Title:
Modular point-of-purchase display
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A modular point-of-purchase display system is provided with a base in which open-fronted trays are inserted, and an alternative base in which open-fronted trays are stacked onto a base having an inclined, L-shaped profile, when observed from the side, the trays being wider than the base surface upon which they rest. Vertical extensions are provided, for increasing the stacking capacity of each of the bases. Two tray sizes are provided, ones having a shallow depth, and ones having substantially greater depth. Front extensions are provided for the bases, in both modes, for accommodating trays having substantially greater depth. Trays are provided with interior wall components that enable the user to select between several alternative tray interior configurations, to accommodate products being displayed, products having different dimensions, and to accommodate products having different row and/or stack counts.



Inventors:
Field, David L. (Cincinnati, OH, US)
Harpring, Jeffrey G. (Cincinnati, OH, US)
Betsch, James A. (Cincinnati, OH, US)
Application Number:
10/198248
Publication Date:
01/22/2004
Filing Date:
07/18/2002
Assignee:
FIELD DAVID L.
HARPRING JEFFREY G.
BETSCH JAMES A.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
248/174, 211/149
International Classes:
A47F5/11; (IPC1-7): A47F3/14
View Patent Images:
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20090107028BUOY HOLDER FOR FISH CULLINGApril, 2009Mullins
20040262250Merchandising strip with locking tabDecember, 2004Kosir
20080142560GROCERY BAG BAR AND HOLDING SYSTEMJune, 2008Lim
20090145866Wall organizing systemJune, 2009Panosian et al.
20050263472Adaptable vertical organizerDecember, 2005Norris et al.



Primary Examiner:
NOVOSAD, JENNIFER ELEANORE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Greenberg Traurig, LLP (CHICAGO, IL, US)
Claims:

We claim:



1. A modular point-of-purchase display system, for the display of a plurality of individual discrete articles, the modular point-of-purchase display system comprising: a base, erectable from a substantially flat blank, and operably configured, upon articulation, to support at least one discrete display tray, the base including an open-fronted tray receiving region, the base including a front panel, a tray support bottom panel extending rearwardly from an upper edge region of the front panel, and a tray support back panel, extending upwardly from a rear edge region of the tray support bottom panel, the tray support bottom panel and the tray support back panel together forming, at least in part, the open-fronted tray receiving region; one or more display trays, each of the one or more display trays being operably configured to be received by and supported within the open-fronted tray receiving region of the base, each of the one or more display trays having one of a first and a second depth, in which said second depth is greater than said first depth.

2. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 1, further comprising: a front extension support, erectable from a substantially flat blank, and operably configured for attachment to the front panel of the base, when at least one of the one or more display trays has a second greater depth, the front extension support including a front extension tray support panel, configured to align in a substantially coplanar orientation with the tray support bottom panel of the base, when the front extension support is attached to the base, for providing support for a forward portion of a bottom wall of a lowermost one of one or more display trays that is received in the tray receiving region.

3. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 1, further comprising: tray receiving region side panels operably disposed on opposite sides of the open-fronted tray-receiving region, to define a tray-receiving cavity.

4. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 3, wherein the tray receiving region side panels, are disposed in planes substantially perpendicular to at least one of the tray support bottom panel, the tray support back panel.

5. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 3, wherein the tray receiving cavity has a width that is greater that the width of each of the one or more display trays.

6. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 1, wherein the tray receiving region of the base is configured for accommodating a stack of trays of a specific number, the modular point-of-purchase display system further comprising: a vertical extension support, operably attachable to an upper region of the base, for enabling the accommodation of additional one or more trays atop an uppermost one of a stack of trays of a specific number, which the tray receiving region of the base can accommodate.

7. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 6, wherein the vertical extension support is configured to accommodate a single additional stacked tray.

8. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 6, wherein the vertical extension support is configured to accommodate a plurality of additional stacked trays.

9. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 6, wherein the vertical extension support includes a center panel, that is operably configured, upon positioning of the vertical extension support atop the base, to align in a substantially coplanar manner with the tray support back panel of the base.

10. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 6, wherein the vertical extension support is provided with a plurality of downwardly extending tabs configured to engage upper edge portions of the base, for maintaining the vertical extension support in position atop the base.

11. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 1, wherein at least one of the one or more display trays is open-fronted.

12. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 1, wherein at least one of the one or more display trays is provided with at least one deployable easel support, for enabling the tray to be employed in an individual countertop display mode, independent of the base.

13. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 1, wherein each of the one or more display trays has a width that is greater than at least one of the tray support bottom panel, the tray support back panel.

14. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 1, wherein at least one of the one or more display trays is erectable from a substantially flat blank, into a substantially rectangular open-fronted parallelepiped.

15. The modular point-of-purchase display system, according to claim 1, wherein the substantially flat blank includes a plurality of successively connected panels, emanating from a panel, forming an outer top wall of a tray, which plurality of successively connected panels may be articulated in a plurality of different sequences, toward providing different selectable interior configurations for the tray.

16. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 15, wherein the plurality of successively connected panels, upon selected articulation, forms a tray having inner and outer top walls and a single back wall.

17. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 15, wherein the plurality of successively connected panels, upon articulation, forms a tray having inner and outer juxtaposed top walls and inner and outer juxtaposed back walls, and inner and outer juxtaposed bottom walls.

18. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 15, wherein the plurality of successively connected panels, upon articulation, forms a tray having inner and outer juxtaposed top walls and inner and outer juxtaposed back walls, and inner and outer vertically spaced bottom walls.

19. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 15, wherein the plurality of successively connected panels, upon articulation, forms a tray having at least one spacer projection extending from inner back and bottom walls, toward an interior region of the tray.

20. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 1, further comprising an interior support, formed from a blank discrete from the base.

21. The modular point-of-purchase display system according to claim 1, wherein the substantially flat blank includes a plurality of successively connected panels, emanating from a panel forming an inner front wall of a tray, which plurality of successively connected panels form further bottom and back walls for the tray.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention is directed to point-of-purchase display shelving structures, in particular point of purchase display shelving structures for small products, that may be packaged in individual cartons, boxes or plastic or paperboard clamshells.

[0003] 2. Prior Art

[0004] Point of purchase display shelving structures for small size goods are well known. Such shelving structures are often fabricated from metal, plastic, or paperboard materials, may be fabricated to be quickly set up and knocked down, in order to accommodate the needs of the particular business establishment, as well as the changing promotional events that prompt the use of the point of purchase display shelving.

[0005] However, such prior art displays are typically very generic in shape, little more than open-topped or open-front bins in which the goods are piled or stacked. Furthermore, such displays, by their generic nature, are incapable of addressing changing needs or conditions for the ultimate customer, the vendor for the goods being displayed.

[0006] Accordingly, prior art point-of-purchase display stands, for different product package sizes, have, in the past, required different die-cut base and/or tray designs, and typically employed fillers to take up extra space when the package sizes or counts are less than that for which the particular display was designed.

[0007] As such, it would be desirable to provide a point-of-purchase display stand that is capable of being adjusted or modified, in order to accommodate the specific products being displayed, without requiring a range of different die-cut configurations.

[0008] These and other desirable characteristics of the invention will become apparent in light of the present specification, including claims, and drawings.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0009] The present invention is directed to a modular point-of-purchase display system, for the display of a plurality of individual discrete articles. The modular point-of-purchase display system comprises a base, erectable from a substantially flat blank, and operably configured, upon articulation, to support at least one discrete display tray, the base including an open-fronted tray receiving region.

[0010] The base includes a front panel, a tray support bottom panel extending rearwardly from an upper edge region of the front panel, and a tray support back panel, extending upwardly from a rear edge region of the tray support bottom panel. The tray support bottom panel and the tray support back panel together form, at least in part, the open-fronted tray receiving region.

[0011] One or more display trays are provided, each of the one or more display trays being operably configured to be received by and supported within the open-fronted tray receiving region of the base.

[0012] Each of the one or more display trays has one of a first and a second depth, in which said second depth is greater than said first depth.

[0013] The modular point-of-purchase display system may further comprise a front extension support, erectable from a substantially flat blank, and operably configured for attachment to the front panel of the base, when at least one of the one or more display trays has a second greater depth. The front extension support preferably includes a front extension tray support panel, configured to align in a substantially coplanar orientation with the tray support bottom panel of the base, when the front extension support is attached to the base, for providing support for a forward portion of a bottom wall of a lowermost one of one or more display trays that is received in the tray receiving region.

[0014] The modular point-of-purchase display system may further comprise tray receiving region side panels operably disposed on opposite sides of the open-fronted tray-receiving region, to define a tray-receiving cavity. The tray receiving region side panels are preferably disposed in planes substantially perpendicular to at least one of the tray support bottom panel, the tray support back panel.

[0015] In an embodiment of the invention, the tray receiving cavity has a width that is greater that the width of each of the one or more display trays.

[0016] In an embodiment of the invention, in which the tray receiving region of the base is configured for accommodating a stack of trays of a specific number, the modular point-of-purchase display system further comprises a vertical extension support, operably attachable to an upper region of the base, for enabling the accommodation of additional one or more trays atop an uppermost one of a stack of trays of a specific number, which the tray receiving region of the base can accommodate. The vertical extension support may be configured to accommodate a single additional stacked tray. Alternatively, the vertical extension support may be configured to accommodate a plurality of additional stacked trays.

[0017] Preferably, the vertical extension support includes a center panel, that is operably configured, upon positioning of the vertical extension support atop the base, to align in a substantially coplanar manner with the tray support back panel of the base.

[0018] The vertical extension support may be provided with a plurality of downwardly extending tabs configured to engage upper edge portions of the base, for maintaining the vertical extension support in position atop the base.

[0019] Preferably, at least one of the one or more display trays is open-fronted.

[0020] In an embodiment of the invention, at least one of the one or more display trays is provided with at least one deployable easel support, for enabling the tray to be employed in an individual countertop display mode, independent of the base.

[0021] In an embodiment of the invention, each of the one or more display trays has a width that is greater than at least one of the tray support bottom panel, the tray support back panel.

[0022] In an embodiment of the invention, at least one of the one or more display trays is erectable from a substantially flat blank, into a substantially rectangular open-fronted parallelepiped. Preferably, in one such embodiment, the substantially flat blank includes a plurality of successively connected panels, emanating from a panel, forming an outer top wall of a tray, which plurality of successively connected panels may be articulated in a plurality of different sequences, toward providing different selectable interior configurations for the tray. The plurality of successively connected panels, upon selected articulation, may form a tray having inner and outer top walls and a single back wall. The plurality of successively connected panels, upon articulation, may alternatively form a tray having inner and outer juxtaposed top walls and inner and outer juxtaposed back walls, and inner and outer juxtaposed bottom walls. The plurality of successively connected panels, upon articulation, may alternatively form a tray having inner and outer juxtaposed top walls and inner and outer juxtaposed back walls, and inner and outer vertically spaced bottom walls. The plurality of successively connected panels, upon articulation, may alternatively form a tray having at least one spacer projection extending from inner back and bottom walls, toward an interior region of the tray.

[0023] The modular point-of-purchase display system may further comprise an interior support, formed from a blank discrete from the base.

[0024] The modular point-of-purchase display system may further comprise at least one tray formed from a substantially flat blank, wherein the substantially flat blank includes a plurality of successively connected panels, emanating from a panel forming an inner front wall of a tray, which plurality of successively connected panels form further bottom and back walls for the tray.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0025] FIG. 1 is a plan view of a blank for an inserted tray floorstand, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.

[0026] FIG. 1a is a plan view of a blank for a support for the floorstand of FIG. 1.

[0027] FIG. 1b is a plan view of a blank for a signage or graphics riser, for use with the stand and the trays in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 1 in the present invention.

[0028] FIG. 1c is a series of illustrations showing the steps for setting up the floorstand of the embodiment of FIG. 1.

[0029] FIG. 2 is a plan view of a blank for a front extension for an inserted tray floorstand, in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 1.

[0030] FIG. 3a is a plan view of a blank for a shallow tray for use in association with an inserted tray floorstand, in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 1.

[0031] FIG. 3b is a plan view of a blank for a deep tray for use in association with an inserted tray floorstand, in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 1.

[0032] FIG. 4 is an illustration of a shallow tray, shown in its erected form, with bottom and back easel portions deployed, to enable the shallow tray to be used in its countertop configuration.

[0033] FIG. 5 is an illustration of a blank for a short vertical extension, for use with the inserted tray floorstand of FIG. 1.

[0034] FIG. 6 is an illustration of a blank for a long vertical extension, for use with the inserted tray floorstand of FIG. 1.

[0035] FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a modular point-of-purchase display, incorporating an inserted tray floorstand, and shallow trays, in a two-up configuration.

[0036] FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a modular point-of-purchase display, incorporating an inserted tray floorstand, and shallow trays, in a three-up configuration.

[0037] FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a modular point-of-purchase display, incorporating an inserted tray floorstand, and deep trays, in a four-up configuration.

[0038] FIG. 10 is an enlarged, top and side perspective view of a portion of the modular point-of-purchase display of FIG. 9.

[0039] FIG. 11 is an enlarged, rear and side perspective view of a portion of the modular point-of-purchase display of FIGS. 9 and 10.

[0040] FIG. 12 is a plan view of a blank for an exposed tray floorstand, in accordance with another embodiment of the invention.

[0041] FIG. 12b is a plan view of a blank for a signage or graphics riser, for use with the stand and the trays in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 1 in the present invention.

[0042] FIG. 13 is a plan view of a blank for a front extension for an exposed tray floorstand, in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 12.

[0043] FIG. 14a is a plan view of a blank for a tray for use in association with an exposed tray floorstand, in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 12.

[0044] FIG. 14b is a plan view of an alternative blank for a tray for use in association with an exposed tray floorstand, in accordance with the embodiment of FIG. 12.

[0045] FIG. 15 is an illustration of a blank for a vertical extension, for use with the exposed tray floorstand of FIG. 12.

[0046] FIG. 16 is a perspective view of an exposed tray floorstand display, employing shallow trays.

[0047] FIG. 17 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of an exposed tray floorstand display, in which the tray is articulated into a slip sleeve configuration without deployed spacer projections.

[0048] FIG. 18 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of an exposed tray floorstand display, in which the tray is articulated into a slip sleeve configuration, with deployed spacer projections.

[0049] FIG. 19 is an enlarged perspective view of an upper portion of an exposed tray floorstand display, showing the vertical extension.

[0050] FIG. 20 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of an exposed tray floorstand display, in which the tray is articulated into a clamshell configuration.

[0051] FIG. 21 is a perspective view of an exposed tray floorstand display, employing two deep trays.

[0052] FIG. 22 is a perspective view of an exposed tray floorstand display, with vertical extension, employing four deep trays, in different configurations.

[0053] FIG. 23 is a perspective view of an exposed tray floorstand display, with vertical extension, employing three deep trays, in different configurations.

[0054] FIG. 24 is a perspective view of the lower portion of an exposed tray floorstand display, showing the front extension.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0055] While this invention is susceptible of embodiment in many different forms, there is shown in the drawings and will be described herein in detail, a specific embodiment, with the understanding that the present invention is to be considered as an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the embodiment illustrated.

[0056] In the figures, unless otherwise noted, the usual convention is observed that solid lines on the interior of a figure represent cuts, edges or points of inflection (like a ridge, crease or inwardly or outwardly projecting gusset), and broken or dashed lines indicate folds, score lines or other lines of weakness.

[0057] The present invention is directed to a modular point-of-purchase display stand system, in two basic embodiments (inserted trays and exposed trays), with several configuration options. The system includes: 1) the “inserted tray” embodiment, including inserted trays (in both shallow and deep configurations); a floorstand base for inserted trays; a base front extender for enabling the accommodation of deep inserted trays; and 2) the “exposed tray” embodiment, including exposed trays (in both shallow and deep configurations); a floorstand base for exposed trays; a base front extender for enabling the accommodation of deep exposed trays; vertical or top extenders, for permitting increased stacks or layers of trays (for both base configurations); and 3) a graphics or signage riser, applicable to both embodiments.

[0058] In preferred embodiments of the invention, the blanks may all be fabricated from corrugated paperboard, particularly of a kind in which all of the surfaces that will be exposed to public visual inspection during use may be faced with bleached white, printed, pigmented or clay-coated kraft paper or some other cosmetically more attractive surface than the typical brown plain kraft paper with which corrugated paperboard is often made.

[0059] FIGS. 1-11 illustrate the components of the “inserted tray” embodiment. FIG. 1 is a plan view of base/blank 10 for an inserted tray floorstand, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. Blank 10, preferably formed from corrugated paperboard material (though other materials may be used) includes front panel 12, front bottom flap 14, fold line 16, tray support bottom panel 18, fold line 20, and tray support back panel 22. Tray support back panel 22 is connected to tray support bottom panel 18 by three fold lines 24a, 24b and 24c, which are separated by contoured cuts 25a and 25b. Top edge panel 28 is connected to tray support back panel 22 along fold line 27, and to back connection panel 30 by fold line 29. Back connection panel 30 includes two notches 31a and 31b.

[0060] Elongated slots 32a, 32b and 32c are located along three edges of front panel 12. Front side panels 34a and 34b emanate from front panel 12, along fold lines 35a, 35b, respectively. Rear side panels 36a, 36b emanate from front side panels 34a and 34b, along fold lines 37a, 37b, respectively (which are provided, for enabling blank 10 to be folded flat for shipping, prior to final articulation into the finished configuration). Side panel bottom flaps 38a-d emanate from the bottom edges of front side panels 34a-b and rear side panels 36a-b, along fold lines 39a-d, respectively.

[0061] Back panel 40 emanates from the rear edge of rear side panel 36b, along fold line 41. Back panel bottom flap 42 emanates from the bottom edge of back panel 40, along fold line 43. Glue flap 44 emanates from the rear edge of rear side panel 36a, along fold line 45.

[0062] Tray receiving region side panels 46a, 46b, emanate from front side panels 34a, 34b, along fold lines 47a, 47b, and are separated from tray support back panel 22, and tray support bottom panel 18, by cuts 48a-b and 49a-b.

[0063] FIG. 1a is a plan view of a blank 42 for an interior base support for base 10. Blank 42 includes center panel 44; fold lines 45a and 45b; rear side panels 46 and 47; fold lines 48a, 48b (which are provided solely for packing purposes, for enabling reduction in the size of the blank for shipping purposes; and front side panels 49 and 50.

[0064] FIG. 1c is a series of illustrations showing the steps for setting up the floorstand of the embodiment of FIG. 1. Fabrication of base 10 is accomplished by gluing tab 44 to panel 40, so that a tube is formed. Typically, the sides will be collapsed by folding front side panels 34a, 34b over rear side panels 36a, 36b, with the edges formed by fold lines 37a, 37b projecting inwardly, so that base 10 is collapsed flat for shipping (upper left of FIG. 1c). Set up comprises pushing out the in-folded side panels, and folding in the bottom flaps. Then, the base support 42 is folded into the shape shown in the upper right of FIG. 1c and inserted down into base 10. Tray support bottom panel 18 is folded downward to form an oblique or perpendicular angle to front panel 12. Tray support back panel 22 is lowered, while top edge panel 28 is folded oblique or perpendicular to tray support back panel 22, to a substantially horizontal orientation, and back connection panel 30 is folded down. Simultaneously, notches 49a and 50a will be aligned with and inserted into slots 22a and 22b of tray support back panel 22. Panel 22 is then folded back over support 42, so that notches 31a and 31b engage and interfit with notches 46a, 47a (lower left of FIG. 1c).

[0065] FIG. 2 is a plan view of a blank for a front extension 50 for inserted tray floorstand 10. Front extension 50 is used, when “deep” inserted trays are going to be used in the display. Front extension/blank 50 includes front panel 52; fold lines 53a and 53b; side panels 54a and 54b; fold lines 55a and 55b; attachment flaps 56a and 56b; fold lines 57a and 57b; hook tabs 58a and 58b; fold line 59; top panel 60; fold line 61; rear flap 62; and die cut flap 63 with tab 64.

[0066] Articulation of blank 50 is accomplished by folding panels 54a, 54b back oblique to front panel 52. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, front panel 52 is not as wide as front panel 12 of base 10. Accordingly, there is an included angle between front panel 52 and each of panels 54a, 54b, in the finally articulated extension, that is greater than 90°. Alternatively, if front panel 52 is as wide as front panel 12, then panels 54a, 54b will eventually be substantially perpendicular to front panel 52. Top panel 60 is folded down, past the perpendicular, so that its surface is parallel to the top edges of side panels 54a and 54b. Back panel 62 is folded down to extend vertically, parallel to front panel 52, and will abut the front of front panel 12, when front extension 50 is attached to a base 10. Attachment flaps 56a, 56b, with their corresponding hook tabs 58a and 58b, are received in slots 32a, 32c, respectively, of base 10, while tab 64 is received through slot 32b.

[0067] In an embodiment of the invention, the displays of the present invention may be employed for the display of video products, such as Digital Video Disc (DVD) holders (relatively thin containers—on the order of one-half inch thick, by five and one-quarter inches, by seven and one-half inches—also known as “Amaray/Amray trays”), or video tapes, in containers known as clamshells (having the following typical dimensions: 9 in.×5 {fraction (7/16)} in.×1 {fraction (3/16)} in.) or in paperboard envelopes known as slipsheets or slip sleeves (which occupy less volume and have smaller overall dimensions than do clamshells—having the following dimensions 7 {fraction (7/16)} in.×4 ⅛ in.×1 {fraction (1/16)} in.).

[0068] The present invention is not to be construed as limited to the display of such products, but may be applicable to other types of product packaging that is generally rectangular parallelepiped in form, as well as, with some modification, blister packs or other packaging modes, all without departing from the scope of the present invention.

[0069] FIG. 3 is a plan view of a blank for a tray 70 for use in association with inserted tray floorstand 10, specifically a shallow tray, as is reflected in the fact that the top and bottom walls are approximately one-half as deep as the back wall is high. Blank 70 is configured to be articulated in several different ways, depending upon the shape, size and quantity of the articles to be displayed, to accommodate different packaging styles and sizes, such as those discussed hereinabove.

[0070] Blank 70 includes back wall 72; diecut easel flaps 74, with movable tabs 76 extending along fold lines perpendicular to the fold lines for flaps 74; and diecut holes 75a, 75b. Bottom wall 82 is connected to back wall 72 along fold line 84, and includes diecut easel flap 86 with movable tabs 88 foldably attached thereto; diecut holes 87a, 87b, and slots 89a, 89b. Tabs 88 include short projections 90a, 90b.

[0071] Outer front panel 92 emanates from fold line 91 (along which are located elongated slots 91a, 91b), and inner front panel 94 emanates from double fold line 93. The free “bottom” edge of front panel 94 includes two shallow tabs 95a, 95b. Middle bottom wall 95c emanates along fold line 95d from inner front panel 94, and middle back wall 95e emanates along fold line 95f from middle bottom wall 95c.

[0072] Sidewalls 96a, 96b emanate from back wall 72 along fold lines 97a, 97b, respectively. Slots 98a, 98b are aligned substantially along fold lines 97a, 97b, as well. Locking flaps 99a, 99b emanate from sidewalls 96a, 96b, along fold lines 100a, 100b. Inner sidewalls 103a, 103b emanate from sidewalls 96a, 96b, along double fold lines 104a, 104b, and include shallow tabs 105a, 105b. Inner side tabs 106a, 106b also emanate along fold lines 104a, 104b. Outer top wall 108 emanates from back wall 72 along fold line 107. Top flaps 110a, 110b, emanate from outer top wall 108, along fold lines 109a, 109b. Inner top wall 112 extends along double fold line 111, and incorporates two shallow tabs 113a, 113b, defined by cuts 114a, 114b, and perforations 114c-e. Optional inner back wall 115 adjoins inner top wall 112, and incorporates diecut deployable projections 116a-116b (although two are shown, a greater or lesser number may be employed, as desired), which are shown in their undeployed form, in FIG. 3. Each deployable projection includes two opposing, joined tabs, e.g., tabs 117a and 117b, that are pivotably connected to one another, and have a circular (or other shape) hole 118 centered on the fold line between the tabs. Inner bottom wall 119 is connected to inner back wall 115, via the several pairs of tabs 117a, 117b, as well as the foldably connected rectangular mini-panels 120a-120c, located between the respective pairs of tabs 117a, 117b. Inner bottom wall 119 includes side flaps 119a and 119b, and inner locking flap 122.

[0073] Articulation of tray 70 is as follows: walls 108 and 82 are folded (e.g., toward the viewer of FIG. 3) to positions perpendicular to back wall 72. Flaps 110a, 110b are folded inwardly, perpendicular to back wall 108; flaps 99a, 99b are folded inwardly, perpendicular to outer sidewalls 96a, 96b, which are, in turn, folded inwardly (toward the viewer), to be perpendicular to back wall 82. Inner side flaps 103a, 103b are folded inwardly, until tabs 105a, 105b are received in slots 98a, 98b. Flaps 99a, 99b, 110a, 110b will be captured between outer sidewalls 96a, 96b, and their respective inner sidewalls 103a, 103b.

[0074] Flaps 106a and 106b are folded to be parallel to back wall 72, and to point toward one another. Outer front wall 92 is folded up perpendicular to bottom wall 82. Inner front wall 94 is folded to the inside of wall 92, so that flaps 106a, 106b are captured between them. Tabs 95a and 95b also lock into slots 91a and 91b. Middle bottom wall 95c is positioned parallel to and to the inside of wall 82, and wall 95d is positioned parallel to and to the inside of wall 72.

[0075] If a maximum amount of volume within the interior of tray 70 is desired, inner back wall 115 is torn away from inner top wall 112, along cuts/perforations 114a-e. Then, inner top wall 112 is folded downwardly and inwardly, into the receiving region which has now been formed, until tabs 113a, 113b, are received in slots created by notches 107a, 107b, upon articulation of the blank into a tray.

[0076] By leaving inner back wall 115 attached to inner top wall 112, then by different methods of articulation of inner back wall 115 and inner bottom wall 119, and the tabs and mini-panels, can be used, to arrive at different interior volumes and architectures for tray 70.

[0077] In another alternative embodiment, a fold is accomplished along line 115a. This positions inner bottom wall 119 in parallel, vertically spaced relation to bottom wall 82, just below the top edge of the front wall formed by panels 92, 94, and double fold line 93. This is shown, in the environment of the exposed tray displays, in the upper portion of FIG. 18. Panels 119a and 119b, and 122 are folded down, toward bottom wall 82, to help support inner bottom wall 119 above bottom wall 82. In this embodiment, the projections 116a-b are still not deployed, but their respective component tabs 117a and 117b are still “flush” with their surrounding panels. In this embodiment, there is substantially less height in the enclosed volume, to accommodate shorter packages, without the need for a void filler.

[0078] In a still further embodiment, projections 116a-b are deployed, during articulation, or thereafter, by one inserting a finger or tool, into each opening 118, and pulling on one or the other of tab pairs 117a, 117b, until each projection 116a-116b “pops” out, at a right angle, so that tabs 117a, 117b and adjacent portions of inner back wall 115, and the adjacent mini-panels 120a, b or c form, from the side, a rectangular contour, as is visible, in the environment of an exposed tray display, in FIG. 19. When projections 116a-b are deployed, there is less available depth to the interior volume of the tray, to accommodate thinner packages or a lower count of packages for a row (front to back) or both, again without requiring a separate void filler.

[0079] Tray 70 is also configured to be a stand-alone countertop display tray, if so desired, as shown in FIG. 4. This orientation is obtained by pushing easel panels 74 and 86 outwardly, and folding panels 76 perpendicular to and in locking engagement with 74, and by folding flaps 88 perpendicular to panel 86, and inserting tabs 90a, 90b into slots 89a, 89b.

[0080] Because, as can be seen from the figures, the individual trays are inclined, so that their top and bottom walls are at an angle with respect to the horizontal, a back wall support is needed to provide stability when the trays are stacked. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, inserted tray base 10 is configured to insertingly receive two stacked trays, whether they are shallow trays or deep trays.

[0081] FIG. 3b illustrates a “deep” tray to be used in combination with base 10, in that the depth of the top and bottom walls is substantially the same as or greater than the height of the back wall. To the extent that the walls, panels and flaps of the embodiment of FIG. 3b have the same orientation, structure and mode of operation (if not the same dimensions or proportions) as counterpart walls, panels and flaps in the blank of FIG. 3a, they have been given like reference numerals, differentiated by a prime (′), and their structure and mode of articulation are understood to be substantially the same as that described hereinabove.

[0082] The tray 70′ of FIG. 3b differentiates from tray 70 primarily in that it lacks the pop-up spacer structures 116a, 116b. In addition, tabs 111a′ and 111b′ are provided with are inserted and received into slots 111c′ and 111d′, respectively. In addition, tabs 117a′ and 117b′ are provided, which are crushed, and are then received in the “slots” formed, upon articulation, between side walls 96a′, 96b′, and flaps 110a′ and 110b′, to assist in alignment, stacking and orientation of trays 70′ atop one another.

[0083] In FIG. 5, “short” vertical extension/blank 150 includes center panel 152; two inner side panels 154a, 154b, joined to center panel 152 along fold lines 153a, 153b; two outer side panels 156a, 156b, joined to inner side panels 154a, 154b along double fold lines 155a, 155b; and back bracing panels 158a, 158b, joined to outer side panels 156a, 156b along fold lines 157a, 157b; and center panel bottom flap 160 joined to center panel 152 along fold line 159. Back bracing panels 158a, 158b include notches 161a, 161b and 162a, 162b. Bottom flap 160 when folded back 90° stabilizes fold 159, to keep it from bending or collapsing.

[0084] In FIG. 6, “long” vertical extension/blank 170 includes center panel 172; two inner side panels 174a, 174b, joined to center panel 172 along fold lines 173a, 173b; two outer side panels 176a, 176b, joined to inner side panels 174a, 174b along double fold lines 175a, 175b; and back bracing panels 178a, 178b, joined to outer side panels 176a, 176b along fold lines 177a, 177b; and center panel bottom flap 180 joined to center panel 172 along fold line 179. Back bracing panels 178a, 178b include notches 181a, 181b and 182a, 182b. Bottom flap 180 when folded back 90° stabilizes fold 179, to keep it from bending or collapsing.

[0085] Short vertical extension 150 and long vertical extension 170 differ in their dimensions and the proportions of their panels, but their articulation and mode of operation are the same. Accordingly, articulation of long vertical extension 170 will be described in detail (particularly in association with FIG. 11), with the understanding that similar steps will be performed for the articulation and mounting of the “short” vertical extension.

[0086] Making reference to FIGS. 6 and 11, inner side panels 174a, 174b are folded forward, perpendicular to center panel 172, to define a C-shaped region as seen from above. Outer side panels 176a, 176b are folded back into juxtaposed overlying relationship with inner side panels 174a, 174b, and affixed in place by any suitable means, so that the outer “edges” of outer side panels 176a, 176b extend backward, beyond the plane of center panel 172. Back bracing panels 178a, 178b are folded inwardly toward one another, to be perpendicular to outer side panels 176a, 176b. Long vertical extension 170 is pushed down onto the top of base 170, with the top edge region of base 10 being inserted into notches 181a, 181b, 182a, 182b, and the downwardly extending portions of outer side panels 176a, 176b are pushed to the inside of the tops of the sidewalls of base 10, so that long vertical extension 170 is held in place, largely by friction. Extension 170 is advantageously dimensioned, so that when mounted on base 10, center panel 172 is parallel to and substantially aligned with tray support back panel 22, to provide an extended, substantially continuous back support surface.

[0087] Long vertical extension 170 as illustrated is preferably dimensioned and proportioned to provide back support for two additional trays, for a total of four trays for the display. Short vertical extension 150 as illustrated is preferably dimensioned and proportioned to provide back support for one additional tray, for a total of three trays for the display. A greater number of trays may be accommodated, by even taller extensions, limited only by issues of center of gravity, the weight of the loaded trays, and the load strength of the particular material employed for the trays, extensions and base.

[0088] A graphics or signage riser 190 (FIG. 1b) may be provided, comprising a central panel 191, two side panels 192, 193 folded perpendicular to the central panel, and a bottom flap 194 and extensions 195, 196. Flap 194 is folded back 90° to stabilize the adjoining fold line, to keep panel 191 from buckling. No adhesive is believed necessary to hold signage riser 190 in place. Extensions 195 and 196 are insertably received in “slots” formed by articulation, in the top side regions of the topmost tray, or alternatively, into slots that are formed into the topmost tray, for example, along upper fold lines therein. The extensions may have small tabs adjoining them, forming slots, into which top edges of tray sidewalls may be insertingly received. The same riser configuration may be employed with any or all of the embodiments of the “inserted tray” modular point-of-purchase display illustrated and described herein, and such risers are shown in FIGS. 7, 8, 9 and 11.

[0089] FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a modular point-of-purchase display, incorporating an inserted tray floorstand 10, and shallow trays, in a two-up configuration, without front extension or vertical extension.

[0090] FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a modular point-of-purchase display, incorporating an inserted tray floorstand 10 and shallow trays (which may be as described hereinabove), in a three-up configuration, incorporating a short vertical extension 150.

[0091] FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a modular point-of-purchase display, incorporating an inserted tray floorstand 10, and deep trays (that are proportioned to have twice the depth of a “shallow” or “small” tray, but are otherwise the same), in a four-up configuration, employing a front extension 50 and a long vertical extension 170. FIG. 10 is an enlarged, top and side perspective view of a portion of the modular point-of-purchase display of FIG. 9. FIG. 11 is an enlarged, rear and side perspective view of a portion of the modular point-of-purchase display of FIGS. 9 and 10, showing the long vertical extender 170 in further detail.

[0092] FIGS. 12-25 illustrate the components of the “exposed tray” embodiment. FIG. 12 is a plan view of base/blank 200 for an inserted tray floorstand, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. Blank 200, preferably formed from corrugated paperboard material (though other materials may be used) includes front panel 212, front bottom flap 214, fold line 216, tray support bottom panel 218, fold line 220, and tray support back panel 222. Tray support back panel 222 is connected to tray support bottom panel 218 by fold line 224. Tray support bottom panel 218 includes two laterally extending tabs 225a and 225b, connected to panel 218 by fold lines 226a and 226b. Tray support back panel 222 includes two laterally extending tabs 223a and 223b, connected to panel 222 by fold lines 227a and 227b.

[0093] Elongated slots 232a, 232b, 232c and 232d are located the opposite vertical edges of front panel 212. Front side panels 234a and 234b emanate from front panel 212, along fold lines 235a, 235b, respectively. Rear side panels 236a, 236b emanate from front side panels 234a and 234b, along fold lines 237a, 237b, respectively (which are provided, for enabling blank 200 to be folded flat for shipping, prior to final articulation into the finished configuration). Side-top panels 236c and 236d emanate from the top edges of rear side panels 236a and 236b, respectively, with fold lines and slots 236e, 236f, separating panels 236a and b, from panels 236c and d, respectively. Side panel bottom flaps 238a-d emanate from the bottom regions of front side panels 234a-b and rear side panels 236a-b, along fold lines 239a-d, respectively.

[0094] Back panel 240 emanates from the rear edge of rear side panel 236b, along fold line 241, formed as lower panel 240a and upper panel 240b, separated by double fold line 242. Back top panel 240c emanates from the top edge region of upper panel 240b, along fold line 240d. Back top flap 240d emanates from back top panel 240c along fold line 240e. Back top panel 240c also includes laterally located, generally rectangular notches 240f and 240g. Glue flap 244 emanates from the rear edge of rear side panel 236a, along fold line 245.

[0095] Tray receiving region side panels 246a, 246b, emanate from front side panels 234a, 234b, and rear side panels 236a, 236b, along fold lines 247a, 247b, which include elongated slots 247c and 247d, respectively. Tray receiving region bottom panels 249a and 249b emanate from front side panels 234a, 234b, respectively, along fold lines 249c and 249d, respectively, which include elongated slots 249e and 249f, respectively. Panels 246a-b receive panel 222. Panels 249a-b receive panel 218.

[0096] Fabrication of base 210 is accomplished by folding front side panels 234a, 234b (which will be parallel and “flat” with respect to rear side panels 236a, 236b) perpendicular to front panel 212 (e.g., away from the observer of FIG. 12). Flap 214 and 238a-d will all be folded away from the observer (i.e., into the figure), so that they will all eventually “point” inwardly toward the interior of the erected base, and substantially perpendicular to their respective adjoining panels. Back panel 240 is then folded parallel to front panel 212. Glue flap 244 will be folded perpendicular to rear side panel 236a, and affixed to the outside or inside of rear panel 240. Panel 249a is folded perpendicular to panel 234a. Panel 249b is folded perpendicular to panel 234b. Panel 246a is folded perpendicular to panel 234a and panel 246b is folded perpendicular to panel 234b. Tray support bottom panel 218 is folded downward to form an oblique or perpendicular angle to front panel 212, with tabs 225a, 225b being inserted into and received by slots 249e and 249f, respectively. Tray support back panel 222 is lowered, until tabs 223a, 223b are aligned with, and subsequently inserted into and received by slots 247c, 247d, respectively.

[0097] Flaps 236c and 236d are folded inwardly, perpendicular to panels 236a and 236b, respectively. Panel 240c is then folded forward, toward the top edge of panel 222, with flap 240d being folded down and inserted behind the top edge of panel 222.

[0098] A graphics or signage riser 190′ (FIG. 12a) may be provided, comprising a central panel 191′, two side panels 192′, 193′ folded perpendicular to the central panel, and appropriate bottom flaps (194′) or extensions (195′, 196′), from each of the panels, that are folded inwardly perpendicular to their respective panels (e.g., 194′) and are preferably insertably received (extensions 195′, 196′), in “slots” formed by articulation, into the top side regions of the topmost tray, or alternatively, into slots that are formed into the topmost tray, for example, along upper fold lines therein. The extensions may have small tabs adjoining them, forming slots, into which top edges of tray sidewalls may be insertingly received. These small tabs are folded back, before tabs 195 and 196 are inserted into slots in the topmost tray. The same riser configuration may be employed with any or all of the “exposed” embodiments of the modular point-of-purchase display illustrated and described herein.

[0099] FIG. 13 is a plan view of a blank for a front extension 250 for exposed tray floorstand 200. Front extension 250 is used, when “deep” exposed trays are going to be used in the display. Front extension/blank 250 includes front panel 252; fold lines 253a and 253b; side panels 254a and 254b; fold lines 255a and 255b; attachment flaps 256a and 256b; hook tabs 258a, 258b, 258c and 258d; flap 257; fold line 257a; fold line 259 and top panel 260.

[0100] Articulation of blank 250 is accomplished by folding panels 254a, 254b back oblique to front panel 252. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, front panel 252 is as wide as front panel 212 of base 210. Accordingly, there is an included angle between front panel 252 and each of panels 254a, 254b, in the finally articulated extension that is approximately 90°. Alternatively, if front panel 252 is not as wide as front panel 212, then panels 254a, 254b will eventually be at obtuse angles (i.e., >90°) to front panel 252. Top panel 260 is folded down, past the perpendicular, so that its surface is past the top edges of side panels 254a and 254b. Attachment flaps 256a, 256b will be folded inwardly toward one another, and out of plane with their corresponding hook tabs 258a, 258b, 258c and 258d, which are received in slots 232a-d, respectively, of base 210.

[0101] FIG. 14a is a plan view of a blank for a tray 270 for use in association with exposed tray floorstand 200, specifically a deep tray. Blank 270 is configured to be articulated in several different ways, depending upon the shape, size and quantity of the articles to be displayed, to accommodate different packaging styles and sizes, such as those discussed hereinabove.

[0102] Blank 270 includes back wall 272; and diecut placement locking flaps 278, 280. Bottom wall 282 is connected to back wall 272 along fold line 284, and diecut fold-out placement flaps 289a, 289b which emanate along fold lines 290a, 290b. Outer front panel 292 emanates from fold line 291, and inner front panel 294 emanates from double fold line 293. The free “bottom” edge of front panel 294 includes two shallow tabs 295a, 295b, that are received in slots formed by notches 323a, 323b, respectively.

[0103] Sidewalls 296a, 296b emanate from back wall 272 along fold lines 297a, 297b, respectively. Slots 298a, 298b are aligned substantially along fold lines 297a, 297b, as well. Locking flaps 299a, 299b emanate from sidewalls 296a, 296b, along fold lines 300a, 300b, as do diecut locking tabs 301a, 301b, at the ends of which are knockouts 302a, 302b. Inner sidewalls 303a, 303b emanate from sidewalls 296a, 296b, along double fold lines 304a, 304b. Inner side tabs 306a, 306b also emanate along fold lines adjacent fold lines 304a, 304b. Outer top wall 308 emanates from back wall 272 along fold line 307. Top flaps 310a, 310b, emanate from outer top wall 308, along fold lines 309a, 309b. Inner top wall 312 extends along double fold line 311, and incorporates two shallow tabs 313a, 313b, defined by cuts 314a, 314b, and perforations 314c-e. Optional inner back wall 315 adjoins inner top wall 312, and incorporates diecut deployable projections 316a-d (although four are shown, a greater or lesser number may be employed, as desired), which are shown in their undeployed form, in FIG. 14a. Each deployable projection includes two opposing, joined tabs, e.g., tabs 317a and 317b, that are pivotably connected to one another, and have a circular (or other shape) hole 318 centered on the fold line between the tabs. Inner bottom wall 319 is connected to inner back wall 315, via the several pairs of tabs 317a, 317b, as well as the foldably connected rectangular mini-panels 320a-320c, located between the respective pairs of tabs 317a, 317b, and the end rectangular mini-panels 321a, 321b. Inner bottom wall 319 includes side flaps 319a and 319b, and inner locking flap 322.

[0104] Articulation of tray 270 is as follows: walls 308 and 282 are folded (e.g., toward the viewer of FIG. 14) to positions perpendicular to back wall 272. Flaps 310a, 310b are folded inwardly, perpendicular to back wall 308; flaps 299a, 299b, and tabs 301a, 301b, are folded inwardly, perpendicular to outer sidewalls 296a, 296b, which are, in turn, folded inwardly (toward the viewer), to be perpendicular to back wall 272. Inner side flaps 303a, 303b are folded inwardly. Tabs 324a, 324b lock into slots 298a, 298b, respectively, when inner flaps 303a, 303b, respectively, are folded in. Flaps 310a, 310b will be captured between outer sidewalls 296a, 296b, and their respective inner sidewalls 303a, 303b. When flaps 299a, 299b are folded so as to overlie bottom wall 282, flaps 289a, 289b are inserted through the openings created by flaps 301a, 301b, and vice versa, to help hold flaps 299a, 299b in place, and maintain bottom wall 282 in place, during subsequent articulation steps. In addition, tabs 325a, 325b are folded forward and inserted into corresponding slots 326a, 326b, as panels 296a, 296b are folded forward.

[0105] Flaps 306a and 306b are folded forward relative to walls 296a and 296b, respectively. Wall 292 is folded up perpendicular to bottom wall 282. Flap 294 is folded down and in, capturing flaps 306a and 306b, so that tabs 295a, 295b engage slots 323a and 323b, respectively.

[0106] If a maximum amount of volume within the interior of tray 270 is desired, inner back wall 315 may be torn away from inner top wall 312, along cuts/perforations 314c, 314d, 314e (although this may not be desired, as a surface having a less than desired surface finish may be exposed). Then, inner top wall 312 is folded downwardly and inwardly, into the receiving region, which has now been formed, until tabs 313a, 313b, are received in slots 307a, 307b.

[0107] By leaving inner back wall 315 attached to inner top wall 312, then by different methods of articulation of inner back wall 315 and inner bottom wall 319, and the tabs and mini-panels, can be used, to arrive at different interior volumes and architectures for tray 270.

[0108] The distance from fold line(s) 314c-e to fold line 319c is slightly less than the distance from fold line 284 to fold line 307, so that if inner bottom wall 319 is folded, relative to inner back wall 315, along fold line 319c, then inner back wall 315 (upon folding inwardly of inner top wall 312, and simultaneous folding outward of wall 315, with respect to top wall 312, overlies back wall 272 in its entirety, from fold lines 314c-e, to fold line 319c. Such an orientation is shown, in FIG. 20 herein. Upon further articulation, inner bottom wall 319 overlies bottom wall 282 (with flaps 299a, 299b, 301a, 301b, between them), wall 322 is folded up perpendicular to its respective bottom wall. Nicks 327a and b are separated, then flaps 328a and 329a, and 328b and 329b are folded up with flaps 328a, b, folded behind flaps 329a, b. This embodiment will result in a volume having slightly less depth and height than the prior (possibly less desired) embodiment, due to the presence of the inner top, back and bottom walls.

[0109] The distance between fold line 319c and 315a is slightly less than the distance between fold lines 291 and 293. In another alternative embodiment, instead of folding inner bottom wall 319 relative to inner back wall 315, along fold line 319c, the fold is accomplished along line 315a, instead. Panel 322 is folded down, against panel 294. This positions inner bottom wall 319 in parallel, vertically spaced relation to bottom wall 282, just below the top edge of the front wall formed by panels 292, 294, and double fold line 293. This is shown, in the upper portion of FIG. 17. Panels 329a, 329b, 328a, 328b, and 322 are folded down, toward bottom wall 282, to help support inner bottom wall 319 above bottom wall 282. In this embodiment, the projections 316a-d are still not deployed, but their respective component tabs 317a and 317b are still “flush” with their surrounding panels. In this embodiment, there is substantially less height in the enclosed volume, to accommodate shorter packages, without the need for a void filler.

[0110] In a still further embodiment, projections 316a-d are deployed, during articulation, or thereafter, by one inserting a finger or tool, into each opening 318, and pulling on one or the other of tab pairs 317a, 317b, until each projection 316a-316d “pops” out, at a right angle, so that tabs 317a, 317b and adjacent portions of inner back wall 315, and the adjacent mini-panels 320a,b or c form, from the side, a square contour, as is visible, in FIG. 18. When projections 316a-d are deployed, there is less available depth to the interior volume of the tray, to accommodate thinner packages or a lower count of packages for a row (front to back) or both, again without requiring a separate void filler.

[0111] FIG. 14b is a plan view of a blank for a tray 470 for use in association with inserted tray floorstand 200, specifically a shallow tray, as is reflected in the fact that the top and bottom walls are approximately one-half as deep as the back wall is high. Blank 470 is configured to be articulated in several different ways, depending upon the shape, size and quantity of the articles to be displayed, to accommodate different packaging styles and sizes, such as those discussed hereinabove.

[0112] Blank 470 includes back wall 472; diecut easel flap 474, with movable tab 476 foldably attached thereto; knockouts 475a, 475b; and diecut placement locking flaps 478, 480. Bottom wall 482 is connected to back wall 472 along fold line 484, and includes diecut easel flap 486 with movable tab 488 foldably attached thereto; and knockouts 487a, 487b. Diecut fold-out placement flaps 489a, 489b emanate along fold lines 490a, 490b. Outer front panel 492 emanates from fold line 491, and inner front panel 494 emanates from double fold line 493. The free “bottom” edge of front panel 494 includes two shallow tabs 495a, 495b.

[0113] Sidewalls 496a, 496b emanate from back wall 472 along fold lines 497a, 497b, respectively. Slots 498a, 498b are aligned substantially along fold lines 497a, 497b, as well. Locking flaps 499a, 499b incorporating notches 500a and 500b respectively, emanate from sidewalls 496a, 496b, along fold lines 400a, 400b, as do diecut locking tabs 401a, 401b, at the ends of which are knockouts 402a, 402b. Inner sidewalls 403a, 403b emanate from sidewalls 496a, 496b, along double fold lines 404a, 404b, and include shallow tabs 405a, 405b. Inner side tabs 406a, 406b also emanate along fold lines 404a, 404b. Outer top wall 408 emanates from back wall 472 along fold line 407. Top flaps 410a, 410b, emanate from outer top wall 408, along fold lines 409a, 409b. Inner top wall 412 extends along double fold line 411, and incorporates two shallow tabs 413a, 413b, defined by cuts 414a, 414b, and perforations 414c-e. Optional inner back wall 415 adjoins inner top wall 412, and incorporates diecut deployable projections 416a-d (although four are shown, a greater or lesser number may be employed, as desired), which are shown in their undeployed form, in FIG. 14b. Each deployable projection includes two opposing, joined tabs, e.g., tabs 417a and 417b, that are pivotably connected to one another, and have a circular (or other shape) hole 418 centered on the fold line between the tabs. Inner bottom wall 419 is connected to inner back wall 415, via the several pairs of tabs 417a, 417b, as well as the foldably connected rectangular mini-panels 420a-420c, located between the respective pairs of tabs 417a, 417b, and the end rectangular mini-panels 421a, 421b. Inner bottom wall 419 includes side flaps 419a and 419b, and inner flap 422.

[0114] Articulation of tray 470 is as follows: walls 408 and 482 are folded (e.g., toward the viewer of FIG. 14b) to positions perpendicular to back wall 472. Flaps 410a, 410b are folded inwardly, perpendicular to back wall 408; flaps 499a, 499b, and tabs 401a, 401b, are folded inwardly, perpendicular to outer sidewalls 496a, 496b, which are, in turn, folded inwardly (toward the viewer), to be perpendicular to back wall 472. Inner side flaps 403a, 403b are folded inwardly, until tabs 405a, 405b are received in slots 498a, 498b. Flaps 410a, 410b will be captured between outer sidewalls 496a, 496b, and their respective inner sidewalls 403a, 403b. When flaps 499a, 499b are folded so as to overlie bottom wall 482, flaps 489a, 489b are inserted through the openings created by flaps 401a, 401b, and vice versa, to help hold flaps 499a, 499b in place, and maintain bottom wall 482 in place, during subsequent articulation steps.

[0115] Flaps 406a and 406b are folded forward relative to walls 496a and 496b, respectively. Wall 492 is folded up perpendicular to bottom wall 482. Flap 494 is folded down and in, so that tabs 495a, 495b engage notches 500a and 500b, respectively.

[0116] If a maximum amount of volume within the interior of tray 470 is desired, inner back wall 415 may be torn away from inner top wall 412, along cuts/perforations 414c, 414d, 414e (although this may not be desired, as a surface having a less than desired surface finish may be exposed). Then, inner top wall 412 is folded downwardly and inwardly, into the receiving region which has now been formed, until tabs 413a, 413b, are received in slots 407a, 407b.

[0117] By leaving inner back wall 415 attached to inner top wall 412, then by different methods of articulation of inner back wall 415 and inner bottom wall 419, and the tabs and mini-panels, can be used, to arrive at different interior volumes and architectures for tray 470.

[0118] The distance from fold line(s) 414c-e to fold line 419c is slightly less than the distance from fold line 484 to fold line 407, so that if inner bottom wall 419 is folded, relative to inner back wall 415, along fold line 419c, then inner back wall 415 (upon folding inwardly of inner top wall 412, and simultaneous folding outward of wall 415, with respect to top wall 412, overlies back wall 472 in its entirety, from fold lines 414c-e, to fold line 419c. Such an orientation is shown, in the environment of exposed trays, in FIG. 20 herein. Upon further articulation, inner bottom wall 419 overlies bottom wall 482 (with flaps 499a, 499b, 401a, 401b, between them), wall 422 is folded up perpendicular to its respective bottom wall. Nicks 427a and b are separated, then flaps 428a and 428b, and 419a and 419b are folded up with flaps 428a, b folded behind flaps 419a, b. This embodiment will result in a volume having slightly less depth and height than the prior embodiment, due to the presence of the inner top, back and bottom walls.

[0119] The distance between fold line 419c and 415a is slightly less than the distance between fold lines 491 and 493. In another alternative embodiment, instead of folding inner bottom wall 419 relative to inner back wall 415, along fold line 419c, the fold is accomplished along line 415a, instead. This positions inner bottom wall 419 in parallel, vertically spaced relation to bottom wall 482, just below the top edge of the front wall formed by panels 492, 494, and double fold line 493. This is shown, in the environment of the exposed tray displays, in FIG. 17. Panels 419a and 419b, and 328a and 328b, and 422 are folded down, toward bottom wall 482, to help support inner bottom wall 419 above bottom wall 482. In this embodiment, the projections 416a-d are still not deployed, but their respective component tabs 417a and 417b are still “flush” with their surrounding panels. In this embodiment, there is substantially less height in the enclosed volume, to accommodate shorter packages, without the need for a void filler.

[0120] In a still further embodiment, projections 416a-d are deployed, during articulation, or thereafter, by one inserting a finger or tool, into each opening 418, and pulling on one or the other of tab pairs 417a, 417b, until each projection 416a-416d “pops” out, at a right angle, so that tabs 417a, 417b and adjacent portions of inner back wall 415, and the adjacent mini-panels 420a, b or c form, from the side, a square contour, as is visible, in the environment of an exposed tray display, in FIG. 18. When projections 416a-d are deployed, there is less available depth to the interior volume of the tray, to accommodate thinner packages or a lower count of packages for a row (front to back) or both, again without requiring a separate void filler.

[0121] Tray 470 is also configured to be a stand-alone countertop display tray, if so desired. This orientation is obtained by pushing easel panels 474 and 486 outwardly, and folding panels 476 toward 474 and 488 toward 486, until acute angles are formed between them. Each of panels 476 and 488 have laterally projecting “ears” that form shoulders with adjacent tab portions. Respective knockout pairs 475a, 475b and 487a, 487b leave behind rectangular openings, into which the top projecting portions of panels 476 and 488 are received, with the shoulders formed by the laterally projecting ears catching on the opposed distal edges of the respective pairs of knockout openings, to form one support, extending from the bottom of the tray, and another, extending outwardly and downwardly from the back wall of the tray, to form an inclined display.

[0122] FIG. 15 is an illustration of a blank for a vertical extension 350, for use with the exposed tray floorstand of FIG. 12. Blank 350 includes center panel 352; fold lines 353a and 353b; side panels 354a and 354b; elongated slots 355a-d; side panel hook tabs 356a and 356b, formed by fold lines 358a and 359a and cut 357a, and fold lines 358b and 359b and cut 357b, respectively; and side panel flaps 360a and 360b. Blank 350 also includes tabs 362a, 362b, having tab ends 364a, 364b, and fold lines 363a, 363b, respectively.

[0123] Making reference to FIGS. 12, 15 and 19, vertical extension is formed by folding panels 354a and 354b perpendicular to panel 352. Flaps 360a and 360b are folded away from their respective tabs 356a, 356b. Tabs 356a, 356b are inserted into slots 240g and 240f, and 236e and f, respectively, while tabs 364a, 364b are inserted into slots 246c and 246d, respectively.

[0124] FIG. 16 is a perspective view of an exposed tray floorstand display, with base 200, employing shallow trays 470, and riser 190, and without a front extension.

[0125] FIG. 17 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of an exposed tray floorstand display, in which the tray 470 is articulated into a slip sleeve configuration without deployed spacer projections (“bumps”).

[0126] FIG. 18 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of an exposed tray floorstand display, with base 200 in which the shallow tray 470 is articulated into a slip sleeve configuration, with deployed spacer projections (“bumps”).

[0127] FIG. 19 is an enlarged perspective view of an upper portion of an exposed tray floorstand display, showing the vertical extension 350 attached to the upper edge of base 200.

[0128] FIG. 20 is an enlarged perspective view of a portion of an exposed tray floorstand display, in which the tray 470 is articulated into a clamshell configuration.

[0129] FIG. 21 is a perspective view of an exposed tray floorstand display, having base 200, front extension 250, employing two deep trays 270, and riser 190.

[0130] FIG. 22 is a perspective view of an exposed tray floorstand display, having base 200, front extension 250, with vertical extension 350, employing four deep trays 270, in different configurations.

[0131] FIG. 23 is a perspective view of an exposed tray floorstand display, having base 200, front extension 250, with vertical extension 350, employing three deep trays 270, in different configurations, and riser 190.

[0132] FIG. 24 is a perspective view of the lower portion of an exposed tray floorstand display, showing the front extension 250, being affixed to the front of base 200.

[0133] While the present invention, as illustrated and described, shows two general embodiments of floorstand bases, using “shallow” and “deep trays” (wherein the deep trays are approximately twice as deep as the shallow trays), it is to be understood that trays having other depths, and relative proportions, may be employed in this modular system, and may be appreciated and understood by one having ordinary skill in the art, having the present disclosure before them, without departing from the scope of the present invention.

[0134] The foregoing description and drawings merely explain and illustrate the invention, and the invention is not limited except insofar as the appended claims are so limited, as those skilled in the art who have the disclosure before them will be able to make modifications and variations therein without departing from the scope of the invention.