and peel and seal roofing tapes; and

[0056] Temporary support angles to stabilize structure during assembly.

[0057] Although only a few exemplary embodiments of the present invention have been described in detail above and in the following figures, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that numerous modifications to the exemplary embodiments are possible without materially departing from the novel teachings and advantages of this invention. Accordingly, all such modifications are intended to be included within the scope of this invention as defined in the following claims.