Title:
Low gas flow in-line orifice assembly
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A low gas flow in-line orifice assembly adapted for use with a gas-fueled device is disclosed. The orifice assembly comprises an elongate body formed about a longitudinal axis with a first end and a spaced second end. A bore is defined within and extends in the lengthwise direction of the body. An orifice is positioned within the bore, and is sized and shaped to meter the gas flow passed therethrough and to also at least partially induce the condensation of any condensates, vapors, aerosols, or entrained particulates that may be present in the gas flow, upstream of the orifice. The body of the orifice assembly is constructed and arranged to be removably placed in fluid communication with a gas supply line feeding the device. A removable filter cartridge may also be positioned within the bore upstream of the orifice, as desired.



Inventors:
Schmidt, Frank (Mulvane, KS, US)
Application Number:
10/417472
Publication Date:
10/21/2004
Filing Date:
04/15/2003
Assignee:
SCHMIDT FRANK
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F23D11/00; F23K5/00; (IPC1-7): F23D11/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
YUEN, JESSICA JIPING
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LEYDIG, VOIT & MAYER, LTD. (CHICAGO, IL, US)
Claims:

I claim:



1. An orifice assembly for use with a gas fueled device, the device having a supply of a pressurized gas, a gas end-use device, and a gas supply line extended in fluid communication between the gas supply and the end-use device; said orifice assembly comprising: a body formed about a longitudinal axis, the body having a first end and a spaced second end; a bore extending in the lengthwise direction of the body from the first end to the second end thereof; the body being placed in fluid communication with the gas supply line so that the bore communicates with the gas supply line whereby the gas flows therethrough; and an orifice positioned within the bore and through which the gas is passed, the orifice being sized and shaped to meter the gas passed therethrough and to at least partially induce the condensation of any condensates that may be present in the gas, upstream of the orifice.

2. The orifice assembly of claim 1, wherein the body is constructed and arranged to be removably placed in fluid communication with the gas supply line intermediate the gas supply and the end-use device

3. The orifice assembly of claim 1, the orifice defining an opening having a diameter of approximately six thousandths of an inch.

4. The orifice assembly of claim 3, the orifice having a length in the range of from about eight thousandths of an inch to about ten thousandths of an inch.

5. The orifice assembly of claim 1, the bore comprising a first bore extending from the first end of the body to the orifice and a second bore extending from the orifice to the second end of the body.

6. The orifice assembly of claim 5, the diameter of the first bore being greater than the diameter of the second bore.

7. The orifice assembly of claim 5, the first bore terminating in a frustoconical point.

8. The orifice assembly of claim 1, the body being comprised of a non-ferrous material.

9. The orifice assembly of claim 1, the body being comprised of a stainless steel.

10. The orifice assembly of claim 1, the body being comprised of a plastic material.

11. The orifice assembly of claim 1, further comprising a filter cartridge positioned within the bore upstream of the orifice.

12. The orifice assembly of claim 11, said filter cartridge being removably received within the bore.

13. An orifice assembly for use with a gas consuming device, said assembly comprising: a supply of gas; a gas end-use device; a gas supply line extended between and in fluid communication with each of the gas supply and the end-use device; and an orifice positioned in the gas supply line intermediate the gas supply and the end-use device, said orifice being constructed and arranged for removable placement in fluid communication with the gas supply line.

14. The assembly of claim 13, the supply of gas comprising a liquid propane storage device.

15. The assembly of claim 14, the propane storage device comprising a refillable gas cylinder.

16. The assembly of claim 14, the propane storage device comprising a disposable gas cylinder or bottle.

17. The assembly of claim 13, the end-use device comprising a burner.

18. The assembly of claim 13, further comprising a gas pressure regulator in fluid communication with the supply of gas and the gas supply line.

19. The assembly of claim 18, wherein the regulator passes the gas from the supply of gas into the gas supply line at a pressure of approximately one-third of a pound per square inch.

20. The orifice assembly of claim 18, said orifice being placed in the gas supply line intermediate the regulator and the end-use device.

21. The assembly of claim 13, wherein the orifice is sized and shaped to meter the gas passed therethrough and to at least partially induce the condensation of any condensates that may be present in the gas, upstream of the orifice.

22. The assembly of claim 13, said orifice comprising: a body formed about a longitudinal axis, the body having a first end and a spaced second end; and a bore extending in the lengthwise direction of the body from the first to the second end thereof; the orifice being disposed within the bore.

23. The assembly of claim 22, said body further comprising a first helical thread defined on and extending about the exterior periphery of the first end of the body, and a second helical thread defined on and extending about the exterior periphery of the second end of the body.

24. The assembly of claim 23, the gas supply line of the assembly further comprising a first end having a first fastener affixed thereto having threads complimentary to the first helical thread defined on the orifice body, and a second end having a second fastener affixed thereto having threads complimentary to the second helical thread defined on the orifice body, wherein the first end of the gas supply line is fastened to the first end of the orifice body, and wherein the second end of the gas supply line is fastened to the second end of the orifice body.

25. An orifice assembly comprising: An elongate body formed about a longitudinal axis; the body having a first end and a spaced second end; an elongate bore defined within the body and extending in the lengthwise direction thereof; and an orifice positioned within the bore; wherein said bore comprises a first bore extending from the first end of the body to the orifice and a second bore extending from the orifice to the second end of the body; and wherein the orifice is constructed and arranged to meter a gas passed therethrough and to at least partially induce the condensation of any condensates that may be present in the gas, upstream of the orifice.

26. The assembly of claim 25, further comprising a pressurized supply of gas, an end-use device, and a gas supply line extending in fluid communication with and between each of the gas supply and the end-use device, respectively.

27. The assembly of claim 25, said orifice defining an opening having a diameter of approximately six thousandths of an inch.

28. The assembly of claim 27, said orifice having a length in the range of from about eight thousandths to about ten thousandths of an inch.

29. The assembly of claim 25, the diameter of the first bore being greater than the diameter of the second bore.

30. The assembly of claim 29, the first bore terminating in a frustoconical point communicating with said orifice.

31. The assembly of claim 30, said orifice extending coaxially along said longitudinal axis.

32. The assembly of claim 25, further comprising a tool engaging surface defined on at least a portion of the exterior periphery of the body intermediate the ends thereof.

33. The assembly of claim 25 wherein the body is constructed and arranged to be removably placed in sealed fluid communication with the gas supply line intermediate the gas supply and the end-use device.

34. The assembly of claim 25, the body being comprised of a non-ferrous material.

35. The assembly of claim 25 further comprising a filter cartridge positioned within the bore intermediate the first end of the body and the orifice.

36. The assembly of claim 35, said filter cartridge being removably received within the bore.

37. A method of removing condensates, aerosols, vapors, or particulates that may be present within a gas flow, comprising the steps of: passing the gas flow through a gas supply line toward an end-use device; positioning an orifice assembly in fluid communication with the gas supply line upstream of the end-use device; and passing the gas through an orifice positioned within the orifice assembly so as to meter the gas passed therethrough and to also cause at least a portion of the condensates that may be present in the gas stream to condense within the gas supply line, or the orifice assembly, upstream of the orifice.

38. The method of claim 37, the step of passing the gas flow through the gas supply line further comprising the step of regulating the gas flow so that the gas passes through the orifice at a pressure of approximately one-third of a pound per square inch.

39. The method of claim 37, the step of passing the gas flow through the gas supply line toward the end-use device further comprising the steps of supplying the gas from a storage container of liquefied propane and vaporizing the liquid propane into gaseous propane as the propane is passed from the storage container into the gas supply line.

40. The method of claim 37, the step of positioning the orifice assembly within the gas supply line further comprising the step of removably placing the orifice assembly in fluid communication with the gas supply line.

41. The method of claim 37, further comprising the step of placing a filter in the orifice assembly upstream of the orifice.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The invention relates in general to gas fueled devices. More particularly, the present invention relates to an orifice assembly adapted for use with a low gas pressure or low velocity gas flow, respectively, passed toward a propane gas fueled or powered device.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] The use of a great many types of propane fueled devices, to include for example camp stoves, lanterns, heaters, outdoor barbeque grills, and weed burners, are known. The great majority of these devices are supplied with propane from either a 20 pound refillable gas cylinder or a disposable storage bottle where the gas is typically passed at a relatively high flow rate and operating pressure to the burner such that the gas supply is exhausted relatively quickly.

[0003] Additionally, most propane fueled devices use a carburetor or other gas metering or throttling apparatus which typically includes an orifice in close proximity to the burner. One such example of a conventional orifice and burner assembly is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 4,759,339, assigned to the Coleman Company, Inc. of Wichita, Kans., which discloses a single burner propane camp stove having an orifice formed as a part of the burner assembly.

[0004] However, the use of a new type of a propane-fueled device, for example an insect trap, has been developed in which the device uses a low gas flow rate, for example no more than approximately {fraction (1/3)} of a pound per square inch operating pressure, as only minimal amounts of heat are required to be generated for heating an insect attractant or bait. One example of such a device is the Mosquito Deleto™ series of flying insect traps manufactured and distributed by the Coleman Company, Inc.

[0005] Another example of such a device is seen in U.S. Pat. No. 6,145,243, which discloses a method and device for producing carbon dioxide gas used to trap insects. As disclosed in the '243 patent, the device uses a catalytic burner to generate carbon dioxide. The catalytic burner is provided with the propane as the fuel gas fed to the burner through a carburetor assembly, which assembly includes a restrictor, i.e., an orifice, as an integral part thereof. The carburetor assembly is enclosed within a housing provided as a part of the device.

[0006] Due, therefore, to the fact that an insect trap type of a propane fueled device operates at such relatively low gas pressures, a 20 pound propane cylinder could last in the range of anywhere from one to three months of operation. The possibility becomes very real then that any condensates present within the gas line may gather and collect on the inside of the supply line, and more particularly bridge across and thus effectively seal or block the orifice. Moreover, turning the gas supply off and back on in such an instance will not typically clear the obstruction out of the orifice, as the pressure of the gas flow does not have enough velocity or force to blow or clear this type of an obstruction from out of the orifice. This problem is further complicated by the fact that the orifice is typically disposed within or as a part of the burner assembly, and access thereto is further restricted by the enclosure or housing within which the burner is held, thus making it somewhat difficult to gain access to the orifice for cleaning, repair, or replacement.

[0007] For example, where a relatively high volume usage of propane gas occurs, the propane gas is exhausted from the supply relatively quickly and any condensates or liquids that may be present in the line, i.e., any vapors or aerosols, would be vented from the line, and thus the device, when the propane gas supply is replaced. However, in low flow applications, as the propane cylinder may be attached to the gas supply line for upwards of three months, there is no such opportunity for aerosols, vapors, or liquids to be vented or otherwise passed from the gas supply line, and thus the greater proclivity of these materials to bridge across and block the orifice that occurs in the more widely known high volume, high pressure propane gas applications.

[0008] What is needed, therefore, but seemingly unavailable in the art, is an improved orifice assembly for use with either a low pressure gas flow and/or a low velocity gas flow, respectively, which orifice assembly will be more resistant to blockage of the orifice in usage, and which may be readily removed and replaced or cleaned, as desired, and is adapted for use in either new or retrofit applications.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] The present invention provides an improved orifice assembly that may be placed in-line and used in low pressure gas flow applications, and which overcomes some of the design deficiencies of the known art.

[0010] In a first embodiment, the invention discloses an orifice assembly adapted for use with a gas fueled device conventionally supplied with a pressurized gas flow, a gas end-use device, for example a burner, and a gas supply line extended in fluid communication between the gas supply and the end-use device. The orifice assembly comprises an elongate body formed about a longitudinal axis, the body having a first end and a spaced second end. The body of the orifice assembly is constructed so as to be removably placed in fluid communication with the gas supply line if so desired.

[0011] A bore extends in the lengthwise direction of the body, and is constructed to allow for the bore to be placed in fluid communication with the gas supply line so that the gas flow passes therethrough. An orifice is positioned or formed within the bore, which orifice may be coaxially disposed along the longitudinal axis of the body. The orifice is sized and shaped so as to meter the gas passed therethrough and to also at least partially induce the condensation of any condensates, e.g., aerosols, vapors, or any entrained particulates, that may be present in the gas, upstream of the orifice.

[0012] In another embodiment, the orifice assembly may have a filter cartridge positioned within the bore upstream of the orifice, which filter cartridge may be removably received within the bore.

[0013] A method of removing condensates, aerosols, vapors, and/or entrained particulates that may be present within a gas flow is also taught by the present invention. In a preferred embodiment, the method includes the steps of passing the gas flow through a gas supply line toward an end-use device, positioning an orifice assembly in the gas supply line upstream of the end-use device, and passing the gas flow through an orifice in order to meter the gas flow as it passes therethrough and to also cause at least a portion of any condensates and/or particulates that may be present in the gas flow or stream to condense within the gas supply line, or the orifice assembly, upstream of the orifice.

[0014] It is, therefore, an object of the invention to provide an improved orifice assembly, and methods of use.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0015] FIG. 1 is a cross-sectioned plan view of a preferred embodiment of the orifice assembly of the invention.

[0016] FIG. 2 is a partial cross-sectioned plan view of an alternate embodiment of the orifice assembly of the invention.

[0017] FIG. 3 is a cross-sectioned plan view of the orifice assembly of FIG. 1 having a filter cartridge placed within the bore thereof.

[0018] FIG. 4A is a partial cross-sectioned plan view of a first exemplary orifice construction for use with the orifice assembly of the invention.

[0019] FIG. 4B is a partial cross-sectioned plan view of a second exemplary orifice construction for use with the orifice assembly of the invention.

[0020] FIG. 4C is a partial cross-sectioned plan view of a third exemplary orifice construction for use with the orifice assembly of the invention.

[0021] FIG. 4D is a partial cross-sectioned plan view of a fourth exemplary orifice construction for use with the orifice assembly of the invention.

[0022] FIG. 5 is a schematic illustration of an illustrative gas fueled or powered system in which the orifice assembly of the invention may be used.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0023] Referring now in detail to the drawings, in which like reference characters indicate like parts throughout the several views, a first embodiment of an orifice assembly 5 of the invention is illustrated in FIG. 1. The orifice assembly is comprised of an elongate body 7 formed about a longitudinal axis 8 and has a first end 10 and a spaced second end 11. A first helical thread 13 is defined on and extends about the exterior periphery of the first end of the body, and a second helical thread 14 is defined on and extends about the exterior periphery of the second end of the body. A tool engaging surface or flat 15 is also defined on and extends about the exterior periphery of the body intermediate the ends thereof, and may be conventionally formed to be hexagonal in shape if viewed along a cross-section (not illustrated) of the body.

[0024] An elongate bore 17 is defined within the body 7 and extends from the first end to the second end thereof. Positioned within the bore, preferably coaxially about the longitudinal axis 8, is an orifice 18 which forms a first bore 19 and a second bore 21 within the bore 17. As shown, the first bore extends from the first end of the body to the orifice, whereas the second bore extends from the orifice to the second end of the body.

[0025] As illustrated in FIG. 1, the first bore 17 may terminate in a frustoconical point 22, i.e., a drilled point, formed at and leading or feeding into the orifice 18. Similarly, a frustoconical point is defined where the second bore extends from the orifice. In an alternate embodiment, illustrated in FIG. 2, a flat milled surface 23 may be formed as the termination point of the first bore at the orifice, and a second flat milled surface 23′ may serve as the beginning of the second bore 21, all dependent upon the method of fabrication used in forming the bore 17, and in particular the first and second bores thereof, as well as the orifice 18.

[0026] As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the orifice 18 is formed as an integral part of the body of the orifice assembly. This is preferably accomplished by drilling the orifice with a suitably sized drill, dependent upon the dimensioned or specified size of the orifice, as described in greater below.

[0027] Referring now to FIG. 3, a removable filter cartridge assembly 25 may optionally be positioned within the first bore 19, upstream of the orifice 18. The filter cartridge assembly 25 is conventionally fashioned and has a filter cartridge frame 26 with a suitable filter media 27 used therein. The filter cartridge assembly may be permanently positioned within the bore of the orifice assembly should it be intended that the orifice assembly be used until the filter cartridge of the orifice becomes plugged or fouled and then replaced; or, if preferred, the filter cartridge assembly can be constructed to be removable for replacement from within the bore, as desired. The filter cartridge assembly 25, and in particular the filter media 27 thereof, is formed to assist in removing any condensates, i.e., any aerosols, vapors, entrained particulates, or liquids, and may be present within the vaporous gas as it is passed to the first bore of the body, and toward the orifice of the assembly.

[0028] Referring now to FIGS. 4A through 4D, four alternate embodiments of an externally fabricated orifice for use with the orifice assembly of the invention are illustrated for those instances where the orifice is not integrally formed as a part of the body of the orifice assembly. Turning first to FIG. 4A, an externally fabricated orifice unit 28 is shown comprised of a block 29 having an orifice inlet 30 defined therein, an orifice 32 in communication with the inlet 30, and an orifice outlet (or second bore) 33 in communication with the downstream end of the orifice 32. The orifice unit 28 is passed into the bore from the second end 11 of the body, and is received against an annular ring or stop 34 defined within or otherwise inserted into the bore. Once the orifice unit 28 is inserted into the bore 17, it defines the first bore 19 and the orifice outlet 33 serves to define and act as the second bore. It is also anticipated, although not illustrated, that the orifice unit 28 of FIG. 4A could be press fit, for example, through a suitable interference fit, into the bore defined within the body, as desired.

[0029] Referring now to FIG. 4B, an alternate construction of the externally fabricated orifice unit 28 is illustrated, in which the block 29 has a first keyway 36 defined therein, and a correspondingly sized and shaped second keyway 37 is defined within the second end 11 of the body 7. Once the orifice unit 28 is inserted into the bore at the second end of the body, a suitably sized and shaped key 38 is passed into the first and second keyways, once aligned, for securing the orifice assembly in position within the bore. Yet another construction of the externally fabricated orifice unit 28 is illustrated in FIG. 4C in which the second end 11 of the body 7 has been counter-bored such that a continuous annular shoulder or ring 40 is defined within the bore and serves as a suitable stop against which the orifice unit 28 is received, the block 29 being correspondingly sized to be received within the counter-bore.

[0030] Another externally fabricated orifice unit 42 is illustrated in FIG. 4D, in which the orifice unit is comprised of an annular plate 43 having an orifice 44 defined therein, which orifice plate is passed into the second end 11 of the body, and into the bore 17, thus defining the first bore 19 and the second bore 21 therein. The orifice plate may be press fit within the bore, or may be formed of any of the constructions for the orifice unit 28 illustrated in FIGS. 4A through 4C. Moreover, although not illustrated, it is anticipated that the filter cartridge assembly 25 (FIG. 3) could also be constructed in the same fashion as are the several embodiments of the orifice unit described above for being received within the bore at the first end of the body.

[0031] The orifice assembly 5 is preferably comprised of a non-ferrous material, which may include, but is not limited to, brass or bronze. Additionally, the orifice assembly may be formed of a suitable stainless steel, or where code permits out of a suitable plastic material.

[0032] An exemplary gas fueled system 50 is illustrated in FIG. 5, with which the orifice assembly 5 of this invention may be used. A supply of a pressurized gas, for example, propane, is held within a gas supply illustrated schematically at 52. The gas supply may thus comprise a 20 pound refillable propane cylinder as known, or may comprise a disposable propane cylinder or bottle, where and as appropriate. A conventional and otherwise known type of a pressure regulator 53 is in communication with the gas supply, and is used to regulate the gas pressure to the desired operating pressure based on the type of end use contemplated. Where, for example, the orifice assembly is being used with a propane fueled insect trap, it is anticipated that the pressure regulator will throttle the propane gas down to an operating pressure of approximately 0.30 to 0.40 pounds per square inch.

[0033] A gas supply line 54 extends in fluid communication with the pressure regulator 53 and the orifice assembly 5. By way of example and not of limitation, the gas supply line may comprise a flexible hose formed in conventional fashion, and may further comprise a UL approved, stainless steel wire outer braided gas hose approved for use with fuel gases.

[0034] A first ferrule assembly 56 is received at the first end of the gas supply line that is extended toward, and placed in fluid communication with the first end 10 of the body 7. The ferrule assembly 56 is formed in conventional fashion, and will preferably be a brass ferrule resistant to a 200 pound pull test, as known. The ferrule assembly 56 therefore has a nipple 57 received within the open end of the gas supply line, the nipple also having a seat 58 which is complimentarily sized and shaped for receiving the first end 10 of the body 7 therein. The nipple is affixed to the end of the gas supply line with a crimped fastener 60 in known fashion, the fastener also serving to secure a loose fitting ferrule nut 61 thereon. The ferrule nut has a helical thread 62 defined therein, the thread being complimentary to the thread 13 defined at the first end of the body 7. The ferrule nut also includes a suitable tool engaging surface 64 defined thereon, which again may be a hexagonally shaped tool engaging surface when shown in cross-section (not illustrated).

[0035] A second ferrule assembly 66 is provided at the second end 11 of the body 7. The ferrule assembly 66 thus has a nipple 67 received within an open end of the gas supply line or hose 54 extended toward an end use device 76. The nipple has a seat 68 defined therein, the seat being complimentary in size and shape to the second end 11 of the body 7. The nipple is affixed to the gas supply line by a suitable crimped fastener 70, and a loose fitting ferrule nut 71 is held by the fastener on the ferrule assembly. The ferrule nut has a continuous helical thread 72 defined therein which is complimentary to the thread 14 defined at the second end of the body, and a tool engaging surface 74 along the exterior periphery thereof. The end use device 76 may comprise any desired type of gas consuming device, which by example and not by way of limitation, may include a stove or cooking element, or a catalytic burner or heater which may be used with an insect trap.

[0036] As known, where the gas is supplied from a twenty pound refillable propane gas tank, for example, and the device/system is being used in relatively warm ambient temperature conditions, it is expected that as the propane vaporizes while being passed from the supply tank into the gas supply line that the vaporized gas will be cooled as a part of the gas vaporization process. Although this is not a problem in itself, where the ambient temperature(s) are somewhat warmer than the temperature of the cooled gas, and the device is operated for relatively long time periods of continuous operation in a low gas flow condition, it has been observed that condensation of some of the vaporized gas within the gas supply line or fueling system may occur due to these temperature differences coupled with the dwell time of the vaporous gas within the gas supply line.

[0037] Accordingly, when supplying a low pressure gas flow from a twenty pound propane or other gas storage cylinder, or other high volume gas supply devices or sources, to include a pressurized commercial gas supply, over a continuous period of time, the gas supply could last in the range of anywhere from one to three months of operation. The likelihood that condensates will gather and collect on the inside of the gas supply line, and will bridge across and thus effectively seal or block the orifice becomes quite real. In contrast, in high gas flow applications, the supply tank is exhausted in a relatively short period of time, and any condensates in the gas supply line will likely be drained or vented to atmosphere while changing out gas supply. By placing the orifice assembly 5 of the invention in the gas supply line upstream of the end-use device, any problems that may occur with orifice blockage due to the long term usage of the gas supply have been minimized in that the orifice assembly can be readily removed by loosening the ferrule nuts and then cleaning and reinstalling the orifice assembly, or by discarding and replacing the assembly, dependent on the desires of the user.

[0038] The orifice 18 in all of the embodiments of the invention is sized and shaped to meter or control the velocity of the gas passed therethrough toward a downstream device, for example, a burner. A second and unique function of the orifice assembly of this invention, in each of its disclosed embodiments, is to at least partially cause or induce the condensation of any condensates, to include vapors, aerosols, liquids, and/or entrained particles, to occur and be collected in the gas supply line 54 and/or the body 7, within the first bore 19, upstream of the orifice. This occurs due to the fact that the orifice is sized and shaped to cause the gas to dwell within the gas supply line upstream of the orifice, thus permitting or otherwise inducing any condensates or entrained particulates in the gas flow to at least partially settle out and collect on the inner wall or surface of the gas supply line, and/or the first bore of the orifice assembly.

[0039] Accordingly, the orifice preferably will at least partially cause any condensation that may occur within the gas supply lines/feed system to take place at a selected location, namely within the gas supply line or hose 54 or the first bore 19 of the orifice assembly rather than passing the condensates through and perhaps otherwise fouling the orifice. It is believed that the problem with the vaporized propane gas lies in the hexanes of the vaporous gas, especially when subjected to being passed under low pressures for prolonged periods of time through a gas supply line where relatively higher ambient temperatures are present such that the hexanes tend to condense out of the vaporous propane within the gas supply line. Although hexanes are described here, however, this situation could arise from the condensation of any of the hydrocarbon components within any type of a hydrocarbon based fuel gas vapor, here propane, to include not only hexane, but also pentane or any particulate matter that may entrained within the gas flow.

[0040] Accordingly, in heretofore unknown fashion, should condensation occur within the system, and should it bridge across the orifice 18, a user may loosen the ferrule assemblies 56 and 66, respectively, and remove and replace the orifice assembly, or clean and reinstall the orifice assembly, as desired. The user will not otherwise be required to gain access to an orifice formed as a part of a burner assembly housed or enclosed within the device.

[0041] In a preferred embodiment, the orifice 18 will preferably have a diameter of approximately six thousandths of an inch (0.15 mm), and will preferably have a depth or length in the range of from approximately eight thousandths of an inch (0.20 mm) to ten thousandths of an inch (0.30 mm). This range of orifice dimensions is particularly suited for use with an insect trap type of propane gas fueled device in which the gas is passed from the gas supply and through the system at an operating pressure of approximately {fraction (1/3)} PSI.

[0042] Although the orifice assembly of the invention has been described above for use with propane as a fuel gas, it is anticipated that the orifice assembly of this invention, and the features and benefits thereof, can be used with any type of a fuel gas, or with other fluids, particularly gases, which may be subject to having condensates, either vapors, aerosols, particulates, or liquids, therein. Moreover, although the specific orifice dimensions discussed above are for use with propane gas and the operating parameters described above, it is anticipated that in those instances where propane gas is not used, the size of the orifice will be determined by the caloric content of the gas used. If, for example, the orifice assembly is to be used with natural gas, a larger diameter orifice opening will be required than that described based on the caloric content of natural gas contrasted to that of propane, as well as the BTUs to be produced by the end-use device.

[0043] Although several embodiments of the invention have been disclosed in the foregoing specification, it is understood by those skilled in the art that many modifications and other embodiments in the invention will come to mind to which the invention pertains, having the benefit of the teaching presented in the foregoing description and the associated drawings. It is thus understood that the invention is not limited to the specific embodiments disclosed hereinabove, and that many modifications and other embodiments are intended to be included within the scope of the invention.

[0044] Moreover, although specific terms are employed herein, they are used in the generic and descriptive sense only, and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention; and the words “a,” “and,” or “the” as they appear herein may mean one or more, depending upon the context in which the words are used, and are not otherwise intended to limit the scope of the disclosed invention.