Title:
Fireworks fuse connector
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A device for connecting the fuse of two firework devices is provided. The device has a tubular member, or connector, having a first and second end. The ends of the connector are each adaptable to receive a fuse. When the device is in operation, two fuses, each from a separate firework, are inserted into the connector. This ensures that the flame from one fuse will be effectively transferred to the next. The device may also contain a primer such as gunpowder within the interior of the connector to further ensure transmission of a flame from one fuse to the next.



Inventors:
Yu, Peter Sung Yan (Florence, AL, US)
Application Number:
10/063464
Publication Date:
10/30/2003
Filing Date:
04/25/2002
Assignee:
YU PETER SUNG YAN
Primary Class:
International Classes:
C06C5/06; F42D1/06; (IPC1-7): C06C5/04
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Primary Examiner:
JOHNSON, STEPHEN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HUSCH BLACKWELL LLP (St. Louis, MO, US)
Claims:
1. A device for connecting the fuses of two firework devices, said device comprising a tubular member having a first end and second end, said first end and said second end each being sized and shaped appropriately to slidingly and securely receive a fuse end therein, to thereby permit the connection of two aerial fireworks for successive firing thereof.

2. The device of claim 1 wherein the tubular member is constructed of paper.

3. The device of claim 1 wherein the tubular member is constructed of cardboard.

4. The device of claim 1 wherein the tubular member is constructed of plastic.

5. The device of claim 1 wherein the tubular member is constructed of metal.

6. The device of claim 1, and further comprising a primer contained within the interior of said tubular member between the substantially adjacent ends of two fuses within the connector, said primer being ignitable when contacted by a flame.

7. The device of claim 1, and further comprising a primer contained within the interior of said tubular member, said primer being gunpowder.

8. A method of successively connecting and lighting at least two aerial fireworks having fuses, the method comprising: connecting the fuses of each of two adjacent aerial fireworks for successive firing thereof by providing a device having a tubular member with a first end and a second end, said first end and said second end each being sized and shaped appropriately to slidingly and securely receive a fuse end therein, and lighting a lighting fuse of the first firework and thereby igniting the fuse of the second firework when the connected end of the fuse of the second firework is lit by flame produced within the tubular member by the adjacent end of the connected fuse of the first firework.

9. A fireworks fuse comprising: an elongated tube-shaped connector having a first end and an opposed second end, a first fuse segment having a first end and a second end, and a second fuse segment having a first end and a second end; the first end of the first fuse being connectable to an aerial firework and the second end of the first fuse being connected slideably within the first end of the connector, and the first end of the second fuse segment being connected slideably within the second end of the connector and the second end of the second fuse segment being connected to a second aerial firework, to thereby provide successive lighting of the second aerial firework via the fuse connector after the first fuse segment has been lit by firing of the first aerial firework

10. The fuse of claim 9, and further comprising a primer disposed within the connector between the second end of the first fuse segment and the first end of the second fuse segment.

11. The fuse of claim 10, wherein the primer is gunpowder.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

Field of the Invention

[0001] The present invention relates, generally, to the field of aerial fireworks, and, more particularly to fireworks fuses and connectors for use in connecting the fuses of at least two separate aerial fireworks, so that they can be successively safely and dependably fired.

[0002] Often during fireworks shows it is desirable to detonate firework devices in sequence to provide a specific pyrotechnic effect. It is difficult and not entirely safe to achieve this effect by individually lighting numerous firework devices in close proximity to one another. In order to address this problem, some firework devices have two fuses, one that is lit to detonate the device and one that transfers the flame to a second firework device. It has been customary to simply tie the outgoing fuse of one device to the incoming fuse of the next device in order to achieve detonation of numerous devices in sequence. This known method of connecting the devices is not entirely effective in that the flame from one fuse is not always efficiently transferred to the next fuse. Because of this, the sequence of detonations may be interrupted, requiring the user to intervene manually and creating a potentially dangerous situation.

SUMMARY OF INVENTION

[0003] In a preferred embodiment, the connector also contains a primer such as gunpowder to further ensure transmission of the flame from one fuse to the next.

[0004] The present invention solves the problems associated with the tying of fuses from two or more separate firework devices in order to achieve a sequential detonation of the same. Disclosed hereafter is a fuse connector for aerial fireworks constructed from heavy paper, cardboard, plastic or soft metal. The device is sized and shaped appropriately to receive fuses from two separate firework devices such that the fuses are positioned substantially coaxially and adjacent to one another within the connector. The respective ends of two fuses within the connector tube may be separated by a primer, such as gunpowder, for example, although the fuses are still in close proximity to one another. During use, as the flame from one fuse travels into the connector, the flame is confined to a small space inside the tube, adjacent the unlit fuse, thereby ensuring that the unlit fuse will be ignited and the sequence of fireworks detonations will proceed uninterrupted.

[0005] In keeping with the above, the invention is, briefly, a device for connecting the fuses of two firework devices, said device comprising a tubular member having a first end and second end, said first end and said second end each being sized and shaped appropriately to slidingly and securely receive a fuse end therein, to thereby permit the connection of two aerial fireworks for successive firing thereof a device for safely connecting the fuse of two firework devices.

[0006] Further, the invention is, briefly, a method of successively connecting and lighting at least two aerial fireworks having fuses, the method including connecting the fuses of each of two adjacent aerial fireworks for successive firing thereof by providing a device having a tubular member with a first end and a second end, said first end and said second end each being sized and shaped appropriately to slidingly and securely receive a fuse end therein. Thereafter the method includes lighting a lighting fuse of the first firework and thereby igniting the fuse of the second firework when the connected end of the fuse of the second firework is lit by flame produced within the tubular member by the adjacent end of the connected fuse of the first firework.

[0007] The invention is still further, briefly, a fuse having an elongated tube-shaped connector with a first end and an opposed second end, a first fuse segment having a first end and a second end, and a second fuse segment having a first end and a second end. The first end of the first fuse is connectable to an aerial firework and the second end of the first fuse is connected slideably within the first end of the connector. The first end of the second fuse segment is connected slideably within the second end of the connector and the second end of the second fuse segment is connected to a second aerial firework, to thereby provide successive lighting of the second aerial firework via the fuse connector after the first fuse segment has been lit by firing of the first aerial firework

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

[0008] FIG. 1 is an exploded view of a fireworks fuse connector and fuses from two separate firework devices to be connected by the new connector in accordance with the present invention.

[0009] FIG. 2 is a cut-away view of the fuse connector and fuses of FIG. 1 assembled in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.

[0010] FIG. 3 is a cut-away view of another embodiment of a fuse connector constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. The position of the fuses from two separate firework devices is shown adjacent to and on opposite sides of a primer within the connector, which connector is otherwise the same as shown in FIG. 1.

[0011] FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a sequence of aerial fireworks connected by fuse connectors constructed in accordance with the present invention.

[0012] Throughout the figures, like numbers indicate like elements.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0013] Referring now to the drawings, numeral 10 designates generally a fuse connector device constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. Connector 10 has an overall, hollow tube-like construction having an opening at each of two opposed ends, sized and shaped to receive a conventional firework fuse. As such, tubular member or connector 10 can be used to connect the fuses, 12 and 14, of two separate firework devices. Connector 10 is preferably constructed of heavy paper rolled into the preferred tube-shaped of the connector, but may also be constructed of other suitable materials such as plastic, cardboard, or soft metals such as copper, zinc, or aluminum, and may take other forms, rather than a perfectly round tube.

[0014] As best shown in FIG. 2, fuses 12 and 14 are inserted into either end of connector 10 until the ends of fuses 12 and 14 are adjacent one another in the interior of connector 10. Thus, there is created a continuous fuse linking two fireworks devices. For example, when a device having fuse 12 is lit, the flame detonates the firework device and then continues to travel along fuse 12 and into connector 10 until it comes in contact with fuse 14. Because the flame is within an enclosed area, it is assured that fuse 14 will be lit before the flame of fuse 12 is extinguished. The fuse connector of the present invention is not limited to connecting two aerial fireworks in serial fashion, but could be used to connect any number of aerial fireworks in any sequence or pattern depending upon the arrangement and placement of the fuses and connectors.

[0015] In a preferred embodiment as shown in FIG. 3, fuse connector 10 is provided with a primer, such as a portion of gunpowder, located near the center of the connector. In this embodiment of the device, when the flame travelling along fuse 12 enters connector 10, it comes into contact with primer 16, causing a small and contained explosion within the interior of the connector. This ignition of primer 16 further ensures that fuse 14 will, in fact, be ignited inside of connector 10 and the sequential detonation of the fireworks devices will continue uninterrupted.

[0016] FIG. 4 provides an illustration of a series of aerial fireworks connected by fuse connectors constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. The operation of such connected fireworks is explained below. An incoming fuse 26 is ignited by a match or other flame-bearing device. When the flame reaches aerial firework 20, aerial firework 20 is detonated, producing a pyrotechnic display specific to that device. Outgoing fuse 12 from aerial firework 20 continues to burn after the detonation of aerial firework 20, burning along the length of fuse 12 and into the interior of connector 10. Once the flame reaches the end of fuse 12, inside the interior of connector 10, it comes into contact with fuse 14. Preferably, a primer such as gunpowder may also be added to the interior of connector 10 to further ensure that the flame reaches fuse 14. Fuse 14 then begins to burn until aerial firework 22 is detonated. This procedure is repeated with respect to the fuses leading form aerial firework 22 and into aerial firework 24.

[0017] It is important to note that the character of the aerial fireworks show produced by connecting aerial fireworks devices with the fuse connectors of the present invention can be customized by adjusting the position and length of the fuses, and the position of the connectors. For example, creating longer fuses between certain aerial firework devices will cause an increased delay between the detonation of one aerial firework in the series and the detonation of the next. Further, multiple fuses could be used, rather than simply an incoming and outgoing fuse, to created complex patterns of detonation. In each case, connectors constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention can be used to ensure the safe and efficient detonation of each connected aerial firework device.

[0018] The foregoing constitutes a description of various features of certain embodiments of the present invention. Numerous changes to the preferred embodiment are possible without departing from the spirit and scope of the Hence, the scope of the invention should be determined with reference not to the preferred embodiment, but to the following claims: