Title:
Snow arc ski board and sports arc
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The snow arc ski board and sports arc is an arch-shaped handle mounted to a snowboard or to any of a variety of sport boards, such as snowboards, skateboards, or boards used in water sports. The arch is removably coupled to the board such that the plane of the arch is aligned with the board's longitudinal axis, thereby enabling the rider, standing beneath the arch, to firmly grasp the two vertical handles while standing sideways on the board. An elevated platform and sport arc mounted thereon may be attached to the surface of a narrow sport board, the elevated platform having a horizontally planar surface sufficient to enable the rider to stand sideways to the longitudinal axis of the board. A multitude of spines disposed on the upper surface of the board, provides traction for controlling the movement of the sport board.



Inventors:
Hamel, Floyd L. (Wilburton, OK, US)
Application Number:
10/430425
Publication Date:
11/13/2003
Filing Date:
05/07/2003
Assignee:
HAMEL FLOYD L.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63C5/03; A63C11/00; (IPC1-7): A63C11/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
AVERY, BRIDGET D
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Richard C. Litman (Alexandria, VA, US)
Claims:

I claim:



1. A sports arc for mounting to a sport board, the sports arc comprising: an arc-shaped handle having an arcuate upper section and a pair of parallel poles extending from opposite ends of the upper section; and a pair of brackets adapted for attachment to opposite ends of an elongated sport board, the brackets having fittings defining recesses, said poles being inserted into the recesses and attached thereto; wherein said arc-shaped handle is dimensioned and configured for extending above a rider's head when the rider stands on the sport board; whereby the arc-shaped handle is disposed in a plane extending along a longitudinal axis of the sport board in order to provide the rider with stability and control.

2. The sports arc according to claim 1, wherein the arcuate upper section and the two parallel poles of said arc-shaped handle are made in a single, unitary, one-piece structure.

3. The sports arc according to claim 1, wherein the arcuate upper section and the two parallel poles of said arc-shaped handle are made in separable components, the arcuate upper section having a pair of opposing ends telescoping into the parallel poles.

4. The sports arc according to claim 3, wherein the arcuate upper segment comprises two segments removably attached to each other at an apex of the arch.

5. The sports arc according to claim 3, further comprising a pair of sleeves slidable on the opposing ends of the arcuate upper section, the sleeves having clips removable receiving said two parallel poles, whereby the opposing ends of the arcuate upper section are insertable in the brackets with the sleeves disposed on the upper section and said two poles clipped to the sleeves for compact storage and transport.

6. The sports arc according to claim 1, further comprising a wedge made from a resilient material pivotally attached to one of said poles, the wedge being removably secured to said one of said poles in order to secure the rider's foot to the sport board.

7. A sport board and arc, comprising: an elongated base having a substantially rectangular top surface with at least one up-turned end, and having a lower surface, the base defining a perimeter and being adapted for supporting a rider in a standing position; an arch-shaped handle having two poles extending upwardly from the base and joining to form an arch at an apex of the handle, each pole having a lower end attached to the base, the arch-shaped handle defining a plane, the plane being normal to and in longitudinal alignment with the base, whereby the poles can be grasped by a rider standing sideways on the base beneath the arch-shaped handle.

8. The sport board and arc according to claim 7, wherein the lower ends of the poles are rigidly attached to the lower surface of the base at the at least upturned end

9. The sport board and arc according to claim 7, further comprising a pair of brackets mounted to the base, the brackets removably receiving the lower ends of the poles.

10. The sport board and arc according to claim 7, further comprising a traction surface disposed on the top surface of the base.

11. The sport board according to claim 10, wherein the traction surface has a plurality of spines extending from the top surface of the base, the spines being adapted to engage a grooved sole of a boot worn by the rider.

12. The sport board and arc according to claim 7, wherein the base comprises a snowboard.

13. The sport board and arc according to claim 7, wherein the base comprises a skateboard.

14. The sport board and arc according to claim 7, further comprising a wedge extending horizontally from and slidably and pivotally mounted to one of the elongated members, whereby the wedge may be rotated in a horizontal plane to a first position, whereby a rider's foot is secured thereunder, and is rotatable to a second position unencumbering the rider's foot.

15. A sport board and arc, comprising: an elongated base having a substantially rectangular top surface with at least one up-turned end, and having a lower surface, the base defining a perimeter; an elevated and substantially planar platform having a top surface and a bottom surface, the bottom being mounted to the base, the platform being adapted for supporting a rider in a standing position; and an arch-shaped handle having two poles extending upwardly from the platform and joining in order to form an arch above the platform, each pole having a lower end attached to the platform, the arch-shaped handle defining a plane, the plane being normal to and in longitudinal alignment with the platform, the arch-shaped handle being adapted for extending above the rider's head, whereby the two poles can be grasped by the rider while standing sideways on the platform beneath the arch.

16. The sport board and arc according to claim 15, wherein the elevated platform has a width approximately equal to the rider's foot size, whereby a rider may comfortably stand sideways on the platform.

17. The sport board and arc according to claim 15, further comprising a traction surface disposed on the elevated platform, the traction surface having a plurality of spines extending upward from the top surface of the platform, the spines being adapted to engage a grooved sole of a boot of the rider.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Serial No. 60/377,837, filed May 7, 2002, and Patent Application Serial No. 60/377,839, filed May 7, 2002.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] 1. Field of the Invention

[0003] The present invention relates to sports boards, and more specifically, to snowboards, snow skis, water skis, skateboards, and to any vehicle used in a sporting environment in which the rider may benefit from additional stabilization and support.

[0004] 2. Description of the Related Art

[0005] Devices providing support and control for riders of snowboards, water skis, skateboards, toboggans and generally, any board used in a sport environment, have been developed and primarily consist of a vertical support member and handle disposed at the front of the board.

[0006] U.S. Pat. No. 1,330,644, issued to A. J. Matson in 1920, discloses an upwardly curved steering rod mounted on a device used on snow or ice in the capacity of a toboggan. The device can also be converted and used as a wheel coaster on dry ground.

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 1,524,850, issued to G. Van Daam in 1925, discloses an improved foot sled adapted for use in the snow by children, having a horizontal board and a steering rod and wheel mounted in the front of the board. The '850 patent further provides a rubber tread disposed on the surface of the board for preventing the slipping of the foot from the platform.

[0008] U.S. Pat. No. 1,644,623, issued to J. M. Ahm in 1927, discloses a glider designed for children to be held on one foot for coasting over ice or snow. The '623 patent includes a runner having its forward end curved upward, a post with a handle fixed in the curved forward end to be held by the rider for support and guidance, a shoe fixed on the runner to removably receive the foot of the rider, and longitudinal grooves on the underside of the runner both at the forward and rear ends to prevent the runner from side-slipping.

[0009] U.S. Design Pat. No. 246,920, issued to Koblick in 1978, describes a snow scooter having a board with a traction providing top surface and a vertical post with a handle disposed in the front of the board.

[0010] U.S. Pat. No. 4,129,313, issued to Benson in 1978, discloses a ski device with an upturned front tip and a combination handle and seat member pivotally mounted on a forward portion of the ski. The upper surface of the rear portion of the ski is provided with a gripping surface.

[0011] U.S. Pat. No. 4,533,150, issued to Hardy in 1985, describes a snowboard with a pivotally secured U-shaped handle for stand-up balance and steering, which may be positioned below the upper riding surface for storage or for no-handle riding. Similarly, U.S. Design Pat. No. 451,162, issued to Spiers in 2001, describes a collapsible snow scooter with a pivoting and collapsible pole mounted in the front of a snowboard with a “T” shaped handle at the top of the pole. Furthermore, Japanese Patent No. 2001-310,008, published in 2001, discloses a snowboard with a handle, which is provided with a freely attachable and detachable handle on the surface of the board.

[0012] Handles and support structures are not limited to single board devices. U.S. Pat. No. 4,643,444, issued to Parkinson in 1987, discloses a ski steering apparatus having a handlebar, telescoping column, and pivotal and rotatable connectors for mounting to a pair of skis. German Patent No. 3,414,757, published in 1985, discloses a sledge with ski runners which are rigidly connected to one another via a frame structure and a tread bar, a push rod connecting the sides of the frame in the front of the rider, on which the rider can hold tight with their hands.

[0013] U.S. Pat. No. 5,397,154, issued to Baldwin in 1995, describes a stabilizer for skiers having two skis, each of the two skis having a pair of support members rising from the top surface of the ski, and a three sided railing, parallel to the ground, mounted to the vertical members, a fourth side open to the rear of the skis.

[0014] U.S. Pat. No. 6,139,013, issued to Wingard in 2000, discloses a snow scooter with an upwardly projecting steering and braking handle for providing maneuverability of the device as well as balance and support for the rider. The board may be upwardly curved at one or both ends. A non-slip surface that may include protrusions is provided.

[0015] Skateboards and in-line skaters have also been the beneficiary of devices to improve their control over their respective sport vehicles. U.S. Pat. No. 5,924,732, issued to Olsen in 1999, describes an in-line skate sail comprising two poles, each having an upper portion and a lower portion. The edges of the sail are attached to the upper portions the poles. The bottom portion of each pole releasably anchors to the rider's skates. The sail projects over the head of a rider as the rider grasps a pole with each hand.

[0016] U.S. Pat. No. 6,199,880, issued to Favorito et al. in 2001, discloses a convertible skateboard/scooter having a handle hinged to the base board and is movable between a lower position, lying near the surface of the board, whereby the device can be used as a conventional skateboard, and an upper position in which the device can be used as a conventional scooter with the handle rising vertically from the front of the board.

[0017] Support structures have also been incorporated into boards used in water sports. U.S. Pat. No. 4,929,208, issued to Corica in 1990, discloses a surfboard having an elastic strap housed in a well in the upper surface of the surfboard, wherein the strap is pulled on a by a surfer to maintain control of the board while doing aerials.

[0018] A rider of the aforementioned devices would normally grasp the forward mounted handle with two hands for maximum control. However, this two handed grip results in a front facing body behind the rider, thereby allowing the rider to maintain his shoulders in line with the direction of the board, at the expense of loss of control of the handle.

[0019] Furthermore, many snowboards without handles have elaborate bootstraps secured to the snowboard, preventing the rider from adjusting their stance and prevent the rider from quickly and easily disengaging themselves from the board.

[0020] None of the above inventions and patents, taken either singly or in combination, is seen to describe the instant invention as claimed. Thus a snow arc ski board and sports arc solving the aforementioned problems is desired.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0021] The present invention is a snow arc ski board and sports arc for providing stabilization and control for boards used in sports. The sports arc is an arch shaped handle and may be mounted to a variety of sport boards including snowboards, skateboards, and boards for use in water sports, and provides the rider with improved maneuvering abilities while freeing the rider from encumbering foot restraints. The substantially rigid arch-shaped handle is vertically mounted to a sports board such that the plane of the arch is aligned with the board's longitudinal axis, thereby enabling a rider, standing beneath the arch, to firmly grasp the sides of the arch while presenting their profile to the front of the board. The height and width of the arch-shaped handle may be telescopically adjusted. Furthermore, the handle may be removably attached to the base of the sport board.

[0022] Unlike many snowboards which have boot brackets that securely attach a rider's foot to the surface of the board, the snow arc ski board of the present invention has a plurality of spines disposed on the upper surface of the board which removably engage grooves on the soles of the rider's boots, thereby providing a non-skid surface enabling the rider to control the angle, pitch, and direction of the board without elaborate buckles and straps.

[0023] Furthermore, a short horizontal brace, pivotally and removably attached to either vertical support, provides the rider with additional control over their board when traversing patches of rough terrain. When not in use, the brace may be pivoted out of the way.

[0024] Snowboards and other sport boards as described above are normally of a width sufficient to allow a rider to stand perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the board, thereby presenting their profile to the front of the board. In many sports, this sideways stance is preferred for balance, stability, and mobility.

[0025] However, snow skis and other narrow sport boards are often of a width that precludes a rider from assuming this advantageous sideways position. For these narrow sport boards, an elevated platform and sports arc mounted thereon may be attached to the top surface of the sport board, the elevated platform having a horizontally planar surface sufficient in size for a rider to stand sideways to the longitudinal axis of the board.

[0026] Accordingly, it is a principal object of the invention to provide a sports arc that can be removably attached to a variety of sport boards including snowboards, skateboards, and boards used in water sports.

[0027] It is another object of the invention to provide a snowboard and skateboard with a removably attached arch-shaped handle.

[0028] It is a further object of the invention to provide a sports arc having an adjustable vertical height and width.

[0029] Still another object of the invention is to provide a sports arc and sport board that can be easily disassembled and reconfigured for ease of transporting.

[0030] It is an object of the invention to provide improved elements and arrangements thereof for the purposes described which is inexpensive, dependable and fully effective in accomplishing its intended purposes.

[0031] These and other objects of the present invention will become readily apparent upon further review of the following specification and drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0032] FIG. 1 is an environmental, perspective view of a snowboard embodiment of the sport board and sports arc according to the present invention.

[0033] FIG. 2 is a side view of the sport board and sports arc of FIG. 1.

[0034] FIG. 3A is an exploded, perspective view of the sport board and sports arc of FIG. 1.

[0035] FIG. 3B is another exploded, perspective view of the sport board and sports arc of FIG. 1, illustrating the detachable arc segments.

[0036] FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the sport board and sports arc of FIG. 1, disassembled and reconfigured for transporting.

[0037] FIG. 5 is an environmental, perspective drawing of sport board and sports arc having an elevated platform adapted to a narrow sport board according to the present invention.

[0038] FIG. 6 is a side view of the embodiment of FIG. 5 illustrating the elevated platform.

[0039] FIG. 7 is an environmental, perspective drawing of the sports arc mounted to a skateboard according to the present invention.

[0040] FIG. 8 is a side view of a sports arc according to the present invention with forward and rearward angled handles, having the lower ends of the arch curving underneath the upturned ends of a skateboard.

[0041] FIG. 9 is an environmental, perspective view of the sports arc according to FIG. 8 mounted to a skateboard.

[0042] Similar reference characters denote corresponding features consistently throughout the attached drawings.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0043] The present invention is a snow arc ski board and sports arc, designated generally as 100 in the drawings. The sports arc is an arch-shaped handle that provides the rider with improved maneuvering abilities while freeing the rider from encumbering foot restraints. The handle may be integrated with a variety of sport boards, such as a snowboard, snow ski, skateboard or boards used in water sports. The arch was chosen as the preferred handle shape for its inherent strength and lack of protruding ends. Furthermore, in the event of a fall, the arch acts as a brake and prevents the rider from chasing his board down the ski slope.

[0044] As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, one embodiment of the present invention is comprised of a sport arc 101 mounted to a standard width snowboard 118. The sports arc 101 is an arch-shaped handle constructed from a substantially rigid material, which may include, but is not limited to plastic, graphite, carbon composites, fiberglass, wood, and metal. The sports arc 101 may be comprised of a single arch-shaped segment, or as best shown in FIGS. 3A and 3B, may be comprised of an upper arc section 120 and two poles 102, 104 extending downward from the upper arc 120, the lower ends of the poles 102, 104 removably attached to the surface of the snowboard 118 by a pair of brackets 106, 108.

[0045] A non-skid surface 110 comprised of a multitude of vertical spines 212 disposed on the top surface of the snowboard 118 enables the rider to control the motion of the snowboard 118 without elaborate straps and buckles.

[0046] To hold a rider's feet securely to the snowboard 118 while traversing patches of rough terrain, a wedge 112, constructed from rubber, or other suitable material, is slidably attached to the arc 101 just above the rider's foot. Pivotally attached by a screw 114 or other fastening means, the wedge 112 protrudes from the side of the arc 101 and over the foot of the rider. Adjustable to the rider's foot, the wedge 112 can be tightened at a height that would secure the rider's foot between the snowboard 118 and the wedge 112. When not in use, the wedge 112 may be swiveled out of the way.

[0047] As shown in the exploded view of FIGS. 3A and 3B, the arc 101 may be comprised of several interlocking and telescoping segments. The upper arc segment 120 is telescopically received by poles 102 and 104, and is secured in the desired position by spring-loaded detent buttons 208, 210 disposed within the lower ends of the upper arc segment 120 and received by apertures formed within the upper ends of the poles 102, 104. Similarly, spring-loaded buttons 310, 312, disposed within the lower ends of the poles 102, 104, provide the means for securing the ends of the arc 101 within the recesses 302, 304 of the brackets 106, 108. The brackets 106, 108 are mounted on the surface of the snowboard 118 using bolts or screws. As shown in FIG. 3B, the upper arc may be further divided into smaller segments 320, 322 for ease of storage and transportation, in addition to providing a means for adjusting the width of the arch. Although the present embodiment uses spring loaded detent buttons, the telescoping mechanism may be of any of a known variety of adjustable connecting devices.

[0048] As shown in FIG. 4, the sports arc 101 and sport board 118 may be disassembled and reconfigured for ease of carrying or transporting. Brackets 106, 108 secure the lower ends of the upper arc section 206, and removable clips 402 attached to the arc 206 secure the poles 102, 104 across the base of the upper arc section 206 parallel to board 118. The clips 402 may be made of plastic or other suitable material.

[0049] FIGS. 5 and 6 illustrate an alternative embodiment of the present invention for narrow sport boards, such as a single snow ski 502, and enables the rider to position themselves perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the narrower board. The platform 504 is attached by screws or bolts 516 to a pair of pedestals 506, 508 several inches above the narrow ski 502, the elevated platform providing the ability to lean to either side of the board with little or no toe or heel drag. As best shown in FIG. 6, screws or bolts 604 fasten the pedestals 506, 508 to the board 502. The platform 504 and pedestals 506, 508 may be fabricated from plastic, graphite, carbon composites, fiberglass, wood, metal, or other suitable material.

[0050] FIG. 7 illustrates a skateboard embodiment of the sports arc in which the ends of a non-adjustable sports arc 704 are mounted beneath the forward 708 and rearward 706 upturned ends of a skateboard 702. This underneath mounting method may also be desirable in the elevated platform version for snowboards where the length of the elevated platform 504 is insufficient to have a top surface mounted arch-shaped handle.

[0051] A properly fitting sport arc has the apex of the arch about a head higher than the top of the rider's head when their legs are separated at about shoulder width. The width of the arch should allow the rider a comfortable grip without pinning the elbows against the rider's sides or causing him to extend his arms too far out to the side in a tiring and potentially dangerous position.

[0052] FIGS. 8 and 9 illustrate an embodiment of the sports arc having an arch-shaped handle 802 with ends 804, 806 which mount to the bottom side of the front and rear upward turned ends of a board 902. In this embodiment, the legs of the arch 802 angle outwards to the front and rear, increasing the width of the opening beneath the arch 802.

[0053] It is to be understood that the present invention is not limited to the embodiments described above, but encompasses any and all embodiments within the scope of the following claims.