Title:
System for enhancing the durability of wood construction
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A universal and integrated water barrier system for exterior wood construction is provided. The system includes a universal waterproofing strip material that is adaptable for use in all of the various connection conditions encountered in exterior construction. The strip material is adaptable for use as a joist cap that is applied over the joist members for use between the joists and deck boards, a beam cap for doubled framing support members and a ledger cap that acts as a flashing protecting the gap between the ledger and adjacent structure as well as the ledger itself. Further, a stair stair stringer base is provided for use on the bottom of stair stair stringers to prevent the bottom the stair stringer from resting in contact with the earth. The system overcomes the disadvantages found in the prior art by providing an effective and simple method of excluding water from the critical structural connections within the construction system.



Inventors:
Sheldon, Forrest W. (Saunderstown, RI, US)
Application Number:
10/842921
Publication Date:
11/18/2004
Filing Date:
05/11/2004
Assignee:
SHELDON FORREST W.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B1/00; E04B1/70; E04C3/12; (IPC1-7): E04C2/38
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LONEY, DONALD J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BARLOW, JOSEPHS & HOLMES, LTD. (PROVIDENCE, RI, US)
Claims:

What is claimed:



1. A rot resistant wood framed structure comprising: at least one wooden ledger member fastened to an adjacent support structure; at least one wooden beam member in spaced relation to said ledger board; a plurality of wooden joist members, wherein said ledger member and said beam member cooperate to support said joist members; a plurality of wooden decking members bearing on a top surface of said plurality of joist members; at least one stair stringer member extending from said structure to the ground beneath said structure; and a plurality of water impervious barrier members provided on a bearing surface of each of said ledger members, said beam members, said joist members and said stair stringer members.

2. The rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 1, said plurality of barrier members further comprising: a joist cap member configured to be installed on a top surface of a wooden joist framing member; a beam cap member configured to be installed on a top surface of a framing member formed from multiple joists fastened adjacent one another; a ledger flashing member configured to be installed in contact with an adjacent supporting structure and a top surface of said ledge member fastened to said supporting structure; a pan flashing member configured to be installed in an opening in an adjacent supporting structure, said pan flashing member extending through said opening and being in contact with a top surface of a ledger member; and a stair stringer support installed at a bottom end of a stair stringer to support said bottom end of said stair stringer and prevent said bottom end of said stair stringer from contacting the ground.

3. The rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 2, said stair stringer support further comprising: a body member having a top surface and a bottom surface, said body formed from a non-wood material; a raised support wall extending around the edge of said top surface, said support wall configured for engagement with the bottom end of said stair stringer whereby said support wall prevents water infiltration between said stair stringer support and the end of said stair stringer; and mounting members extending from said bottom surface of said stair stringer support, said mounting members configured for engagement with the ground.

4. The rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 3, said mounting members selected from the group consisting of: concrete hook anchors, concrete sleeve anchors, leveling bolts threadedly received into said bottom surface of said stair stringer support and flange connectors.

5. The rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 2, said joist cap member, said beam cap member, said ledger flashing member and said pan flashing member further comprising: a flexible, resilient strip having a length, a top surface and a bottom surface; a pressure sensitive adhesive layer on the bottom surface of said strip; and a fiber impregnating material applied to said top surface of said strip, wherein said strip is installed onto a top surface of each of said joists, beams, ledgers beneath said deck members and said fiber impregnating material penetrates the deck member preventing water migration between said deck member and said joists, beams and ledgers.

6. The rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 5, wherein said joist cap member has a width that is wider than the width of each of said joist members, said bottom bituminous layer including at least two score lines in parallel spaced relation extending longitudinally along the length of said barrier device, said score lines being spaced apart by a distance approximately equal to the width of said joist members to define a central region and two side regions, said score lines allowing said two side regions to be bent downwardly thereby allowing water to shed from the top of said joist cap member.

7. The rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 5, wherein said beam cap member has a width that is wider than the width of said beam member, said bottom bituminous layer including at least two score lines in parallel spaced relation extending longitudinally along the length of said barrier device, said score lines being spaced apart by a distance approximately equal to the width of said beam member to define a central region and two side regions, said score lines allowing said two side regions to be bent downwardly thereby allowing water to shed from the top of said joist cap member.

8. The rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 5, wherein said ledger flashing has a width that is wider than the width of said ledger member, said top and bottom bituminous layers each including at least one score line, said top and bottom score lines being in parallel spaced relation extending longitudinally along the length of said ledger flashing, said score lines being spaced apart by a distance approximately equal to the width of said ledger member to define a central region and first and second side regions, said first region adjacent said score line in said top surface allowing said first side region to be bent upwardly for installation against said adjacent supporting structure and said second side region adjacent said score line in said bottom surface allowing said second side region to be bent downwardly thereby allowing water to shed from the top of said ledger member away from said adjacent supporting structure.

9. The rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 5, wherein said pan flashing has a width that is wider than the width of the wall system of the adjacent structure, said top and bottom bituminous layers each including at least one score line, said top and bottom score lines being in parallel spaced relation extending longitudinally along the length of said ledger flashing, said score lines being spaced apart by a distance approximately equal to the width of said ledger member to define a central region and first and second side regions, said first region adjacent said score line in said top surface allowing said first side region to be bent upwardly at the back of an opening in said adjacent supporting structure and said second side region adjacent said score line in said bottom surface allowing said second side region to be bend downwardly thereby allowing water to shed from said opening in said adjacent supporting structure.

10. A water impervious barrier device for constructing rot resistant wood framed structures, said structures including at least one wood support member having a width and a top surface and at least one wood deck member supported by said top surface of said support member, said barrier device comprising: a flexible, resilient strip having a length, a top surface and a bottom surface; a pressure sensitive adhesive layer on the bottom surface of said strip; and a fiber impregnating material applied to said top surface of said strip, wherein said strip is installed onto said top surface of said support member between said joist member and said deck member and said fiber impregnating material penetrates the deck member preventing water migration between said deck member and said support member.

11. The water impervious barrier device of claim 10, said flexible resilient strip further comprising: a central reinforcing layer having a top surface and a bottom surface; a top bituminous layer applied to said top surface of said reinforcing layer; and a bottom bituminous layer applied to said bottom surface of said reinforcing layer.

12. The water impervious barrier device of claim 11, wherein said barrier device has a width that is wider than the width of said support member, said bottom bituminous layer including at least two score lines in parallel spaced relation extending longitudinally along the length of said barrier device, said score lines being spaced apart by a distance approximately equal to the width of said support member to define a central region and two side regions, said score lines allowing said two side regions to be bend downwardly thereby allowing water to shed from the top of said barrier device.

13. The water impervious barrier device of claim 11, wherein said support member is selected from the group consisting of: a joist, a beam and a ledger.

14. The water impervious barrier device of claim 11, further comprising: a curing agent integrated into said fiber impregnating material, said curing agent causing said fiber impregnating material to harden during prolonged exposure to air in regions wherein said deck members are not bearing on said support members, said fiber impregnating material forming a protective coating to shield said top bituminous layer against damage from abrasion and ultraviolet radiation exposure.

15. A stair stringer support for a rot resistant wood framed structure, said structure including at least one stair stringer member extending from said structure to the ground beneath said structure, said stair stringer support comprising: a body member having a top surface and a bottom surface, said body formed from a non-wood material; a raised support wall extending around the edge of said top surface, said support wall configured for engagement with a bottom end of said stair stringer whereby said support wall prevents water infiltration between said stair stringer support and the bottom end of said stair stringer; holes extending through said body to receive fasteners for fastening said stair stringer support to said stair stringer; and mounting members extending from said bottom surface of said stair stringer support, said mounting members configured for engagement with the ground.

16. The stair stringer support for a rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 15, said mounting members selected from the group consisting of: concrete hook anchors, concrete sleeve anchors, leveling bolts threadedly received into said bottom surface of said stair stringer support and flange connectors.

17. The stair stringer support for a rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 15, said raised support wall having a tapered cross sectional profile with a narrow top edge, said support wall penetrating into the end of said stair stringer member when said stair stringer support is fastened to said end of said stair stringer thereby preventing the infiltration of water between said stair stringer support and the end of said stair stringer member.

18. The stair stringer support for a rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 15, further comprising: a water impervious barrier material on said top surface of said stair stringer support.

19. The stair stringer support for a rot resistant wood framed structure of claim 18, said water impervious barrier material comprising: a flexible, resilient strip having a length, a top surface and a bottom surface; a pressure sensitive adhesive layer on the bottom surface of said strip; and a fiber impregnating material applied to said top surface of said strip, wherein said strip is installed onto said top surface of said stair stringer support between said stair stringer support and end of said stair stringer and said fiber impregnating material penetrates the end of the stair stringer preventing water migration between said end of said stair stringer and said stair stringer support member.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application is related to and claims priority from earlier filed provisional patent application No. 60/470,643, filed May 15, 2003.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The present invention relates generally to a new system for protecting the wood construction typically found within a deck. More specifically, this invention relates to components that are installed during construction that are adapted to reduce rotting of wood framing members resulting from moisture that is trapped between these members and the adjacent materials to which they are fastened. This is particularly the case in areas such as those at the supporting end of a joist or a supported flooring plank.

[0003] Outdoor structures, such as decks, gazebos, fences, furniture etc., are subject to a continuous cycle of harsh environmental conditions generated by mother nature including extensive and continuous exposure to ultraviolet radiation, heat, humidity, freeze/thaw cycles, rain and snow. This rapidly changing environment can have a large impact on the wood materials used and the connections made between the framing members causing degradation in the overall structure. The construction of this type of outdoor structure typically consists of, for example, a supporting structure formed of spaced joists or stair stringers, which in turn support decking that extends transverse to the direction of the joist supporting the decking. The supported decking is typically secured to the joist using standard fasteners, such as nails or screws, to obtain a sound structure. Further, to make connections to surrounding structure, such as to attach the structure to the side of an adjacent building, a ledger is connected in a similar fashion. Finally, stair stringers leading from the deck and ultimately resting on the ground are also provided to allow access onto and off the deck. Each one of these connections and contact points provides a potential problem area that could ultimately lead to a degradation of the deck and stair structure.

[0004] These connection areas are particularly susceptible to great stress, fatigue and eventual failure due to the nature of the wood material. Specifically, because of the nature of wood framing members, broad changes in temperature and humidity result in relatively high dimensional changes in the construction materials. When exposed to long periods of dry, cold weather the construction materials will shrink a great deal. When exposed to long periods of hot, humid weather or soaking rains, the construction materials will swell and expand. This movement is translated into the connections between all of the construction members causing the fasteners to move and the grain of the wood to open up allowing additional water infiltration.

[0005] Often the exposed decking material is stabilized and protected somewhat from the weather by treating, such as by staining and water sealing with commercially available products. Further, the joists are typically made using a treated lumber to achieve a structure with a satisfactory useful life. However, even when treated lumber is utilized for the joists, the joists will eventually rot due to the moisture which becomes trapped between the supported decking where it bears upon the joists. In addition, even though the ends of the joists are usually not directly exposed to the atmosphere, the porous properties of wood cause the framing members to act as a wick and pull moisture from rain or condensation under the decking thereby also facilitating rotting.

[0006] Many prior art systems are known to prevent moisture and humidity from migrating into a floor system from below, such as when a wood floor product is installed over a concrete basement floor. Typically, such a material is disposed between joists and the flooring to prevent moisture infiltration as well as to provide cushioning between the surfaces and to achieve a dampening of sound. For example, U.S. Pat. No. Re. 18,573 discloses a sound-deadening assembly where a felt strip is placed between a furring strip and the strips of flooring material. However, the felt strip in this application is not impermeable to water and is not effective to impede the rotting of the joist should it be utilized in an outdoor environment. Similarly, U.S. Pat. No. 3,385,018, issued to Harry teaches a support member that is particularly designed and dimensioned to conform to undulating surface of corrugated panels that are often used for walls, roofs etc. Disposed between each of the corrugated panels and the support member upon which they bear, there is an elastomeric filler strip of flexible, relatively dense material. The filler strip cushions the surfaces against one another, but does not serve to prevent moisture from becoming entrapped between the support member and the panels.

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 5,479,750 issued to Carlberg provides for the installation of a rigid plastic cap over the joist members before the installation of the deck members. The deck boards are then fastened in the traditional manner using screws or nails. This system has several drawbacks. First, the fasteners create punctures that are not sealed thereby still allowing water infiltration around the shaft of the fastener. Second, water flowing along the top of the cap is still entrapped beneath the deck boards. Finally, the system can only be applied to the single joist framing structural members and does not allow for larger members such as laminated or doubled up joists.

[0008] There is therefore a need for a material and system for constructing a wood framed exterior structure that provides improved durability and enhanced resistance against exposure to water. Further, there is a need for providing a means for constructing a wood structure that is rot resistant while further enhancing the overall performance of the entire structure.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] In this regard, the present invention provides for a universal and integrated water barrier system for exterior wood construction. The system includes a universal waterproofing strip material that is adaptable for use in all of the various connection conditions encountered in exterior construction. The strip material is adaptable for use as a joist cap that is applied over the joist members for use between the joists and deck boards, a beam cap for built-up framing support members and a ledger cap that acts as a flashing protecting the gap between the ledger and adjacent structure as well as the ledger itself. Similarly, the same concepts and materials in the present invention may also have applicability for use in numerous applications including but not limited to fence purlins and between various interconnected parts of outdoor furniture. Further, a stair stringer base is provided for use on the bottom of stair stringers to prevent the bottom of the stair stringer from resting in contact with the earth. The system overcomes the disadvantages found in the prior art by providing an effective and simple method of excluding water from the connections within the construction system.

[0010] Specifically, the present invention provides a membrane composition that is produced in strip form. In the preferred embodiment, the composition of the membrane includes two layers of resilient membrane material applied to the top and bottom of the strip and may optionally include a reinforcing scrim material. In this fashion, the pliable membrane is reinforced in a dimensionally stable product for use in the present invention. On the bottom of the membrane, a layer of pressure sensitive adhesive is provided for adhering the material to the structure being protected. On top of the membrane, an optional bonding layer is provided. The bonding layer is a key element of the present invention. When placed into a structure, the material of the present invention is installed on top of the structural support elements. The deck members are then placed over the membrane elements. The top layer of the membrane includes a pliable and flowable material that is pressed into firm contact with the underside of the deck members and slightly up into the gap between adjacent deck board members. When the material flows in this manner and ultimately cures, a seal is formed between the protective membrane and the deck member preventing water from flowing between the membrane and the deck member. Further, the flowable material includes a curing agent to allow the exposed material between the deck boards to cure and form a durable, impact and UV resistant coating. By excluding water in this fashion, the life of the deck member is greatly enhanced. As can be seen the membrane of the present invention thereby provides both an effective cap for the framing members located below as well as preventing the infiltration and entrapment of water between the membrane and the decking members installed on top thereof.

[0011] A further feature that differentiates the present invention from the prior art devices is that the membrane material is pliable and forms a seal around the locations where the fasteners are installed. This is important because the fasteners create a gap in the wood fibers that allows water infiltration. When the water is trapped in this manner, wood rot and damage from freeze/thaw cycles is accelerated. The membrane of the present invention is self-sealing around each of the fastener punctures to create a truly sealed assembly.

[0012] Each of the components of the present invention is tailored to the specific location in which it will be installed. The same material structure is employed but alternate configurations are utilized. For joist caps, the profile is slightly wider than the standard 1½″ dimension of standard framing lumber. Similarly for doubled framing members, the profile is slightly wider than 3″ and optionally includes an additional bead of flowable material on the centerline of the bottom side of the material to fill the gap between the sistered framing members. The material is further scored on the underside to allow the overhanging sides to bend slightly downwardly creating a drip edge and includes registration marks thereon to assist the installer in aligning the material with the framing members onto which it will be installed. The ledger flashing is fashioned from the same material construction but is configured to act as a flashing under the siding material and project over the top of the ledger board effectively protecting the connection between the ledger board and the adjacent construction to which it is attached. Finally, the pan flashing typically used in door thresholds is configured to form a pan beneath the door installation and includes means for positive drainage to the exterior of the structure on the threshold portion, and preformed corner pieces that interface with the threshold to seal the corners of the opening once the pan flashing is installed.

[0013] Additionally, the present invention discloses a rigid component for installation onto the bottom edge of a stair stringer member. Stair stringer base is a manufactured element that serves to isolate and elevate the stair stringer from contact with the ground allowing air circulation and reinforcing of the end of the stair stringer. Further, the base includes leveling screws or other fastening means such as inserts for casting into concrete to facilitate installation. The top portion of the stair stringer base includes periphery edges that extend upwardly to engage the bottom of the stair stringer member and further serve to provide a positive contact between the stair stringer bottom and a strip of membrane material provided on the top of the stringer base.

[0014] Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a novel structure for wood construction applications which require protection against water infiltration. It is a further object of the present invention to provide a unique sealant strip for use in wood construction applications to prevent water infiltration between the structural members. It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide a sealant strip material that includes a fiber impregnating material thereon which creates an impervious seal when installed between structural members of a wood structure. It is an even further object of the present invention to provide an integrated system for constructing a wood structure which includes a sealant assembly for preventing water infiltration between the structural members. It is yet a further object of the present invention to provide an integrated system for use in wood construction that includes components that shield all of the critical connections and structural intersections from the infiltration of water.

[0015] These together with other objects of the invention, along with various features of novelty which characterize the invention, are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed hereto and forming a part of this disclosure. For a better understanding of the invention, its operating advantages and the specific objects attained by its uses, reference should be had to the accompanying drawings and descriptive matter in which there is illustrated a preferred embodiment of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0016] In the drawings which illustrate the best mode presently contemplated for carrying out the present invention:

[0017] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the wood framing support for a deck including the waterproofing members of the present invention;

[0018] FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

[0019] FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

[0020] FIG. 4 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 1; and

[0021] FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0022] Now referring to the drawings, the system for enhancing the durability of exterior structures having wood frame construction is shown and generally illustrated in FIGS. 1-5. While the preferred embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in the context of a wooden framed deck structure, this disclosure is not meant to be limiting on the application for the present invention but illustrative on one potential application. Further, while this particular embodiment is shown in the context of a wood deck, the present disclosure would be equally applicable in any exterior wood framing environment where such a connection as is detailed is encountered, these structures may include but are not limited to, decks, gazebos, docks, stages, fences and furniture.

[0023] In general the generic components utilized in a wood framed structure are detailed in FIG. 1. The wood framed structure has a group of supporting structural members and a plurality of deck members extending over the supporting members to form a usable platform or surface. The primary supporting structural members are beams 2. Typically the beams 2 are formed from two or more pieces of dimensional framing lumber 4 joined or sistered together. The beams 2 are supported at their ends and occasionally at additional intermediated points by vertical support members 6. These vertical supports 6 may be posts as is shown in FIG. 1, or simply concrete piers upon which the bottom edge of the beams 2 rest. If the deck is free standing, the deck support will include at least two beams 2 in parallel spaced relation. If the deck is to be attached to an adjacent supporting structure 8, the deck will use at least one beam 2 on one side and in place of a second beam 2, a ledger board 10 will be mounted to the adjacent supporting structure 8 on the other side. The ledger board 10 is attached directly to the wall of the adjacent supporting structure 8 to create a rigid connection between the deck structure and the adjacent structure 8, such as a house.

[0024] A plurality of joist members 12 is installed to extend between the spaced apart beam members 2 or the beam and ledger members 10. The plurality of joists 12 may be installed on top of both the beam members 2 and ledger members 10 or on the same level as the beam 2 and ledger members 10, using construction means and techniques well known in the art. Further the joists 12 are rigidly fastened to these supporting members 2, 10.

[0025] The decking members 14 are then installed over the top of the entire structure spanning over and supported by a top supporting surface of each of the plurality of joists 12, beams 2 and ledgers 10. It is primarily the interface region where the deck members 14 contact these structural framing supports that is the concern of the present disclosure. These interface regions provide a region where water can become trapped resulting in the deterioration of the integrity of the wood structure.

[0026] Two additional areas of concern are at the bottom of the stair stringer framing member 16 and at openings 18 in the adjacent support structure 8. The stair stringer 16 supports a stairway that extends from the deck surface to the ground or second deck level beneath the deck. In most cases, the stair stringer 16 is supported directly on the ground 20 or on a concrete pad 22 at ground level. In either case, the bottom of the stair stringer 16 is in a location that allows the wood material to absorb a large quantity of water over an extended period of time. Additionally, where openings 18 are provided in the adjacent supporting structure 8 for access to the deck surface, such as patio doors, a special condition exists that requires a tailored flashing configuration to prevent water from infiltrating the adjacent structure 8.

[0027] Primarily, all of the framing members encountered in each one of the identified applications above is formed from wood. It is the nature of wood that the material is fibrous and susceptible to absorbing water into the fibrous structure. In particular, when water is maintained in a standing condition in contact with wood members for long periods of time, the wood will rot. The disclosure of the present invention is directed at protecting these susceptible regions in wood framed construction by preventing water migration between the various mated surfaces of the structural members.

[0028] The present invention provides a plurality of water impervious barrier members that are installed onto a bearing surface of each of the ledger members 10, beam members 2, joist members 12 and stair stringer members 16. The barrier members serve to protect their respective structural framing members by shielding the exposed surface of the members directly from contact with moisture and by preventing the migration of water into the connections between the structural members and the adjacent structures such as the deck members, the adjacent supporting structure or the ground.

[0029] Generally, the barrier members have two different constructions. The first general group of barrier members has a similar construction and is particularly suited for use as joist cap members 24, beam cap members 26, ledger flashing 28 and pan flashing. The second barrier member type is particularly suited for use as a stair stringer support member 30. While differing in actual construction, the application and purpose of the two different barrier members is the same. Specifically they are tailored to protect their respective framing support members from the adverse effects of prolonged exposure to standing water or against particular configurations resulting in water entrapment.

[0030] Turning now to FIGS. 2 and 3, the first group of barrier members is generally illustrated in the context of a joist cap flashing 24 and a beam cap flashing 26. The barrier member is a flexible resilient strip material configured for installation on top of a joist member 12 or a beam member 2 between the joist 12 or beam 2 and the decking members 14. The barrier member is preferably a resilient membrane and more preferably a strip of bituminous material 32, 34 with a pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) layer 38 on the bottom surface thereof and a fiber impregnating material 40 applied to a top surface thereof. To facilitate shipping and handling of the barrier members, a protective backing sheet will be applied to the top and bottom of the strip to maintain the integrity and cleanliness of the PSA 38 and the fiber impregnating material 40. In this manner, immediately prior to installation, the backing strip is removed from the bottom surface to expose the PSA 38 and the barrier member is placed onto the framing member using guidelines printed on the top protective strip. The PSA 38 accordingly adheres the barrier member to the respective framing member preventing it from becoming dislodged during subsequent construction operations. Similarly, immediately prior to the installation of the decking members 14, the protective backing strip is removed from the top surface of the barrier strip exposing the fiber impregnating material 40 and allowing it to contact the bottom surface of the decking members 14.

[0031] More preferably the barrier strips will be constructed having a central reinforcing layer 36 such as a fabric scrim, fiberglass mesh or UV stable plastic with a top 34 and bottom 32 bituminous layer applied thereto. While two particular constructions are detailed herein regarding the barrier members it can be appreciated that other constructions are possible and different layers may be added to tailor the product to other applications. In turn as was disclosed above, a PSA 38 layer is applied to the bottom surface of the bottom bituminous layer 32 and a fiber impregnating material 40 is applied to the top surface of the top bituminous layer 34. This particular construction provides a highly durable barrier strip material that has improved dimensional stability and can endure relatively rough handling on a construction site while maintaining its integrity when installed and facilitates control of the exposure and use of each of the various layers depending on the particular application.

[0032] In accordance with the present invention, the barrier strip members will be provided in widths that are slightly wider than the structural members to which they will be applied. As is generally known in the art, a dimensional framing member such as is used to form a joist 12 is typically 1½″ thick. Similarly, a beam 2 formed of two framing members 4 joined together is 3″ thick. When provided as a joist cap barrier member 24 the barrier strip will have a width that is slightly wider than the 1½″ thickness of the joist 12 while providing sufficient additional material to either side of the joist 12 to deflect water away from the joist member 12. Similarly, when provided as a beam cap barrier member 26 the barrier strip will have a width that is slightly wider than 3″. Further, in either of the above applications, the bottom layer of material may include longitudinal score lines 42 defining a central region 44 that corresponds to the width of the framing member and two side regions 46. The score lines 42 assist in aligning the barrier strip with the top of the framing member. Similarly guide or registration lines may be provided in the top release sheet to assist in aligning the barrier member. The score lines 42 also facilitate the bending of the side regions 46 relative to the central region 44. In this manner, when the installer installs the joist cap 24 or beam cap 26 on the top surface of the framing member, the side regions 46 can be bent slightly downward thereby allowing water to be shed off of the central region 44 of the barrier strip and downwardly along the side regions 46 where the water reaches a drip edge formed by the end of the side region. This configuration prevents the water from migrating upwardly between the barrier member and the top of the structural framing member and generally allows the water to drip clear of the side of the wood framing members.

[0033] Further, the barrier strip includes a fiber impregnating material 40 provided on the top surface thereof in the central region 44. When the decking members 14 are installed onto the barrier strips, the bottom surface of the deck members 14 are in contact with the fiber impregnating material 40. Preferably, the beads of fiber impregnating material 40 will be disposed transverse to the length of the barrier member. When fastened in place, the deck members 14 compress and distribute the fiber impregnating material 40 between the top surface 34 of the barrier strip and the bottom surface of the deck member 14. Additionally, the fiber impregnating material 40 penetrates and seals the wood fibers of the deck members 14. The fiber impregnating material 40 effectively forms a dam between the bottom surface of the deck members 14 and the top surface 34 of the barrier strips thereby preventing water infiltration at the connection. The fiber impregnating material 40 may further be provided with a curing agent that hardens the material after prolonged exposure to air. The curing agent causes the impregnating material 40 to harden in the areas where it is not in contact with a deck member 14 thereby forming an abrasion and ultraviolet radiation resistant coating over the top bituminous layer 34 of the barrier strip. Additionally, when used as a beam cap member 26, the barrier strip may include an additional bead of fiber impregnating material 48 applied to the center of the bottom surface 32. This bead of material 48 corresponds to the seam 50 between the two framing members 4 used to form the beam 2 and serves to form a waterproof dam between the two framing members 4 used to fabricate the beam 2.

[0034] Finally, the resilient nature of the bituminous layers 32, 34 provides the additional feature of being self healing or self flashing when punctured. This feature is particularly useful when the deck members 14 are fastened to the support members using screws or nails. When the fastener is installed, the fastener punctures the barrier member. The resilient nature of the barrier member causes the material adjacent the puncture to contract around the shaft of the fastener thereby waterproofing each fastener installation.

[0035] The barrier member can also be formed into a specialty configuration for use in flashing a ledger board against an adjacent supporting structure. Turning to FIG. 4, a barrier strip formed for use as a ledger flashing 28 is shown. In this application, one score 42 is made in the bottom bituminous layer 32 and the second score 52 is made in the top bituminous layer 34. The scores 42, 52 are spaced apart at a distance corresponding to the thickness of the ledger member 10. The opposing scores 42, 52 allow one of the side regions 46 to be bent downwardly over the edge of the ledger 10 as was described above relative to joist 24 and beam cap 26 members. The other edge region 54 is scored to allow it to be bent upwardly as a flashing against the wall of an adjacent support structure 8. When the siding is installed over the upwardly bent portion 54 of the flashing a complete flashing system is provided preventing water from infiltrating between the ledger 10 and the adjacent support structure 8 as well as preventing water from infiltrating the adjacent support structure 8 itself. When an opening 18 is provided in the adjacent support structure 8, such as an opening 18 for a patio door, an additional pan flashing member 51 is provided that has a lip 53 that extends over and counter flashes the upwardly bent portion 54. The base 55 of the pan flashing 51 provided with means for positive drainage in the base 55 of the pan flashing 51 that directs water towards the exterior of the structure causing positive drainage from under the threshold 57 of the door that is installed into the opening 18 in the adjacent structure 8. Corner members 59 are also provided to enhance the performance of the pan flashing 51 and prevent migration of water laterally off the sides of the pan flashing 51.

[0036] The second category of barrier members is the stair stringer support member 30. The stair stringer support member 30 has a polymer or metallic body with a top 56 and bottom surface 58. The stair stringer support 30 is configured and arranged to be installed onto the bottom of a stair stringer 16 framing member to rigidly support the stair stringer 16 and prevent the stair stringer 16 from contacting the ground 20 or the contact pad where the bottom of the stair is to terminate. The top surface of the stair stringer support 56 has a wall 60 extending upwardly therefrom. The wall 60 has a tapered profile ending in a knife-like edge. When the stair stringer support 30 is installed onto the bottom of the stair stringer 16, the wall 60 engages the bottom of the stair stringer 16 to prevent water from infiltrating between the top surface 56 of the stair stringer support 30 and the bottom of the stair stringer 16. Holes 62 are provided through the body of the stair stringer support 30 so that fasteners 64 can be installed to firmly attach the stair stringer support 30 to the stair stringer 16. It is anticipated that as the fasteners 64 are installed, they will draw the stair stringer support 30 tightly against the base of the stair stringer 16 causing the wall 60 to penetrate more deeply into the stair stringer 16. Further, the present invention provides that a strip of bituminous barrier strip be installed at this location to further enhance the seal and prevent the migration of water.

[0037] The bottom surface 58 of the stair stringer support member 30 includes holes therein to receive mounting members 66 to facilitate the stair stringer support 30 interface with the adjacent ground 20. The mounting members 66 may be concrete hook anchors that are cast into a concrete pad when formed, concrete sleeve anchors that are drilled into concrete after it is cured, leveling bolts threadedly received into said bottom surface of said stair stringer support 30 or flange connections for attaching to additional wood supports such as another deck level.

[0038] It can therefore be seen that the present invention provides a novel integrated system for constructing a rot resistant wood framed structure that provides superior water sealing properties and a novel construction for preventing water from migrating into the critical joints of the wood structural members. Further, the present invention can be modified to accommodate any conceivable number of different wood framed structures to create a highly improved and durable structure. For these reasons, the present invention is believed to represent a significant advancement in the art, which has substantial commercial merit.

[0039] While there is shown and described herein certain specific structure embodying the invention, it will be manifest to those skilled in the art that various modifications and rearrangements of the parts may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the underlying inventive concept and that the same is not limited to the particular forms herein shown and described except insofar as indicated by the scope of the appended claims.