Title:
Adjustable belt system for towing a golf cart
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A cart tower for towing a hand pulled cart has a handle extending therefrom and is worn about the waist of a user. The cart tower includes a belt, a buckle, a first padded side, a second padded side, a padded back and a handle-connector. The belt has a first strap and a second strap. Each strap has a distal end and a proximal end. The buckle system mechanically couples the distal ends of the first and second straps to each other. The first and second padded sides are mechanically coupled to the proximal ends of the first and second straps. The padded back has a first side and a second side. The first and second sides of the padded back are being mechanically coupled to the first and second padded sides. The handle-connector is mechanically to the padded back. The handle connector is connected to the handle of the hand pulled cart.



Inventors:
Postel, Raymond M. (Ogden, UT, US)
Application Number:
10/142692
Publication Date:
11/13/2003
Filing Date:
05/08/2002
Assignee:
POSTEL RAYMOND M.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
224/675
International Classes:
A45F3/14; (IPC1-7): A45F3/14; A45C1/04; A45F3/00; F41C33/02; F42B39/02
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MAI, TRI M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
W. Edward Johansen (Los Angeles, CA, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A cart tower for towing a hand pulled cart having a handle extending therefrom and being worn about the waist of a user, said cart tower comprising: a. a belt having a first strap and a second strap, each strap having a distal end and a proximal end; b. a buckle that mechanically couples said distal ends of said first and second straps to each other; c. a first padded side and a second padded side, said first and second padded sides being mechanically coupled to said proximal ends of said first and second straps; d. a padded back having a first side and a second side, said first and second side of said padded back being mechanically coupled to said first and second padded sides; and e. a handle-connector mechanically to said padded back whereby said handle connector is connected to the handle of the hand pulled cart.

2. A cart tower according to claim 1 wherein said padded sides include: a. an outer layer that is a fabric; b. an interlining; and c. an inner layer that is filled with fibers.

3. A cart tower according to claim 1 wherein said padded back includes: a. an outer layer that is a fabric; and b. an inner layer that is foam whereby said padded back is configured so that it can be worn either in a first position by a relatively tall person or in a second position by a relatively shorter person wherein said padded back is turned upside down thereby lowering the position of said handle connector.

4. A cart tower according to claim 1 wherein said handle-connector includes: a. a first strap and a second strap wherein said first and second straps and the first and second rectangular use Velcro fasteners; b. first loop and a second loop wherein said first and second loops use Velcro fasteners; and c. a first rectangular pad and a second rectangular pad, said first and second straps being mechanically coupled to said first rectangular pad, said first and second loops are mechanically coupled to said second rectangular and said second rectangular pad being mechanically coupled to said first rectangular pad whereby said first and second loops of said handle connector are inserted into said first and second loops, respectively, after the handle is placed adjacent to said first and second loops in order to secure the handle of the cart.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] The invention relates to a belt system for towing a golf cart and more particularly to a belt system for towing a golf cart that is adjustable in accordance with the height of the user.

[0002] Golf is a popular sport, both for the thrill and satisfaction of doing well at the sport, as well as the exercise that is available to the golfer. While many golfers ride in electric or gas-powered carts about the course thereby largely defeating the available exercise. Other golfers forego the cart and choose to carry their bag of golf clubs, to have the golf clubs carried by a caddy, or tow the golf clubs behind them in a two wheeled hand pulled golf cart.

[0003] Over a golf course having eighteen holes of regulation play, a golfer will typically cover over three miles of walking thereby enjoying a fair amount of beneficial aerobic exercise.

[0004] When pulling a two wheeled golf cart over such long distances, the golfer's arms can become quite tired from the constant pulling of the can. This fatigue will affect the level of play after several hours on the come. Thus, many golfers will forego the two-wheeled can in favor of a motorized cart so that their arms are not unduly tired by extraneous activity.

[0005] U.S. Pat. No. 5,622,294 teaches a golf cart towing device adaptable to the waist of a user that includes a belt, an adjusting ring, a buckle female portion, a buckle male portion, a tube, and an elastic strip. The belt has an outer surface, an inner surface, and first and second distal ends. The adjusting ring has an inner post and an outer post that defines a slot between them through which the belt passes. The buckle female portion contains a slot through which the belt first distal end passes. The buckle male portion has a male portion body that contains an inner slot, an outer slot and a partition. The belt second distal end passes through the buckle male portion inner slot, around the buckle male portion partition, through the buckle male portion outer slot, around the adjusting ring outer post and is secured therearound. The tube is horizontally positioned at the belt outer surface intermediate the belt first distal end and the belt second distal end and is movable therefrom. The tube removably receives the handle of a golf cart. The elastic strip has a first distal end and a second distal end. The elastic strip passes freely through the robe with the elastic strip first distal end and the elastic strip second distal end attached to the belt outer surface. The tube removably receives the handle of a golf cart so that it prevents a force encountered by the golf cart from being transmitted to the user.

[0006] U.S. Pat. No. 3,328,043, U.S. Pat. No. 2,559,981 and U.S. Pat. No. 3,311,385 teach golf cart towing assemblies

[0007] U.S. Pat. No. 6,302,430 teaches a foldable golf cart that includes a main support rod, two wheels, two wheel support rods, a connecting members, two connecting rods and a handle. The wheel support rods are pivoted to an intermediate portion of the main support rod. Each wheel support rod is connected to one of the wheels. The connecting member is connected to an upper end of the main support rod. The handle is pivoted to an upper end portion of the main support rod. Each of the connecting rods is each pivoted to the handle from one end and is pivoted to a respective one of the wheel support rods from other end. The handle has hooked portions separately engaging a depressing block of the connecting member. The handle is pivoted down to a folded position so that the connecting rods will at the same time move the wheel support rod to a folded position. The handle is pivoted upwards to an upright unfolded position so that the connecting rods will move the wheel support rods to an unfolded position. The depressing block fixes the handle in the upright position by engaging the hooked portion of the handle. The depressing block is disengaged from the hooked portion when depressed.

[0008] U.S. Pat. No. 6,301,746 teaches a telescoping handle assembly for luggage or other luggable items that includes a primary handle and a secondary handle. The secondary handle provides at least one gripping surface that, when deployed, may extend in a direction generally parallel to a direction that a traveler may move when transporting an item attached to the secondary handle from one location to another.

[0009] U.S. Pat. No. 5,215,318 teaches a body trailer that includes housing having a compartment for storing various items, with a door hinged to the housing for covering the compartment. Two wheels are mounted on one end of the housing, while a mechanism is mounted on other end of the housing for towing the body trailer behind a person, with the wheels rolling along the ground.

[0010] U.S. Pat. No. 3,926,448 teaches a golf cart that includes a main frame and at least three wheels rotatably mounted to the main frame. A golf bag holder is movably mounted on the frame. A connector is secured to the main frame and attaches to hips of a human for pulling the golf cart.

[0011] U.S. Pat. No. 5,215,355 teaches a wagon bin that is supported above a wheel and axle combination, and a tongue extends outwardly from the axle. A universal joint is provided on the outer end of the tongue. A harness is attached to the universal joint.

[0012] U.S. Pat. No. 5,244,217 teaches a golf-cart pulling device that includes a strap detachably mounted to the handle of a golf cart. A large hoop is formed in the strap extending essentially from the handle of the golf cart over the shoulder of a person pulling the cart,

[0013] U.S. Pat. No. 4,037,765 teaches a golf club carrier that includes a rigid aluminum frame that is suspended from the shoulders to support cross members to which golf clubs are releasably attached.

[0014] U.S. Pat. No. 5,265,891 teaches a frame that mounts a coach member thereon and includes spring means, first and second harness tubes, and a torso harness worn by an individual transporting the carriage structure.

[0015] U.S. Pat. No. 5,575,362 teaches a telescoping pull handle that is used in towing wheeled luggage. The handle may be collapsed to a reduced length to accommodate easy use with luggage that is carried onto and stowed in passenger transportation vehicles. The handle is extendable to a sufficient length to permit the user comfortably to tow the wheeled luggage across a supporting surface. The handle includes incorporating into the telescoping handle devices permitting the user to strap or hook to the wheeled luggage auxiliary items of luggage.

[0016] U.S. Pat. No. 5,590,748 teaches collapsible handle for a wheeled suitcase that includes a bottom board disposed on a bottom of the suitcase. The bottom board has a first end and a second end. The first end thereof has a first wall extending upwardly therefrom and two openings defined in the first wall and two passages defined in an upper surface. The passages communicate with their respective openings. A limit element is disposed on the lower surface of the first end of the bottom board and two wheels are disposed to the lower surface of the second end of the bottom board. A U-shaped handle has two legs slidably received to the two passages via the two openings. Each leg has a head formed at a distal end thereof. The head has a flexible protrusion extending laterally from opposite sides thereof so as to be received in two corresponding engaging recesses respectively defined in two side walls defining the passage when the legs are completely received in the suitcase. The handle is extended out from the openings and is stopped by the head contacting against an end of the limit element.

[0017] U.S. Pat. No. 5,943,936 teaches wheeled luggage cases that include at least two wheels and a handle with which to roll the luggage on these wheels. Wheel handles require the user to use considerable force to balance the case on these two wheels, either when the case is carrying auxiliary cases or when otherwise fully loaded. The luggage case has a wheel handle that extends out of and along one side of the case on an arm. A handle grip is mounted on this arm in a way that tips the luggage case forward to better balance over the wheels when carrying varying loads. The wheel handle arm includes a mechanism that supports the handle grip at different heights to further optimize this load balancing function.

[0018] U.S. Pat. No. 5,253,739 teaches a “flight bag” style carry-on bag that incorporates a pair of wheels positioned at a bottom corner of the bag and spaced along the width dimension of the bag. A pull handle is integrated with the bag, and preferably both the pull handle and the wheels are attached to an internal support structure such as a bottom pan. The wheels have an exterior surface presenting an edge upon which the wheels roll at the furtherestly spaced apart locations to increase the width of lateral support provided by the wheels. The pull handle assembly includes at least one rod moving in a channel with a slider member connected to the rods to effectively transmit torque between a grip connected to the rod and the internal support structure.

[0019] U.S. Pat. No. 6,131,917 teaches a towing device for a golf trolley that includes a spring, a damper for the resilient portion, the remainder of the linkage being rigid, and means at one end of the linkage for pivotal attachment of the linkage to the bag-carrying part of the trolley. The towing device may be incorporated in the handle of a trolley or may be an accessory attachable to the trolley. The damper may include a piston-and-cylinder type damper which may contain air or other gas or oil or other hydraulic fluid. The extent of pivotal movement of the towing device relative to the bag-carrying part of the trolley is restricted by a flexible link or spring. The device may be attached to a belt or other item of clothing on the trunk of a user. The trolley may have an auxiliary wheel fitted to the bottom of the bag-carrying part.

[0020] U.S. Pat. No. 6,027,001 teaches a harness for pulling a child's wagon that is worn around the waist of an individual having a length of tensile rope material with padding material around the circular end-portion contacting the wearer's waist. The tensile rope material terminates in two looped distal ends, with each end having a spring-link to allow direct attachment to a wagon or by passing the looped distal ends through a wagon handle and back attaching each spring-link to its respective strand of rope material extending behind the individual. The circular end-portion is adjusted and held securely behind the user's waist by looping fastening material around the padding material encircling the rope material. Binding mach adjacent to washers covering each distal end of rubber padding secure and allow adjustment of the padding material along the length of rope material. The harness allows a user freedom of movement by enabling the user to free up the hands to walk naturally while pulling the child's wagon.

[0021] In the manufacture of various types of cloth products having an outer fabric substrate and an inner lining, it is a time-honored practice to place an insert, which is normally referred to as an interlining, between the outer fabric substrate and the inner lining. This can be found in garments such as suits, shirts, blouse shoulders, fronts, collars and cuffs.

[0022] Normally, the interlining is conventionally adhered or fused to the outer fabric substrate by bonding of a thermoactive adhesive material that can be applied by coating or by printing in spaced deposits or dot patterns, the latter being accomplished by use of a roller. The adhesive is applied to one side of the interlining fabric that is then placed in contact with the outer fabric substrate. The adhesive material in contact with the outer fabric substrate is subjected to heat through either ironing or pressing which has the effect of softening the thermoactive adhesive material and causing the interlining fabric to adhere to the outer fabric substrate.

[0023] U.S. Pat. No. 4,228,208 teaches a facing or lining material of a thermoplastic such as polypropylene that has a key fabric bonded to its reverse face so that a reinforcing material such as fiber-reinforced resin or hydraulic cement can be bonded to it. The key fabric is a pile fabric made for example by tufting, and the pile fibers can be embedded in the reinforcement material to provide a strong bond. Glass fibers are suitable for the pile and are made of alkali-resistant glass for use with cement reinforcement. The composite material can be used for lining vessels, tanks, ducts and pipes in chemical plant and as an external or internal facing material for buildings.

[0024] The fibrous pile may be secured to the base layer by any of the known techniques including tufting, pile weaving (terry or plush), sliver knitting, terry knitting, stitch-bonding (“Malipol” machine) and needle punching—obviously, in some of these techniques the base layer is formed at the same time as the pile. Tufting is a favored technique because it lends itself to the use of glass fiber to form the pile without too much damage to the fiber and provides a good anchorage of the pile in the base layer, particularly when the base layer is bonded to the facing layer. Also, it is a comparatively inexpensive operation. Additional techniques which may be used to make the pile-bearing key fabric include raising or knapping the surface of a fibrous base fabric to partially withdraw some of the base fabric fibers into an integral fibrous pile.

[0025] U.S. Pat. No. 4,737,396 teaches a composite fusible interlining fabric. The fabric includes a non-woven layer and a fibrous layer stitched together so that the interlining is composed of two different fabrics. Moreover, the stitching runs both lengthwise of the fabric and widthwise thereof.

[0026] U.S. Pat. No. 4,818,227 teaches a fusible interlining fabric that consists of a layer of rayon in the warp and filling, this being the woven embodiment, and in a knit embodiment a high wet modulus rayon in a weft-inserted yarn. The stitching does not extend through the interlining.

[0027] U.S. Pat. No. 4,450,196, an interlining fabric that is formed of a layer of non-woven fabric, a layer of fibrous material and stitching that extends lengthwise and widthwise of the interlining.

[0028] U.S. Pat. No. 4,719,144 teaches a fusible interlining that has a high, wet modulus rayon in the warp filling.

[0029] U.S. Pat. No. 4,495,661 teaches a composite interlining material that includes outside layers of fabric with a sheet of foam sandwiched between them. The foam material provides bulk and resiliency to the interlining, while the outside layers of fabric provide smooth and nonabrasive surfaces to the interlining.

[0030] U.S. Pat. No. 4,583,249 teaches a waistband assembly that includes a waistband construction having a woven strip 12 for stiffening the construction and preventing the waist portion of the garment from rolling over. Stiffening strip is stitched to a fabric.

[0031] The inventor incorporates the teachings of the above-cited patents into this specification.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0032] The present invention is generally directed to a cart tower that tows a hand-pulled cart. The cart has a handle extending therefrom. The cart tower is worn about the waist of a user. The cart tower includes a belt, a buckle and a handle-connector. The belt has a first strap and a second strap. Each strap has a distal end and a proximal end. The buckle system mechanically couples the distal ends of the first and second straps to each other. The handle connector is connected to the handle of the hand pulled cart.

[0033] In a first separate aspect of the present invention, the cart tower includes a first padded side, a second padded side and a padded back. The first and second padded sides are mechanically coupled to the proximal ends of the first and second straps. The padded back has a first side and a second side. The first and second sides of the padded back are being mechanically coupled to the first and second padded sides. The handle-connector is mechanically to the padded back.

[0034] Other aspects and many of the attendant advantages will be more readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the drawing and the following detailed description.

[0035] The features of the present invention which are believed to be novel are set forth with particularity in the appended claims.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0036] FIG. 1 is a perspective drawing of an adjustable belt for towing a golf cart according to the invention.

[0037] FIG. 2 is a rear view in elevation of the adjustable belt for towing a golf cart of FIG. 1.

[0038] FIG. 3 is top plan view of the adjustable belt for towing a golf cart of FIG. 1.

[0039] FIG. 4 is a front view in elevation of the adjustable belt for towing a golf cart of FIG. 1.

[0040] FIG. 5 is a bottom plan view of the adjustable belt for towing a golf cart of FIG. 1.

[0041] FIG. 6 is a side view in elevation of the adjustable belt for towing a golf cart of FIG. 1.

[0042] FIG. 7 is a top plan view in cross-section of the adjustable belt for towing a golf cart of FIG. 1.

[0043] FIG. 8 is a schematic diagram of a golfer towing his golf cart using the adjustable belt for towing a golf cart of FIG. 1.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0044] Referring to FIG. 1 in conjunction with FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 adjustable belt system 10 for towing a golf cart includes a belt 11, two padded sides 12, a padded back 13 and a handle connector 14. The belt 11, the two padded sides 12 and the padded back 13 are mechanically coupled together and are worn about the waist of a user.

[0045] Referring to FIG. 4 in conjunction with FIG. 3 and FIG. 5 the belt 11 has an outer surface 21 and an inner surface 22. The belt 11 also has a first length 23 with a distal end, a second length 24 with a distal end and a belt buckle 25. The belt buckle 25 includes a female connector 26 and a male connector 27. The female connector 26 has a vertically disposed slot through which the distal end of the first length 23 passes. The male connector 27 has a body with an inner slot, an outer slot and a partition that separates the inner slot from the outer slot. The distal end of the second length 24 passes through the inner slot, around the partition and through the portion outer slot. The belt 11 has two Velcro fasteners 28 that are disposed on its outer surface 21. Each Velcro fastener 28 has a male portion 29 that is disposed adjacent to one of the distal ends 23 and 24 and a female portion 30 which is disposed adjacent to one of the male portions 29. The distal ends 23 and 24 of the belt 11 passes through the female and male connectors 26 and 27, respectively, so that the length of the belt 11 can be quickly adjusted in order to accommodate for different sized waists. The Velcro fasteners 28 secure the distal ends 23 and 24 in place.

[0046] Referring to FIG. 6 in conjunction with FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 the handle connector 14 includes a first strap 31, a second strap 32, a first loop 33, a second loops 34 and a first rectangular pad 35 and a second rectangular pad 36. The first and second straps 31 and 32 are mechanically coupled to the first rectangular pad 35. The first and second loops 33 and 34 are mechanically coupled to the second rectangular pad 36. The second rectangular pad 36 is mechanically coupled to the first rectangular pad 35. The first and second straps 31 and 32 and the first and second rectangular use Velcro fasteners 37 and 38.

[0047] Referring to FIG. 7 in conjunction with FIG. 5 the padded sides 12 have an outer layer 41 that is a fabric, an interlining 42 and an inner layer 43 that is filled with fibers. The padded back 13 has an outer layer 51 that is fabric and an inner layer 52 that is foam. The padded back 13 is configured so that it can be worn either as shown in a first position by a relatively tall person or in a second position by a relatively shorter person. In the second position the padded back 13 is turned upside down thereby lowering the position of the handle connector 14.

[0048] Referring to FIG. 8 in conjunction with FIG. 7 a golf cart has a handle 80. The loops 31 and 32 of the handle connector 14 are removed from the loops 33 and 34, respectively, and the handle 80 is placed adjacent to the loops 33 and 34. The straps 31 and 32 are inserted into the loops 33 and 34, respectively, in order to secure the handle 80 of the golf cart. The handle-connector is adaptable to a variety of handles 80.

[0049] From the foregoing it can be seen that an adjustable belt system for towing a golf cart has been described. The foregoing disclosure has discussed the use of the adjustable belt system for towing a golf cart, but it can also be used for towing other carts including wheeled suitcases.

[0050] Accordingly it is intended that the foregoing disclosure and drawings shall be considered only as an illustration of the principle of the present invention. position the padded back 13 is turned upside down thereby lowering the position of the handle connector 14.

[0051] Referring to FIG. 8 in conjunction with FIG. 7 a golf cart has a handle 80. The loops 31 and 32 of the handle connector 14 are removed from the loops 33 and 34, respectively, and the handle 80 is placed adjacent to the loops 33 and 34. The straps 31 and 32 are inserted into the loops 33 and 34, respectively, in order to secure the handle 80 of the golf cart. The handle-connector is adaptable to a variety of handles 80.

[0052] From the foregoing it can be seen that an adjustable belt system for towing a golf cart has been described. The foregoing disclosure has discussed the use of the adjustable belt system for towing a golf cart, but it can also be used for towing other carts including wheeled suitcases.

[0053] Accordingly it is intended that the foregoing disclosure and drawings shall be considered only as an illustration of the principle of the present invention.