Title:
Snowboard having modified edge structure
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Snowboards with various edge structures are disclosed herein. A portion of the edge of the snowboard may be formed by a hardened or metal edge. A remaining portion of the edge defined by an absence of the hardened or metal edge forms a grind edge. The disclosed invention provides a snowboard that has only partial metal or hardened edges along its perimeter to allow the rider to slide or grind on a rail without worry of catching a hardened or metal edge on the rail, or damaging the hardened or metal edge during the grinding activity. Embodiments of the invention also relate to edge structures of snowboards that allow for easy repair of those edge structures.



Inventors:
William Jr., Muff H. (Denver, CO, US)
Application Number:
10/300671
Publication Date:
08/14/2003
Filing Date:
11/19/2002
Assignee:
MUFF WILLIAM H.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
280/14.21
International Classes:
A63C5/03; A63C5/048; (IPC1-7): A63C5/048
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
SHRIVER II, JAMES A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
janice a steinle (highlands ranch, CO, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A snowboard comprising: a main body having a bottom surface, a front end, a rear end, and a sidewall extending around said main body, said sidewall intersecting with said bottom surface; a first portion of said intersection along said main body forming a first grind edge; and a second portion of said intersection adjacent one of said ends forming a first hardened edge.

2. The snowboard of claim 1 wherein said bottom surface is made of P-Tex.

3. The snowboard of claim 1 wherein said sidewall is made of P-Tex along said first grind edge.

4. The snowboard of claim 1 wherein said first hardened edge is made of metal.

5. The snowboard of claim 1 further comprising a third portion of said intersection along said main body forming a second grind edge.

6. The snowboard of claim 5 further comprising a fourth portion of said intersection adjacent one of said ends forming a second hardened edge.

7. The snowboard of claim 1 further comprising a third portion of said intersection adjacent one of said ends forming a second grind edge.

8. The snowboard of claim 7 further comprising a fourth portion of said intersection adjacent one of said ends forming a second hardened edge.

9. The snowboard of claim 1 wherein a plurality of portions of said intersection are formed by a plurality of hardened edges.

10. The snowboard of claim 10 wherein said plurality of portions of said intersection formed by said plurality of hardened edges do not extend around at least one of said ends.

11. The snowboard of claim 1 wherein said first hardened edge terminates in said main body.

12. A snowboard comprising: a main body having a bottom surface, a front end, a rear end, a middle portion defining opposing sides, and a sidewall extending around said main body, said sidewall intersecting with said bottom surface; a first portion of said intersection extending along at least one of said ends being formed by a hardened material; and a second portion of said intersection extending along at least one of said opposing sides being formed without said hardened material.

13. The snowboard of claim 12 wherein said bottom surface is made of P-Tex.

14. The snowboard of claim 12 wherein said hardened material terminates within said main body.

15. The snowboard of claim 12 further comprising a plurality of portions of said intersection formed by said hardened material.

16. The snowboard of claim 15 wherein said plurality of portions of said intersection formed by said hardened material do not extend around at least one of said ends.

17. The snowboard of claim 12 wherein said hardened material is made of metal.

18. A snowboard comprising: a main body having a bottom surface made of P-Tex, a top surface, a front end, a rear end, a middle portion defining a first side opposite of a second side, and a sidewall made of P-Tex extending around said main body, said sidewall forming an intersection with said bottom surface; a plurality of layered materials between said bottom surface and said top surface; a first portion of said intersection being formed by a first hardened edge adjacent said front end, said first hardened edge having at least one end tucked into said sidewall; a second portion of said intersection being formed by a second hardened edge adjacent said rear end, said second hardened edge having at least one end tucked into said sidewall; a third portion of said corner being formed by P-Tex extending along said first side; and a fourth portion of said corner being formed by P-Tex extending along said second side.

19. The snowboard of claim 18 wherein said hardened edges are made of metal.

20. The snowboard of claim 19 wherein said hardened edges define a plurality of T-shaped extensions extending inwardly into said sidewall.

21. The snowboard of claim 20 wherein said hardened edges define a first thickness and said tucked ends define a second thickness wherein said second thickness is smaller than said first thickness.

22. The snowboard of claim 18 wherein the tucked ends terminate.

22. The snowboard of claim 17 wherein the tucked ends terminate.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/331,896, filed on Nov. 19, 2001. The above identified provisional application is hereby incorporated by reference as if fully disclosed herein.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0002] This invention relates to snowboards, and more particularly relates to the edge structures of snowboards to allow for easy edge repair.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0003] Snowboarding has become a very popular winter sport. High-level snowboarding is very competitive, with formal competitions including the traditional ski-type races as well as races more akin to skateboarding. Many freestyle competitions include these types of races, typically performed in a half-pipe structure.

[0004] One of the features of the half-pipe freestyle competition is called “grinding.” Grinding is where a rider (a person riding on a snowboard) jumps onto a handrailing type structure, and while positioned generally transverse to the railing, slides down the railing on the snowboard. The railing is generally made of some sort of tubular steel, and can be anywhere from about 2 feet to 20 feet off the ground.

[0005] When grinding, the rider slides along the railing on the bottom of the snowboard, and uses the leading and/or trailing edge of the snowboard to control (to the extent possible) the speed of the snowboard, and the angle at which the snowboard is transverse to the railing. This position is very precarious and is generally performed by riders having a high level of skill.

[0006] The edges of existing snowboards are metal, and thus do not provide very good control of the grinding activity. The metal of the edge contacting the metal of the rail can create a relatively low-friction engagement. In addition, since the metal of the edge is hard, if it contacts a protrusion on the railing, the rider may be caused to lose his or her balance and fall off the rail. In addition, by grinding the edges of the snowboard can be damaged beyond repair, or can be dislodged from the snowboard, requiring expensive repair of the edges and sidewalls (if possible) or replacement of the board altogether.

[0007] What is needed in the art is a snowboard that has an edge structure that facilitates the grinding activity and preferably also allows the edges to be repaired as needed.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0008] The instant invention provides a snowboard that has partial metal or hardened edges along its length to allow the rider to grind without worry of catching a hardened or metal edge on the rail, or damaging the hardened or metal edge during the grinding activity. The metal or hardened edge is removed from at least a part of at least one of the bottom edges of the snowboard, generally between the binding mountings.

[0009] The edge of the snowboard where the hardened or metal edge is removed, the grind edge, in the present invention is made of a bottom thin layer of P-Tex on the base, and a sidewall of P-Tex, together sandwiching adhesive/strengthening layers. When the grinding edge is worn down during the grinding activity, the grinding edge can be repaired by simply filling in the damage with P-Tex, shaping and smoothing. Any other material suitable for filling, shaping and smoothing, to fix edge damage, is suitable, such as epoxy resin or the like.

[0010] The metal or hardened edge of the snowboard can be terminated by a tucked or anchor portion that extends away from its longitudinal extension along the outer edge of the board toward the centerline of the board. The tucked end is thinner then the rest of the metal or hardened edge, and thus is below the surface of the base P-Tex so as not to interfere with the smoothness of the base and to allow the base to hold it securely in place. This tucked end helps keep the edge securely fastened, and highly resistant to being torn out or dislodged from its anchored position.

[0011] The combination of the tucked edge securing the metal or hardened edge to the board, the P-Tex-on-P-Tex sidewall/base, and grind edge, either individually or in any combination, are believed to provide significant benefits over the art.

[0012] One embodiment of the present invention may described as a snowboard including: a main body having a bottom surface, a front end, a rear end, and a sidewall extending around the main body, the sidewall forming a corner at an intersection with the bottom surface; a first portion of the corner along the main body forming a first grind edge; and a second portion of the corner adjacent one of the ends forming a first hardened edge.

[0013] An alternative embodiment of the present invention may be described as a snowboard including: a main body having a bottom surface, a front end, a rear end, a middle portion defining opposing sides, and a sidewall extending around the main body, the sidewall forming a corner at an intersection with the bottom surface; a first portion of the corner extending along one of the ends being formed by a hardened material; and a second portion of the corner extending along one of the opposing sides being formed without the hardened material.

[0014] More particularly, an exemplary embodiment of the present invention may be described as a snowboard including: a main body having a bottom surface made of P-Tex, a top surface, a front end, a rear end, a middle portion defining a first side opposite of a second side, and a sidewall made of P-Tex extending around the main body, the sidewall forming a corner at an intersection with the bottom surface; a plurality of layered materials between the bottom surface and the top surface; a first portion of the corner being formed by a first hardened edge adjacent the front end, the first hardened edge having at least one end tucked into the sidewall; a second portion of the corner being formed by a second hardened edge adjacent the rear end, the second hardened edge having at least one end tucked into the sidewall; a third portion of the corner being formed by P-Tex extending along the first side; and a fourth portion of the corner being formed by P-Tex extending along the second side.

[0015] The features, utilities, and advantages of various embodiments of the invention will be apparent from the following more particular description of embodiments of the invention as illustrated in the accompanying drawings and defined in the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0016] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a rider on a snowboard grinding along a rail.

[0017] FIG. 2 is a top perspective view of a snowboard according to one embodiment of the present invention.

[0018] FIG. 3A is a bottom view of the snowboard in FIG. 2.

[0019] FIG. 3B is a bottom view of the snowboard in FIG. 2 depicting general dimensions.

[0020] FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 2, depicting one embodiment of a cross-sectional view of the snowboard through an area of the sidewall with a grind edge.

[0021] FIG. 5 is a fragmentary view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 2, depicting one embodiment of a cross-sectional view of the snowboard through an area of the sidewall with a hardened or metal edge.

[0022] FIG. 6 is a bottom view of a snowboard utilizing hardened or metal edges with tucked ends.

[0023] FIG. 7 is an enlarged, fragmentary view of the tucked end within the dashed circle numeral 7 of FIG. 6.

[0024] FIG. 8 is a fragmentary view taken along line 8-8 of FIG. 7, depicting one embodiment of a cross-sectional view of the snowboard through an area with a tucked end.

[0025] FIG. 9A depicts a detail view a tucked end angling away from an edge of a snowboard at an acute angle.

[0026] FIG. 9B depicts a detail view a tucked end angling away from an edge of a snowboard at a right angle.

[0027] FIG. 9C depicts a detail view a tucked end angling away from an edge of a snowboard at an obtuse angle with a pointed front edge.

[0028] FIG. 9D depicts a detail view a tucked end angling away from an edge of a snowboard at an obtuse angle with a flat front end.

[0029] FIG. 10 is a top view of one embodiment of a hardened or metal edge forming a tucked end.

[0030] FIG. 11 is a side view of the embodiment of the hardened or metal edge shown in FIG. 10.

[0031] FIG. 12 is a top view of a snowboard showing the placement of four hardened or metal edges.

[0032] FIG. 13 is a bottom view of the snowboard depicted in FIG. 12.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0033] FIG. 1 shows a view of a rider 2 on a snowboard 4 incorporating the instant invention sliding or grinding on a rail structure 6. The rail structure 6 is similar to a handrailing type structure. The rail structure 6 generally includes a rail 8 with a front support 10 and a rear support 12. The rail 8 may be made of some sort of tubular steel, and can be anywhere from about two feet to twenty feet off the ground. Grinding is where the rider 2 maneuvers the snowboard 4 onto the rail structure 6, and while standing on the snowboard 4, slides along the rail 8 while positioned generally transverse to the rail. As the snowboard 4 slides along the rail 8, the rider 2 uses a front edge 14 and/or a rear edge 16 of the snowboard to control (to the extent possible) the speed of the snowboard and angle at which the snowboard is transverse to the rail 8.

[0034] FIG. 2 shows a top perspective view of the snowboard 4 incorporating the instant invention. In particular, the snowboard 4 has a main body 18 with a top 20, a bottom 22, and rounded front and rear ends (24, 26). Generally, the snowboard has a width that varies along its length. As shown in FIG. 2, the width of the top 20 and bottom 22 of the board 4 is generally larger at the ends (24, 26) than the width of the top and bottom between the ends due to a sidewall cut 28 that creates a “waist” 30 near the middle of the length of the board. A series of binding mounting hole sets (32, 34) are formed near either end (24, 26), and allow for boot bindings to be mounted to the snowboard 4. The binding mounting hole sets (32, 34) identify binding locations (36, 38). The boot bindings can be moved longitudinally along the board to the extent the binding mounting holes allow such movement. The snowboard also has a sidewall 40 that extends around the perimeter of the board. A corner 42 is formed between the sidewall 40 and a bottom surface 44 of the board 4. The corner is where an “edge” 46 of the board is formed, as described below.

[0035] A portion of the edge may be formed by a hardened or metal edge 48. Generally, the hardened or metal edge 48 is made from a material that is harder and more resilient than materials from which the sidewall 40 and bottom surface 44 are made. While the term metal edge is used herein, it refers to any suitable material used as a traditional “edge” on a ski or snowboard. A remaining portion of the edge defined by an absence of the hardened or metal edge forms a grind edge 50. Various embodiments of the present invention may have more than one hardened or metal edge and more than one grind edge that may vary in length and location along the edge of the sidewall.

[0036] FIGS. 3A and 3B show bottom views of the snowboard 4 of FIG. 2. As depicted in the embodiment shown FIGS. 2, 3A, and 3B, each hardened or metal edge 48 terminates at its respective end (24, 26) of the board 4 at or near the binding location. The grind edge 50, which is defined by an absence of the hardened or metal edge 48, extends from approximately one binding location 36 to approximately the opposite binding location 38, or any distance there between. As shown in FIG. 1, the grind edge 50 allows a rider to “grind” the rail 8 (slide along the rail) on the grind edge 50 while likely minimizing the contact of the hardened or metal edge 48 of the snowboard 4 with the rail. Generally, the sidewall 40, grind edge 50, and bottom surface 44 of the snowboard 4 are made with material suitable for filling, shaping, and smoothing to fix edge damage, such as P-Tex, epoxy resin, or the like. In a preferred embodiment, the bottom surface of the board is made of P-Tex. Since the grind edge 50 is relatively soft compared to the hardened or metal edge 48, it is able to be worn off, perhaps in a groove to help the rider track the rail. The grind edge 50 also accommodates nicks and protrusions along the rail 8 without necessarily causing the rider 2 to lose his or her balance.

[0037] Referring now to FIG. 3B, the following dimensions relating to the length and spacing of the physical features of the snowboard are typical, but not exclusive:

[0038] L=Total length of the snowboard. This is typically 57 to 66 inches.

[0039] Lb=Length of binding locations (36, 38). Generally, with 5 pairs of holes Lb is 6.25 inches, and with 4 pairs of holes Lb is 4.75 inches.

[0040] Lr=Distance from a rear tip 52 of board to rear end 54 of rear binding location 38. This is approximately 17 inches.

[0041] Lf=Distance from a front tip 56 of the board to the front end 58 of the front binding location 36. Generally, this is 17 to 20 inches.

[0042] Lm=Distance between binding locations (36, 38) (from the rear 60 of the front binding location 36 mount to the front 62 of the rear binding location 38). This is approximately 16 inches.

[0043] The grind edge 50 extends generally between the binding locations (36, 38), as discussed throughout, although it can extend beyond the binding locations, or it can be less than the distance between the binding locations. The length of and location of the grind edge 50 needs to be appropriate for the rider and sufficient to provide a space for grinding without contacting the hardened or metal edge 48. The length and location of at least one grind edge can be determined by the rider and customized on the board prior to manufacture. As shown in FIG. 3B, the length of the grind edge 50 is Lg. The preferred range of the ratio of lengths of the grind edge on one side of the board to the total length of the board is from approximately 0.24 to 0.27. In a preferred embodiment, the hardened or metal edges 48 can extend around the ends of the snowboard 4 sufficiently to allow the rider to adequately control the board during the non-grinding portions of his or her ride. The grind edge 50 on one side could also be longer or shorter than the grind edge on the other side.

[0044] FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 2 depicting one embodiment of a cross-sectional view 64 of the snowboard 4 through an area of the sidewall 40 with the grind edge 50. As shown in FIG. 4, the cross-sectional area 64 of the snowboard 4 may be constructed of several layers of materials. A bottom layer of the section is referred to as a base layer 66. In one embodiment, the base layer 66 is made of P-Tex and is approximately 0.040 inches thick. A layer on top of the base layer 66 is referred to as a first bonding layer 68. In one embodiment, the first bonding layer 68 is made of rubber and is approximately 0.008 inches thick. A layer on top of the bonding layer 68 is referred to as a fiberglass layer 70. In one embodiment, the fiberglass layer 70 is 0/90 type and is approximately 0.015″ thick. A layer on top of the fiberglass layer 70 is referred to as a second bonding layer 72. In one embodiment, the second bonding layer 72 is made of rubber and is approximately 0.008 inches thick. A layer on top of the second bonding layer 72 is referred to as a combination core/sidewall layer 74. The core/sidewall layer 74 may comprise an inner portion 76 and an outer portion 78. The outer portion 78 of the core/sidewall layer 74 forms part of the sidewall 40 and extends inwardly away from the sidewall 40 and toward the center of the top 20 and bottom 22 of the board at a distance equal to the width of the outer portion. The inner portion 76 of the core/sidewall layer 74 encompasses a space inside the outer portion 78. In one embodiment, the inner portion 76 of the core/sidewall layer 74 is made of wood, and the outer portion 78 of the core/sidewall layer 74, at least along the grind edge 50, is made of P-Tex. In one embodiment, the inner portion 76 of the core/sidewall layer is approximately one-quarter inches thick, and the outer portion 78 of the core/sidewall layer is approximately 0.5 inches wide. This allows the grind edge 50 to be substantially worn away before it should be repaired, if so desired. A layer on top of the core/sidewall layer 74 is referred to as a normal top layer 80 and it may be constructed of various materials known in the art. It should be understood that the snowboard may be constructed with a different number of layers of materials and with different materials from those described above.

[0045] When the rider 2 grinds the snowboard 4 on the rail 8, as shown in FIG. 1, the rail can wear a groove in the bottom layer 66 and the sidewall 40 of the board, or on one or both of the grind edges 50. For example, if the rider 2 grinds the board 2 on the rail 8 such that the rail is predominately in contact across the width of the bottom surface 44, the rail 8 may wear the groove in the sidewall 40 and across the width of the board 4 on the bottom surface 44. However, if the rider 2 grinds the board 4 on the rail 8 such that front edge 14 of the board is tilted up from the rail so that the rear edge 16 is predominately in contact with the rail, the rail may wear a groove in the grind edge 50 and sidewall 40 on the rear edge 16. Conversely, if the rider 2 grinds the board 4 on the rail 8 such that rear edge 16 of the board is tilted up from the rail so that the front edge 14 is predominately in contact with the rail, the rail may wear a groove in the grind edge 50 and sidewall 40 on the front edge 14. A dashed line in FIG. 4 shows a grind area 82 that is most likely to become damaged during the grinding activity. The groove may provide a “seat” for the rail 8 to help the rider perform the grind activity, if so desired. If this is not desired, as soon as a noticeable groove is formed in the bottom layer 66 and sidewall 40, or edges of the board 46, or both, the groove can be eliminated by utilizing any material suitable for filling, smoothing, and polishing the groove. In a preferred embodiment, P-Tex can be used to fill the groove and repair any damage done to the grind edge 50, because the sidewall 40 and base layer 66 are made of P-Tex with only thin layers of rubber and fiberglass between the sidewall and base.

[0046] FIG. 5 is a fragmentary view taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 2 depicting one embodiment of a cross-sectional view of the snowboard through an area of the sidewall with the hardened or metal edge 48. The layers depicted in the cross-section of FIG. 5 are similar to those shown in FIG. 4, except that the hardened or metal edge 48 replaces a small portion of the base layer 66 along the outer edge 46 of the board. As previously stated, it should be understood that the snowboard may be constructed with a different number of layers of materials and with different materials from those described above.

[0047] As shown in the embodiment depicted in FIGS. 3A and 3B, the grind edge 50 generally extends between the rear end 60 of the front binding location 36 to the front end 58 of the rear binding location 38. Conversely, the hardened or metal edges 48 extend from the rear end 60 of the front binding location 36 and around the front end 24 of the board 4, and from the front end 62 of the rear binding location 38 and around the rear end 26 of the board 4. Terminal ends 86 of each of the hardened or metal edges 48 may be held in place in a number of different ways. The hardened or metal edges 48 may be directed inwardly a sufficient distance away from the grind edges 50 so as not to interfere with the degradation (such as the formation of a groove) on the grind edges 50.

[0048] FIG. 6 depicts a bottom view of a snowboard 4 utilizing hardened or metal edges 48 with tucked, or anchor, ends 88 to hold the terminal ends 86 of the hardened or metal edges 48 in place. The tucked ends 88 are shown in dash, because the tucked ends 88 penetrate the sidewall 40 of the board 4 and are buried at least partially under the base layer material. FIG. 7 depicts an enlarged fragmentary view of the tucked end 88 within the dashed circle numeral 7 of FIG. 6. A last portion of the metal edge 48 exposed on the bottom of the board is referred to as an external end 90, and a final tip of the metal edge buried at least partially under the base layer is referred to as a terminal anchor end 92. As shown in FIG. 7, the hardened or metal edge 48 is bent inwardly toward the center of the board 4 at the external end 90. Because the anchor end 88 penetrates the sidewall 40 and is buried in the board 4, it aids in holding the external end and hardened or metal edge in place. The bend could be a smooth curve or other type of offset structure. It should also be understood that the hardened or metal edges can terminate on the edge of the board without being tucked into the board. This type of termination structure does not create the additional anchoring of the tucked end, but is still operational and effective.

[0049] FIG. 8 is a fragmentary view taken along line 8-8 of FIG. 7, depicting one embodiment of a cross-sectional view of the snowboard through an area 94 with the tucked end 88. The tucked end 88 of the hardened or metal edge 48 is spaced away from the sidewall 40 of the board, and is held in place by the base layer 66. As previously discussed, the base layer 66 may be made of P-Tex. The base layer 66 helps to anchor the external end 90 of the hardened or metal edge 48 solidly to the board. The tucked ends 66 of the hardened metal edges 48 also help keep the terminal end 86 of the metal edge in place, so it cannot easily be torn loose during the grinding activity.

[0050] The tucked, or anchor, ends 88 may be secured in the base layer 66 in a number of different configurations. For example, FIG. 9A shows a first anchor end 96 angling away from the edge 46 of the board 4 at an acute angle 98. FIG. 9B shows a second anchor end 100 angling away from the edge 46 of the board 4 at a right angle 102. FIG. 9C shows a third anchor end 104 angling away from the edge 46 of the board 4 at an obtuse angle 106 with a pointed front edge 108. FIG. 9D shows a fourth anchor end 110 angling away from the edge 46 of the board 4 at the obtuse angle 106 with a flat front end 112. In other embodiments, the anchor end 88 may be curved, as opposed to have a bent-angle shape. Typically, the anchor ends 88 are bent in a plane such that the anchor end extends away from the edge 46 of the board 4 parallel to the bottom surface 44. Bending the anchor end 88 in such a way that it extends parallel to the bottom surface 44 may not be desirable in some embodiments, because the anchor end may by flush with the bottom 22 of the board 4. This configuration would make it easier for the anchor end 88 to be torn loose from the board 4 while in use. Therefore, in other embodiments, the anchor end 88 may be bent inwardly and upwardly so the anchor end 88 not only extends away from the edge 46 but also extends upwardly at an angle toward the top 20 of the board. Bending the anchor end 88 upwardly into the board 4 keeps the anchor end from being flush with the bottom 22 of the board. Therefore, a portion of bottom surface material would separate the anchor end 88 from the bottom 22 of the board 4 making it more difficult to tear loose while in use.

[0051] FIG. 10 shows a top view of one embodiment of a hardened or metal edge 48 with a bend 114 forming the tucked end 88. The hardened or metal edge 48 has a top side 116, a bottom side 118, an inward side 120, and an outward side 122. When the hardened or metal edge 48 is installed in a snowboard 4, the outer side 22 and bottom side 118 are generally flush with the sidewall 40 and bottom surface 44 of the snowboard, respectively, and the inward side 120 extends inwardly from the sidewall 40 toward the center of the snowboard. The outward side 122 is generally smooth, while the inward side 120 may be formed in various ways in order to help hold the hardened or metal edge 48 in place. For example, in FIG. 10, the inward side 120 of the hardened or metal edge 48 is formed with T-shaped extensions 124 that may be buried in the bottom layer 66 of the snowboard 4 when the hardened or metal edge is installed on the snowboard. In one embodiment, the tucked end 88 extends approximately 1.5 inches from the bend 114, and can be in the range of ¼ inch to three inches, with a practical limit being the width of the board. The bend 114 defines an angle 126 between the tucked end 88 and the outward side 122 of approximately 30 degrees. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 10, the tucked end 88 is bent in a plane such that the tucked end extends away from the edge 46 of the board parallel to the bottom surface 44. However, as stated previously, the tucked end 88 may be bent inwardly and upwardly.

[0052] FIG. 11 is a side view of the embodiment of the hardened or metal edge 48 shown in FIG. 10. The tucked end 88 is thinner than a main length 128 of the hardened or metal edge 48 and is also offset upwardly to allow the tucked end 88 to be seated entirely within or under the base layer 66 of the board 4, which holds the tucked end in place and keeps the external end from separating from the board. Because the tucked end 88 is thinner than the main length 128 of the hardened or metal edge 48, there may be no need to bend the tucked end upwardly in order to prevent the tucked end from being flush with the bottom 22 of the board. In one embodiment, the thickness, Tt, of the tucked end 88 is approximately 0.040 inches, and the thickness, Tm, of the main length 128 of the hardened or metal edge 48 is 0.080 inches. Not only is the thickness of the tucked end 88 less than the thickness of the main length 128, but the tucked end 88 is also offset upwardly by a distance, Du, of 0.40 inches.

[0053] The invention can be implemented to define a plurality of grinding and hardened or metal edges on a snowboard. If desired, it can also be implemented on one or both edges of skis, mono-boards, or the like, to allow them to perform the grinding activity with the same benefits as the instant invention provides on the snowboard.

[0054] FIGS. 12 and 13 show an alternative edge placement for the present invention. FIG. 12 is a top view showing the placement of four hardened or metal edges 48 on the snowboard 4. In FIG. 12, the hardened or metal edges 48 are shown in dash, representing that they are hidden in this view, and the dash representations indicate the placement of the hardened or metal edges 48. Each hardened or metal edge 48 has a tucked, or anchor, end 88 to secure the external end 90 of each edge to the board. The benefit and function of the tucked edge 88 is described above, all of which applies in this example. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 12, the four hardened or metal edges 48 are positioned to extend from approximately the inner ends (60, 62) of mounting locations (36, 38) toward an apex 130 of each end (24, 26) of the board, but not all the way around each end. Portions of the edge on each side of the board defined by an absence of the hardened or metal edge 48 forms side grind edges 50. Portions of the edge on each end of the board defined by the absence of the hardened or metal edges form end grind edges 50 at each end of the board. Therefore, each end (24, 26) of the board can be damaged and repaired, as the side grind edges 50 can be.

[0055] Locations of the four hardened or metal edges 48 can sufficiently encompass the edge 46 to assist in controlling the motion of the board 4 during non-trick riding, such as carving turns. FIG. 13 shows a bottom plan view of the board 4 depicted in FIG. 12, and the exposed portions of the four hardened or metal edges 48. The placement and quantity of hardened or metal edges 48 can be customized by the rider prior to manufacture for the desired control level and grind edge placement. For example, there may be one, two, three, four, or any number of hardened or metal edges, or any combinations of grind and hardened or metal edges, positioned around the corners of the board or elsewhere, as desired by the rider. The lengths of various grind edges and hardened or metal edges may vary, the placement of which does not have to be symmetrical.

[0056] Although various embodiments of this invention have been described above with a certain degree of particularity or with reference to one or more individual embodiments, those skilled in the art could make numerous alterations to those disclosed embodiments without from departing from the spirit or scope of this invention. It is intended that all matter contained in the above description and shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative only of particular embodiments, and not limiting. Changes in detail or structure may be made without departing from the basic elements of the invention as defined in the following claims.