Title:
Simple handle
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The usefulness of this invention is based on the building roof construction options it gives:

1. Very slow (three weeks) but very cheap; unskilled hand labor

2. Very fast (one Day) but very expensive, placing timber floor jacks every square yard.

With this invention those without money can still build houses.




Inventors:
Littleton, Earl Raymond (Pearland, TX, US)
Application Number:
10/443717
Publication Date:
11/25/2004
Filing Date:
05/23/2003
Assignee:
LITTLETON EARL RAYMOND
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/414
International Classes:
E04B5/36; (IPC1-7): E04B1/18
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
YIP, WINNIE S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
EARL LITTLETON (PEARLAND, TX, US)
Claims:
1. What I claim as my invention is procedure for supporting roof panels placing concrete strips on the top (SIC) of the covered wire mesh panels

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] NON-APPLICABLE

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

[0002] NON-APPLICABLE

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] The 3-d panel cannot just be placed on the roof and covered with 1.5 inch of concrete. The panels are stiff, but they are too weak to be treated like this. It is easy to see why:

[0004] 56 Square feet of a 14 foot by 4 foot panel

[0005] 8064 Square inches in this panel

[0006] 12096 Cubic inches of concrete at 14 feet by 4 feet by 1.5 inches

[0007] 0.087 Weight of 1 cubic inch of concrete at 150 pounds per cubic foot.

[0008] 1050 Weight of 1.5 inches concrete on a 14 foot by 4-foot panel.

[0009] There is just no way an unsupported, un-reinforced panel can hold a half ton of concrete in a straight configuration, or, indeed, to hold it at all. The panel will buckle and collapse before the 1.5-inch pour is completed. But 3-d panels can be used as a concrete covered roof. Placing the lightweight panels, of course, is no problem. Spraying the roof with concrete can to be successfully done in two different ways:

[0010] The fast expensive way is using 2×4 roof jacks with a 46″ cross T at the top. These are placed under each roof panel, (at considerable cost and labor), and set 3 feet apart down the length of the panel.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0011] Spraying the roof with concrete can to be successfully done in two different ways:

[0012] The fast expensive way is using 2×4 roof jacks with a 46″ cross T at the top.

[0013] These are placed under each roof panel, (at considerable cost and labor), and set 3 feet apart down the length of the panel, Or the very slow inexpensive way is to support the panel by putting concrete beams on top.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0014] The 3-d panel cannot just be placed on the roof and covered with 1.5 inch of concrete. The panels are stiff, but they are too weak to be treated like this. It is easy to see why:

[0015] 56 Square feet of a 14 foot by 4 foot panel

[0016] 8064 Square inches in this panel

[0017] 12096 Cubic inches of concrete at 14 feet by 4 feet by 1.5 inches

[0018] 0.087 Weight of 1 cubic inch of concrete at 150 pounds per cubic foot.

[0019] 1050 Weight of 1.5 inches concrete on a 14 foot by 4-foot panel.

[0020] There is just no way an unsupported, un-reinforced panel can hold a half ton of concrete in a straight configuration, or, indeed, to hold it at all. The panel will buckle and collapse before the 1.5-inch pour is completed. But 3-d panels can be used as a concrete covered roof. Placing the lightweight panels, of course, is no problem. Spraying the roof with concrete can to be successfully done in two different ways:

[0021] The fast expensive way is using 2×4 roof jacks with a 46″ cross T at the top. These are placed under each roof panel, (at considerable cost and labor), and set 3 feet apart down the length of the panel.

[0022] The very slow inexpensive way is to support the panel by putting concrete beams on the top. This seems insane at first glance, but it works very well. While the panel is on a flat surface on the ground, lay two 1 inch by 4 inch planks down the length of the panel, one inch apart. That is to say, leave a 1-inch gap between the planks. Position the planks so that the center of the gap is 6 inches from one side of the panel. The best way to hold the planks in position is with sealed plastic bags containing 25 pounds of sand. Now lay two more planks lengthwise with a 1-inch gap. Position the new planks so that the gap center is one foot from the gap center of the first two. Place 25 pound sand filled plastic bags the hold the new planks. Repeat this with two more planks, and then two more for a total of eight planks, producing four gaps one foot apart. The last two planks should end like the first two started, with the center of the gap 6 inches from the panel edge. When you have the eight planks held firmly on the panel, press high slump, high grade grout into the gaps. leaving no spaces or voids. When you pull the forms away the grout will stick up in the air % inch above the panel. These concrete beams give the panel great strength, but is still light enough to handle and pick up for placement on the roof. The problem with this technique is that it is so slow. You will need to wait until the beams gain strength, a week to ten days. You then must cast the roof in four stages, filling a fourth of the roof area at a time and waiting a week between each cast. The advantage is that it is very low skill and very cheap. You do not need to use floor jacks with these concrete strips. They will hold the weight of one fourth of the wet concrete. As each part is cast, the holding strength is increased.