Title:
Laminate shingle having a thick butt edge
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A multi-layer laminate roofing shingle having a first sheet with a first marginal edge, an intermediate sheet with a second marginal edge, and a bottom sheet with a third marginal edge. The first sheet has a defined width (L), the intermediate sheet is about ⅔ the width of the first sheet, and the bottom sheet is about ⅓ the width of the first sheet. The first, intermediate and bottom sheets are arranged so that marginal edges coincide with one another. When applied to a roof, the multi-layer laminate shingle creates the appearance of depth on the roof.



Inventors:
Phillips, John D. (Pataskala, OH, US)
Application Number:
10/334417
Publication Date:
07/01/2004
Filing Date:
12/31/2002
Assignee:
PHILLIPS JOHN D.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04D1/26; (IPC1-7): E04D1/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
D ADAMO, STEPHEN D
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
OWENS CORNING (GRANVILLE, OH, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A laminate roofing shingle comprising: a) a first sheet having a first length and a first width, wherein said first sheet further comprises a first butt portion comprising a first marginal edge; b) an intermediate sheet having a length that is substantially equal to said first length of said first sheet and having a second width that is about ⅔ of said first width, wherein said intermediate sheet further comprises an intermediate buff portion comprising a intermediate marginal edge, wherein said intermediate sheet is affixed on the undersurface of said first sheet so that said intermediate marginal edge of said intermediate sheet substantially coincides with said first marginal edge of said first sheet; and c) a third sheet having a length that is substantially equal to said first length of said first sheet and said second sheet and having a third width that is about ⅓ of said first width, wherein said third sheet further comprises a third butt portion comprising a third marginal edge, wherein said third sheet is affixed on the undersurface of said second sheet so that said third marginal edge of said third sheet substantially coincides with said first marginal edge of said first sheet and said second marginal edge of said second sheet.

2. The laminate roofing shingle of claim 1, wherein said shingle is an asphalt shingle.

3. The laminate roofing shingle of claim 1, wherein said first butt portion of said first sheet further comprises a plurality of spaced apart tabs defining cutouts therebetween.

4. The laminate roofing shingle of claim 1, wherein said first marginal edge of said first sheet comprises cuts.

5. The laminate roofing shingle of claim 1, wherein said second sheet is affixed to said first sheet with an adhesive material.

6. The laminate roofing shingle of claim 5, wherein said third sheet is affixed to said second sheet with an adhesive material.

7. A laminate roofing shingle comprising: a) a first sheet having a length and a first width, wherein said first sheet further comprises a first butt portion comprising a first marginal edge; b) an intermediate sheet having a second width that is less than said first width and greater than half of said first width, wherein said intermediate sheet further comprises an intermediate butt portion comprising a intermediate marginal edge, wherein said intermediate sheet is affixed on the undersurface of said first sheet so that said intermediate marginal edge of said intermediate sheet substantially coincides with said first marginal edge of said first sheet; and c) a third sheet having a third width that is less than said second width, and the sum of the second width and the third width is less than or equal to the first width, wherein said third sheet further comprises a third butt portion comprising a third marginal edge, wherein said third sheet is affixed on the undersurface of said second sheet so that said third marginal edge of said third sheet substantially coincides with said first marginal edge of said first sheet and said second marginal edge of said second sheet.

8. The laminate roofing shingle of claim 7, wherein the sum of the second and third width substantially equals the first width.

9. The laminate roofing shingle of claim 7, wherein said first butt portion of said first sheet further comprises a plurality of spaced apart tabs defining cutouts therebetween.

10. The laminate roofing shingle of claim 7, wherein said first marginal edge of said first sheet comprises cutouts.

11. The laminate roofing shingle of claim 7, wherein said second sheet is affixed to said first sheet with an adhesive material.

12. The laminate roofing shingle of claim 11, wherein said third sheet is affixed to said second sheet with an adhesive material.

13. A method for manufacturing a laminate roofing shingle comprising the steps of: a) providing a first sheet of roofing material having a first length and a first width, wherein said first sheet further comprises a first butt portion comprising a first marginal edge; b) providing an intermediate sheet of roofing material having a length substantially equal to said first length of said first sheet and having a second width that is about ⅔ of said first width, wherein said intermediate sheet further comprises an intermediate butt portion comprising a intermediate marginal edge; c) affixing said intermediate sheet to the undersurface of said first sheet so that said intermediate marginal edge of said intermediate sheet substantially coincides with said first marginal edge of said first sheet; d) providing a third sheet having a length substantially equal to said first length of said first sheet and said second sheet and having a third width that is about ⅓ of said first width, wherein said third sheet further comprises a third butt portion comprising a third marginal edge; and e) affixing said third sheet to the undersurface of said second sheet so that said third marginal edge of said third sheet substantially coincides with said first marginal edge of said first sheet and said second marginal edge of said second sheet.

14. The method of claim 13, wherein said shingle is an asphalt shingle.

15. The method of claim 13, further comprising the step of cutting a plurality of spaced apart tabs and cutouts from said first butt portion of said first sheet further.

16. The method of claim 13, further comprising the step of cutting a plurality of cuts from said first marginal edge of said first sheet.

17. The method of claim 13, further comprising the step of adhering said second sheet to said first sheet.

18. The method of claim 17, further comprising the step of adhering said third sheet to said second sheet.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD AND INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The present invention relates to a laminate shingle having a thick butt edge. More particularly, it relates to an asphalt laminate shingle wherein the thick butt edge is constructed of layers giving the appearance of depth on a finished roof.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] Many attempts have been made to produce asphalt shingles which would achieve the substantially structural and architectural appearance characteristics of wood shake roofing shingles. It is well known that an asphalt shingle of this type may be made by securing an additional strip or strips beneath the tabs of a conventional shingle.

[0003] U.S. Pat. No. 3,848,384 shows an asphalt roofing shingle having multiple layers including a base layer, a nailing strip along the butt edge of the base and tab portions. The shingle has cut-out portions in between the tab portions with the base layer being visible in the cut-out portions. The base layer and tab portions have equal lengths and widths. The multi-layer shingles give the appearance of cedar shakes or wood shingles.

[0004] U.S. Pat. No. 4,775,440 illustrates a laminated asphalt roofing shingle having three layers. The shingle includes a main sheet having a single upper edge and a triple lower edge. The lower ledge has an upper layer having a main sheet with an intermediate layer comprising a laminated sheet and a bottom layer comprising a continuous strip. The intermediate layer and bottom layer having identical lengths and widths. The shingle has cut-out portions which are two layers in depth with the bottom layer covering the cut-out portions.

[0005] U.S. Pat. No. 5,181,362 depicts a laminated asphalt, three-layer roofing shingle having a base layer, a secondary layer and a top layer. The secondary layer has tab portions that are somewhat shorter than the tab portions of the base layer, showing portions of the tab portion of the base layer beneath the tab portions of the secondary layer. The secondary layer has spaced-apart slots forming tab portions. The top layer is comprised of individual strips that are narrower than the tab portions of the secondary layer. The base layer and the secondary layer are secured by adhesive strips. The top layer is secured to the secondary layer by adhesive strips, as well.

[0006] U.S. Pat. No. 4,869,942 shows a laminated shingle formed from a glass mat coated with asphalt. The shingle includes a main sheet having a single layer upper edge and a triple layer lower edge. The lower edge has an upper layer comprising the main sheet with an intermediate layer comprising a laminated sheet and a bottom layer comprising a continuous strip. The intermediate layer and bottom layer have equal widths. Both the main strip and the intermediate layer have corresponding cut out portions with the bottom layer covering the cut out portion.

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 6,220,329 illustrates a laminated roofing shingle having a top layer, a middle layer and a bottom layer. The top and middle layers includes tabs and cut-out areas. The top layer is adhered to the middle layer by adhesive and the middle layer is adhered to the bottom layer by an adhesive. All of the layers are equal in length and width and, as constructed, each shingle will have varying tab configurations.

[0008] Although, in the past, laminate shingles have been made by laminating multiple layers of roofing material together, the multiple layers have either been the same width or the top (overlay) layer a defined width and the two (underlay) layers a shorter, but equal, width. There is a need for a laminate shingle having a thick butt edge that will provide the appearance of depth on a roof. There is a need for a laminate shingle that is fabricated of less material, thereby reducing waste. There is also a need for a low-cost, laminate shingle that may be manufactured by standard laminate shingle manufacturing processes. Further, there is a need for laminate shingles that are designed to be stacked and packaged in a flat bundle.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a laminate shingle with a thick butt edge that, when installed on a roof, will give the appearance of depth.

[0010] It is another object of the present invention to provide a laminate shingle that is low in cost.

[0011] It is an object of the present invention to provide a laminate shingle that may be produced by standard manufacturing methods.

[0012] It is an object of the present invention to provide a laminate shingle with a design that permits the shingle to be stacked and bundled so that the total thickness of the stack will be the same throughout the stack so that the shingles may be packaged flat.

[0013] According to the present invention, a laminate roofing shingle is provided having a first sheet with a first length and a first width and an intermediate sheet with a length that is equal to the first length of the first sheet. The intermediate sheet has a second width that is about ⅔ of the first width. The intermediate sheet is affixed on the undersurface of the first sheet so that the marginal edge of the intermediate sheet coincides with the marginal edge of said first sheet. A third sheet is affixed to the undersurface of the second sheet so that the marginal edge of the third sheet coincides with the marginal edges of the first and second sheets. The intermediate sheet has a length that is equal to the lengths of the first and second sheets and has a width that is about ⅓ of said first width.

[0014] The foregoing and other advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following disclosure in which one or more preferred embodiments of the invention are described in detail and illustrated in the accompanying drawings. It is contemplated that variations in procedures, structural features and arrangement of parts may appear to a person skilled in the art without departing from the scope of or sacrificing any of the advantages of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0015] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the roofing shingle according to the present invention.

[0016] FIG. 2 is a side view of the roofing shingles illustrating how the shingles are packaged.

[0017] FIG. 3 is a simplified sectional view, cut through the longitudinal centerline of the machine, of an apparatus for cutting and laminating sheet material into laminated roofing shingles.

[0018] In describing preferred embodiments of the invention which are illustrated in the drawings, specific terminology is resorted to for the sake of clarity. However, it is not intended that the invention be limited to the specific terms so selected and it is to be understood that each specific term includes all technical equivalents that operate in a similar manner to accomplish a similar purpose.

[0019] Although preferred embodiments of the invention are herein described, it is understood that various changes and modifications in the illustrated and described structure can be affected without departure from the basic principles that underlie the invention. Changes and modifications of this type are therefore deemed to be circumscribed by the spirit and scope of the invention, except as the same may be necessarily modified by the appended claims or reasonable equivalents thereof.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION AND PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

[0020] Referring now to the drawings, specifically FIG. 1 thereof, there is shown a multi-layer laminate roofing shingle 2 having a first sheet 4 having a first marginal edge 18, an intermediate sheet 6 having a second marginal edge 16, and a bottom sheet 8 having a third marginal edge 20. As shown in FIG. 1, first sheet 4 has a defined width (L), intermediate sheet 6 is about ⅔ the width of the first sheet 4, and bottom sheet 8 is about ⅓ the width of the first sheet 4. Preferably the ⅓ and ⅔ dimensions are maximum dimensions, so as to optimize stacking as described below. Additionally, one skilled in the art appreciates that “about ⅓” and “about ⅔” could be any dimension such that the ⅔ dimension is less than a full underlay and greater than a half underlay; and that the ⅓ dimension is less than a half underlay, and the addition of the two dimensions is less than or equal to one (e.g. about {fraction (4/9)} and {fraction (5/9)}). One skilled in the art appreciates that the dimensions may be less than described in this paragraph, such that the nesting occurs as described, but ideally the layers are nearly completely supported in the package as illustrated in FIG. 2 (with ⅓ and ⅔ underlays), so as to avoid damage to the layers during shipment and handling.

[0021] The sheets 4, 6 and 8 are arranged so that marginal edges 16, 18 and 20 substantially coincide with one another. The sheets 4, 6 and 8 are preferably affixed to one another by an adhesive that is applied in the shingle manufacturing process discussed below between each pair of sheets {fraction (4/6)}, and {fraction (6/8)}. The sheets 4, 6 and 8 are then laminated to assure adhesion of the sheets to one another. Additionally, if any of the layers is not coated with granules, an adjacent asphalt coated sheet may provide sufficient adhesive, while the asphalt is in a non-solidified state.

[0022] In a preferred embodiment, the roofing shingle 2 preferably has tabs 26, 28 which define cut-out portions 21. As shown in FIG. 1, cut-out portion 21 is shown to one layer in depth with the intermediate sheet 6 being exposed. Intermediate sheet 6 extends beyond the length of the cut-out portions 21 so as to provide positive aesthetic qualities to the shingle. The style of the tabs may be a “dragon tooth” design or may be square cut tab, a standard three-tab design or any other interlocking pattern design. The number of tabs may vary but typically there are three tabs per shingle, with the shingle typically having and an overall length of about 3 feet. Preferably, roofing shingle 2 may be either a fiberglass asphalt shingle or an organic felt asphalt shingle.

[0023] Turning now to FIG. 3, the cutting and laminating apparatus 30 for manufacturing the shingles of the present invention is shown. Before being directed to the cutting and laminating apparatus 30, a continuous sheet of asphalt roofing material is prepared using any standard method and apparatus known in the art to manufacture roofing shingles. In FIG. 3, one manufacturing line is shown. It should be noted that two lines can be used, as shown in U.S. Pat. No. 5,102,487 which is herein incorporated by reference.

[0024] The mat or substrates is payed out from a roll (not shown) as continuous sheet 41. The mat can be any type of material known for use in reinforcing roofing shingles, such as a web, scrim or felt of fibrous materials such as mineral fibers, cellulose fibers, rag fibers, mixtures of mineral and synthetic fibers, or the like. Preferably, the mat is a nonwoven web of glass fibers.

[0025] The sheet is passed through a coater (not shown) where a coating is applied to the sheet. The coating can be applied in any suitable manner. Typically, the sheet is submerged in a supply of hot, molten coating to completely cover the sheet with the tacky coating. However, in other embodiments, the coating can be sprayed on, rolled on, or applied to the sheet by other means.

[0026] The term “coating” means any type of material suitable for coating roofing shingles. Usually, the coating includes a bituminous material such as an asphalt, tar, pitch, or a mixture thereof. The asphalt can be either a manufactured asphalt produced by refining petroleum or a naturally occurring asphalt. The coating can also include various additives and/or modifiers, such as inorganic fillers or mineral stabilizers, organic materials such as polymers, recycled streams, or ground tire rubber.

[0027] The hot coated sheet is passed beneath one or more granule applicators that discharge protective surface granules onto the top of the sheet. The sheet is passed around a drum that presses the granules into the hot, tacky coating and inverts the sheet sufficiently for any non-adhering granules to fall into a hopper (not shown) for recycling. The sheet is then passed between a pair of press rolls that further press the granules into the sheet and then is passed through a conventional cooling apparatus.

[0028] As shown in FIG. 3, after the cooling process, the sheet 41 is fed into the apparatus 30, through a pattern cutter 37 consisting of a knife roll 38 and an anvil roll 35, traveling in the direction indicated by arrow 43. The knife roll 38 engages the continuous sheet 41 and divides it into continuous overlay strips 45, first underlay 46 and second underlay 47. The knife roll has two straight blades (not shown) that divide the underlay strips from the overlay strips, and a patterned blade (not shown) that cuts the overlay strip into two continuous overlay strips having a dragon tooth pattern of tabs and cutouts (as shown in FIG. 1) or a standard three tab design (as shown in FIG. 1a). The patterned blade can be changed to produce different pattern lengths. For example, the patterned blade may form one pattern for every revolution of the knife roll. In such a case, the length of the pattern can be varied by changing the circumference of the knife roll. The patterned blade can also be changed so that it forms more or less than one pattern for every revolution of the knife roll. Additionally, the cutter 37 may be divided, such that the underlay strips 46, 47 are cut by one or more rolls separate from a pattern cutter. Furthermore, one or more of the underlay strips 46, 47 need not come from the same sheet as the overlay 45, so that each layer may be optimized to provide desired properties. For example, sheet 6 or sheet 8 may be made form modified asphalt, or have a high strength mat, to provide additional strength properties. Alternatively, since bottom layer 8 is generally not visible except at edge 20, this layer may be made from a less costly material, such as seconds from a strip shingle process, or be made from a non-asphalt material.

[0029] The overlay 45 and underlays 46, 47 then proceed over alignment rollers 50, 51, 52. Overlay 45 passes over single rotating roller 45, which sits in an adhesive bath 32, which coats the bottom surface of overlay 45 with adhesive. Typically, a laminating adhesive is used. First underlay 46 proceeds under guiding rollers 51, 53 to adhesive bath 38 where adhesive is applied to the bottom surface of underlay 46. Alternatively, an extruder may be used to apply adhesive to the underlays. Second underlay 47 proceeds under guiding rollers 52 and 36 and comes into contact with first underlay 46 at combining rollers 40 where first underlay 46 and second underlay 47 are laminated together forming sheet 58. Sheet 58 comes into contact with overlay 45 at guiding roller 54. At this point, the adhesive applied to the bottom surface of overlay 45 adheres to the top surface of sheet 58. Sheet 58 is laminated to overlay 45 at combining rollers 39 and is directed to free loop rolls 55, 56. As shown in FIG. 3, the final multi-layer sheet 59 is moved to an end cutter 42. Additionally, the bottom underlay layer 8 may not include granules, as the top surface is not exposed in the embodiments shown here. Similarly, the middle layer 6 may not have granules in the area above the cutouts 21 (above the bottom underlay), and may not include granules in the areas under the tabs 26, 28. Alternatively, the layers may include a granule coating on the top of each of the underlays 46, 47, as well as granules provided on the bottom of one or more of the underlays 46, 47 and/or overlay 4, to provide additional thickness to the laminated shingle. All such non-visible granules could be a less expensive material known to one skilled in the art, so as to reduce the overall cost.

[0030] FIG. 2 illustrates roofing shingles of the present invention being packaged after they are formed by the cutting and laminating apparatus 30. Shingle 24 is overturned so that undersides 11, 13 and 15 of sheets 10, 12 and 14 face upward. Shingle 22 is stacked on top of overturned shingle 22 so that the underside 5 of bottom sheet 8 contacts underside 15 of first sheet 14, underside 7 of intermediate sheet 6 contacts underside 13 of intermediate sheet 12, and underside 9 of first sheet 4 contacts underside 11 of bottom sheet 10, and the underlay layers thus are packaged so that the ⅓ and ⅔ lengths of the respective underlay of adjacent sheets nest. The shingles may be stacked in palletized form, with two shingles 22, 24 in a given layer, with the next overlying layer of shingles being stacked thereon. Suitable apparatus for positioning and orienting moving webs is well-known in the art. Such apparatus could include, for example, guiding conveyor belts that move the webs into position and invert one of the webs.

[0031] Although not illustrated here, one skilled in the art appreciates that the intermediate underlayment 6 may include cutouts within he cutouts 21 of the overlay sheet 4. Similarly, the bottom edge of the tabs 26, 28, may not extend to the marginal edge 18 of the overlay 4, and thereby may expose a portion of an underlay layer for visual effect. Likewise, the middle layer 6 may have visible portions within the cutouts 21 that do not extend to the marginal edge 16, and thereby provide an additional visual effect. One skilled in the art appreciates that each of these alternative embodiments is considered to have marginal edges of the overlay and underlay sheets that substantially coincide, as is the case with normal variation in alignment of such layers in a typical manufacturing process. Likewise, the ends of each layer substantially coincide to provide for efficient packaging and handleability.

[0032] In a further alternative embodiment (not shown), the intermediate layer 6 may include cutouts above the bottom sheet 8 and above the tabs 26, 28. Preferably, the bottom layer 8 includes tabs (not shown) that extend under the portion above the ⅓L to the ⅔L portion and when adjacent shingles are nested as shown in FIG. 2, the bottom underlay tabs nest between the cutouts of the intermediate underlay. The shingle preferably includes nailing targets on the overlay (e.g. a paint drop) above the underlay tabs, to provide a nailing zone through each of the three layers. Such a design is shown in U.S. Pat. No. 6,044,608 which is herein incorporated by reference. Furthermore, although described with respect to a three-layered shingle, the principles of the present invention may be applied to a shingle having additional layers.

[0033] It is possible that changes in configurations to other than those shown could be used but that which is shown is preferred and typical. It is therefore understood that although the present invention has been specifically disclosed with the preferred embodiment and examples, modifications to the design concerning sizing and shape will be apparent to those skilled in the art and such modifications and variations are considered to be equivalent to and within the scope of the disclosed invention and the appended claims.