Title:
Fence with removable slats
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
This invention consists of a fence constructed of metal vertical posts with upper and lower bars connecting the posts. The bottom bar is a cup or a trough in which wooden fence slats sit. The top bar consists of a back that is permanently affixed to both posts and a removable or hinged front that opens to permit the slats to be inserted without nails or tools. This invention is novel in that it presents a wooden backyard fence with standard wooden slats that can be removed or replaced without tools. The homeowner may therefore vary the height, the slat width and the design of the slats without replacing the entire fence.



Inventors:
Charles Sr., Raphael Chesnutt (Dallas, TX, US)
Application Number:
10/282051
Publication Date:
04/29/2004
Filing Date:
10/29/2002
Assignee:
CHESNUTT CHARLES RAPHAEL
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04H17/14; (IPC1-7): E04H17/16
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
CHAU, ERIC
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CHARLES R. CHESNUTT (DALLAS, TX, US)
Claims:

What I claim for my invention is:



1. A pair of laterally spaced substantially vertical metal posts having two horizontal support members affixed thereto. These horizontal support members contain a row of fence slats held secure by means of a removable front rail holding the top of the slats against a fixed backing and a three sided base in which the bottom of each slat resides.

2. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein the front side of the lower horizontal support member contains holes for the purpose of securing each fence slat with one or more screws, pins or nails.

3. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein the front portion of the upper horizontal support member contains holes for the purpose of securing each fence slat with one or more screws, pins or nails.

4. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein the removable front rail is affixed to a hinge permitting it to swing forward in order to provide access to the placing of the slats.

5. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein the hinged or removable upper support member contains sharp protrusions that pierce the slats and hold them in place.

6. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein the hinged or removable upper support member contains pins that fit into corresponding holes placed in the slats.

7. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein the front portion of the lower support member is hinged or removable and contains sharp protrusions that pierce the slats and hold them in place.

8. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein front portion of the lower support member is hinged or removable and contains pins that fit into corresponding holes placed in the slats.

9. A fence construction as in claim 1 where the front rail (either hinged or entirely removable) is placed between the upper horizontal member and the lower horizontal member.

10. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein one side of the lower horizontal support member is absent.

11. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein the posts and the horizontal members are constructed of something other than metal, preferably a durable and non-disintegrating material.

12. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein the slats are made of a material other than wood.

13. A fence construction as in claim 1 wherein the lower horizontal member contains holes in the bottom to permit water to drain.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] None.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

[0002] None.

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING

[0003] None

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0004] Since time immemorial, property owners have sought to define the limits of their estate by means of physical markings. As man moved to cities, this desire to define the limits of ownership was nonetheless compelling, but as more people began to live in closer proximity, the desire to express the limits of ownership expanded to meet other human needs. Fences in cities and towns now serve to create privacy, serve as protection from intruders and to enclose pets. In many suburban areas of the United States almost every house has a fence.

[0005] The primary disadvantage of the classic “back-yard” wood fence is that the wood deteriorates and it ultimately must be replaced in its entirety. Of course metal fences are available, but metal fences are either insubstantial (consider the chain link fence) or they afford no significant privacy (consider the iron spoke fence). This invention provides the homeowner with the best of both worlds: a metal (or other durable material) structure that contains wooden fence slats that does not have to be replaced in its entirety when the wood deteriorates. This invention provides a true wooden fence that can be replaced with new wood without any tools whatever. Once the metallic structure is installed, a teenager can literally replace the entire fence in one day—with the only cost being the cost of the wood. All that is necessary to install the wood in this fence is to open or remove the upper horizontal support member, place each successive slat in the cup of the lower horizontal support member and then close or replace the upper horizontal support member.

[0006] Against this background, various applications have been proposed for the construction of fences. These comprise three types of fences, picket fences, wire mesh fences and back-yard fences. See the following.

[0007] The Meglino U.S. Pat. No. 6,402,127 discloses a fence construction wherein the slats are inserted vertically through a wire mesh. Also see the Meglino U.S. Pat. No. 5,799,929 which presents slats with stops inserted into a wire mesh and Meglino U.S. Pat. No. 5,794,922 disclosing another version of slats inserted in to a wire mesh.

[0008] The McClure U.S. Pat. No. 5,639,069 discloses a louvered fence with horizontal angulated slats.

[0009] The Lancer, Sr. U.S. Pat. No. 5,529,289 discloses a fence constructed into a pattern of interlocking vertical slats.

[0010] The Taylor U.S. Pat. No. 4,969,2914 provides for fence slats to be inserted into holes. See also a similar hole construction in the Pettit U.S. Pat. No. 4,722,514.

[0011] The Schwartz U.S. Pat. No. 5,601,279 discloses an imitation wood picket fence arrangement whereby the pickets are unshaped and held in place by inserting the pickets over similarly formed protrusion in the upper transverse horizontal member.

[0012] The Barrett U.S. Pat. No. 2,573,239 discloses a fence arrangement wherein the pickets are sheet metal and held in place with horizontal stringers.

[0013] The Murray U.S. Pat. No. 2,685,432 discloses a fence arrangements whereby metal pickets are inserted into the ground and held in place by an upper horizontal member to which they are fastened by the use of fasteners.

[0014] The Roberts U.S. Pat. No. 2,766,967 discloses a fence construction with vertical slats with notches cut in the edges. The notches correspond to punched tabs and the slats are bent and expand to secure them within notches.

[0015] The Cofield U.S. Pat. No. 2,919,112 discloses a fence that is collapsible and therefore moveable, with pickets that are permanently attached.

[0016] The Revell U.S. Pat. No. 3,212,754 discloses a fence structure that utilizes grooves in the upper horizontal member that mate with correspondant structures on the pickets.

[0017] The Bos U.S. Pat. No. 3,411,752 discloses a guardrail fence for use on a balcony with pickets or slats inserted through holes in the upper and lower horizontal members.

[0018] The Lustvee U.S. Pat. No. 4,625,948 discloses a fence whereby the slats or pickets are hung in a groove.

[0019] The Emmie U.S. Pat. No. 4,130,272 discloses a fence wherein the slats or pickets are connected by stringers and fit into grooves.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0020] This invention differs from the traditional wooden backyard fence in that the wooden slats are easily removable and held in place by means of removable or hinged bar. This design differs from standard backyard fences in that the slats are not permanently affixed to the structure. The advantage of this design over the design of the standard backyard fence is that when the wooden slats deteriorate, then they may be replaced without the use of any tools. In this way, a rotten fence can be replaced for the cost of materials only—and in the space of a few hours. Since the slats are not affixed to the fence structure, varying sizes of slats may be used, so the homeowner may increase the height of the fence simply by inserted longer slats, or slats of different colors, or different colors on opposite sides, or slats of varying heights in order to produce an artistic curving fence top.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWING

[0021] The drawing of this invention contains a front view only showing three possible variations of slat sizes and designs.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0022] This invention consists of a fence construction for use with a pair of substantially vertical metal posts. The posts are laterally spaced from each other and have at least two metal horizontal support members affixed to each post. The fence construction includes a plurality of fence slats that are contained by the horizontal support members. The upper horizontal support member consists of a back rail permanently affixed to the two posts and a removable front rail that mounts directly in front of the back rail by means of two braces. The fence slats are placed against the back rail and secured in place by the removable front rail. The lower horizontal transverse support member forms an extended “cup” with a bottom, a front side and a back side and is open on the top. The bottom portions of the fence slats rest in the cup of the lower horizontal transverse support member. At least one of the horizontal support members contains holes through which pins or screws may secure the fence slats against removal. As many posts and connecting horizontal members as is necessary may be installed.