Title:
Positioning tool for concrete forming boards
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A positioning tool includes two L-shaped rigid members, a stake guide assembly, and a cinch assembly. The two L-shaped rigid members are adapted to releasably grip an elongated concrete channel forming board when the cinch assembly is in its closed position. The guide assembly is adapted to secure the positioning tool to a stake driven into the ground through the guide assembly.



Inventors:
Jenkins, Lane (San Francisco, CA, US)
Application Number:
10/310574
Publication Date:
07/29/2004
Filing Date:
12/05/2002
Assignee:
JENKINS LANE
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E01C19/50; (IPC1-7): E04B2/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
LEE, JONG SUK
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Paradice and Li LLP (Campbell, CA, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A tool for positioning an elongated concrete forming board to define a channel, comprising: a grip assembly including a first L-shaped grip member having vertical and horizontal portions, and a second L-shaped grip member having vertical and horizontal portions, wherein the vertical portions of the first and second L-shaped grip members are aligned with each other and the horizontal portions of the first and second L-shaped grip members are parallel to each other; a guide assembly attached to the first and second L-shaped grip members and through which a stake may be aligned and driven into a ground surface; and a cinch assembly attached to the first and second L-shaped grip members, the cinch assembly pulling the first and second L-shaped grip members towards each other to firmly grip the forming board when the cinch assembly is in a closed position and pushing the first and second L-shaped grip members away from each other to release the forming board when the cinch assembly is in an open position.

2. The tool of claim 1, wherein the stake comprises a metallic material.

3. The tool of claim 1, wherein the horizontal portions of the first and second L-shaped grip members are between approximately 10-14 inches apart from each other.

4. The tool of claim 1, wherein the difference in distance between horizontal portions of the first and second L-shaped grip members when the cinch assembly is in the open position is between approximately one-half to 2 inches more than when the cinch assembly is in the closed position.

5. The tool of claim 1, further comprising a plurality of spikes formed on facing surfaces of the horizontal portions of the first and second L-shaped grip members.

6. The tool of claim 1, wherein the vertical and horizontal portions of the L-shaped grip members comprise substantially flat, rectangular pieces of rigid material.

7. The tool of claim 1, wherein the first and second L-shaped grip members have a width of approximately two inches, a height of approximately two inches, and a length between five and eighteen inches.

8. The tool of claim 1, wherein the cinch assembly comprises: a first mounting bracket attached to the first L-shaped grip member and having a slot formed therein; a first threaded bolt extending through the slot in the first mounting bracket; a first nut disposed on the first threaded bolt and securing a first end of the first threaded bolt to the first mounting bracket; a second mounting bracket attached to the second L-shaped grip member and having a slot formed therein; a second threaded bolt extending through the slot in the second mounting bracket; a second nut disposed on the second threaded bolt and securing a first end of the second threaded bolt to the second mounting bracket; and a lever attached to corresponding second ends of the first and second threaded bolts.

9. The tool of claim 8, wherein the cinch assembly further comprises: a first spring disposed over the first threaded bolt between the first nut and the first mounted bracket; and a second spring disposed over the second threaded bolt between the second nut and the second mounted bracket.

10. The tool of claim 9, wherein the cinch assembly further comprises: a first washer disposed over the first threaded bolt between the first nut and the first spring; and a second washer disposed over the second threaded bolt between the second nut and the second spring.

11. The tool of claim 8, wherein the first and second threaded bolts are approximately one inch in diameter and approximately eight inches in length.

12. The tool of claim 1, wherein the guide assembly comprises: a first substantially horizontal guide member having a first end attached to the first L-shaped grip member; a second substantially horizontal guide member having a first end attached to the second L-shaped grip member; and a vertical guide member having first and second ends attached to second ends of the first and second substantially horizontal guide members, and having a slot through which the stake may be slidably disposed.

13. The tool of claim 12, wherein the guide assembly further comprises a threaded knob connecting with an elongated slot formed in the vertical guide member.

14. The tool of claim 12, wherein the first and second substantially horizontal guide members are approximately one inch in diameter and between approximately five and eighteen inches in length.

15. The tool of claim 14, wherein the vertical guide member is approximately one inch in diameter and between approximately eight and twelve inches in length.

16. The tool of claim 1, wherein the cinch assembly comprises: a housing member having first and second ends attached to corresponding first and second L-shaped grip members, and having a slot formed therein; a rod having a first end slidably disposed within the slot in the housing member and having a second end attached to the first L-shaped grip member; and a vertical guide member attached to the housing member and having a slot through which the stake may be slidably disposed.

17. The tool of claim 16, further comprising a spring disposed on the rod between the first L-shaped grip member and the housing member.

18. The tool of claim 17, wherein the vertical guide member is approximately one inch in diameter and approximately 10 inches in length.

19. A tool for positioning an elongated concrete forming board to define a channel, comprising: means for releasably gripping opposite edges of the forming board; means for switching the releasably gripping means between an open position and a closed position; and means for securing the tool to a stake driven into a ground surface without using nails.

20. The tool of claim 19, wherein the stakes comprises metal.

21. The tool of claim 19, wherein the releasably gripping means comprises: a first L-shaped grip member having vertical and horizontal portions; and a second L-shaped grip member having vertical and horizontal portions, wherein the vertical portions of the first and second L-shaped grip members are aligned with each other and the horizontal portions of the first and second L-shaped grip members are parallel to each other, the first and second L-shaped grip members adapted to releasably grip the forming board.

22. The tool of claim 21, wherein the means for switching pulls the first and second L-shaped grip members towards each other to firmly grip the forming board when in the closed position and pushes the first and second L-shaped grip members away from each other to release the forming board when in the open position.

23. The tool of claim 22, wherein the means for switching comprises: a first mounting bracket attached to the first L-shaped grip member and having a slot formed therein; a first threaded bolt extending through the slot in the first mounting bracket; a first nut disposed on the first threaded bolt and securing a first end of the first threaded bolt to the first mounting bracket; a second mounting bracket attached to the second L-shaped grip member and having a slot formed therein; a second threaded bolt extending through the slot in the second mounting bracket; a second nut disposed on the second threaded bolt and securing a first end of the second threaded bolt to the second mounting bracket; a first spring disposed over the first threaded bolt between the first nut and the first mounted bracket; a second spring disposed over the second threaded bolt between the second nut and the second mounted bracket; and a lever attached to corresponding second ends of the first and second threaded bolts.

24. The tool of claim 19, wherein the means for securing comprises: a first substantial horizontal guide member having a first end attached to the first L-shaped grip member; a second substantial horizontal guide member having a first end attached to the second L-shaped grip member; a vertical guide member having first and second ends attached to second ends of the first and second substantially horizontal guide members, and having a slot through which the stake may be slidably disposed; and a threaded knob connecting with an elongated slot formed in the vertical guide member.

25. The tool of claim 22, wherein the means for securing comprises: a housing member having first and second ends attached to the corresponding first and second L-shaped grip members, and having a slot formed therein; a rod having a first end slidably disposed within the slot in the housing member and having a second end attached to the first L-shaped grip member; a vertical guide member attached to the housing member and having a slot through which the stake may be slidably disposed; and a threaded knob connecting with an elongated slot formed in the vertical guide member.

26. The tool of claim 25, further comprising a spring disposed on the rod between the first L-shaped grip member and the housing member.

Description:

FIELD OF INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates generally to concrete forming and specifically to positioning boards used to form concrete curbs.

DESCRIPTION OF RELATED ART

[0002] A curb is a border that forms an enclosing framework along the edge of a street. A curb usually has parallel side walls and a planer top surface, and is typically made of concrete. Some curbs also include a gutter portion. Generally, one or more faceboards and one or more backboards are used to define a channel into which concrete slurry is poured and then allowed to harden to form the curb. The faceboard and backboard, hereinafter referred to collectively as concrete forming boards, are usually thin, elongated, wooden boards that can be bent so that the poured concrete may be directed in a given path and/or assume a desired shape. The forming boards are held in place by driving stakes into the ground on exterior sides of the boards, i.e., on surfaces of the faceboard and backboard opposite the channel defined therebetween. The stakes are placed at specified intervals (usually between 3 and 4 feet) along the channel, and are typically secured to the forming boards with nails. For added strength, kickers may be driven into the ground at an angle and secured to the top edge of corresponding forming boards with nails. After the concrete slurry hardens, the stakes and kickers are pulled from the ground, and the forming boards are removed from the newly formed curb.

[0003] Positioning the forming boards to define the channel into which the curb will be formed and nailing the stakes to the forming boards is a time consuming and labor intensive process. For example, the forming boards must be carefully positioned to properly define the curb channel, and then steadfastly held into place while stakes are first driven into the ground alongside the forming boards and then nailed into the forming boards. In addition to requiring significant time and manpower to hold the forming boards in place while the stakes are driven into the ground and then nailed into the forming boards, the process of nailing the stakes to the forming boards often results in inadvertent movement of the forming boards, which in turn may result in formation of a curb having a non-uniform width or an improper shape. Further, subsequent removal of the nails from the stakes and forming boards requires additional time and manpower. Failure to secure the stakes to the forming boards with nails may result in a weakened forming architecture.

[0004] Moreover, the stakes must be fairly wide to provide enough room for driving nails through the stakes and into the forming boards, which in turn makes the stakes more difficult to drive into the ground. In addition, because the stakes are usually made of wood to accommodate the nails, the stakes frequently replaced due to wear and tear caused by driving the stakes into the ground and nailing the stakes to the forming boards. The frequent replacement of stakes, along with an accompanying disposal of used nails, undesirably increases material costs.

[0005] Accordingly, it would be desirable to securely position concrete forming boards to define a channel in easier, more efficient, and more economically manner.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0006] The features and advantages of the present invention are illustrated by way of example and are by no means intended to limit the scope of the present invention to the particular embodiments shown, and in which:

[0007] FIG. 1 is a side view of a first embodiment of the present invention;

[0008] FIG. 2 is a front view of the first embodiment of the present invention;

[0009] FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the first embodiment of the present invention;

[0010] FIG. 4 is a side view of a second embodiment of the present invention;

[0011] FIG. 5 is a front view of the second embodiment of the present invention; and

[0012] FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the second embodiment of the present invention.

[0013] Like reference numerals refer to corresponding parts throughout the drawing figures.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0014] The present invention is discussed below with respect to two exemplary embodiments for simplicity only. It is to be understood that those skilled in the art will, after reading this disclosure, be able to implement the present invention in other ways to construct positioning tools for concrete forming boards that are not specifically shown herein. Further, although described below in the context of forming concrete curbs, embodiments of the present invention are equally applicable in forming other structures (e.g., gutters, sidewalks, foundations, walls, or other formations) using any suitable hardenable material. In addition, as used herein, the term metal includes steel, iron, metallic alloys, and other similar rigid and durable materials. Accordingly, the present invention is not to be construed as limited to specific examples described herein but rather includes within its scope all embodiments defined by the appended claims.

[0015] Embodiments of the present invention allow concrete forming boards to be securely positioned to define a channel for a concrete curb more quickly and more efficiently than conventional techniques. Positioning tools in accordance with the present invention include a grip assembly, a guide assembly, and a cinch assembly. The grip assembly includes two L-shaped grip members adapted to releasably grip an elongated concrete forming board. The forming board is placed between the L-shaped grip members, and the cinch assembly is closed to cause the L-shaped grip members to firmly grip the forming board. Once the forming board is firmly gripped by one or more of the positioning tools, the forming board is positioned using the positioning tool(s) to define one side of the channel.

[0016] Thereafter, a stake is driven into the ground through the guide assembly to secure the positioning tool and the forming board to the ground. For one embodiment, the guide assembly is laterally displaced from the L-shaped grip members so that kickers are not necessary to prevent the forming boards from tilting. The other side of the channel may be defined in a similar manner. Then, concrete slurry is poured into the channel, and allowed to harden to form the curb. Thereafter, the stakes are pulled from the ground, and the positioning tools are released from corresponding forming boards by moving the cinch assembly to its open position.

[0017] As described in detail below, using positioning tools in accordance with the present invention to securely position concrete forming boards results in significant savings in time and manpower. First, the forming boards may be easily positioned by maneuvering the positioning tools into place. Second, because nails are not used to secure the stakes to the forming boards, labor costs associated with driving nails into the stakes and forming boards and with removing the nails from the stakes and forming boards is eliminated. In addition, eliminating the use of nails also reduces material costs. Third, by providing a guide assembly for the stakes that automatically aligns the stakes and secured them to the forming board, labor costs associated with driving the stakes into the ground are reduced. Fourth, because the stakes are not nailed to the forming boards, the stakes may be smaller in diameter or width and constructed of a rigid material such as, for example, metal. The use of smaller stakes reduces the difficultly of driving the stakes into the ground, thereby reducing labor costs and labor-related injuries, while the use of a metal stake instead of a wooden stake may significantly increase the useful life of the stake, which over time further reduces material costs.

[0018] In the discussion below and accompanying Figures, width is defined along the x-axis, height is defined along the y-axis, and length is defined along the z-axis. In addition, the horizontal direction is that which is parallel to the ground surface, as defined by the plane formed by the x-axis and the z-axis, and the vertical direction is that which is perpendicular to the ground surface.

[0019] A first embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 1-3, where FIGS. 1-2 show a positioning tool 100 with an elongated concrete forming board 20, and FIG. 3 shows only the positioning tool 100. Referring now to FIGS. 1-3, positioning tool 100 is used to securely position an elongated concrete forming board 20 to the ground surface to form a channel for a concrete curb. For simplicity, the ground surface and channel are not shown in the Figures. Forming board 20, which may be wood or any other suitable material, includes a top edge 20a, a bottom edge 20b, an interior surface 20c, and an exterior surface 20d. Interior board surface 20c abuts and defines one side of the channel, while exterior board surface is opposite the channel.

[0020] Positioning tool 100 includes a grip assembly 110, a guide assembly 120, and a cinch assembly 130. Grip assembly includes upper and lower L-shaped grip members 111 and 112. Upper L-shaped grip member 111 includes a horizontal portion 111a and a vertical portion 111b, and lower L-shaped grip member 112 includes a horizontal portion 112a and a vertical portion 112b. Vertical grip member portions 111b and 112b are aligned with each other, and horizontal grip member portions 111a and 112a are parallel to each other. Upper and lower L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 may be constructed of any rigid, durable material such as, for example, metal. For some embodiments, spikes 113 are formed on or attached to opposing horizontal surfaces of L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 to more effective grip forming board 20. Spikes 113 may be formed of any suitable rigid, durable material, and may be connected to L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 by welding, riveting, or other suitable means. For other embodiments, spikes 113 may be eliminated. The upper and lower L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 are connected together by guide assembly 120 and cinch assembly 130.

[0021] Guide assembly 120 includes upper and lower substantially horizontal guide members 121 and 122 and a vertical guide member 123. First ends of guide members 121 and 122 are attached to opposite ends of vertical guide member 123. A second end of guide member 121 is attached to the vertical portion 111b of upper L-shaped grip member 111. A second end of guide member 122 is attached to the vertical portion 112b of lower L-shaped grip member 112. Guide members 121 and 122 may be attached to L-shaped grip members 111 and 112, respectively, and to vertical guide member 123 via welding, riveting, or other suitable means. Vertical guide member 123 has a slot 124 formed therein through which a stake 10 may be easily aligned and driven into the ground. For some embodiments, stake 10 is constructed of a rigid material such as metal. A threaded knob 125 connecting with a complementary threaded, elongated slot 126 of vertical guide member 123 may be tightened to press firmly against stake 10, thereby securing guide assembly 120 to stake 10 so as to prevent positioning tool 100 from moving relative to stake 10. In this manner, forming board 20 may be quickly and easily secured to stake 10 via positioning tool 100 without the use of nails or the like.

[0022] Guide members 121-123 may be constructed of any substantially rigid and durable material such as, for example, metal. For some embodiments, guide members 121 and 122 are slightly flexible to allow the distance between first and second L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 to be varied by switching cinch assembly 130 between its open and closed positions. This variation in distance between first and second L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 should be sufficient to allow forming board 20 to be easily inserted between first and second L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 when cinch assembly 130 is in its open position. For one embodiment, the variation in distance between first and second L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 realized by transitioning cinch assembly between its open and closed positions is between approximately 0.25 to 0.5 inches, although other tolerances may be used.

[0023] Cinch assembly 130 includes mounting brackets 131a and 131b, springs 132a and 132b, threaded bolts 133a and 133b, washers 134a and 134b, nuts 135a and 135b, a U-shaped bracket 136, and a lever 137. Mounting brackets 131a and 131b are attached to upper and lower L-shaped grip members 111 and 112, respectively, via welding, riveting, or other suitable means. For some embodiments, upper L-shaped grip member 111 and mounting bracket 131a are formed together as a single component, and lower L-shaped grip member 112 and mounting bracket 131b are formed together as a single component.

[0024] Threaded bolt 133a extends through a hole formed in mounting bracket 131a and through the center of spring 132a, which is positioned between washer 134a and mounting bracket 131a. Nut 135a is provided on a first end of threaded bolt 133a to secure washer 134a and spring 132a to mounting bracket 131a. The other end of threaded bolt 133a is attached to U-shaped bracket 136, which in turn is attached to lever 137 by a bolt 138. Threaded bolt 133b extends through a hole formed in mounting bracket 131b and through the center of spring 132b, which is positioned between washer 134b and mounting bracket 131b. Nut 135b is provided on a first end of threaded bolt 133b to secure washer 134b and spring 132b to mounting bracket 131b. The other end of threaded bolt 133b is attached to lever 137 by a bolt 139.

[0025] Tension of spring 132a may be adjusted by tightening or loosening nut 135a. Similarly, tension of spring 132b may be adjusted by tightening or loosening nut 135b. Thus, the distance between opposing grip member portions 111a and 112a when cinch assembly 130 is in its open position may be adjusted by tightening or loosening nuts 135a and 135b, thereby allowing positioning tool 100 to be adjusted to accommodate forming boards 20 of varying widths. For other embodiments, springs 132a and/or 132b may be eliminated.

[0026] Positioning tool 100 is shown in FIGS. 1-3 with cinch assembly 130 in its closed position, which allows elongated forming board 20 to be easily positioned between upper and lower L-shaped grip members 111 and 112. Specifically, forming board 20 is placed between upper and lower L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 so that exterior board surface 20d abuts vertical grip member portions 111b and 112b and board edges 20a and 20b are parallel to horizontal grip member portions 111a and 112a, respectively.

[0027] To releasably secure forming board 20 to positioning tool 100, lever 137 is pulled in the direction of arrow 30 to its closed position, which in turn pulls threaded bolts 133a and 133b toward each other. The complementary pulling action of bolts 133a and 133b translates through mounting brackets 131a and 131b to pull upper and lower L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 firmly toward each other until the cinching pressure exerted by grip members 111 and 112 on opposite board edges 20a and 20b causes forming board 20 to be firmly gripped by positioning tool 100. Note that as forming board edges 20a and 20b come into contact with horizontal grip member portions 111a and 112a, spikes 113 sink into board edges 20a and 20b to more firmly secure forming board 20 to positioning tool 100.

[0028] With one or more positioning tools 100 secured to forming board 20, forming board 20 may be easily maneuvered into proper position to define a channel using positioning tools 100. Then, for each positioning tool 100 secured to forming board 20, stake 10 is aligned by and driven into the ground through vertical guide member 123, and knob 125 is tightened to firmly secure stake 10 to positioning tool 100. In this manner, positioning tool(s) 100 firmly maintains forming board 20 in the proper position without nailing stake 10 to forming board 20. Eliminating the use of nails not only reduces the time and manpower required for correctly positioning forming board 20 when defining the channel, but also reduces material costs.

[0029] After a curb is formed in the channel defined by board 20, stake 10 is pulled from the ground, and lever 137 is returned to its open position. Tension exerted by springs 132a and 132b pushes L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 away from each other, thereby allowing forming board 20 to be easily released from positioning tool(s) 100. Again, because nails are not used, less time and manpower are required to remove positioning tool 100 and forming board 20 from the newly formed curb. In addition, because stake 10 is not nailed to anything, stake 10 may be smaller in diameter or width and constructed of a rigid, durable material such as metal. The use of a smaller stake 10 reduces the difficultly of driving stake 10 into the ground, thereby reducing labor costs and labor-related injuries, while the use of a metal stake instead of a wooden stake may significantly increase the useful life of the stake, which over time further reduces material costs.

[0030] The specific dimensions of components of positioning tool 100 may vary between different embodiments of the present invention as may be required for particular applications. For an exemplary embodiment, L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 have a width of approximately 2 inches, a height of approximately 2 inches, and a length of approximately 10 inches, although L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 may be of other suitable dimensions. It is important to note that the width of horizontal grip member portions 111a and 112a should be less than the width W of forming board 20 so that positioning tool 100 does not contact any portion of the curb formed within the channel defined by forming board 20. This allows the top curb surface to be smoothed or edged while positioning tool(s) 100 maintains forming board(s) 20 in contact with the newly formed curb. For the exemplary embodiment, four spikes 133 having a length of approximately {fraction (1/4)} inch are provided on grip members 111 and 112, although other numbers and/or different length spikes may be provided.

[0031] With respect to guide assembly 120, for the exemplary embodiment, guide members 121 and 122 are hollow cylindrical rods having a diameter of approximately 1 inch and a length of approximately 18 inches, and vertical guide member 123 is a hollow cylindrical rod having a diameter of approximately 1 inches and a length of approximately 10 inches, although rods of other lengths and diameters may be used. It is important to note that vertical guide member 123 may be laterally displaced a sufficient distance from L-shaped grip members 111 and 112 so that kickers are not required. For other embodiments, guide members 121-123 may be rectangular or elliptical rods or poles.

[0032] With respect to cinch assembly 130, for the exemplary embodiment, threaded bolt 133a has a diameter of approximately {fraction (1/4)} inch and a length of approximately 7 inches, threaded bolt 133b has a diameter of approximately {fraction (1/4)} inch and a length of approximately 8 inches, lever 137 has a length of approximately 8 inches, U-shaped member has a length of approximately 3 inches, springs 132a and 132b have a diameter and a compressed length of approximately 1 inch, and brackets 131a and 131b have a width and height of approximately 2 inches, although other lengths and diameters may be used. For the exemplary embodiment, tension in springs 132a and 132b may be adjusted to allow positioning tool 100 to accommodate boards 20 having varying heights.

[0033] A second embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 4-6, where FIGS. 5-6 show a positioning tool 200 with an elongated concrete forming board 20, and FIG. 6 shows only the positioning tool 200. Referring now to FIGS. 4-6, positioning tool 200 is used to securely position elongated forming board 20 to the ground (not shown) to form a channel for a concrete curb in a manner similar to that described above for positioning tool 100, where elements common to positioning tools 100 and 200 are similarly labeled. Thus, because positioning tools 100 and 200 share the grip assembly 110 and the cinch assembly 130, which are described in detail above, a discussion of those elements is not repeated here.

[0034] Positioning tool 200 utilizes a guide assembly 220 that is different from guide assembly 120 of positioning tool 100. Guide assembly 220 includes a slidable rod 221, a housing member 222, a spring 223, and a vertical guide member 224. One end of housing member 222 is attached to lower vertical grip member portion 112b via welding, riveting, or other suitable means. Rod 221 is slidably disposed in a slot (not shown) formed in housing member 222, and includes an exposed end portion extending through spring 223 and attached to upper vertical grip member portion 111b via welding, riveting, or other suitable means. Housing member 222 and upper L-shaped grip member 111 provide stops for spring 223, which in turn acts to push upper and lower grip members 111 and 112 of positioning tool 200 away from each other. In this manner, cinch assembly 130, along with rod 221, housing member 222, and spring 223, provide a robust mechanism for gripping and releasing board 20.

[0035] Vertical guide member 224 is attached to housing member 222 via welding, riveting, or other suitable means. For some embodiments, an end portion of vertical guide member 224 is attached to lower grip member 112 via welding, riveting, or other suitable means. Vertical guide member 224 has a slot 225 formed therein through which stake 10 may be aligned and driven into the ground. A threaded knob 226 connecting with a complementary threaded, elongated slot 227 of vertical guide member 224 may be tightened to press firmly against stake 10, thereby preventing positioning tool 200 from moving relative to stake 10. In this manner, forming board 20 may be quickly and easily secured to stake 10 via positioning tool 200 without the use of nails or the like.

[0036] Operation of positioning tool 200 in releasably gripping forming board 20 and thereafter securely positioning forming board 20 using stake 10 to define a channel is similar to that described above with respect to positioning tool 100, and thus is not repeated here.

[0037] The specific dimensions of components of positioning tool 200 may vary between different embodiments of the present invention as may be required for particular applications. For an exemplary embodiment, grip assembly 110 and cinch assembly 130 are of the dimensions described above with respect to positioning tool 100, although other dimensions may be used. With respect to guide assembly 220, for the exemplary embodiment, vertical guide member 224 is a hollow cylindrical rod having a diameter of approximately 1 inch and a length of approximately 10 inches, although rods of other lengths and diameters may be used. For other embodiments, guide member 224 may be a rectangular or elliptical rod or pole. For the exemplary embodiment, housing member 222 is a hollow cylindrical rod having a diameter of approximately 1 inch and a length of approximately 8 inches, and rod 221 is a cylindrical pole having a diameter of approximately {fraction (3/4)} inch and a length between approximately 5-9 inches, although other lengths and diameters may be used.

[0038] While particular embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that changes and modifications may be made without departing from this invention in its broader aspects and, therefore, the appended claims are to encompass within their scope all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of this invention.