Title:
Raker bits and tools for finishing masonry joints
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A raker bit for a masonry tool for taking mortar from between courses of brick includes two longitudinally extending arm sections, each of which is adapted to extend in the rear to front direction relative to the tool during use of same. A raker tooth is attached to front ends of these arm sections and projects in a transverse direction relative to the length of the arm sections. A connecting section is attached to a rear end of at least one of the arm sections and is adapted for detachable connection to the masonry tool in such a manner that the two arm sections extend in the rear to front direction. The masonry tool can have an elongate handle and a carriage portion attached to the front end of the handle. This carriage portion has a pair of wheels spaced from one another in a transverse direction. There is a hole in the carriage portion into which fits the connecting section of the raker bit.



Inventors:
Kairys, George John (Mississauga, CA)
Application Number:
10/458836
Publication Date:
12/16/2004
Filing Date:
06/12/2003
Assignee:
KAIRYS GEORGE JOHN
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
15/235.3
International Classes:
E04F21/00; (IPC1-7): E04G21/20
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
SPISICH, MARK
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GEORGE J. KAIRYS (MISSISSAUGA, ON, CA)
Claims:

I therefore claim:



1. A raker bit for taking mortar from a joint, such as a joint between courses of brick or blocks or between tiles, said raker bit being constructed for use with a tool or handle and comprising: a longitudinally extending supporting arm section adapted to extend in a substantially rear to front direction relative to said tool or handle in which said raker bit is mounted during use of said raker bit; a raker tooth having a top thereof attached to a front end portion of said supporting arm section and projecting substantially downwardly in a first transverse direction relative to the length of said arm section, said front end portion extending outwardly from the top of the raker tooth in a second transverse direction relative to said length of said arm section; and a connecting section attached to a rear end of said arm section, said connecting section being adapted for detachable connection to said tool or handle in such a manner that the arm section extends in a substantially rear to front direction; wherein, during use of said raker bit, said arm section acts to limit an amount said raker tooth can be inserted into said joint.

2. A raker bit according to claim 1 wherein said supporting arm section comprises two longitudinally extending arm parts each of which is integrally connected at its front end to said raker tooth and at least one of which is rigidly attached to said connecting section.

3. A raker bit according to claim 1 or 2 wherein the entire bit is formed from a single steel wire piece.

4. A raker bit for taking mortar from a joint, such as a joint between courses of brick or blocks, said raker bit being constructed for use with a masonry tool or handle and comprising: two longitudinally extending, supporting arm portions each of which extends in a substantially rear to front direction relative to said tool or handle during use of the raker bit; a raker tooth integrally attached to front end portions of both supporting arm portions and projecting in a direction substantially perpendicular to the lengths of said supporting arm portions, said front end portions extending outwardly from a top of said raker tooth in a transverse direction relative to said lengths of the supporting arm portions; and at least one rear end connecting portion attached to a rear end of at least one of said supporting arm portions and projecting at a substantial angle to said at least one supporting arm portion in a direction generally opposite to the direction in which said raker tooth projects, wherein said substantial angle is substantially less than 180 degrees.

5. A raker bit according to claim 4 wherein said at least one rear end connecting portion is a straight wire section integrally joined to one of said supporting arm portions.

6. A raker bit according to claim 4 wherein said at least one rear end connecting portion is flattened for a portion of its length so as to allow said at least one rear end portion to be securely clamped in said masonry tool.

7. A tool for taking unhardened building material, such as mortar, from a joint, such as a joint between courses of brick or blocks, said tool comprising: an elongate handle having a front end and a rear end; a raking device having a longitudinal arm portion that extends substantially in a rear to front direction during use of said tool, a raker tooth attached to and projecting substantially downwardly from a front end portion of said longitudinal arm portion, and an upstanding connecting section attached to a rear end of said longitudinal arm portion, said front end portion of the arm portion extending outwardly from the top of the raker tooth in a transverse direction relative to the length of the arm portion; and a carriage portion rigidly attached to said handle at said front end of the handle, said carriage portion including a pair of rotatable wheels spaced from one another in a transverse direction relative to said handle and located on opposite sides of said carriage portion, and a supporting arrangement for said raking device for detachably holding the raking device so that said raker tooth can project into said joint as said wheels roll across an exposed face of adjacent bricks or blocks to enable said raker tooth to remove undesired excess building material from the joint, wherein, during use of said tool, said arm portion acts to limit an amount said raker tooth can be inserted into said joint between adjacent bricks or blocks.

8. A tool according to claim 7 wherein said longitudinal arm portion of the raking device includes two wire sections of similar shape each of which is integrally connected to said raker tooth and at least one of which is connected to said upstanding connecting section.

9. A tool according to claim 7 or 8 wherein said connecting section is flattened for a portion of its length and notched so as to allow said upstanding connection section to be securely clamped and held by said supporting arrangement.

10. A tool according to any one of claims 7 to 9 wherein said supporting arrangement includes a round passageway formed in said carriage portion and sized to snugly receive said upstanding connecting section and a threaded locking pin which can be turned until the pin extends into said passageway and clamps said upstanding connecting section.

11. A tool according to claim 7 or 9 wherein said raker tooth comprises a curved section of bent wire that is concavely curved in an upwardly facing direction.

12. A tool for taking unhardened mortar, concrete, or adhesive from between courses of brick, blocks, or tiles, said tool comprising an elongate handle having a first end and a second end; and a raking apparatus attached to the first end of said handle, said apparatus including a tooth supporting section and a raker tooth integrally attached to and projecting substantially downwardly from an outer end portion of said supporting section, said tooth supporting section and said raker tooth being formed from a single piece of metal wire, said outer end portion extending outwardly from a top of the raker tooth in a transverse direction relative to the length of said handle, wherein during use of said tool, said supporting section acts to limit an amount said raker tooth can be inserted into a joint between adjacent bricks, blocks or tiles.

13. A tool for taking unhardened mortar, adhesive or concrete from a joint or a surface formed with mortar, adhesive or concrete, said tool comprising an elongate handle having a first end and a second end; a raking device attached to the first end of said handle, said raking device including two tooth-supporting arm sections and a raker tooth integrally attached to an outer end portion of each of said arm sections and projecting from the outer end portions which extend transversely and in opposite directions from an inner end of the raker tooth, wherein during use of said tool, said arm sections can act to limit a maximum amount said raker tooth can be inserted into said joint or into said surface.

14. A tool according to claim 13 wherein said raking device is formed from a single thin metal strip which is bent to form both said arm sections and said raker tooth.

15. A tool according to claim 14 wherein said raker tooth comprises a U-shaped central section of said metal strip and two opposite end sections of said metal strip are rigidly connected to said handle.

16. A tool according to claim 13 wherein said raking device is formed from a single wire which is bent to form both said arm sections and said raker tooth.

17. A tool according to claim 13 or 16 wherein there is a second raking device attached to the second end of said handle, said second raking device comprising two tooth-supporting arm sections and a raker tooth integrally attached to an outer end portion of each of the arm sections of the second raking device.

18. A tool according to claim 17 wherein both of said raking devices are detachably connected to said handle by means of transversely extending holes or cavities formed at the opposite ends of said handle and two clamping devices mounted in said tool, and each raking device is formed with at least one inner end connecting portion that projects into a respective one of said holes or cavities, and is held therein by a respective one of said clamping devices.

19. A raker bit for use in a tool to remove unhardened mortar, concrete or adhesive material from a joint or surface formed from mortar, concrete or adhesive material, said raker bit comprising: two longitudinally extending, supporting arm portions each of which extends in a substantially rear to front direction relative to said tool during use of the raker bit; a raker tooth integrally attached to front end sections of both supporting arm portions and projecting from said front end sections, which extend transversely and in opposite directions from an inner end of said raker tooth; and at least one rear end connecting portion attached to a rear end of at least one of said supporting arm portions and projecting at a substantial angle to said at least one supporting arm portion, wherein said substantial angle is substantially less than 180 degrees.

20. A raker bit according to claim 19 wherein said at least one rear end connecting portion is a straight wire section integrally joined to one of the said supporting arm portions.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] Canadian Application Number: 2,389,796

[0002] Filing Date: Jun. 7, 2002

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

[0003] The art of bricklaying has existed for a substantial period of time and its techniques are well known within the construction industry. A variety of tools for bricklayers have been developed over the years, including tools for taking unhardened, excess mortar from between courses of bricks. As is well known by bricklayers, a variety of joints can be formed between the courses of bricks in order to achieve an objective such as weather resistance or to achieve a certain look to the finished brick wall. Some known weather resistant joints include joints where the exposed face of the mortar is concave or V-shaped or is sloped in a downwardly and outwardly direction (a so called weathered joint). Some special non-weather resistant joints include the known flush, raked and struck joints.

[0004] One well known form of joint raker is a so-called skate wheel joint raker having two large, spaced apart metal wheels with a diameter of 1¾ inches rotatably mounted on a metal carriage that is integrally attached to an elongate handle, the carriage and handle having a combined length of about 8½ inches. A hole is provided in the carriage for the insertion of a hardened nail and the flat head of the nail is used to remove the excess mortar and form the joint. The position of the nail can be adjusted in its hole, as desired. The typical type of nail that is used for this purpose is a concrete nail. Difficulties with this known joint raker include the fact that the head of the nail when installed in the tool can be difficult to see and therefore the user cannot easily see exactly what and where he is raking. Also, several adjustments of the nail may be required in order to obtain the required raking depth. The result is that the quality of the joints formed between the brick courses may be less than ideal when using this well known tool.

[0005] Recent U.S. Pat. No. 4,856,135 issued Aug. 15, 1989 teaches a masonry tool similar to that described above wherein a nail is used as a raker bit. A raker and carriage assembly is attached to the forward end of the tool and has a pair of wheels arranged for movement along a line parallel to the handle axis.

[0006] Another brick joint cleaning rake that employs a standard nail as the raking bit is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,662,423 issued May 16, 1972. This rake has a tubular cross bar attached to a handle in a non-perpendicular manner so that the ends of the cross-bar and the wheels mounted at the ends of the crossbar are offset. The position of the nail in its mounting hole can be adjusted by means of a clamping set screw.

[0007] Published Canadian patent application No. 2,003,064 laid open on May 15, 1991, also teaches a masonry tool for raking a masonry joint similar to those described above but also having a special handle detachably mounted to the standard, elongate handle that connects to the wheel carriage section. This masonry tool also uses a standard nail mounted in a hole as the raking bit.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF INVENTION

[0008] This invention relates to raker bits for a tool used to extract undesired excess mortar, concrete or adhesive from between courses of brick, cement, and glass blocks, ceramic tiles, and field and flag stones, and to remove material from masonry and concrete surfaces, and a tool with a raker bit provided thereon.

[0009] The present invention provides an improved, inexpensive raking bit that can be used in place of a nail in a masonry tool of the aforementioned type, this bit having a raker tooth attached to its front end and a connecting section at its rear end for detachable connection to the masonry tool.

[0010] The present invention further provides an easy to use masonry bit for a masonry tool that can be made from standard metal materials using standard manufacturing techniques and wherein the raker tooth can be shaped in different ways in order to form different desirable types of masonry joints.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

[0011] In the drawings:

[0012] FIG. 1 is a side view of a masonry tool equipped with a raker bit constructed in accordance with the invention;

[0013] FIG. 2 is a top view of a masonry tool of FIG. 1, this view showing front section of the raker bit;

[0014] FIG. 3 is a perspective view taken from the front and above of one preferred form of raker bit;

[0015] FIG. 4 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 3 but showing another form of raker bit;

[0016] FIG. 5 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 4 but showing another form of raker bit;

[0017] FIG. 6 is a front detail view illustrating another form of raker bit;

[0018] FIG. 7 is a front view of three courses in a brick wall showing mortar joints extending between the bricks;

[0019] FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view taken along the line VIII-VIII of FIG. 7, this view illustrating a raked joint in solid line;

[0020] FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIG. 8 but showing V-shaped joint that can be formed with another form of raker bit;

[0021] FIG. 10 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIGS. 8 and 9 but showing a joint formed with a preferred embodiment of the raker bit of the invention;

[0022] FIG. 11 is a top view of another form of masonry tool constructed according to the invention;

[0023] FIG. 12 is a perspective view showing a further embodiment of a masonry tool;

[0024] FIG. 13 is a top view showing still another embodiment of a tool constructed in accordance with the invention;

[0025] FIG. 14 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 3 showing another embodiment of a raker bit;

[0026] FIG. 15 is a perspective view similar to FIG. 12 showing another embodiment of a masonry tool constructed according to the invention;

[0027] FIG. 16 is a schematic view in perspective illustrating yet another embodiment of a masonry tool embodying the present invention;

[0028] FIG. 17 is a top view of a masonry tool having a raker bit mounted at each end;

[0029] FIG. 18 is a right side view of the masonry tool shown in FIG. 17;

[0030] FIG. 19 is a plan view showing a type of concrete surface that can be formed using a tool of the invention; and

[0031] FIG. 20 is a cross-sectional elevation illustrating the manner in which a tool of the invention can be used to form the decorative concrete surface shown in FIG. 19.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0032] According to one aspect of the invention, a raker bit for taking mortar from a joint, such as a joint between courses of brick or blocks or between tiles, the raker bit being constructed for use with a tool or handle, includes a longitudinally extending, supporting arm section adapted to extend in a substantially rear to front direction relative to the tool or handle in which the raker bit is mounted during use of the raker bit. The bit also has a raker tooth having a top thereof attached to a front end of the supporting arm section and projecting substantially downwardly in a first transverse direction relative to the length of the arm section. The front end portion extends outwardly from the top of the raker tooth in a second transverse direction relative to the length of the arm section. A connecting section is attached to a rear end of the arm section, this section being adapted for detachable connection to the tool or handle in such a manner that the arm section extends in a substantially rear to front direction. During use of the raker bit, the arm section acts to limit an amount the raker tooth can be inserted into the joint.

[0033] In one preferred embodiment, the raker tooth comprises a U-shaped section of a bent wire which also forms the supporting arm section.

[0034] According to another aspect of the invention, a raker bit for taking mortar from a joint, such as a joint between courses of brick or blocks includes two longitudinally extending supporting arm portions, each of which extends in a substantially rear to front direction relative to the tool or handle during use of the raker bit. A raker tooth is integrally attached to front end portions of both longitudinally extending supporting arm portions and projects in a direction substantially perpendicular to the lengths of the supporting arm portions. The front end portions extend outwardly from a top of the raker tooth in a transverse direction relative to the lengths of the supporting arm portions. At least one rear end connecting portion is attached to a rear end of at least one of the arm portions and projects at a substantial angle to the at least one supporting arm portion in a direction generally opposite the direction in which the raker tooth projects. The substantial angle of projection is substantially less than 180°.

[0035] In the preferred embodiment of this raker bit, the raker tooth comprises a U-shaped section of metal wire and the U-shaped section has a rounded bottom end.

[0036] According to a further aspect of the invention, a tool for taking unhardened building material, such as mortar from a joint, such as a joint between courses of brick or blocks, includes an elongate handle having a front end and a rear end and a raker device. The raking device has a longitudinal arm portion that extends substantially in a rear to front direction during use of the tool. A raker tooth is attached to and projects substantially downwardly from a front end portion of the longitudinal arm portion and an upstanding connecting section is attached to a rear end of the longitudinal arm portion. The front end portion of the arm portion extends outwardly from the top of the tooth in a transverse direction relative to the length of the arm portion. The tool also has a carriage portion rigidly attached to the handle at the front end of the handle. The carriage portion includes a pair of rotatable wheels spaced from one another in a transverse direction relative to the handle and located on opposite sides of the carriage portion and a supporting arrangement for the raking device for detachably holding the raking device so that raker tooth can project into the joint as the wheels roll across an exposed face of adjacent bricks or blocks to enable the raker tooth to remove undesired excess building material from the joint. During use of the tool, the arm portion acts to limit an amount the raker tooth can be inserted into the joint between the adjacent bricks or blocks.

[0037] In a preferred embodiment, the longitudinal arm portion of the raking device includes two wire sections of similar shape each of which is integrally connected to the raker tooth and at least one of which is connected to the upstanding connecting section.

[0038] According to still another aspect of the invention, a tool for taking unhardened mortar, adhesive, or concrete, from a joint or surface comprises elongate handle having a first end and a second end and a raking device attached to the first end of the handle. The raking device includes two tooth-supporting arm sections and a raker tooth integrally attached to an outer end portion of each of the arm sections and projecting from the outer end portions which extend transversely and in opposite directions from an inner end of the raker tooth. During use of the tool, the arm sections can act to limit a maximum amount the raker tooth can be inserted into the joint or into the surface.

[0039] According to still another aspect of the invention, a raker bit for use in a tool to remove unhardened mortar, concrete or adhesive from a joint or surface comprises two longitudinally extending, supporting arm portions each of which extends in a substantially rear to front direction relative to the tool during use of the raker bit and a raker tooth integrally attached to front end sections of both supporting arm portions and projecting from the front end sections, which extend transversely and in opposite directions from an inner end of the raker tooth. At least one rear end connecting portion is attached to a rear end of at least one of the supporting arm portions and projects at a substantial angle to the at least one supporting arm portion, wherein the substantial angle is substantially less than 180°.

[0040] Further features and advantages will become apparent from the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

[0041] With reference initially to FIGS. 7 to 10 of the drawings, a plurality of masonry elements such as bricks 10 are formed into a wall or other structure by being joined together with mortar joints 12. The joints act to separate the bricks a uniform distance as shown. Usually this distance ranges between {fraction (3/8)} inch and {fraction (1/2)} inch. As is well known by bricklayers, the mortar joints can be formed in several different known ways, three of which are illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 9. These known joints or a variation thereof can be formed with a masonry tool as illustrated in FIG. 1 equipped with a raker bit constructed in accordance with the invention. The raked mortar joint 14 illustrated in solid line in FIG. 8 is considered a non-weather resistant joint while the mortar joint shown in FIG. 9 is considered to be weather resistant joint that can be used outdoors, for example, to form the brick exterior of a house. The raked joint 14 shown in FIG. 8 can be formed using a standard raking tool employing a nail as a raker bit and the joint has a uniform depth with a substantially flat bottom. The surface of the mortar is recessed a uniform depth from the brick surface 72. Shown in FIG. 9 is a V-shaped mortar joint 16 which can be formed with the masonry tool of FIG. 1 equipped with an appropriate version of a raker bit constructed in accordance with the invention. Shown in FIG. 10 is a preferred “raked” joint 13 that can be formed with the preferred raker bit of the present invention described hereinafter and shown in FIGS. 3 and 4. In this joint, the exposed surface of the mortar is rounded and this helps to shed water from the joint, making it more weather resistant.

[0042] Turning now to the masonry tool shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, this tool 20 can be used to take unhardened mortar from between the courses of brick 10. The tool includes an elongate handle 22 having a front end 24 and a rear end 26. The illustrated preferred handle is made from solid aluminum and has a central, straight section 28 and an upwardly curved rear section 30.

[0043] The tool 20 also has a carriage portion 32 rigidly attached to the handle 22 at the front end of the handle. In fact, in the preferred embodiment, the body of the carriage portion is integrally formed with the aluminum handle. The wider, rear end portion of the carriage portion is formed with a transverse passageway 36 through which extends an axle 38. The carriage portion includes a pair of rotatable wheels 40 which can, for example, take the form of metal skate wheels having a diameter of about 1¾ inches. The wheels 40 are spaced from one another in a transverse direction relative to the handle 22 and are located on opposite sides of the carriage portion 32. The wheels can be held on the ends of the axle by means of C-shaped clips 42 that engage in circumferential grooves formed in the axle ends.

[0044] Also, in a known manner, the tool can be provided with a supporting arrangement indicated generally at 44 for a raking device, the preferred arrangement being able to detachably hold the raking device or raking bit in the tool. Preferably the supporting arrangement includes a round passageway 46 that extends generally vertically and that is open ended, at least at the bottom of the passageway. This passageway is sized to snugly receive an upstanding connecting section of the raker bit described hereinafter. The supporting arrangement further includes a locking pin 50 which can be turned until the pin extends into the passageway 46 and clamps the connecting section of the raker bit. The locking pin extends through a threaded, horizontally extending passageway formed in the carriage portion 32. It will be understood that the preferred, illustrated carriage portion 32 is in the form of a triangular block of substantially solid metal, for example aluminum, and in this block the transverse passageway 36 for the axle is formed.

[0045] It will be understood that the above described masonry tool 20, not including the raker bit of the present invention, can be constructed in the same manner as well know, masonry tools that are currently being sold. One such masonry tool is sold under the trade-mark MARSHALLTOWN in the United States and Canada while a similar masonry tool is sold under the trade-mark GOLDBLATT. Typically these masonry tools are simply provided with a masonry nail that is extended upwardly into the passageway 46 and that acts as a raker bit. The nail is held in place by the locking pin 50. However, as indicated above, the use of a nail as a raker bit in such a masonry tool does have several disadvantages, including the inability of the user to see the head of the nail as he uses the tool to rake a mortar joint between courses of bricks and the difficulty of maintaining the depth of the raked joint. Additional disadvantages are the inability to use such a tool to fully rake inside corner joints and the need for multiple passes to clean a joint due to the small contact area of the nail.

[0046] A preferred form of the raking device or raker bit 52 of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 3 with the raker bit being shown by itself in FIG. 3. The raker bit is preferably formed from a single length of bent steel wire of sufficiently heavy gauge to give the bit substantial rigidity and it includes a longitudinally extending, supporting arm section 55 that extends substantially in a rear to front direction indicated by the arrow A in FIG. 1 during use of the tool. A raker tooth 56 has a top 57 attached to a front end portion of the arm section and projects substantially downwardly in a first transverse direction relative to the length of the arm section and it is this tooth which extends into the joint to remove the unhardened mortar. The raker bit also includes an upstanding connecting section 59, the top end of which can be seen in FIG. 2. This connecting section is attached to a rear end of the arm section 55 and is adapted for detachable connection to the masonry tool in such a manner that the arm section extends in a substantially rear to front direction.

[0047] In the illustrated preferred embodiment of the raker bit of FIG. 3, the supporting arm section comprises two longitudinally extending arm parts 55a and 55b that are substantially L-shaped in plan view. Each arm part is a portion of metal wire and is integrally connected to the raker tooth 56 and at least one arm part 55a is rigidly and integrally attached to the upstanding connecting section 59. Also, as can be seen clearly in FIG. 3, the upstanding connecting section 59 comprises a straight wire section that can be flattened or machined flat on one side at 67 for a portion of its length so as to allow the rear end connecting section to be securely clamped in the tool. Due to the flat side which forms a recess in the end section, the connecting section 59 can be securely clamped by and held by the aforementioned supporting arrangement including the locking pin 50, the end of which will project into the recess. Thus, even when the pin 50 is not as tight as possible, it is still able to hold the raking bit in the tool, thereby preventing it from failing out and possibly getting lost or causing a safety hazard.

[0048] One preferred form of the raker tooth is illustrated in FIG. 3 and this raker tooth 56 comprises a U-shaped section of the bent wire, this U-shaped section having a rounded bottom end 66. In one preferred embodiment, the height or depth of the U-shaped section indicated by H is {fraction (1/4)} inch while the width of the tooth is preferably a maximum of {fraction (3/8)}th inch, most preferably {fraction (5/16)}th of an inch. As indicated above, a tooth of this shape can be used to form the type of raked joint which is shown in FIG. 10. In order to form a “raked” joint like that shown in solid lines in FIG. 8, it is also possible to bend the raker tooth about midway along its length so that it projects first downwardly and then forwardly. In one preferred embodiment, the size of the downward leg of the tooth ranges between {fraction (3/16)} and {fraction (3/8)}th inch while the amount of the forward projection is {fraction (5/16)}th inch. The bottom of the wire in the region of the forward projection is preferably machined flat so that it can readily form a flat surface in the mortar joint.

[0049] Another form of the raking device or raker bit of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 4. This raker bit 52 is also formed from a single length of bent wire and it includes a longitudinal supporting arm portion 54 that extends substantially in a rear to front direction (indicated by the arrow A in FIG. 1) during use of the tool. A raker tooth 56′ is attached to and projects downwardly from the front end of the supporting arm portion and it is this tooth which extends into the joint to remove the unhardened mortar. The raker bit also includes an upstanding connecting section 58. This connecting section is attached to a rear end of the supporting arm section 54.

[0050] In the illustrated embodiment of the raker bit of FIG. 4, the longitudinal arm section comprises two longitudinally extending, supporting arm portions in the form of wire sections 60a and 60b that are substantially L-shaped in plan view. Each wire section is integrally connected to the raker tooth 56′ and also to a part of the upstanding connecting section 58. Also, as can be seen clearly from FIG. 4, the upstanding connecting section 58 in this version of the bit comprises two opposite end sections 62a and 62b of the bent wire which are substantially parallel to each other. These end sections 62a and 62b can also be termed rear end connecting portions, which are integrally attached to the longitudinally extending arm portions. As shown in FIG. 4, when the raker bit is removed from the tool, the end sections 62a and 62b will move apart from one another due to the resilient, spring action of the wire from which this raker bit is formed. When it is desired to insert the end sections 62a and 62b in the circular hole 46 of the tool, the two end sections are pressed together and they are pressed into contact so that they will fit into the round passageway 46 shown in FIG. 2. In the preferred embodiment, each end section 62a and 62b of the bent wire is flattened or machined on one side as indicated at 64. This flattened area extends for a substantial portion of the length of the end section to its top end and it can also be notched at 67, if desired. Due to the flat facing sides on the end sections and the notching 67, the end sections can be securely clamped and held by the aforementioned supporting arrangement including the locking pin 50, the end of which will project into the notch. When the two flat sides are brought together into contact, they preferably form a split connecting section that is substantially circular in cross-section, matching the shape of the hole 46.

[0051] Another type of raker tooth is formed on the raker bit 75 shown in FIG. 5. Except for the raker tooth portion, the raker bit 75 is similar in its construction to the raker bit 52 of FIG. 4. However, in this embodiment, the raker tooth comprises a curved section 76 of bent wire that is concavely curved in an upwardly facing direction. The radius of the curved portion can, for example, be in the {fraction (3/8)} inch to 1 inch range, such as ⅜, ½, ¾, ⅞, and 1 inch. This type of raker tooth can be used to form a concave mortar joint 70 illustrated in dash lines in FIG. 8. This is a commonly used weather resistant joint.

[0052] A further type of raker tooth is illustrated in FIG. 6 and is again integrally formed on a raker bit 80. The bit 80 can be of the same construction as the raker bit 52 of FIG. 3 except for the raker tooth. In the bit 80 the raker tooth 82 is a substantially V-shaped section of the bent wire. With this raker tooth, one is able to form a V-shaped weather resistant joint between the adjacent bricks. This V-joint 16 is illustrated in FIG. 9. The height X of the raker tooth 82 can be the same as the aforementioned height H, that is, about {fraction (1/4)} inch. The tooth height X can, of course, vary and will depend on the application that the raker bit is intended for. It is expected that the tooth depth in manufactured versions of the bit will range from {fraction (1/8)} inch to {fraction (1/2)} inch and the available tooth bits will vary in increments, ie. ⅛, ¼, {fraction (5/16)}, ⅜, and {fraction (1/2)} inch. It will be understood that the maximum depth of unhardened mortar that can be scraped out by either the raker tooth 56, 56′ or the tooth 82 is equal to the height H or the height X respectively. Deeper penetration of the tooth into the joint is prevented by the inwardly extending arm parts 90, 92 of the supporting arm portions. Thus, with the use of the raker bit of the present invention, it becomes relatively easy for the user of the masonry tool to achieve a uniform depth of the masonry joint. The arm section of the bit, ie. the arm parts 90, 92 acts to limit the amount the raker tooth can be inserted into a mortar joint located between the courses of brick.

[0053] Elaborating further on the above described versions of the raker bit, the two central wire sections 55a, 60a and 55b, 60b can be considered two longitudinally extending, supporting arm portions of the bit, each of which extends in a substantially rear to front direction relative to the tool during use thereof. These longitudinally extending arm portions are preferably substantially L-shaped or acute angled in shape as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3 and include the aforementioned inwardly extending, short arm parts 90, 92 that are integrally connected to the raker tooth.

[0054] Also, the opposite end sections 62a and 62b can be considered rear end portions of the raker bit which are integrally attached respectively to rear ends of the longitudinally extending, supporting arm portions. These end portions preferably project at a substantial angle indicated at B to the longitudinally extending arm portions in a direction opposite the direction in which the raker tooth 56 projects. This substantial angle is substantially less than 180° and, in the preferred illustrated embodiment, is approximately 90°.

[0055] Another form of masonry tool constructed in accordance with the invention is illustrated in FIG. 11. This masonry tool 100 which can also be used for taking unhardened mortar, concrete, or adhesive from between rows of brick, blocks or ceramic tiles, or from between stones, includes an elongate handle 102 which can be made of plastic, metal or wood, this handle having a front end 103 and a rear end 104. Firmly attached to the front or first end of the handle is a raking apparatus 106 which is preferably formed from a single piece of heavy gauge wire but it can also be made from suitably shaped and bent metal plate, if desired, or it can be cast in a die or forged. This raking apparatus includes a tooth supporting section 108 and a raker tooth 110 which can be similar to the raker tooth in the raker bit of FIG. 3. The raker tooth is integrally attached to and projects substantially downwardly from a front end portion 112 of the supporting section. As with the raker bits described above, the tooth supporting section and the raker tooth are preferably formed from a single piece of metal wire, preferably steel wire having substantial rigidity and strength. However, again it will be understood that the tooth supporting section and the raker tooth can be manufactured in other ways such as by bending and forming flat plate, by a casting process, or by injection moulding a suitable plastic material. Also, as in the raker bits described above, the front end portion 112 extends outwardly from the top of the raker tooth 110 in the transverse direction indicated by the arrows D relative to the length of the handle 102. It will be appreciated that during use of this masonry tool, the supporting section acts to limit an amount the raker tooth 110 can be inserted into the joint between adjacent bricks.

[0056] In the particularly preferred embodiment of the masonry tool 100, the raker tooth 110 comprises a U-shaped section of metal wire and this U-shaped section has a rounded bottom end (ie. a tooth of the type illustrated in FIG. 3). As illustrated in FIG. 11, the steel wire forming the tooth supporting section and the raker tooth can have its two opposite end sections shown in dash lines at 114 and 116 tightly wrapped around each other so that they are mechanically connected together. This can be done prior to attachment of a separate handle 102 if desired. Alternatively, it is possible that the wrapped opposite ends o the metal wire can themselves be used as the handle for manipulating the masonry tool. Also, in the illustrated preferred embodiment, the two elongate arm sections 118 and 120 are each formed with a front portion 122 and a rear portion 124 with the two portions being connected together by a short connecting leg located at 126. This integral connecting leg at 126 extends substantially perpendicular to the two arm portions 122, 124 and the leg may have a length of about 1½ inches. By providing these legs, this allows more clearance between the user's hand and the surface of the brick wall being raked. It will be understood that the two legs 126 extend from the front portion 122 in a direction opposite to the direction of projection of the tooth 110 from the front end portion 112.

[0057] The masonry tool 100 can be made inexpensively so that as soon as the tool is worn out or damaged, it can simply be replaced with a new tool 100 by the user at a very reasonable cost. An advantage of the tool 100 is that it is much lighter than the skate wheel raker shown in FIG. 1 and thus can lessen arm strain on the user.

[0058] It will be understood that although raker bits made from steel wire are illustrated, it is also possible to make raker bits constructed in accordance with the invention from suitable metal plate material bent in the required manner. With the use of plate material, it is expected that the raker bit can be constructed with a single, unitary arm section extending between the raker tooth and the upstanding connecting section, that is, the arm section of the bit may not be comprised of two separate arm parts of similar shape and construction. The same can be said of raker bits manufactured in other possible ways, ie. by forging, by casting, or by injection moulding.

[0059] One advantage that can be gained with the use of a raker bit having a tooth of the shape shown in FIG. 3 or FIG. 4 is that this tooth is able to create a new U-shaped joint shown in FIG. 10 which has an appearance similar to a raked joint (see FIG. 8) but with a slightly “softer” look as compared to the standard raked joint having 90° inside corners that would be made with a concrete nail as the raker bit. The slight inside curvature of this joint will tend to repel water out of the joint, especially when the joint is a standard {fraction (3/8)}ths inch size. Thus, the use of this particular version of the raker bits of this invention offers a new style for architects to use and provides a joint which highlights the brick surface and creates good shadow lines.

[0060] Preferably the raker bits of the invention and the wire portion of the masonry tool of FIG. 11 are made from high carbon steel which makes these bits and the tool durable and able to resist the abrasion that is inherent in the task of raking mortar. However, other materials such as hardened acrylic plastic, may be quite suitable for some raker applications, for example, for joints between glass blocks. FIG. 12 illustrates another embodiment of a tool for removing mortar or concrete from joint or surface. This tool indicated generally by reference 130 includes an elongate handle 132 that can be made of plastic, wood or metal, this handle having a front or first end 134 and an opposite or second end 136. As indicated in dashed lines in the figure, the opposite end can be formed with internal threads 138, if desired. In a manner known per se, a standard broom handle (not shown) can be attached to the handle 132 in order to create a long handle that may be necessary or desirable for some job applications. At the front end of the handle there is mounted a raking device 140 that is formed from a single, thin metal strip that can range between approximately {fraction (1/4)} inch and {fraction (3/4)} inch in width. This strip can be bent in the illustrated manner to form the raking device which includes two tooth-supporting arm sections 142, 144, each of which preferably forms an acute angle. A U-shaped raker tooth is integrally attached to a front or outer end portion, 148, 150 of each of the arm sections. This raker tooth projects from the front end portions which extend transversely and in opposite directions from an inner end 152 of the raker tooth. In this particular tool, the raker tooth 146 projects from the front or outer end portions 148, 150 in a forwards direction away from the handle 132.

[0061] The metal strip also forms two opposite end sections 154, 156 which are rigidly connected to the handle. If the handle is made from moulded plastic, these end sections can be embedded in the handle 132 when it is moulded. In order to securely hold the end sections in the handle, short end tabs 158 can be formed on the end sections. Each tab can extend perpendicular to the length of the end section. The provision of the tabs helps to prevent the working device from being pulled out of the handle. It will thus be seen that in the tool 130, the raking device is formed from a single metal strip, which is bent to form both the arm sections and the raker tooth. It will be appreciated that the tool 130 can be manufactured at a relatively low cost.

[0062] A further embodiment of a tool constructed in accordance with the invention is illustrated in FIG. 13. This tool 160 can be manufactured in a manner similar to the tool 130 described above except for the differences noted hereinafter. This tool also has an elongate handle 162 at the front end of which is mounted a raking device 164. However, in the tool 160, the raking device is formed from a single wire which is bent to form both arm sections 166, 168 and a U-shaped raker tooth 170. As in the embodiment of FIG. 12, the raker tooth 170 projects from front or outer end portions 172, 174 of the arm sections in a forward or outwards direction away from the handle.

[0063] The raker device in the tool 160 has two opposite end sections 176, 178 which can be rigidly connected to the handle. Again, if the handle 162 is made from moulded plastic, the plastic can be moulded around these end sections to firmly and rigidly attach the raking device to the handle. The end sections can wrap around each other as illustrated so that they are connected to one another as well as to the handle.

[0064] Another embodiment of a raker bit constructed in accordance with the invention is illustrated in FIG. 14. This raker bit 180 can be used in a tool to remove unhardened mortar, concrete or adhesive from a joint or surface formed from mortar, concrete or adhesive material. The raker bit is similar to that illustrated in FIG. 3 and described above except for the formation of its raker tooth 182. As in the embodiment of FIG. 3, the raker tooth is integrally attached to front or outer end sections 184, 186 of supporting arm portions 188, 190. The raker tooth projects from the front end sections 184, 186 which extend transversely in opposite directions from an inner end 192 of the raker tooth. However, in the raker bit 180, the raker tooth projects from the front end portions in a forwards or outwards direction away from the rear end connecting portion 194. Again, the preferred raker tooth in this embodiment is a U-shaped section of wire and this U-shaped section has a rounded outer end at 196. It will be understood that the bit 180 can be used in a masonry tool of the type shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 if desired. When the bit is used in a tool of this type, the wheels are not used to engage the surface of the adjacent bricks or blocks. When this particular raker bit is used, the masonry tool is oriented so that the arm sections 188, 190 extend at a substantial angle to the plane of the outer surface of the bricks or blocks, for example, an angle of 90 degrees or close to 90 degrees. In addition, with the raker bit 180 of FIG. 14, it is possible to use a masonry tool specially constructed for the use of these bits, for example, a tool similar to that shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 without the wheels.

[0065] A further embodiment of a masonry tool is illustrated in FIG. 15 and this tool 200 is similar to that illustrated in FIG. 12, except for the design of the raker tooth 202. Again, in the tool 200, the raking device is formed from a single thin metal strip 204, which is bent to form both the arm sections and the raker tooth 202. The tooth 202 is also U-shaped and is formed from a central section of the metal strip. The tooth 202 is formed so as to be narrower than the tooth 146. In particular, the tooth 202 can range in width between only {fraction (1/16)}th and {fraction (1/8)}th of an inch. One use for this tool is for cleaning latex tile glue or mortar from between ceramic tiles or other thinly spaced building materials.

[0066] Turning now to the additional embodiment illustrated schematically in FIG. 16, this masonry tool 206 can be constructed in a manner similar to the embodiment of FIG. 11 except that it has two raking devices 208 and 210 at opposite ends of its central, cylindrical handle 212. The raking device 208 has a U-shaped raker tooth 214 which is integrally attached to two tooth-supporting arm sections 216, 218, each of which is rigidly attached to the handle. The raking device 210 has a V-shaped raker tooth 220, which is integrally attached to two tooth supporting arm sections 222 and 224. If desired, both of the raking devices can be made from a single length of bent wire, end sections of which are embedded in or otherwise held in the handle. It will be appreciated that various raker tooth combinations can be provided on a masonry tool of the type illustrated in FIG. 16. For example, both raking devices can be provided with a concave type tooth with one tooth having a radius of {fraction (1/2)} inch and another having a radius of, for example, {fraction (5/8)}ths inch. With this tool, a skilled bricklayer or blocklayer may be able to work faster and more efficiently at a job site that requires different types of joints to be provided between the bricks or between the blocks.

[0067] Illustrated in FIGS. 17 and 18 is another embodiment of a masonry tool constructed in accordance with this invention. This masonry tool indicated generally at 260 has some characteristics in common with the masonry tool shown in FIG. 16 and described above. The tool 260 has an elongate handle 262 which can be made in a similar manner as the handle of the tool of FIGS. 1 and 2. In other words, it can be made from cast aluminum and thus can be quite light. It is also possible to make the main body of the handle plastic and then provide separate metal sections or parts for engaging the two detachable raker bits 264, 266. Each of the raker bits 264, 266 can be constructed according to the embodiment of the raker bit illustrated in FIG. 3 of the drawings and described above.

[0068] Preferably, the handle 262 is formed with widened end sections 268, 270. Also, at each end there is a connecting section 272, 274 and, in each of these connecting sections, a circular passageway 276 is formed. It will be understood that an upstanding connecting section 59 of the raker bit is mounted in this circular passageway and it is held therein by a locking pin 280 which can be formed with a turnkey 282 on its outer end for ease of turning. Thus, with this embodiment of masonry tool, it is possible for the tool to be fitted with two different raker bits which project from the handle in opposite directions as shown. If one of the raker bits should become worn and in need of replacement, it is possible to replace this particular raker bit without having to throw out the remainder of the tool.

[0069] In the embodiment of FIGS. 17 and 18, the holes in which the raker bits are mounted are transversely extending holes in that they extend in a transverse direction relative to the longitudinal axis of the handle 262. It will also be understood that the locking pins 280 constitute a form of clamping device which is mounted in the tool.

[0070] FIGS. 19 and 20 of the drawings illustrate an alternate use for some of the tools constructed in accordance with the invention. As illustrated in FIG. 19, it is known to form a decorative concrete surface wherein the surface has “pseudo-stones” 230, 232 formed by means of a pattern thereon. This type of surface is created from a simple flat layer or bed of concrete that has been trawled to form a rough surface 234 that is similar to a stone surface. Then the masonry worker forms simulated, elongate joints 236 in the concrete surface, these joints actually being elongate recesses or channels. These simulated joints can be created using a raker tool constructed in accordance with the invention in the manner illustrated in FIG. 20.

[0071] In FIG. 20, an uncured concrete layer is illustrated at 240. This layer may be laid on submaterial 242 which can be a base concrete floor, for example, or a layer of gravel that has been suitably compacted. Again, the top surface 244 has been troweled rough so as to simulate to some extent the surface of stone. After the rough surface is formed, the simulated joints can be formed by employing a suitable flat trowel 246 of known construction, this trowel including a flat, metal plate 248, and a tool constructed in accordance with the invention, for example, the tool 130 illustrated in FIG. 12. This tool has an outwardly projecting raker tooth 146. As illustrated, it will be seen that the raking device of the tool can be dragged along a straight edge 250 of the trowel and in this way the straight simulated joint will be formed in the surface of the concrete. Note also that the top surface of the metal plate 248 of the trowel is engaged by a front end portion of one of the arm sections of the raking device and in this way the depth of the simulated joint is kept uniform and all of the joints can be made so that they have approximately the same depth. Although not shown in FIG. 20, the tool 130 can, of course, be fitted with a broom handle by screwing the handle into the threaded end of the handle 132. In this way, the reach of the masonry tool can be extended substantially.

[0072] It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that various modifications and changes can be made to the described raker bits and raker tools without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention and accordingly all such modifications and changes as fall within the scope of the appended claims are intended to be part of this invention. For example, the raker tooth can be made in a shape other than those shown, in order to form other types of joints that are known in the bricklaying and masonry art.

[0073] In addition, it will be appreciated that the raker bit can be constructed so that there is a single upstanding connecting section to which both longitudinal arm sections are connected at the rear ends. For example, it is possible to join together in a permanent or non-permanent fashion the illustrated end parts 62a and 62b so that they do not come apart when the raker bit is removed from the masonry tool. This joining could be accomplished by welding or braising, for example. It is also possible to construct the raker bit with only a single upstanding end part to which one of the longitudinal extending arm sections can be integrally connected, while the other arm section is joined thereto by welding or some other form of secure fastening.

[0074] There are a number of advantages that can be obtained by the use of raker bits constructed in accordance with the invention in addition to those already mentioned. Because these raker bits can be manufactured with accuracy and repeatability, the joint depth formed by the bricklayer would generally always be uniform and this is true even if different bricklayers are used at the same job site. Furthermore, it is generally not necessary for the user to readjust the masonry tool in order to obtain uniformly of joint depth.

[0075] Because the raker tooth is at a projecting front end of the raker bit where it can be readily seen by the user, it becomes easy to do inside and outside corner raking without having to change masonry tools. With an inside corner, the present raker bit is able to extend into the corner, but when a nail is used, the wheels of the tool and the location of the nail prevent the nail from reaching into the corner. In the case of an outside corner which is normally raked from the outside to the inside (away from the corner), use of the present raker bit reduces the tendency to pull out mortar from the corner joint. Thus the present invention helps to reduce tabor costs and improves the quality of the raked joints.

[0076] Because the front end portion of the raker bit extends over two brick faces and in use is dragged across the brick faces, a masonry tool equipped with the present raker bits will clean the bricks of excessive mortar, thereby improving brick appearance.

[0077] A raker tooth constructed in accordance with the invention and formed from standard, round wire can be made the same thickness as the head of a conventional concrete nail. However, once the nail head wears down, the raker tooth described herein is approximately 50% wider than the worn concrete nail. This can result in faster joint raking as compared to when one is using a masonry tool fitted with a concrete nail.

[0078] Another advantage that can be gained with the use of the raker bits of the invention is that they can be used to rake very thin mortar joints. A bricklayer can rake such joints by turning the raker bit 90° to the direction of the joint and moving the narrower or thin side of the raker tooth along the joint. This avoids the use of a separate tool for this purpose.

[0079] It is also possible to manufacture the raker bits of the invention so that the tops of the bits are painted with distinctive colors, which designate a particular tooth type and tooth depth. The use of such colors will permit easy identification of the proper raker bit. It is also possible to stamp the tooth dimensions on at least one of the longitudinal support arms.