Title:
Carrying carton and can dispenser
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The carton has two side panels, a front panel, a back panel and top and bottom flaps attached by a crease to each panel. The front panel has a trapezoidal shaped tear out section from a top edge to a bottom portion. A tape carrying handle is adhesively attached to a top portion of each side panel. Upon removing the trapezoidal tear out section, a purchaser of the carton filled with cans in a longitudinally stacked array is able to remove one can at a time without causing other cans to fall out of the carton.



Inventors:
George Jr., White H. (Palm Harbor, FL, US)
Application Number:
10/075977
Publication Date:
08/14/2003
Filing Date:
02/14/2002
Assignee:
WHITE GEORGE H.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
B65D5/46; B65D5/72; B65D71/00; B65D71/36; (IPC1-7): B65D65/00; B65D75/00
View Patent Images:
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20020070138Container holderJune, 2002Dunne
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Primary Examiner:
PICKETT, JOHN G
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
LARSON AND LARSON (LARGO, FL, US)
Claims:

What is claimed is:



1. A carton blank comprising: a unitary sheet of material having a first and second side panel, a back panel and front panel together with a top and bottom flap attached to each panel by a longitudinal crease line and each flap adapted to be bent inwardly; a first vertical crease line attaching the first side panel to the front panel, a second vertical crease line attaching the second side panel to the front panel, a third vertical crease line attaching the second side panel distal from the front panel to the back panel, a fourth vertical crease line attaching the back panel to a support panel; and a perforation outline on the front panel outlining a trapezoidal section extending from a horizontal perforation line attaching the top flap to the front panel to a bottom portion of the front panel.

2. The carton blank according to claim 1 wherein a notch is located on an outside edge of the top flap attached to each side panel.

3. The carton blank according to claim 1 wherein a notch is located on an inside edge of the top flap attached to the front panel.

4. The carton blank according to claim 1 where a pair of diagonal crease lines are located on the top flap attached to the back panel and front panel.

5. A beverage carton comprising: an upright first and second side panel, a back panel and a front panel, the panels attached together to form a container for longitudinally stacking an array of cans, a bottom flap attached to each panel folded inwardly and adhesively joined to form a bottom section of the carton; a perforation outline of the front panel outlining a trapezoidal section beginning at a horizontal perforation line attaching a top flap to the front panel and extending downwardly to a bottom portion of the front panel; the front and back panels having a width substantially the same as the longitudinal length of the cans; a carrying handle adhesively attached to an upper portion of the first and second side panel; and a top flap attached to the first and second side panels, the front panel and back panel folded inwardly to partially enclose a top of the carton below the carrying handle.

6. The beverage carton according to claim 5 wherein the carton encloses twelve cans.

7. The beverage carton according to claim 5 wherein the trapezoidal section has been removed to permit removal of one can at a time from the carton.

8. The beverage carton according to claim 5 wherein a first corner portion of the back panel top flap is glued to the first side panel top flap and a second comer portion of the back panel top flap is glued to the second side panel top flap.

9. The beverage carton according to claim 5 wherein a first corner portion of the front panel top flap is glued to the first side panel top flap and a second corner portion of the front panel top flap is glued to the second side panel top flap.

10. A beverage carton for stacked cans, the cans stacked in a lengthwise configuration, the carton comprising: an upright first and second side panel, a back panel and a front panel having a width conforming substantially to the length of the cans, the panels attached together along crease lines to form an enclosure for the stacked cans, a bottom flap attached to each panel folded inwardly along a crease line and the bottom flaps adhesively joined to form a bottom section of the carton; a perforation outline of the front panel outlining a trapezoidal section beginning at a horizontal perforation line attaching a top flap to the front panel, the perforation outline extending downwardly to a bottom portion of the front panel; a carrying handle attached to an upper portion of the first and second side panels; and a top flap attached to each first and second side panels, the top flap attached to the front panel and a top flap attached to the back panel, all folded inwardly to partially enclose a top of the carton below the carrying handle.

11. The beverage carton according to claim 10 wherein the carton encloses twelve cans.

12. The beverage carton according to claim 11 wherein the cans are stacked in three rows of four cans each.

13. The beverage carton according to claim 10 wherein the trapezoidal section has been removed to permit removal of one can at a time from the carton.

14. The beverage carton according to claim 10 wherein each bottom flap has a trapezoidal shape.

15. The beverage carton according to claim 10 wherein the carrying strap is a flexible polymeric material and the carton panels, top flaps and bottom flaps are cardboard material.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

[0001] This invention relates to a packaging system for cans. More particularly, it refers to a packaging system for carrying and dispensing individual cans in a can array positioned longitudinally in a carton.

BACKGROUND ART

[0002] Twelve can beverage cartons are well known and are currently popular commercial items as seen by Mead Corporation's U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,558,816 and 5,292,059. Access to the cans only can be achieved by tearing open one of the end panels so the cans can be rolled out. Once the end panel is opened all of the cans will roll out if the carton is tipped. Dispensing cartons such as seen in U.S. Pat. No. 5,690,230 have a tear out panel which permits removal of flat, thin products in stacked relationship. Other patents relating to cartons, such as U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,505,372; 4,378,877 and 3,262,631, have access doors to obtain products contained in the carton.

[0003] No carton exists having a tear out panel in one end of the carton that allows for individual removal of a longitudinally stacked can while maintaining the remaining cans in a stacked relationship in the carton. For convenience of the public, a packaging system is needed to keep cans stored while access to individual cans is achieved.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0004] The present invention is directed to a can beverage carton permitting removal of individual cans stacked in a longitudinal configuration without causing the remaining cans to fall out of the carton. The carton has two side panels, a front panel and a back panel with top and bottom flaps on each panel. The front panel has perforations outlining a trapezoidal shape from a top edge of the front panel to a bottom portion of the front panel. A tape carrying handle is adhesively attached to a top portion of each side panel.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0005] The invention can be best understood by those having ordinary skill in the packaging art by reference to the following detailed description when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

[0006] FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a unitary blank prior to forming the carton.

[0007] FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the carton of this invention after being formed from the blank of FIG. 1.

[0008] FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the carton containing twelve cans longitudinally stacked.

[0009] FIG. 4 is a formed perspective view of the carton of FIG. 3 with one can removed.

BEST MODE FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION

[0010] Throughout the following detailed description, the same reference numbers refer to the same elements in all figures.

[0011] The carton 10 of this invention set forth in FIG. 1 has a first side panel 12, and a second side panel 14. Side panel 12 has a top flap 16 and a bottom flap 18. Side panel 14 has a top flap 20 and a bottom flap 22. Top flap 16 bends inwardly along crease 24. Bottom flap 18 bends inwardly along crease 26. Top flap 20 bends inwardly along crease 28 and bottom flap 22 bends inwardly along crease 30.

[0012] Carton 10 also has a back panel 32 and a front panel 52. Back panel 32 has a top flap 36 with a first diagonal crease 38 and a second diagonal crease 40. In addition, back panel 32 has a side flap 42 with a vertical crease line 44 between the back panel 32 and a side support panel 42. Back panel 32 also has a bottom flap 46 which bends inwardly along crease 48. Top flap 36 also bends inwardly along crease 50.

[0013] Front panel 52 has a top flap 54 and a bottom flap 56. Flap 54 has a perforation line 58 to permit top flap 54 to bend inwardly. In addition, flap 54 has a first diagonal crease 60 and a second diagonal crease 62. Bottom flap 56 has a crease 64 to permit flap 56 to bend inwardly. Front panel 52 has downwardly descending perforation lines 66 and 68 tapering inwardly from perforated horizontal line 58 at the top of panel 52 to a bottom portion 70 where perforation line 72 connects the downwardly directed distal ends of perforation lines 66 and 68.

[0014] A cut out groove 74 is formed along a top edge 76 of flap 20 and a cut out groove 78 is formed along a top edge 80 of flap 16. A cut out groove 82 is formed along perforated line 58 of flap 54.

[0015] As seen in FIG. 2 a tape flexible carrying handle 84 is adhesively attached at one end to first side panel 12 and at its other end to second side panel 14. The handle 84 increases side panel rigidity to maintain can integrity within the carton.

[0016] In forming the carton 10 shown in FIG. 2, all the flaps are folded inwardly along their crease lines. Side panel 12 is bent inwardly at a right angle to front panel 52 along crease 86. Side panel 14 is bent inwardly at a right angle to front panel 52 along crease 88. Back panel 32 is bent inwardly at a right angle to side panel 14 along crease 90. Side support panel 42 is bent inwardly along crease 44 and is glued to an edge portion 92 of side panel 12 and to an edge of flap 16. Diagonal crease 38 on flap 36 is bent inwardly so a corner portion 98 of flap 36 can be pressed against flap 20. Crease 40 is bent inwardly so a corner portion 100 of flap 36 can be pressed against flap 16. Diagonal crease 60 on flap 54 is bent inwardly so a corner portion 96 of flap 54 can be pressed against flap 16. Crease 62 is bent inwardly so corner portion 102 of flap 54 can be pressed against flap 20. Bottom flaps 18 and 22 are glued over bottom flaps 46 and 56. The flexible carrying handle 84 is adhesively attached to side panels 12 and 14 so that handle 84 passes over grooves 74 and 78. Of course, the carton 10 is loaded with cans 94 prior to enclosing the top flaps and carrying handle 84.

[0017] As seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, the carton 10 is designed to hold twelve cans stacked longitudinally in three rows. The carton could be made smaller or larger to accommodate fewer or a greater number of cans. The purchaser of the filled carton is able to remove cans 94 individually by tearing out the trapezoidal section 34 along perforation lines 66, 68 and 72. The cans are removed at the top of front panel 52, the lower portion of panel 52 retaining the ends of each can 94 in place. In this manner, a purchaser can store the filled carton 10 in a 15 refrigerator and singly remove a can 94 at his or her pleasure.

[0018] The carton 10 is made of heavy duty cardboard or other suitable paper product commonly used for cartons. The handle 84 is preferably made from a flexible polymer. Adhesives commonly used in the carton manufacturing industry are used to adhere the flaps in place.

[0019] The back panel 32 and front panel 52 have a width that slightly exceeds the length of the cans 94; i.e., the width of the back panel 32 and front panel 52 is substantially the same as the length of the cans 94 stacked in the carton 10.

[0020] Other equivalent elements for the components of carton 10 can be substituted for the components described herein to make substantially the same carton.