Title:
Action figure game
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method and an apparatus by which rules and record keeping in games employing figures as game pieces are incorporated onto the figures themselves. Counters or wheels keep track of a character's characteristics and how they change as a game progresses. Accessories can be added to the figures that change the characteristics of a character. The accessories also identify how the characteristics of a character are modified by adding the accessory.



Inventors:
Weisman, Jordan K. (Redmond, WA, US)
Barrett, Kevin P. (Etobicoke, CA)
Application Number:
10/244096
Publication Date:
03/18/2004
Filing Date:
09/13/2002
Assignee:
WEISMAN JORDAN K.
BARRETT KEVIN P.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/288, 273/289
International Classes:
A63F3/02; A63F9/00; A63F11/00; (IPC1-7): A63F3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DAVIS WRIGHT TREMAINE, LLP/SEATTLE (SEATTLE, WA, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. An action figure for use in a game having rules of play, the action figure comprising: a representational figure, the figure having characteristics according to the rules of the game; and accessories mountable on the figure, the accessories identifying how the accessories modify the characteristics of the action figure in the game.

2. The action figure of claim 1, wherein the action figure includes a base.

3. The action figure of claim 2, wherein the base includes a self-contained record-keeping device, and wherein the record-keeping device adjustably displays variable information relating to the game.

4. The action figure of claim 3, wherein the variable information identifies the current status of the characteristics of the action figure, unmodified by the accessories.

5. The action figure of claim 2, wherein the base includes multiple record-keeping devices, and wherein the record-keeping devices selectively display variable information relating to the game.

6. The action figure of claim 5, wherein the figure includes multiple parts and wherein the multiple record-keeping devices display variable information relating to the multiple parts of the figure.

7. The action figure of claim 6, wherein each of the multiple parts of the figure corresponds to a separate one of the multiple record-keeping devices.

8. The action figure of claim 7, wherein the multiple parts include a head, a torso, and arms.

9. The action figure of claim 1, wherein the accessories include symbols, the symbols identifying how the accessories modify the characteristics of the action figure.

10. The action figure of claim 9, wherein the symbols include a color.

11. The action figure of claim 9, wherein the symbols include a number.

12. The action figure of claim 9, wherein the symbols correspond to a specific die shape.

13. The action figure of claim 1, wherein the accessories include a weapon.

14. The action figure of claim 1, wherein the accessories include a shield.

15. The action figure of claim 1, wherein the accessories include armor.

16. An accessory mountable on an action figure for use in a game having rules of play, the action figure having characteristics according to the rules of play, the accessory comprising: information identifying how the accessory modifies the characteristics of the action figure in the game.

17. The accessory of claim 16, wherein the information includes a symbol.

18. The accessory of claim 17, wherein the symbol includes a color.

19. The accessory of claim 17, wherein the symbol includes a number.

20. The accessory of claim 17, wherein the symbol includes a die shape.

21. The accessory of claim 16, wherein the accessory is shaped to resemble a weapon.

22. The accessory of claim 16, wherein the accessory is shaped to resemble a shield.

23. The accessory of claim 16, wherein the accessory is shaped to resemble armor.

24. A method for playing a game, the method comprising the acts of: providing an action figure representing a character having characteristics; engaging the action figure in play following a set of rules; providing an accessory for use with the action figure; and mounting the accessory on the action figure, the accessory indicating how the accessory modifies the characteristics.

25. The method of claim 24, further comprising displaying information on the action figure relating to the characteristics of the character.

26. The method of claim 25, further comprising varying the information displayed on the action figure.

27. The method of claim 26, wherein varying the information displayed on the action figure includes changing the current status of the characteristics during game play.

28. The method of claim 25, wherein providing an action figure includes providing an action figure that includes a self-contained record-keeping device that selectively displays the varied information on the action figure.

29. The method of claim 28, wherein providing an action figure includes providing an action figure having multiple parts and multiple record-keeping devices that selectively display varied information relating to multiple parts of the action figure.

30. The method of claim 29, wherein displaying the information includes displaying information relating to the multiple parts of the action figure.

31. The method of claim 30, wherein displaying the information includes displaying information relating to a head, a torso, and arms.

32. The method of claim 24, wherein mounting the accessory includes mounting a weapon on the action figure.

33. The method of claim 24, wherein mounting the accessory includes mounting a shield on the action figure.

34. The method of claim 24, wherein mounting the accessory includes mounting armor on the action figure.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The invention relates to games involving the use of representational figures to represent characters in the games.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] A degree of realism can be added to interactive games, especially war and fantasy games, through the use of figures to represent characters in the games. Each participant in the game manipulates characters, each represented by a figure and each being endowed with certain characteristics, e.g., strength abilities and defense abilities, that enter into the resolution of a given event, such as a battle or other interface between characters. As the complexity of each character and each scenario grows, and as the number of characters increases, the complexity of the game increases.

[0003] The more complicated prior art games require voluminous rules of play manuals. These manuals include massive amounts of rules and statistics for all of the figures in the game. The number of included statistics makes it difficult for a player to find a specific figure's statistics. In addition, a player is limited to figures included in their specific manual. Further, the rules often entail detailed record keeping by the players, which are often recorded on miscellaneous slips of paper that can become misplaced or disorganized.

[0004] Additional record keeping is required to identify accessories carried by the character during the game. The accessories can typically include items such as weapons, armor, shields, or magical items. In most games, possession of an accessory modifies the character's characteristics by increasing the character's attack strength, defense strength, or healing capabilities. The accessories are not physically represented and, therefore, the accessories and the modification to the characteristics must be recorded by the player, typically on the same paper as the other record keeping. In most games, the accessories will change throughout the game as upgraded accessories become available. In this regard, record keeping involves erasures or scratch-outs to keep one's record sheet updated with the character's current accessories.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0005] The solution to these problems is to take both the statistics pertaining to a specific character and the recording of game effects upon that character and incorporate them within each figure. Accordingly, some embodiments of the invention described herein provide a method and an apparatus by which record keeping is incorporated onto the game piece base of the figures themselves with a self-contained record-keeping device. This device includes counter-wheels having numbers, colors, or other indicia that reflect the nature and values of a character's characteristics and how they change as a game progresses.

[0006] Further, some embodiments include accessories that can be added to the figures. The accessories change the characteristics of that character and identify how the characteristics of the character are modified.

[0007] Other features and advantages of the invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon review of the following detailed description, claims, and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0008] FIG. 1 is an exploded view of the game piece according to the described invention.

[0009] FIG. 2 is an enlarged top view of the base of the game piece of FIG. 1.

[0010] FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an accessory for use with the game piece illustrated in FIG. 1.

[0011] FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an alternate accessory for use with the game piece illustrated in FIG. 1.

[0012] FIG. 5 is a schematic view of dice used with the game piece illustrated in FIG. 1.

[0013] Before one embodiment of the invention is explained in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and the arrangements of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or being carried out in various ways. Also, it is understood that the phraseology and terminology used herein is for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. The use of “including” and “comprising” and variations thereof herein is meant to encompass the items listed thereafter and equivalents thereof as well as additional items.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0014] Figures are often used in games, especially war and fantasy games, to represent characters in the games. These characters, for example, can be a Roman legionnaire, a Civil War Union soldier, a magician, or a mythical beast, depending on the game. Games can be played to re-enact historical battles, such as the Spartan defense of Thermopylae against the invading Persian army under King Xerxes, or to create a fantastical battle such as one pitting elves and humans against trolls and orcs. Each participant in the game commands an army of characters, each represented by a figure. Each character is endowed with certain strengths and weaknesses, all of which enter into the resolution of a given battle. To add interest to the battle, other factors such as magic and terrain can also be included.

[0015] FIG. 1 illustrates a game piece 4 for use in a game according to the invention described below. For the purposes of this description, the terms action figure and game piece will be used interchangeably. The game piece 4 includes a base 8 and a FIG. 12. It is to be understood that a generic game piece base could be designed to be connectable with other action figures, such as a G.I. JOE figure.

[0016] Each game piece base 8 includes a self-contained record-keeping device 16 similar to that described in pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/958,201, filed Oct. 5, 2001, the entire contents of which is incorporated by reference herein. The base 8 also includes a hollow box 20. In the illustrated embodiment, the base 8 is shown as being round. It is to be understood, however, that the base 8 could be any suitable size or shape to facilitate storage.

[0017] The record-keeping device 16 includes three dials 24 that can keep track of three different sets of variable information relating to the game. Each FIG. 12 represents a character in the game and the variable information relates to characteristics of that character. One dial 32 correlates with the figure's head, another dial 36 correlates with the figure's arms and a third dial 40 correlates with the figure's torso. The head dial 32 shows the figure's initiative value. The torso dial 36 shows the figure's movement and defense values. The arm dial 40 shows the figure's attack value. It is to be understood that the game piece 4 could contain any number of dials that correlate to a corresponding number of parts on the FIG. 12. It is further understood that the dials are not limited to showing only one or two values. The values can be numbers, symbols, letters, or any combination thereof. Alternatively, the dials could show three or more values and other games can be played where additional numbers are varied within each dial.

[0018] Each time a part of an action FIG. 4 takes a point of damage during a game, the player clicks the appropriate dial 24 clockwise to the next set of numbers. Each point of damage taken by an action FIG. 4 changes the action figure's game piece base numbers, typically reducing the action figure's effectiveness. Each time an action FIG. 4 takes a click of healing during the game, the player clicks the dial counter-clockwise to the previous set of numbers. When three skulls, or other symbols used to indicate elimination, show up on any of the dials 32, 36, 40 on the game piece base 8, the action FIG. 4 has been eliminated and is removed from the battlefield.

[0019] As illustrated in FIG. 1, the FIG. 12 can also be outfitted with accessories 44. These accessories 44 can increase the figure's attack and defense characteristics. FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate two examples of specific accessories 44 that can be used with the game piece 4 which will be described in more detail below.

[0020] As shown in FIG. 2, each action figure's game piece base 8 contains important information. This information includes the action figure's: a) name 48, b) base action dice 52, c) close, short and long range codes 56, d) special ability 60, e) accessory slot limit 64, and f) combat values 68. Each action figure's base 8 also has three stat slots 72 to see numbers on the record-keeping devices 16. Each action FIG. 4 has four combat values: initiative 76, movement 80, defense 84, and attack 88. These four values are shown separately on the three dials 24 corresponding to the different parts of the FIG. 12, and can be seen through the action figure's stat slots 72. In other embodiments, each dial 24 could show values relating to initiative, movement, defense and/or attack together.

[0021] FIG. 3 illustrates an arm shield 92 for use with the action FIG. 4. The arm shield 92 is a defense accessory and can make the action figure's defense characteristics stronger. The arm shield 92 includes an accessory slot number 96 that indicates how much of an action figure's accessory slot limit 64 is used up by carrying that accessory 44. The arm shield 92 also includes shield symbols 100 that identify when the arm shield 92 will defend against an attack. The shield symbols 100 can be of different colors and any number of shield symbols can be found on a given defense accessory.

[0022] FIG. 4 illustrates a rifle 104 for use with the action FIG. 4. The rifle 104 is an attack accessory and can make the action figure's attack characteristics stronger. The rifle 104 includes a number 108 that acts as an accessory slot number and as a dice indicator. In the illustrated example, if an action FIG. 4 carries this weapon, three points of its accessory slot limit 64 are used up and up to three dice 112 can be used in an attack using the rifle 104. This will be described in greater detail below. The rifle 104 also includes a dice symbol 114 that indicates which type of dice 112 may be thrown to use the weapon in an attack. The dice symbol 114, like the shield symbols 100, can be of different colors, the colors indicating what dice may be used in an attack. This also will be described in greater detail below. It should be noted that accessories 44 can also include other items such as a talisman, belt, cape, communication device, animal companion, glasses or the like. Each of these accessories 44 are capable of modifying the characteristics of the character in different ways.

[0023] FIG. 5 illustrates the dice 112 for use with the action FIG. 4 in the game. Six different shaped dice can be used with the action FIG. 4 in a game: four-sided dice 116, six-sided dice 120, eight-sided dice 124, ten-sided dice 128, twelve-sided dice 132, and twenty-sided dice 136. According to the rules of play of the game, different dice 112 can be used at different times to the advantage of a player. The dice 112 are also of different colors, the colors indicating the different uses each die 112 can have.

[0024] Although the invention described herein may be used for a wide variety of games, a basic version of a game called ACTION FIGURE GAME will be used as an example to illustrate the invention. In ACTION FIGURE GAME, a player takes on the role of a powerful warlord, king, baron, or high wizard who sends his action FIG. 4 out to do battle with opposing armies. ACTION FIGURE GAME is a game of tabletop combat using collectible action FIG. 4. Each action FIG. 4 has different strengths and weaknesses, some inherently stronger than others. A player is given the opportunity to add accessories 44 to the action FIG. 4 to supplement their inherent characteristics.

[0025] Game Items: In addition to a player's ACTION FIGURE GAME action FIG. 4 and a rules sheet, a player needs the following items to play the ACTION FIGURE GAME: a) a flexible ruler (not shown), b) dice 112, and c) attack and defense accessories 44. In another embodiment of the game, the flexible ruler may be a tape measure built-in to the base 8 of the game piece 4. Optionally, a player may also collect simple terrain items.

[0026] Accessories: Each action FIG. 4 can be equipped with accessories 44 before a game begins. Each accessory 44 shows the number of slots a figure must use from his accessory slot limit 64 to carry it (see FIG. 3). An action FIG. 4 may not carry more accessories 44 than allowed by his accessory slot limit 64. Some action FIG. 4 may have a higher slot limit 64 than others. In this way, players may equalize action FIG. 4 that have stronger inherent abilities with weaker action FIG. 4 by allowing the weaker action FIG. 4 to supplement their inherent characteristics with more accessories 44 (i.e. a higher slot limit). If an accessory 44 does not fit on an action FIG. 4, then that accessory 44 may not be used by that action FIG. 4. For example, if an arm shield 92 is too small to fit on the arm of an action FIG. 4, that action FIG. 4 may not pick up that arm shield 92.

[0027] Each attack accessory 44 identifies an accessory slot cost 96 and a dice code 114. Each attack accessory 44 is designated one of the range codes 56 provided on the base 8. Each movement accessory 44 has an accessory slot cost 96 and dice code 114. Defense accessories 44 have an accessory slot cost 96, a shield code 100 (described in the Standard Game rules) and, sometimes, a dice code 114.

[0028] Beginning the Basic Game: ACTION FIGURE GAME can be played on a flat tabletop. The players designate an area to play that is at least five feet long on each side. A game can be played with any number of people, and each player should bring two action FIG. 4 to the game, along with enough accessories 44 to completely equip them. Each player places up to two terrain items in a pile off to the side of the battlefield. The purpose of the terrain will be described in greater detail below. Next, each player rolls two six-sided dice 120 where the highest roll determines the first player. The first player then places his two action FIG. 4 in base contact with his edge of the playing surface. Every other player, in clockwise order, then does the same. The first player, followed by the other players in clockwise order, then places a Magestone treasure on the playing surface, at least twenty-four inches from each action FIG. 4. Magestone treasures are additional accessories 44 that a player may pick up during a game and allow players to increase the power of their action FIG. 4. Finally, the first player places one final Magestone treasure, just like the others. The players then fill the dice pool for each of their figures.

[0029] Dice Pool: ACTION FIGURE GAME is a dice chucking game. In order to execute an action, the players must roll dice 112. Typically, players want the highest numbers possible in any given roll. Every FIG. 12 in a battle has its own dice pool and dice 112 from one figure's pool cannot be transferred to another figure's pool. Each action FIG. 4 comes with three base action dice 52, which are labeled on the base 8 of the game piece 4. The accessories 44 for use with the action FIG. 4 also come with dice 112. A player's dice pool consists of that figure's base action dice 52, plus any dice 112 provided by the accessories 44 currently on a FIG. 12. Up to six dice 112 from the dice pool are placed on the figure's base 8 at the beginning of each turn. The remaining dice 112 are set aside and may be used on any subsequent turn. The selection of dice 112 for a given turn, like the selection of accessories 44 and FIG. 12, are strategies for the game. As dice 112 are rolled during the turn, they are removed from the figure's base 8 and returned to the figure's dice pool. If an accessory 44 is lost during a turn, its dice 112 are not added to the dice pool for the next turn. Similarly, if an accessory 44 is picked up during play, its dice 112 are added to a figure's dice pool for the next turn.

[0030] The dice 112 are coded by color and shape and are used for several game mechanics. Any dice 112 on the base 8 can be used for initiative, defense or to acquire an accessory 44. Any white dice 112 on the base 8 can be used for movement. Any colored (non-white) dice 112 on the base 8 can be used to attack.

[0031] Turns and Actions: In ACTION FIGURE GAME, players alternate moving their action FIG. 4 and attacking opposing action FIG. 4 to win the battle. At the beginning of each turn, each player moves up to six dice 112 from each game piece's dice pool to its base 8. Players then determine the order that each action FIG. 4 will take its actions. Starting with the first player, initiative dice are selected for each action FIG. 4. Each player openly assigns initiative dice for each action FIG. 4 in order, remembering that once a die is rolled, it is removed from the figure's base 8 and returned to the dice pool. After all initiative dice are assigned for each action FIG. 4, the dice 112 are rolled and added to that figure's initiative value 76. The total is the figure's initiative number for the turn. Initiative number ties are resolved by re-rolling the same initiative dice 112.

[0032] Starting with the action FIG. 4 with the highest initiative number, each action FIG. 4 takes its actions. An action FIG. 4 may move once and attack once or twice, as the owning player wishes. An action FIG. 4 may move and/or perform its attacks in any order. An action FIG. 4 may not perform any actions if there are no dice 112 on its base 8. The controlling player may declare that his figure's actions are ended, even if dice 112 remain on its base 8.

[0033] When each action FIG. 4 has had the opportunity to take its actions for the turn, the turn is over. Move all dice 112 off of the bases 8 and return them to their dice pools. The next game turn begins with the first player status moving to the next player in clockwise order around the playing surface, again, the first player being the first to select initiative dice. The turn sequence is repeated until the game ends.

[0034] Special Abilities: Each action FIG. 4 has a special ability 60. The special ability 60 for a given action FIG. 4 is described on the base 8 of that action FIG. 4. Examples of some special abilities 60 include: a) the figure's initiative dice rolls are doubled; and b) any action FIG. 4 friendly to the owning action FIG. 4 may use the owning figure's defense number while in base contact with the owning figure. Players should consider these special abilities when strategizing for their turns and when strategizing their character selection at the start of the game.

[0035] Movement: An action FIG. 4 may move once each turn. When an action FIG. 4 is about to move, the controlling player selects some or all of the white dice 112 on the figure's base 8 and rolls them. The total is the number of inches that action FIG. 4 may move. At least one white dice 112 must be rolled in order for an action FIG. 4 to move. An action FIG. 4 may not move farther than the maximum movement distance allowed on the figure's flexible ruler. A movement accessory 44 may allow a player to roll a die 112 having increased sides, thereby offering the opportunity for a further movement.

[0036] Attack: An action FIG. 4 can make up to two attacks each turn. Attacks occur at different ranges. Each figure base 8 is printed with range codes 56: C=close (melee) attack; S=short range attack; and L=long range attack. A target can be attacked as long as the range 56 of the target is indicated on the figure's base 8. Short range and long range bands are printed on each figure's flexible ruler. Close attacks can be made against any target in base contact with the action FIG. 4. Short range and long range attacks may only be made against targets within the front arc (90°) of the action FIG. 4, and the target is within the appropriate range band.

[0037] When an action FIG. 4 makes an attack, the controlling player selects any number of colored (non-white) dice 112 on the figure's base 8 to be rolled for the attack. If the target has any dice 112 on its base 8, the defending player may select any of them as his defensive parry. The attacking dice 112 are then rolled and added to the attacking figure's attack value 88. The defender rolls any defense dice 112 and adds them to the target's defense value 84. If the attacker's total is greater than or equal to the target's total, the attack succeeds and the target is hit by the attack. An attack can only be made if the attacking action FIG. 4 rolls at least one colored die 112. In the Basic Game, special targeting symbols found on some dice 112 are ignored and should be treated as a one if rolled.

[0038] An attack that succeeds does one click of damage to the target for each colored die 112 rolled. The defender selects where to apply the damage (to the head, arms or torso of the target action FIG. 4). Damage clicks cause the appropriate dial 24 to be clicked clockwise on the target's base 8. An action FIG. 4 is eliminated when a total of three skulls show up on any of its dials 24.

[0039] There are also three special damage effects that appear in the figure dials: stun; rout; and weak. If the stun effect appears, at the beginning of a turn, remove the figure's base action dice 52 from its dice pool. If rout appears, the action FIG. 4 may not move into base contact with an enemy action FIG. 4. If weak appears, the action FIG. 4 drops all accessories 44 held in its hands or on its arms. These accessories 44 are placed by the owning player in contact with the dropping figure's base 8.

[0040] An action FIG. 4 may also fumble an attack. Once the dice 112 are rolled, look at the numbers. If any doubles are rolled, the attack is fumbled and there is no effect.

[0041] Measuring Distances: When measuring distances for movement and attacks, always measure from and to the edge of a figure's base 8. When measuring movement, the ruler must show the exact path of movement. The path may not pass over another figure's base 8. When measuring a short or long ranged attack, the ruler must show the exact line of fire. This line of fire must be along an imaginary line that passes through the center of the attacker's and target's bases 8.

[0042] Potions: Each action FIG. 4 may carry up to three potions. Potions are special accessories 44 that are used once, and then discarded. Although referred to as accessories 44, potions do on occupy any slots on the figure and therefore do not subtract from the slot limit 64. A potion can be used by an action FIG. 4 at any time, unless it has just been eliminated. The potion's effect is resolved immediately when it is used. For example, a healing potion may allow the player to click one dial 24 on the base 8 of one action FIG. 4 one click counter-clockwise, typically causing that figure to become stronger again.

[0043] Dropping and Acquiring Items: An action FIG. 4 may drop an accessory 44 at any time. When an action FIG. 4 is eliminated, it is removed from the playing surface, but all of its accessories 44 and Magestone treasures are left there in a pile. An action FIG. 4 may pick up one item on the playing surface it is in base contact with instead of taking its movement action. To pick up an item, roll any dice 112 on the figure's base 8. If the result is at least ten, the item is picked up and can be equipped by the action FIG. 4 as long as it does not exceed the accessory slot limit 64.

[0044] Ending the Game: The game lasts for one hour or until one player possess all the Magestone treasures. At the end of one hour, the player with the most Magestone treasures is the winner. If two or more players have the same number of Magestone treasures, use the following tiebreakers, in order, to determine a winner: 1) greatest number of action FIG. 4 still in play; 2) greatest number of equipped accessories 44; or 3) greatest number of dice 112 in all owned dice pools.

[0045] The Standard Game: The Standard Game is a more involved version of the Basic Game. All of the Basic Game rules are used in the Standard Game, except where altered below.

[0046] Colored Dice Effects: All colored dice 112 (except for yellow dice) have a special targeting symbol printed on them. If that symbol is rolled, it does not add a number value to the roll. It can, however, add a special damage effect to the attack. If a target is hit and a target symbol is showing, the additional damage effects are: 1) the red die target symbol causes the elimination of one accessory 44 on the target (attacker's choice); 2) the blue die target symbol allows the attacker to remove any three dice 112 from the target's base 8; 3) the green die target symbol prevents the target from making any attack for the rest of the turn; and 4) the black die target symbol allows the attacker to put three more damage clicks on the target dial 24 of his choice if the attack is successful.

[0047] Color Shields: If the target has an accessory with a shield symbol 100, the target can ignore one click of damage each turn caused by a die 112 of the matching color. If a click of damage is cancelled this way, any extra damage effect caused by that die 112 is also cancelled.

[0048] Tabletop Terrain: Players are not required to use terrain when fighting a battle, but adding terrain to the tabletop will make the game more challenging and interesting. Small pieces of furniture, small boxes or stacks of books can be used to represent terrain. Terrain blocks movement and ranged attacks. Also, if the terrain is flat on top and large enough, action FIG. 4 can be moved up and onto it. Before the game starts, the first player can place one terrain item on the battlefield. Each player, in clockwise order around the playing surface, has the opportunity to do the same. A figure's move must stop as soon as it moves onto or off of the top of a piece of terrain. An action FIG. 4 that is above its target can add one to any attack it rolls.

[0049] The winner of the Standard Game is determined in the same way described above for the Basic Game.

[0050] Various features of the invention are set forth in the following claims.