Title:
Logic gate board game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A logic gate board game with a board having a logic tree marked thereon with spaces for placement of tile playing pieces. Each tile has a particular logic gate symbol marked thereon. Each space has receptacles defining inputs and outputs. Colored pegs for insertion into the board receptacles on the game playing board identify the logic input and output state of the logic gate on the board. Players draw logic gate tiles from a non-transparent bag. Players take alternate turns to place tiles and pegs on the board. The object of the game is to complete a path of logic outputs of one player's pre-selected colored pegs to the top of the pyramid before his or her opponent completes a path of logic outputs of his or her pre-selected colored pegs to the top of the pyramid. The first player to reach the top is the winner.



Inventors:
Britt, Randall (Placentia, CA, US)
Application Number:
10/444808
Publication Date:
11/25/2004
Filing Date:
05/24/2003
Assignee:
BRITT RANDALL
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/288, 273/281
International Classes:
A63F3/04; A63F3/02; A63F9/00; A63F11/00; (IPC1-7): A63F1/00; A63F9/20; A63F3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
COLLINS, DOLORES R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Ben E. Lofstedt (Fullerton, CA, US)
Claims:

What I claim as my invention is:



1. A logic gate board game with tile playing pieces each having a pre-defined logic gate symbol thereon comprising: (a) a game playing board having a plurality of marked spaces for the placement of tile playing pieces thereon, each of said marked spaces on the game playing board having a plurality of at least three receptacles about each of said marked spaces in the game playing board; (b) a pair of logic gate inputs and at least one logic gate output identified by one of the at least three receptacles for each of the marked spaces, and (c) a plurality of colored markers with a single color selected by each player adapted to be removably placed into the receptacles on the game playing board to identify the logic input and logic output state of the logic gate marked on the tile playing piece in the marked space.

2. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the game playing board has a logic tree thereon formed by said marked spaces for the placement of tile playing pieces thereon arranged in the shape of a pyramid.

3. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces include an AND logic gate symbol thereon.

4. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces include an OR logic gate symbol thereon.

5. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces include an NAND logic gate symbol thereon.

6. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces includes a NOR logic gate symbol thereon.

7. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces includes a XOR logic gate symbol thereon.

8. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces includes a XNOR logic gate symbol thereon.

9. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces include an RIGHT NOT logic gate symbol thereon.

10. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces include an LEFT NOT logic gate symbol thereon.

11. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces includes a LEFT PASS logic gate symbol thereon.

12. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces includes a RIGHT PASS logic gate symbol thereon.

13. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the tile game playing pieces includes a FUZZY logic gate symbol thereon.

14. The logic gate board game of claim 1 wherein the number of logic tiles is twenty-five.

15. The logic gate board game of claim 1 wherein the number of logic tiles is one hundred.

16. The logic gate board game of claim 1 wherein two of the three receptacles are operably identified as inputs to the marked spaces for the placement of tile playing pieces thereon.

17. The logic gate board game of claim 1 further comprising a non-visually transparent container for holding the logic tile game playing pieces to allow random selection of the logic tile game playing pieces by the players for play purposes.

18. The logic gate board game of claim 17 wherein said non-visually transparent container for holding the logic tile game playing pieces to allow random selection of the logic tile game playing pieces by the players for play purposes is a bag formed of black plastic material.

19. The logic gate board game of claim 1 wherein the remaining one of the three receptacles is operably identified as a logic gate output.

20. The logic gate board game of claim 1 wherein the plurality of colored markers consists of two colors.

21. The logic gate board game of claim 20 wherein the two colors of the colored markers are RED and GREEN.

22. The logic gate board game of claim 21 wherein the RED colored markers represent a LOW OUTPUT from said logic gate.

23. The logic gate board game of claim 21 wherein the GREEN colored markers represent a HIGH OUTPUT from said logic gate.

24. The logic gate board game of claims 1, 20, 21, 22 and 23 wherein the markers are pegs.

25. The logic gate board game of claim 1 further including a memory aide device for each player consisting of a TRUTH TABLE listing the inputs and outputs of each one of the logic gate symbols marked upon said tile playing pieces.

26. The logic gate board game of claim 1, wherein the marked spaces on the game playing board for the placement of tile playing pieces thereon are arranged in a plurality of alternating rows of marked spaces thereon according to the mathematical series of (n) then (n−1) then (n) and continuing on, where n is a real number commencing with 2 and increasing to any number more than 2.

27. The logic gate board game of claim 1 wherein the marked spaces on the game playing board for the placement of tile playing pieces thereon are arranged in a combination of the arrangements of the marked spaces on the game playing boards identified in claim 2 and claim 24.

28. The logic gate board game of claim 1 wherein the marked spaces on the game playing board for the placement of tile playing pieces thereon are arranged in a plurality of alternating rows of marked spaces thereon according to the mathematical series of (n+1), (n), (n+1), (n), (n), (n), (n−1), wherein n is a minimum of 2 and the number of marked spaces in the last row cannot be less than [(n)−(n−1)].

29. The logic gate board game of claims 2, 24, 25 and 26 wherein each of the marked spaces on the game playing board for the placement of tile playing pieces thereon each has dual inputs and dual outputs.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The invention relates, in general, to a logic board game played by two or more persons, and, more specifically, to a logic board game with a board having a plurality of logic tile spaces each having marker receptacles for identifying two inputs and one output, the logic tile spaces being arranged on the game playing board, and involving randomly drawn tiles each having one of a limited number of logic gate symbols thereon for player placement on one of the logic tile spaces on the game board with the understanding that a logic tile can only be placed on a logic tile space if one of the logic tile space inputs has a colored peg in it.

[0003] 2. Description of the Prior Art

[0004] Games of skill and strategy have been increasingly popular forms of entertainment. In today's modern, rapidly growing technologically sophisticated society, “gamesters” require, more than ever before, that the games must not only be entertaining, but must be intellectually challenging. Board games have become increasingly popular in this regard.

[0005] Board games which provide not only entertainment value, intellectual challenges, and stimulation of the gamesters' minds, but also teach something useful and valuable are in even greater demand today.

[0006] To accomplish such desirable goals, a number of attempts have been made to provide board games to satisfy the ever increasing need for entertainment along with intellectual stimulation. Along these lines, various board games have been created in the prior art to which the present invention pertains. Among such prior art inventive board games are the following.

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 3,640,531 relates to a word forming game device. The inventor claims that while there are a wide variety of word forming games in use such as “SCRABBLE” there are none employing a device for determining the random selection of a predetermined number of letters from which words are to be formed in accordance with certain rules. FIG. 1 illustrates the game board. The object of the game is to make or spell as many words as possible in the shortest period of time. The longer the words, the greater the number of points. The words formed may be crossed or independent as exemplified by the rearranged pieces 50 as shown in FIG. 8. Perhaps, the most intriguing feature of the game is that the use of the inventive device 10 determines the letters from which the words actually are to be formed with all players being given the same letters to begin with as a result of the operation of the device. As a result, the game is started by all the players on an equal basis unlike “SCRABBLE.” The game begins with a spin of the rotor 28. Assuming that there are four players, if the detent 32 stops at “20” all players take playing pieces 50 bearing the letters “N,G,N,E” and arrange these letters as shown in FIG. 6. As the rotor 28 stops upon successive rotations, the fourth symbols in each of the five exposed circumferential groups are selected by each player until all 20 symbols are selected to form words by the use of playing pieces having corresponding symbols.

[0008] U.S. Pat. No. 3,887,189 relates to a word board game with a display board having a wired circuit underneath and electrically operated lightbulbs on top. The board is approximately 12 in. by 24 in. with a divider placed in the middle to obstruct the view of the other player as to the opposite portion of the game playing board. The object of the game is to discover the other player's word or sentence first. Score is tallied by number of letters multiplied by 10. The electrical wiring is arranged so that when the bulbs are in corresponding positions on either side either both lamps will flash ON, or the lamps will flash ON and a buzzer will sound to alert the player when he has found a letter.

[0009] U.S. Pat. No. 4,591,161 relates to a method and apparatus for a word-building game. The preferred word building structure comprises a pyramid-shaped grid have 49 playing spaces. The pyramid is arranged in 7 rows, with 13 playing spaces in the base row and two less playing spaces in each succeedingly higher row. Each player uses a color-coded set of playing pieces for building intersecting words in the horizontal, vertical and diagonal directions in his respective word-building structure during a three minute word-building phase. The game board is then rotated to place each player in front of an opponent's word-building structure for an offensive phase, during which a competitor may strategically place his playing pieces to block selected spaces adjacent previously built words on an opponent's structure limiting the opponent's used of the blocked spaces in subsequent word-building phases and capturing the scoring value of the blocked words. Play continues with alternating word-building phases and offensive phases until one of a set of predetermined conditions occurs. Scores are tallied at the end of a game.

[0010] U.S. Pat. No. 4,616,832 is a game of stealth, like “Stratego” and “Battleship.” It comprises a game board having substantially identical playing surfaces for each player with the two playing surfaces hidden from view of the other player. Each playing surface has a plurality of receptacles each representing a location for positioning a playing piece. The receptacles on the one playing surface match the receptacles on the other playing surface. The game also includes a plurality of playing pieces each having a pair of electrical contracts and each being adapted to mate with any receptacle. A first diode is connected across these contacts and a second diode and an electrically powered light source are also connected across these contacts with the anode of one diode and the cathode of the other diode being commonly connected to the same contact. Each of the playing pieces has one of its contacts positioned to contact a receptacle terminal and its other contact positioned to be brought into electrical contact connection with the other contact of a playing piece positioned in a corresponding receptacle on a second playing surface whereby both light sources are energized.

[0011] U.S. Pat. No. 4,637,609 relates to a method for a game. (This is similar in many respects to the continuation application of U.S. Pat. No. 4,591,161 issued to the same inventor; in fact, the Figures are identical.)

[0012] U.S. Pat. No. 4,772,027 pertains to a board game incorporating electronic logic device. A constant feature of the invention is that he board is arranged to carry or to be mounted to a sensor/indicator device which is electrically connected to associated switches. The switches are activated by persons who participate in the game. Each triggering device comprises a push-button switch which is located within a plastics material casing. The switches are connected by wires to the sensor/indicator device is centrally located with respect to the triggering devices.

[0013] U.S. Pat. No. 5,069,458 teaches an illuminating peg board game 20 which includes peg 58 and 60 having numerically identified electrical sockets 64 formed therein. Each socket 64 is provided to activate a light illuminating peg 66 when placed in the socket. Some of the pegs illuminate a constant light when activated while the other pegs illuminate a blinking light when activated. Two players play the game. The object of the game is to completely fill the sockets 64 in one or the other of the boards 58 or 60 with illuminating pegs 66 before the opponent can fill the sockets 64 in the other board. The first to completely fill the assigned board 58 or 60 wins.

[0014] U.S. Pat. No. 5,882,011 concerns a board game requiring instant complex decisions and immediate competitive action. The game board is shown in FIG. 1A with four identical players' sections 10A, 10B, 10C and 10D around an enclosure 24 formed in the center of the game board 8. Each player's section contains one or more ready switches, multiple response switches, a response indicator, and a scoring means such as a series of pegs and holes. Along the outer edge of each player's section are two ready switches, spaced far enough apart that they cannot be operated with one hand. Toward the center of each section are a plurality of response switches and a response indicator.

[0015] While board games such as found in the prior art described herein above may be enjoyable, they oftentimes fail to offer the much preferred intellectual challenge, or are too complex for broad entertainment value, or fail to offer an educational or vocational value.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION AND OBJECTS

[0016] Basically, this is a logic board game consisting of a game playing board with a number of logic tile spaces laid out in the form of a pyramidically-shaped array. In the logic game board layout, the game board layout is topped with a single square and branches out therebeneath in horizontal rows each with a number of spaces equal to the row number starting from the top of the array. For example, in an array with a base of eight (8) logic tile spaces, the base would be identified as Row 8 and the top row having a single logic tile space would be identified as Row 1. Consequently, each numbered row contains the same number of squares as it's numbered row, i.e. Row 1 contains 1 square; Row 2 contains two squares, etc. Each individual logic tile space has three (3) dashed lines running from it either as inputs or an output as logic inputs simulating electrical connections thereto. The individual logic tile squares are “linked” together by these dashed lines and the combination of the logic tile squares arranged in the form of a logic gate array.

[0017] In one embodiment of this game, four (4) different logic gates are simulated: an “AND” gate, a “NOR” gate, a “NAND” gate, and an “OR” gate. A laminated game players card is provided to each player commonly known as a logic gate “Truth Table.” Each one of the four (4) logic gates, with its associated logic symbol, and it's logical output produced by various combinations of inputs to its two inputs, is depicted thereon for convenient use by the players. Immediately above each of the logic gates is a table containing the symbols for the two INPUTS A and B and the OUTPUT C. In an AND gate, for example, there is only a “HIGH” or “TRUE” output C when BOTH inputs A and B are “HIGH” or “TRUE.” Other logic gates have different throughput logic functions. In the present embodiment of the invention, the RED peg is used to mark a LOW (FALSE) output signal and GREEN (TRUTH) is the HIGH output signal.

[0018] One way to commence the game involving two (2) players involves a random selection process such as flipping a two sided coin, drawing a card from a stack of cards, or whatever, to determine who starts the game by drawing the first colored peg and inserting the peg in each of the holes forming the bottom row.

[0019] Then, one of the two players draws a small wooden tile from the “black” (non-transparent bag). On the wooden tile is a logic circuit. In this particular embodiment of the game, there are four (4) different logic circuits; namely, an AND gate, a NOR gate, an OR gate, and a NAND gate. Of course, Using the wood tile that was drawn, the first player attempts to place the logic gate that he drew from the bag onto one of the squares in the bottom row (here, the 8th Row) on a square so that his logic circuit tile produces the desired OUTPUT. The desired OUTPUT is “HIGH” if the player is a GREEN player, and “LOW” if you are a RED player.

[0020] As a handy reference device, each player is provided with a chart of each one of the four logic circuits which provide three (3) columns: A, B and C. A and B represent the two logic circuit INPUTS and C represents the logic circuit output. Each logic circuit works only on digital logic. For example, an AND gate will only produce a HIGH output identified as C only if the two inputs, A and B, are HIGH (GREEN). If a player locates an empty square on the game board that he or she can put the logic tile randomly drawn from the black bag on the empty space and produce an output, the player will place a single peg in the output peg hole. The color of the peg is determined by the using the Truth Table for that particular gate type and with reference to the two inputs to that particular gate type.

[0021] The game sequence continues until one of the two players reaches the very top row, Row 1, and produces a final output. The first player to create a continuous logic path with that player's colored pegs from the start of the logic path input at the base of the pyramid to the output of the single logic space at the top of the pyramid is declared to be the winner. There is no “stalemate” of the game such as found in the other games, such as Chess.

[0022] If, on the other hand, neither player can reach the top, and the game is locked in a “checkmate” type of mode, a number of game possibilities present themselves. One method of unraveling or breaking the “checkmate” mode is both players are permitted to replace a logic tile with another tile playing piece that they draw from a black bag. This continues until a complete path is created. The player whose path from the bottom to the top is first competed is declared the winner.

[0023] In this particular embodiment of the logic board game, three logic circuits or four logic circuits are found to work well with eight (8) to twelve (12) logic tile spaces arranged in a row forming the base of the triangle or pyramid-shaped tree form with a total of eight (8) to twelve (12) rows of logic tile spaces respectively.

[0024] It is one unique object and feature of the present invention to provide a game of skill in which logical decisions must be made, at the time required, requiring each player to determine how to logically respond, then determine how to respond completely and correctly, to create a path to the top of the pyramid or to prevent your opponent from doing so, or to unravel your opponent's march to the top of the pyramid.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0025] The details of the invention will be described in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

[0026] FIG. 1 shows the layout of the standard pyramid game playing board.

[0027] FIG. 2 shows four (4) Truth Tables for AND, OR, NAND and NOR gates for use for two players.

[0028] FIG. 3 shows a second set of four (4) Truth Tables for AND, OR, NAND and NOR gates for use for three players.

[0029] FIG. 4 shows four (4) Truth Tables for AND, OR, NAND and NOR gates for use for four players.

[0030] FIG. 5 shows and depicts fifteen (15) Truth Tables for AND (LEFT NOT), OR (LEFT NOT), NAND (LEFT NOT), NOR (LEFT NOT), AND (RIGHT NOT), OR (RIGHT NOT), NAND (RIGHT NOT), NOR (RIGHT NOT), XOR, XNOR, RIGHT NOT, RIGHT PASS, LEFT NOT, LEFT PASS, and FUZZY logic circuits.

[0031] FIG. 6 is a figure of a specially designed peg which allows insertion into a receptacle in the game playing board for insertion into one of the receptacles or holes in the board either in an upright or a laid down orientation.

[0032] FIG. 7 is a figure of the layout of the logic game playing board depicting logic tile spaces arranged in an alternating rows configuration consisting of rows of logic tile spaces containing 8-7-8-7, etc. or (n) to (n−1) to (n) to (n−1), etc. where n is a real number.

[0033] FIG. 8 is a figure of the layout of the logic game playing board depicting logic tile spaces arranged in an stepping down configuration.

[0034] FIG. 9 is a figure of the layout of the logic game playing board depicting logic tile spaces arranged in a constant width configuration.

[0035] FIG. 10 is a figure of the layout of the logic game playing board depicting logic tile spaces arranged in a dual output configuration.

[0036] FIG. 11A depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output STANDARD AND gate.

[0037] FIG. 11B depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output OR gate.

[0038] FIG. 11C depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output CROSS-OVER gate.

[0039] FIG. 11D depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output AND INVERT RIGHT gate.

[0040] FIG. 11E depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output OR INVERT R gate.

[0041] FIG. 11F depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output CROSSOVER INVERT R-L gate.

[0042] FIG. 11G depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output AND-OR gate.

[0043] FIG. 12 depicts a logic game playing tile with a dual-input, single-output AND gate depicted thereon.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0044] With continuing reference now to all of the drawings herein, and with special emphasis now on FIG. 1 there is basically shown a logic gate board game including a game playing board generally indicated at 10 having a pyramid-shaped logic tree generally indicated at 11 thereon with marked spaces 12 for the placement of tile playing pieces 13 thereon, each tile playing piece 13 having a pre-defined logic gate symbol thereon, as depicted in FIG. 12 uniquely defining the type and character of the logic gate 14 represented thereon by the tile playing piece 13, a plurality of at least three receptacles 15 on the game playing board 10 logically associated with each of the marked logic tile spaces 12 with each of the logic tile spaces 12 having dashed lines 16 defining the logic tile space 12 each with a pair of logic gate inputs 17 and one logic gate output 18, and a plurality of colored pegs 19 for insertion into the receptacles 15 on the game playing board 10 to identify the logic input and output state of the logic gate 14 on the tile playing piece 13. The first player to create a continuous logic path of his or her colored pegs 19 from the start of the logic path at the base of the pyramid-shaped logic tree 11 to the output of the single logic tile 13 positioned at the very top of the pyramid-shaped logic tree 11 is declared to be the winner. The logic gate tiles 13 are randomly drawn from a non-transparent bag by each of the players. When it is the player's turn, the player can place a logic tile playing piece 13 on one of the logic tile spaces 12 identified on the game playing board 10 but only if that particular logic tile space 12 on the game board 10 has at least one colored peg 19 showing an input 17 to that logic tile space 12. However, it is generally only when it is to the player's advantage to do so, does the player take the next step. The player looks for a logic tile 13 in his or her possession that has a logic gate 14 which when placed on the logic tile space 12 on the board 10, that this particular logic gate tile 13 will produce an output from the logic gate 14 which is beneficial to the player. If the logic gate 14 produces an OUTPUT which matches the player's color, it is generally considered favorable to that particular player.

[0045] As a memory aide, each player is provided a game playing card 20 with logic gate symbols 14 thereon indicating the input colors and the output color of the particular logic gate 14, i.e. RED for LOW OUTPUT and GREEN for HIGH OUTPUT. The RED and the GREEN pegs 19 are inserted into the three receptacles 15 in the game playing board 10 corresponding to the game playing card with the logic gate symbols thereon. The representations on the game playing card are generally referred to as a “TRUTH TABLE” identified generally at 21.

The Logic Gate Game

[0046] The object of the LOGIC game is to WIN. For one of the players to win the game, the player must complete a continuous path of his or her colored outputs from the starting point on the LOGIC game board 10 at first row 22 of logic spaces 12 on the LOGIC game board 10 of the pyramidically-arranged logic tree 11 formed of logic spaces 12 to the second row 23 of logic tile spaces 12 above the first row 22 of logic tile spaces 12 and continuing to each consecutive row of logic tile spaces 12 above it until the player reaches the very top row 24 of the pyramidically-arranged logic tree 11 spaces before the player's opponent reaches it.

[0047] In this particular embodiment of the invention, the game playing pieces 13 consist of square-shaped tiles 13 each having a logic gate symbol 14 thereon. For example, in one embodiment of the present game, one hundred (100) tiles 13 each with a logic gate symbol 14 thereon are placed in a darkened, non-transparent (can't-see-through) or black bag (not shown). The 100 tiles consist of twenty-five (25) logic tiles 13 each with an AND, OR, NAND and NOR logic gate symbol thereon (total 100 tiles) respectively identified as 25, 26, 27 and 28. There are three (3) receptacles 15 for each of the logic tile spaces identified on the game playing board shown in FIG. 1 identified as the standard pyramid game playing board 10. For the single logic tile space 12 at the top of the pyramidical array shown in FIG. 1 there are three (3) receptacles 15 for pegs 19. Two (2) of the receptacles 15 are for inputs 17, to the logic gate 14 on the tile 13 placed on this logic tile space 12, and one of the receptacles 15 is for the output 18, generally indicated at 18. At the base row 22 of eight (8) logic tile spaces 12, there are seventeen (17) receptacles 15 for pegs 19 associated with the eight (8) logic tile spaces 12. With the sole exception of the three (3) peg receptacles 15 for the single logic space receptacle 15 at the top of the pyramid logic tree array 11, the number of peg receptacles 15 required for each row is not determined by multiplying 3×(the number of logic spaces 12). This is due to the fact that in horizontal rows of logic tile spaces 12, all of the logic tile spaces 12 between the two (2) logic tile spaces 12 at the ends of the row, such as the base row 22, share a peg receptacle 15. The number of shared peg receptacles 15 is {[(number of logic tile spaces)−(number of end tiles, i.e. always “2”]+1}. For example, the number of shared peg receptacles 15 for a horizontal row having five (5) logic gate spaces would be {[(5)−(2)]+1} or a total of four (4) shared peg receptacles 15. To determine the number of peg receptacles 15 for each horizontal row of peg receptacles 15, the following mathematical formula is used: [(number of logic tile spaces)×2]+1. For example, in a horizontal row of five (5) logic tile spaces, the number of peg receptacles would be [(5)×2]+1, or eleven (11).

[0048] GREEN and RED colored pegs 19 are used to indicate whether an input/output of a logic gate 14 belongs to one player or the other.

Rules for Playing the Game with Two Players

[0049] To start the game involving two players, the first step is to choose which player will be GREEN and which player will be RED. The GREEN player always makes the first move.

[0050] The next step is to randomly select the initial input pegs 19 from a darkened bag. For a logic game board 10 having eight (8) logic gate spaces 12 forming the base row 22 of a triangularly-shaped logic array 11, the number of input only pegs 19 that must be drawn to fill the peg receptacles 15 will be: [(number of logic tile spaces)+1], or (8)+1=9. This step can be done by either one of the players drawing nine (9) colored pegs 19 from the black bag, or the players can alternatively draw colored pegs 19 from the black bag until a total of nine (9) color pegs 19 are drawn. Of course, as a colored peg 19 is drawn, each colored peg 19 is placed into the next unfilled peg receptacle 15 located directly beneath the horizontal row of logic gate spaces forming the base 22 of the pyramidically-shaped array 11 of logic gate spaces 12.

[0051] Next, each player is provided a logic or “Truth Table” card 20 listing what inputs to a logic tile 13 playing piece will produce what output. A copy of one (1) truth table card 20 for four (4) logic gates; namely: an AND, OR, NAND, and NOR logic gate is shown in FIG. 2 of the drawings herein.

[0052] The game playing board 10 consists of a play area layout which is in the shape of a triangle 11 as shown in FIG. 1 with a plurality of receptacles 15 for holding the input/output pegs 19, a plurality of spaces 12 for the placement of the game playing tiles 13 with logic gate symbols 14 thereon, and three (3) separate sets of dotted lines eminating therefrom which show the path from one logic tile space 12 to another logic tile space 12 disposed immediately above it.

[0053] Except for the initial inputs along the bottom row of peg holes 19 and final output consisting of a single peg hole 19 at the top of the pyramid, each gate output is also an input for one or more other logic gates. It should be noted that all logic gates have two inputs and one output.

Game Playing Technique

[0054] Beginning with the green player and then taking turns, each player draws a logic gate tile 13 from the bag and places it on a legal space 12 on the game playing board 10. Only spaces 12 with at least one input peg 19 are legal.

[0055] If both inputs to the logic gate have pegs 19 inserted in the peg holes 15 in the game playing board 10, the player puts the proper output peg 19 in the peg hole 15 with the use the truth tables to determine the output based upon the inputs to the particular logic gate. (It should be noted that there can not be any output unless there is a peg 19 in both input peg holes 15 associated with the logic gate.)

[0056] Each player must decide where to place their respective logic gates in an attempt to complete their color pegs 19 forming a continuous path of outputs working to the last logic gate space 12 at the top of the pyramid 11, while, at the same time, also working on blocking his or her opponent from completing a continuous path of the opponents' colored pegs 19 to the top of the logic pyramid 11. (Remember, the initial inputs do not count as part of a completed path).

[0057] A player MUST play a logic gate tile 13 drawn in a legal space 12 even if doing so causes the output to be a peg 19 of the opposition's color.

[0058] When all the peg holes 15 are filled, i.e. all input/outputs will also be filled, if no path is completed for either player, the game enters the “Gate Replacement” phase. In this phase of the Logic Gate Game, each succeeding logic gate tiles 13 drawn are used to replace logic gate tiles 13 already placed on existing gate spaces 12 on the game playing board 10. Each of the logic gate tiles 13 that are removed and replaced are put back into the bag. After this is accomplished, all of the logic gate outputs affected by the logic gate tile 13 replaced must be changed according to the respective truth tables.

[0059] When changing the outputs in the “Gate Replacement” phase, the player must start in the lowest row affected by the gate replacement. All changes are made in each row before proceeding to the next row. After all of the changes are made, the player must check to see if a path has been completed from the bottom row to the top row consisting of a single logic tile space 12. The game ends whenever a path of pegs 19 having a single color is completed. One must be cautious and careful because a player can cause his or her opponent to win by mistakenly, through inadvertence or otherwise, completing a path of his or her opponent's colored pegs 19.

Alternative Variations of the Logic Gate Board Game

[0060] Changing initial inputs. The basic logic gate game commences by randomly setting the initial logic gate inputs to either RED or GREEN. These logic gate inputs are not considered in determining if a winning path exists. The logic gate game can be played where these inputs are considered to be the outputs of unseen gates, and are used for determining whether a particular logic gate path of a single color is complete. Consequently, a method for changing the logic gate inputs must be implemented.

[0061] There are numerous ways of achieving this. One such method for accomplishing this is described as follows. A set of at least nine cards can be used to determine which if any inputs will or can change. Nine cards are used because there are nine inputs. An individual card can have ‘O’s to indicate the inputs which will change and “‘X’s to show which ones will not. For example, XXXOXXOXX could be one card. In this case, the rule could be either that those colors and design for the help cards which are provided for each player and use 2, 3 and/or 4 two inputs MUST change or they MAY change at the player's discretion. A card could have all ‘X’s on it as well and simply mean the player loses their turn. The use of this option can be limited in several ways. The card can be drawn in place of the normal turn for the player. The cards could be used only after all of the tile spaces 12 are filled and no logic path exists. Another method that could be employed is described as follows. For example, the players could be limited to a predetermined number of cards for a game. In this version both players should be involved in the random selection to begin the game.

[0062] Adding more gates. FIG. 5 depicts several other logic gates and their associated truth tables. It is anticipated that adding any or all of these will have the effect of making the game more challenging. In each of the logic gates, there is an output C, and dual inputs A and B. The Truth Tables 21 are presented immediately above the specific logic gate.

[0063] “FuzzyGate”. The rules governing this logic gate can be varied, but it is basically a wild piece. Another unique aspect of the “FuzzyGate” 29 becomes evident when making the changes row by row. Other logic gates leave no choice in what the output will be with given inputs. With the “FuzzyGate” 29 each time an input changes the player who caused the change gets to decide what output it will have. They may also leave it as the current color if they desire. This unique feature can be used to add yet another twist to the Logic Gate Game . For example, two governing rules can apply for the “FuzzyGate” 29 when it's input is affected by a logic gate replacement. Of course, which rule to use has to be determined in advance by the players.

[0064] Fuzzy Immediate. The “FuzzyGate” must have its output determined and set before a player moves on to the next row just as all other gates.

[0065] Fuzzy Delayed. The player can make all other output changes in all rows and then return to decide what the output of the “FuzzyGate” will be. This can cause a new cascade of logic gate output changes.

[0066] Many other logic devices can be incorporated into the game to make it more challenging and interesting. One example would be a flip flop.

[0067] Flip Flop. This game playing tile piece known as a flip flop could use one input as a clock and pass the other input, whatever that might be at the time, to the output when the clock input changes. Otherwise, the other input (data input) has no effect on the output.

[0068] Adding More Colors. The basic version of the Logic Gate Game uses two colors and is played by two players. By the addition of a third color, another challenging variation of the Logic Gate Game is obtained. By the addition and use of a third color, such can be a used as a blocking color to interrupt the colored logic path through it for any player. It can alternately be used as a free color for both players helping to complete any path through it. And, of course, the most obvious use of the third color is the addition of a third player.

[0069] Obviously, more than three colors can be used in the Logic Gate Game. Each color added makes it more difficult for any player to win. Each new color can be used as a blocking color, a free color or an additional player color.

[0070] The Truth Tables—How They Work.

[0071] FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 contains the Truth Tables containing the currently preferred colors. The following discussion assumes color ranking of GREEN=HIGHEST, BLUE MIDDLE, or SECOND HIGHEST, and RED=LOWEST.

[0072] AND Gate Function−Lowest Color=Color Out In short, in the AND gate 25, the lowest ranking color on either the ‘A’ or ‘B’ input determines the output. If RED, the lowest color, appears on either input to the AND gate 25, the output will be RED.

[0073] If BLUE is on an input to the AND gate, and the other color is not RED, the output will be BLUE because as compared to GREEN, it is lowest. The only time GREEN will be the output color is when both inputs to the AND gate 25 are GREEN.

[0074] OR Gate Function−Highest Color=Color Out.

[0075] The OR gate 26 functions basically the opposite of the AND gate 25.

[0076] Any time GREEN, our highest color, is on either input or on both inputs, the output will be GREEN.

[0077] If BLUE is on any input and the other color on the other input is not GREEN, the output will be BLUE. The only time RED will be the output color is when no higher color is on one of the inputs, or put another way, when RED is on both inputs.

[0078] NAND Gate Function

[0079] These are the three NAND gate 27 function rules:

[0080] 1. Low/High inputs, Highest input color=output color.

[0081] 2. Low/Low inputs, Next higher color=output color.

[0082] 3. Highest/Highest inputs, Lowest color=output color.

[0083] The following is an explanation on how to use the four-color truth tables on FIG. 4. In looking at the four-color truth tables, the additional color, YELLOW, is ranked between BLUE and RED. The only time RED is the output color is when both inputs to the NAND gate are GREEN. This is the third rule for NAND.

[0084] Looking now at the doubles other than GREEN, we see that in each case the output is the next higher ranking color. This is rule 2 for a NAND gate 27. What's left is identical to the OR gate 26 because in the case of a combination of colors on the inputs a NAND gate 27 acts exactly like an OR gate 26. Rule 1 is applied here.

[0085] NOR Gate Function

[0086] These are the three NOR gate 28 function rules:

[0087] 1. Low/High inputs, Lowest input color=output color.

[0088] 2. High/High inputs, Next Lower color=output color.

[0089] 3. Lowest/Lowest inputs, Highest color=output color.

[0090] The function of a NOR gate 28 is opposite to that of the NAND gate 27.

[0091] Now instead of RED only showing up as the output one time out of sixteen possible outputs, GREEN does. Rule 3 is satisfied by the two RED inputs yielding the single GREEN output in the truth table.

[0092] All the other double color inputs follow Rule 2 since they are each considered HIGH because at least one color in the four is lower than them. The combination input colors follow the AND gate exactly because the NOR acts as an AND when applied to disparate inputs just as the NAND acted as an OR under the same conditions.

[0093] These rules can be applied to the standard truth table using true as higher than false. They do not violate the known rules of logic.

[0094] At first glance it may seem as though an advantage may exist for some colors over others. Upon investigation, however, it can be demonstrated to be equitable for all. Using four colors to demonstrate, there are 64 possible outputs. Each color has the following in common:

[0095] 1. Sixteen of the outputs are that color.

[0096] 2. Fifty percent of the time the color is an input it is also the output.

[0097] 3. Twice when the color is not an input it is the output.

[0098] 4. Both of the times in #3 the inputs are a double of another color.

[0099] 5. Half the time the color is both inputs it is also the output.

[0100] If more logic gates are used one need only to insure that they are in pairs such as XOR and XNOR or that they are of the variety that are “fair alone” (doesn't favor either player due to the properties of the logic gate) like the LEFT PASS or RIGHT PASS in FIG. 5.

Using Reverse Logic

[0101] Phase I The Setup. Reverse Logic gets its name not from the way the logic works, but from how the game progresses. Using the basic two colors and four gates, with very little modification all the variations available to standard logic gates, such can be incorporated into what is referred to as “Reverse Logic.” Referring again to FIG. 1, in this variation of the Logic Gate Game, the bottom row of inputs is not initialized. The top (final) output is initialized to either GREEN or RED. A determination must be made to determine which player is GREEN and which is RED. This completes the setup phase of the game.

[0102] Phase II The Fill Phase. The first move still belongs to the GREEN player; however, the tile that must be drawn MUST be placed in the top space.

[0103] Next, using the truth table help card, the player must first determine which of the four possible input combinations that will yield the given output from the gate. If only one input pair will work, the player places the appropriate colored pegs in the input holes and the player turn ends. For example, this would be the case if the output peg were GREEN and the gate drawn was a NOR gate. The only way a NOR gate can output a GREEN is if both inputs to the NOR gate are RED. If more than one input pair will satisfy the gate with the given output the player selects which pair to use and places the pegs accordingly.

[0104] The next move, this time by the RED player, will involve more choices to make because there will be two outputs to choose from. Otherwise, the action is the same as it was for the first move. The players take turns in this fashion until there is either a complete path or the board is filled.

[0105] Legal spaces on the game playing board 10 in this phase of the game are only those spaces whose output hole has a peg 19 in it. The player whose color occupies the final output during this phase is known as the “Aggressor” and the other player is the “Blocker” because they cannot win during this phase and must block their opponent from completing a path.

[0106] In Reverse Logic the initial inputs are considered outputs of unseen gates and must be included in a path for it to be complete. This is because they are not permanently set to either color. In fact, as will be seen in the next phase, no output is permanently set in Reverse Logic.

[0107] Phase III Replacement. As in the standard Logic Gate Game, the players begin Replacing logic gate tiles 13 once the game playing board is filled if no complete colored logic path exists. Unlike standard Logic though, in Reverse Logic the new logic gate does not change the output based on the inputs, the logic gate output and the new logic gate are used to determine the inputs instead; hence, the name “Reverse Logic”. If the existing inputs already satisfy the gate and output, the players turn ends.

[0108] If, on the other hand, the inputs do not work for the given logic gate and output the player is allowed to change the logic input pegs 19 one at a time in the input receptacles 15 on the game playing board 10 until they do. The player is not allowed to change both inputs if changing only one will make the logic gate yield the given logic output even if changing both will do the same.

[0109] An example of this situation is when the output of a NOR gate is GREEN and both inputs are RED. If the GREEN player replaces the NOR gate with an OR gate, one need only change one of the inputs to GREEN for the logic gate to work and yield the GREEN output. If the same situation existed and the player drew an AND gate instead of an OR gate, the player would have to make both inputs GREEN in order to yield the GREEN output. Once an input has been changed to satisfy the new logic gate and the given output, it too must be satisfied as an output in the same fashion. This process continues backwards until the initial row of inputs is reached. These are considered satisfied outputs no matter what color they end up with since the gates are not seen.

[0110] Next, there is a “bounce back” effect due to all the changes of the outputs/inputs as the logic gates are replaced. Some of the inputs that were changed to satisfy their logic gates and outputs branch off in two directions. This will affect the outputs of the other gates that these gates are inputs to. During this “bounce back” portion of the replacement logic tiles phase, the outputs are changed in like manner as the outputs would be changed in standard Logic. With the the “bounce back” effect, this can cause a cascade all the way to the top of the game playing board, the blocking player now has an equal opportunity to win.

[0111] The number of inputs/outputs which must be traced in a Reverse Logic replacement move necessitates the use of specially designed pegs as shown in FIG. 6 which have the ability to be placed in the holes when laid on the pegs' side as well as when the pegs are upright. Laying a peg 19 on its side indicates that it is still in play. Once the logic gates affected by the peg 19 as an input to the logic gates have had their outputs changed, the peg 19 can be stood up. Winning in Reverse Logic is accomplished by completing a continuous path of the player's color just as in standard Logic with one exception and that is this: the path in Reverse Logic must include the initial input row. To accomplish these remarkable feats, the specially-designed pegs 19 consist of a manual gripping portion 38, a vertical insertion element 39, and a horizontal insertion element 40. When the vertical insertion element 39 is inserted into the receptacle 15, the manual gripping portion 38 is disposed vertically with respect to the surface of the game playing board 10. On the other hand, when the horizontal insertion element 40 is inserted into the receptacle 15, the manual gripping portion 38 is disposed horizontally with respect to the surface of the game playing board 10.

Special Rules for “FuzzyGate”

[0112] During the fill phase of Reverse Logic and when replacing another gate with a “FuzzyGate” 29, the player is allowed to change BOTH inputs to whatever color is desired. This is also true when a “FuzzyGate” 29 is encountered while working one's way back after Replacing a logic gate above the “Fuzzy Gate” 29. However, in the “bounce back” portion of the replacement phase of Reverse Logic, the “FuzzyGate” rules of standard logic apply.

Playing Game Board Variations

[0113] Alternating Rows. The standard pyramid game playing board 10 design FIG. 1 does not have to be adhered to. FIG. 7 depicts a playing game board design with alternating rows of eight and seven gate spaces. In this variation there are seven final outputs, any one of which can be used to complete a player's path. Playing along the sides of the game playing board 10 will be to the player's advantage since it is possible to create a path with fewer logic gates. In this variation, the game playing board 10 width can be maintained while not limiting the length of the game playing board 10. Also, in this variation, the marked spaces 12 on the game playing board 10 for the placement of tile playing pieces 13 thereon are arranged in a plurality of alternating rows of marked spaces 12 thereon according to the mathematical series of (n) then (n−1) then (n) and continuing on, where n is a real number commencing with 2 and increasing to any number more than 2.

[0114] Stepping Down. A variation on the previous variation, FIG. 8 shows an example of what can be done by using the original design and the alternating rows together. The pattern in this example is 8-7-8-7-6-5-6-5-4-5-4-3-2 for a total of 13 rows. This design makes it harder to complete a path than the alternating rows while still allowing the flexibility of adding rows without widening the board 10, which is not possible in the triangle or pyramid board design.

[0115] Constant Width. Another feature that can be added to the mix is shown in FIG. 9. In the fourth, fifth and sixth rows from the top of this stepping down design the rows all have five spaces 12. Hence, it is described as having “constant width” because each of these rows consist of five spaces wherein the marked spaces 12 on the game playing board 10 for the placement of tile playing pieces 13 thereon are arranged in a plurality of alternating rows of marked spaces 12 thereon according to the mathematical series of (n+1), (n), (n+1), (n), (n), (n), (n−1), wherein n is a minimum of 2 and the number of marked spaces 12 in the last row cannot be less than [(n)−(n−1)].

[0116] This feature can be used in addition to the others to add even more flexibility in the design of the logic gate gaming board 10.

[0117] Dual Output Gates. FIG. 10 is a stepping down design with an interesting twist. Instead of the standard single logic gate output splitting to feed two logic gates as inputs. This design has two outputs from each logic gate. Specially designed logic gate tiles 13 are used with this variation. There are numerous possible gate designs for the game playing tiles 13. I have shown some of those possibilities on FIGS. 11A, 11B, 11C, 11D, 11E, 11F, and 11G.

[0118] All of the logic tile playing pieces 13 used in the standard logic gate game with the single output board designs can be made into dual output pieces. An example of this is found in the standard AND logic gate 25. As shown in FIG. 11A when the standard AND logic gate 25 is converted to a dual-input, dual-output AND logic gate 31. Other examples are depicted in FIG. 11B which depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output OR gate 32. FIG. 11C depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output CROSS-OVER gate 33. FIG. 11D depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output AND INVERT RIGHT gate 34. FIG. 11E depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output OR INVERT RIGHT gate 35. FIG. 11F depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output CROSSOVER INVERT R-L gate 36. FIG. 11G depicts a Truth Table for a dual-input, dual-output AND-OR gate 37. Obviously, some of the functions of these dual-input, dual-output logic gates cannot be accomplished by a dual-input, single-output logic gates. Examples of these are shown in FIGS. 11C, 11D, 11E, 11F, and 11G.

[0119] The outputs along the edges of the playing area are not used whenever a step down occurs in the spaces per row without a corresponding step up in the next row up. Starting from the bottom of the game playing board 10 shown in FIG. 10, rows 3 to 4, 4 to 5, and 7 to 8 show how the stepping down design would look with dual output logic symbol gaming board design. The outer dual output from the end tile spaces 12 in these rows does not connect to any tile space above it; therefore, these dual output tile spaces 12 have only one connected output instead of two connected outputs.

[0120] Separate Play Areas. The play area does not have to be one area used by all players. The players can each have their own areas on which they try to complete a path. Other players try to place a logic tile piece 13 on the other players' game boards when the player draws a logic tile piece 13 that he or she cannot beneficially play on his or her own game board 10. With this variation, all players can participate in trying to complete a path of the same color or they can each choose a color to clearly identify their game play both on their own game board 10 or the game boards of other players.

[0121] The choice can be purposed or by random selection. The separate play areas do not have to be physically attached to the same game playing board 10 although there is no reason why it certainly can't be so arranged.

Other Variations in the Logic Gate Board Game Play

[0122] Unrestricted Tile Placement: In the original rules for the logic gate board game play, the players must place a tile 13 drawn only in a space 12 which has at least one of the input holes 15 occupied by an input/output indicator piece, namely, a peg 19, as utilized in the preferred embodiment of the invention described in detail herein.

[0123] However, it should be clearly noted that the logic gate board game can also be played where the players are allowed to select the tile space to play a tile without this restriction.

[0124] Non-Random Peg Initialization: The original rules of the logic gate board game play dictate that the bottom row of indicator pieces, namely, pegs 19, be initialized or set-up prior to the commencement of play. However, this restriction can be eliminated to make the game even more challenging. For example, if the bottom row is not randomly initialized, that row can be included in the necessary rows to complete a logic path. The indicator pieces or pegs 19 can also be permanently initialized or set once a player sets them in the game board 10, or, alternatively, the pegs 19 can be changed during the tile replacement phase of the logic gate board game. The means whereby the pegs 19 used as indicator pieces can be set by the player such, as for example, during one or his or her turns, so as to purposely set one of the pegs 19 to the color of their selection.

[0125] Although the present invention has been described in accordance with the embodiments shown, one of ordinary skill in the art will recognized that there could be variations of the embodiment and those variations would be within the spirit and scope of the present invention. Therefore, although the present invention was described in terms of a particular verification system, one of ordinary skill in the art readily recognizes, that any number of parameters can be utilized and their use would be within the spirit and scope of the present invention. Accordingly, many modifications may be made by one of ordinary skill without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention, the scope of which is defined and limited only by the following claims.





 
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