Title:
Magnetic gypsum panel
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Magnetic gypsum or drywall is a concept that adds value and application to a standard gypsum drywall panel by insertion of a various sized flat, thin gage ferrous metal sheet into the interior face or substrate of the drywall during the drywall manufacturing process. The drywall-finished product would then become a platform to accept the attachment of a variety of magnets and magnetic objects to its finished surface for display and storage.



Inventors:
Schroth, Michael (Mullica Hill, NJ, US)
Application Number:
10/075714
Publication Date:
08/14/2003
Filing Date:
02/14/2002
Assignee:
SCHROTH MICHAEL
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04C2/04; (IPC1-7): E04C2/34
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
CHAPMAN, JEANETTE E
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
RANDY SHAY (FAIRFAX, VA, US)
Claims:

Many other variations in feature and construction are obvious to the inventor and to those skilled in the art that fall within the scope of this invention. Having briefly described the invention, I claim:



1. A panel with a flat metal insert placed internally facing one surface to act as an attraction target for magnets and objects with magnetic properties.

2. A panel where the flat metal insert is constructed of very high iron concentration.

3. A panel where the flat metal insert is constructed of a corrosion resistant coating or treatment.

4. A panel where the flat metal inserts is positioned in any location or locations within the outside perimeter of the wall panel.

5. A panel where the flat metal insert is sized to any dimension or shape to accommodate a specific magnetic application.

6. A panel where the flat metal insert is positioned in any dimension in relation to the depth or thickness of the finished panel.

7. A panel where the metal insert is constructed of a dimension, curvature, shape, thickness or gage to accommodate a specific magnetic application.

8. A panel that is used in the construction of interior wall, floor or ceiling that contains a flat metal insert for the purpose of magnetic attraction properties.

9. A process for inserting a flat metal insert into a gypsum slurry substrate during the panel manufacturing process.

10. A process for inserting and adhesively securing a flat metal insert onto one surface of a gypsum panel top surface paper covering.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

[0001] This invention relates to gypsum board used in the construction of interior walls, and ceilings, and more specifically to apparatus and method for inserting a flat metal sheet into the gypsum substrate of the board during the manufacturing process for the purpose of creating a base for magnetic attraction.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0002] This invention is based upon the consumer requirement for a vertical magnetic surface that is conveniently located within a home, office, store or school. Gypsum, plasterboard, wallboard, sheetrock, drywall and other terms are common names given to panels constructed of gypsum and cardboard. These panels are used extensively in the construction of interior residential, commercial and industrial walls, floors and ceilings. Gypsum drywall is sold commercially in a variety of sizes, thickness and type. Gypsum drywall is manufactured and distributed by a large number of international manufacturers. This invention focuses primarily on wall panels constructed of gypsum and cardboard, but has application to other panels used in similar applications but are constructed of similar, but not identical materials. This invention describes a concept that addresses the creation of a new application of “standards gypsum drywall by adding magnetic properties to a specific section of the front or “finished” surface of a drywall panel. The completed, finished product would show no apparent difference to the consumer. A magnetic drywall panel and a standard drywall panel would look identical in every respect. Magnetic drywall panels would be used in similar applications of standard drywall panels. In most applications the magnetic drywall panels would be used in the construction of interior walls, but would also have applications where other magnetic adherence is desired. Magnetic drywall panels after erection can be treated with paint, wallpaper or coverings in a normal fashion. After magnetic drywall panels are treated with the final cosmetic paint or wallpaper, the panel can be utilized as a surface to apply a wide variety of magnets on the area that contains the flat, thin gage metal sheet. Magnets can be applied to secure posters, drawings, notes etc. in a similar fashion as magnets are applied to the surface of a refrigerator or any other object made of a metallic ferrous material. It would in fact act as a magnetic bulletin board. A room(s) in a new home, school or office can be constructed with magnetic drywall thereby providing a 24” high or more eye level band of magnetic surface around the perimeter of a room (FIG. 3).

DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART

[0003] Gypsum board is well known and widely used in the construction industry. A typical sheet of gypsum wallboard comprises a gypsum core, a back cover sheet on one side of the core and a face or front cover sheet on the other side of the core. The face cover sheet is folded around the long edges of the core and overlaps the side edges of the back cover sheet.

[0004] Prior art reveals a plurality of methods and practices for the manufacture of gypsum wallboard U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,288,263 (1981); 5,116,671 (1992); 4,392,896 (1983); and 5,116,671 (1992). Each of the inventions describes processes varying in technique and apparatus. Most claim specific additives and ingredients that benefit the process and/or final product.

[0005] Prior art related to magnetic gypsum includes a variety of methods related to securing objects to the surface of the wallboard by mechanical means that project from the wallboard allowing magnetic attraction (U.S. Pat. No. 3,031,799). These methods are almost all focus on installing the components after the gypsum is installed.

[0006] Chiro (U.S. Pat. No. 5,476,559) discloses a method of adhesively applying a metal sheet to the surface of the gypsum wallboard and covering the metal with sheetrock compound after the board is installed. Similar to Chiro, is Frye (U.S. Pat. No. 4,942,071) who invents a method of applying several layers of material adhesively to a wall-like structure.

[0007] There are a number of inventions focused on “veneer” laminations, in particular Snyder (U.S. Pat. No. 6,004,648) and Elbey (U.S. Pat. No. 4,376,003) that provide a means of adhesively securing material to wall-like structures.

[0008] Much work has been disclosed in inventions related to “building panels”. In these cases the panels are generally not gypsum or related material. Panels mentioned are usually structural in design and are intended for exterior use. Bader (U.S. Pat. No. 6,044,603) and Meyerson (U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,769,963 and 5,086,599) each claim methods of inserting metal material into a panel during the manufacturing process, but only for the purpose of structural integrity and shape.

[0009] Clear (U.S. Pat. No. 6,119,422) claims a method of adhesively securing bonded mesh to a wall-like surface for the purpose of creating an impact resistant building panel.

[0010] Deets (U.S. Pat. No. 5,609,788) discloses a method of creating a magnetic paint additive for the purpose of creating magnetic signs made of various materials, including gypsum.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0011] During the gypsum drywall manufacturing process a flat, thin gage ferrous metal sheet with a preferred high iron content would be placed in position within the horizontal top (finished) surface of the panel. The metal insert is covered by a thin layer of gypsum material and the finished cardboard-covering surface, or applied directly by adhesive means directly to the interior surface of the top surface cardboard. This task is performed automatically during the gypsum wallboard manufacturing process. As stated, the inspection of the drywall panel would reveal no visible difference between the subject panel and a standard drywall panel with a metal insert. The only apparent difference would be in the slight increase of weight in the magnetic drywall panel.

[0012] The size of the metal insert can vary according to application. It is anticipated that the most common application will be an insert approx. 24 inches high×47″ inches wide. The center (12 inches) of the insert would be placed approx. at eyelevel within a 48 inch wide by 96-inch panel when it is positioned in a normal vertical location. Horizontally installed panels can also accommodate metal inserts.

[0013] The metal insert would not significantly effect or interfere with standard and accepted methods and practices of installing, erecting or contouring drywall. Nails, screws and adhesive can be used in a normal fashion.

[0014] Magnetic drywall panels after erection can be treated with paint, wallpaper or coverings in a normal fashion.

[0015] If desired, magnetic drywall panels can be used to hang pictures or any other object in a normal fashion using nails, screws or adhesive. The thin gage of the metal insert would not prevent these activities. In fact, the addition of the metal would present an improved, stronger surface for nail or screw penetration allowing heaver objects to be hung.

[0016] The size of the metal insert can be made larger or smaller, or of any shape depending on the size or orientation of the drywall panel, or the amount of surface required or desired for magnetic application. Tests have confirmed that the covering of drywall with its normal covering paper and the cosmetic covering of paint or wallpaper do not interfere with the application of magnets to the surface. The quality (high iron content) of the ferrous metal insert and the quality, type and shape of the magnet itself, and the depth of the metal insert in the drywall substrate determine the magnetic strength or attraction of the magnets to the panel. Testing indicates that vibration from door closings and other similar activities do not affect the magnetic strength if the quality of the insert and magnet are high.

[0017] The invention discloses two methods of inserting flat metal sheets into a gypsum panel during the panel manufacturing process. The invention also discloses a method of inserting a flat metal sheet into a standard gypsum panel after it is installed.

[0018] The key to this invention is quality material. The metal inserts must be of a grade of steel with a very high iron content. Magnets used for holding framed objects and similar heavy items must be commercially available high-grade Alnico magnets. Tests have confirmed that Alnico magnets versus standard ceramic or flexible magnets have much higher magnetic strength (gauss). Heavier objects (up to 10 pounds) can be securely held by use of adhesively mounted Alnico magnets to the object. The object can then be placed against the magnetic wallboard and be repeatedly rearranged within the perimeter of the metal insert area. Lightweight objects held by standard magnets can be used for everyday applications of holding notes, photographs, decorative magnets, documents, drawings, etc.

[0019] Commercially available magnetic gypsum wallboard or drywall would provide the consumer a choice presently not available between standard wallboard and magnetic wallboard during the construction stage of a building or addition. Families would find the use of magnetic wallboard very convenient in kitchens, family rooms and children bedrooms. Offices and schools would also contain scores of applications for magnetic wallboard. It is not suggested that magnetic wallboard completely replace standard wallboard in any respect. It is estimated that after an appropriate period of market education and introduction, magnetic wallboard would account for approximately 5% of the wallboard market. But, due to its value added qualities, producers of magnetic wallboard would be able to charge consumers a premium price for the product. Standard wallboard is a price sensitive commodity with a great deal of competition between producers. The market for wallboard continues to grow with no apparent cost effective replacement in sight. There is very little difference in product or in wholesale and retail pricing of wallboard between manufacturers. Because of this factor, a producer of magnetic wallboard would be able to differentiate and clearly establish themselves as an innovator. The premium cost of magnetic wallboard would allow a producer to realize a relatively short period of time return on investment of R&D, and process line modifications expenditures. Although magnetic wallboard would approximately account for less than 5% of a producer's wallboard output, it could eventually account for 25% of the producer's sales dollars. This is a product that appeals to the consumer. This invention allows producers of wallboard to refine the invention and introduce it to the marketplace.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

[0020] The process of manufacturing natural or synthetic gypsum wallboard or drywall is very similar throughout the world's gypsum wallboard producers. In general terms the process is as follows:

[0021] A. Gypsum rock is mined from quarries. The rock is blasted, collected and crushed. The crushed rock is transported to a drywall plant for processing.

[0022] B. The gypsum rock is fed into pan feeder that uniformly meter the gypsum rock into a conveyor belt that carries it to a crusher. The crusher then breaks up the larger rocks and sometimes blends in recycled waste-board. The crusher smashes rocks larger than 2 inches in diameter while allowing smaller rocks to pass through it. The crushed rock blend in conveyed to silos that meter the crushed rock directly to a rock dryer.

[0023] C. The rock dryer is a large rotating kiln or oven that evaporates any surface moisture on the rocks. The dry gypsum is then ground in a roller-type crushing mill or a heated impact mill. These powerful mills grind the gypsum into a fine powder normally referred to as “land plaster”.

[0024] D. The plaster is then fed into a calcining system where it is “calcined” or heated to remove remaining water or moisture that is chemically bound in the gypsum. At this point the gypsum is referred to as “stucco”.

[0025] E. After the stucco is formed, dry additives such as perlite, starch, fiberglass or vermiculite are mixed in depending on the different properties the drywall needs to adopt when finished (added water resistance, fire protection, sound properties etc.). The stucco is then stored in large silos to await use in the drywall manufacturing process.

[0026] F. At the beginning of the board forming process, water, soap foam and accelerators are added in a pin-mixing machine. The pin mixer is the first step of the “wet end” of the manufacturing process.

[0027] G. After mixing, the stucco becomes a “slurry” or paste. The slurry is spread on a moving stream of cream-colored paper or cardboard and then covered, or sandwiched with top paper or cardboard (gray paper) to be formed into wallboard or drywall. The cream paper is used for the face of the wallboard while the gray is used for the backside.

[0028] H. The paper is placed on racks beside the pin mixer where the slurry is made. The edges of the paper are scored and sometimes chamfered to allow precise folding of the paper to form the edges of the wallboard. The rack run above and below the exit of the pin mixer so the stucco slurry can be sandwiched.

[0029] I. The long continuous sheet of wallboard travels up to 800 feet on moving belt and roller conveyor to the knife where it is cut into specified lengths. The long “board line” is needed to allow the gypsum slurry to harden before it is cut (about 4 minutes). Essentially, the gypsum slurry is hardening back into a form of gypsum rock that has been molded into sheets.

[0030] J. The cut boards or sheets are then flipped, cream side up and sent into a multi-stage kiln to dry for about 40 minutes.

[0031] K. Upon exiting the kiln, the wallboard is sent to a bundler where it is trimmed to an exact length, end-taped in two panel bundles, stacked and moved to a warehouse for shipment to customers.

[0032] This section describes two processes of inserting a flat metal sheet into the body of a gypsum or similar material wallboard panel during the wallboard manufacturing process.

[0033] 1. For the purpose of this description the “metal insert” shall be described as a galvanized flat ferrous carbon steel sheet approximately 26 gage in thickness (0.0179″), and 12 ounces per square foot in weight. The physical size is 47-inches wide (horizontal) by 24-inches high (vertical). These are the physical properties used in the testing and development of this invention. It is understood that materials of varying shape, size, thickness and weight could be utilized to accomplish the intention of this invention to a greater or less degree.

[0034] 2. For the purpose of this description it is desired that the wallboard manufacturing process be described as manufacturing the most common 48-inch by 96-inch by ½-inch thick sheets. It is understood that the manufacturing process of sheets of other perimeter and thickness dimension could be modified to accomplish the intention of this invention.

[0035] 3. It is understood that it is highly desirable that an existing wallboard manufacturing process line could be modified to accept the additional process of inserting metal sheets during the board forming process. Utilizing an exiting line for the manufacture of “standard” and “magnetic” wallboard would be very cost effective for the producer.

[0036] 4. A quantity of metal insert blanks with the properties stated above shall be stacked in a commercially available high-speed horizontal sheet metal feeder (FIG. 6).

[0037] 5. The sheet metal feeder shall be placed perpendicular or above (FIG. 6 and FIG. 7) to the board forming process line. The feeder shall be positioned at the line immediately before the application of the gray or “bottom” paper to the slurry. It must be noted that most wallboard manufacturing process lines operate with the gray (bottom) paper being applied to the top of the slurry board forming process (the back side of the wallboard). In this application the paper application shall be reversed with the cream (top) paper being applied from the top, (FIG. 7) and the gray becoming the bottom carrier. Magnetic drywall may in fact utilize completely different paper of color and/or composition for technical or marketing purposes.

[0038] 6. Utilizing commercially available indexing and sensor components, the sheet metal feeder will deliver the metal insert in its proper orientation to the surface and direction of the slurry at the appropriate speed and accuracy to match the speed and accuracy of the board forming process line.

[0039] 7. If required, the metal insert, before it is conveyed onto the slurry can be treated with a viscous adhesive application on one or two surfaces with a commercially available product that would increase friction of the metal insert to the slurry once it is in position (FIG. 6 & 7, Item 67). This would reduce potential movement of the metal insert before the top paper is applied.

[0040] 8. Another method to prevent the metal insert from moving in the slurry is to design the metal insert with ¼″ flanges at each end of the 47-inch dimension. The flanges would act as anchors and reduce the possibility of shifting.

[0041] 9. The position of the metal insert in relation to a standard sized 48-inch by 96-inch wallboard is critical. The centerlines of the metal inert must be located precisely at 23½″ side to side and 36″ from either end. (FIG. 1 & 2).

[0042] 10. The position of the insert into the slurry shall be precisely coordinated between the ends of the sheet relative to the cutting or knifepoint further along the board forming line that determines the finished length of the sheet.

[0043] 11. Delivery of the metal inert into the slurry at the correct depth is also critical. If the insert is placed too deep, the gypsum thickness over the metal will reduce magnetic adhesion. Off line tests have confirmed that a depth of a minimum of 0.0625″ to a maximum of 0.125″ is satisfactory.

[0044] 12. Depth control of the metal insert into the gypsum slurry can be accomplished by a commercially available high-speed precision electromagnetic delivery system (FIG. 7, Item 68) that is coordinated with the sheet metal feeding system. The precision of the delivery system will insure accurate and repeatable depth insertion.

[0045] 13. It is understood that due to the surface displacement area of the metal insert the insert would tend to “float” on top of the slurry mixture. This is why the delivery system must be capable of “pushing” the metal insert to the desired depth. After the desired depth is attained and before the paper is applied, a method of applying or spreading additional slurry on top of the metal insert is required. This can be accomplished by a series of standard controlled, high-speed wiper/rollers mechanisms. Uneven slurry would be smoothed further along the process by standard compression rollers.

[0046] 14. In order to have a continuous process that operates at cost effective line speeds it is crucial to coordinate the timing of the metal insert delivery to the slurry bed. It is anticipated that the “Magnetic Wallboard” line will be an unknown factor slower than “standard” wallboard speeds.

[0047] 15. After the placement of the metal insert into the slurry and the application of the paper, the process of manufacturing “Magnetic Wallboard” is identical to the manufacture of “Standard” wallboard.

[0048] 16. A second process, in addition to the process described above is for placing a metal insert directly onto the inner surface of the cream or “top” paper of the gypsum board. Retaining the cream color (front or top side) on the bottom of the board forming process as the carrier it is proposed that the cream color paper delivery system be lengthen to accommodate the addition of a sheet metal feeder as described above. The sheet metal feeder (FIG. 8, Item 64) would deliver the metal inserts as described in the prior process, including use of a adhesive application directly to the inner surface of the cream colored paper at specific locations coordinated with the knife/cutting operation. The adhesive applied to the inner surface would insure positive adherence and alignment of the metal insert to the cream paper. The cream paper would then be introduced to the bottom of the board forming line where the gypsum slurry would be applied to the inner surface of the paper and thus the metal insert. This alternative solves several problems (simpler delivery and placement of the metal insert, better magnetic attraction). Tests have confirmed that placing the metal insert directly under a paper covering without a thin layer of gypsum between the metal and the paper reveal no major problems as long as the metal insert is absolutely flat.

[0049] 17. The addition of a metal insert into the gypsum substrate and the covering with paper will not affect the “standard manufacturing operation” process. Conversely, the standard manufacturing process will not adversely affect the metal insert. The standard wallboard manufacturing process parameters of temperature, pressure, speed and handling would have no effect on the implanted metal insert.

[0050] 18. Moisture affect on the metal insert would be negligible due to the low moisture content of the process and the final curing process which would drive out remaining moisture on the metal insert. Nevertheless, it is recommended that the metal insert be specified to be treated with a galvanized or equivalent corrosion resistant surface treatment due to the possibility of a moist—humid atmosphere or conditions on the wallboard while in storage or in its final installation. The corrosion resistant treatment of the metal insert will prevent a possible “bleeding” effect of rust or the like through the thin layer of gypsum and cardboard covering.

[0051] 19. The placement of the metal insert into the gypsum substrate would not affect the structural integrity of the wallboard in its final application. Wallboard generally is fragile when handled roughly. Most of its collective strength is supported and reinforced by the cardboard covering. Without the cardboard encapsulation, wallboard would be very difficult to handle or install. Once installed, wallboard is very stable and strong. The addition of a metal insert would not decrease the strength or handling properties of wallboard. The only physical difference would be the slight increase in overall weight. The increase in weight would not affect the wallboards performance in any know application.

[0052] 20. The placement of a metal insert into the gypsum substrate would not affect the fire rating of a “standard” wallboard product. The metal itself would be more resistant to fire than the gypsum/paper product itself.

[0053] 21. Installation of magnetic wallboard would be handled in the same fashion as standard wallboard. Most applications of magnetic wallboard would be directed specifically toward flat whole wall sections. Use of magnetic wallboard for closets and other non-flat wall configurations would not be recommended, due to the extra time it would take to trim the material. If time or money is not a factor, magnetic wallboard could be utilized in every application that standard wallboard is used. In most cases installing magnetic wallboard—whole sheets of magnetic wallboard would be utilized. Because of this, there would be minimal cutting and trimming. Due to the metal insert's left to right dimension of 47-inches and a standard wallboard outside dimension of 48-inches the possibility of trimming the metal edge is reduced. In cases where trimming or cutting sheets in half is necessary, the use of standard sheet metal shears would adequately perform the task in acceptable time limits. In addition, the very thin gage of the metal insert would also allow scoring, bending and breaking of the steel for straight line cuts.

[0054] 22. This invention also claims a process for adding metal inserts to existing previously installed wallboard (claim 10). This process requires the measuring and marking of an area that is targeted for the metal insert (FIG. 4). After marking the area (any area, up to one inch of the perimeter of the wallboard can be utilized) a utility knife is used to score the perimeter of the targeted area (FIG. 4, Item 40). After the perimeter is scored (scoring means cutting through the paper and approximately ⅛″ into the gypsum substrate), the interior surface of the scored area must then be scored with intersecting horizontal and vertical lines (FIG. 4) creating small blocks ranging from ½ to 1 inch square. After the scoring is complete it is necessary to remove the paper and gypsum from the targeted area to create a “pocket” for the metal insert to be placed. This is accomplished by utilizing a stiff, sharp putty knife, or chisel and hammer. The putty knife is placed within one of the perimeter score lines at a slight angle and hammered into a depth of approximately ⅛″. Using the putty knife in a chisel-like fashion, the gypsum material is removed from the targeted area to a uniform depth of no less than ⅛″ (FIG. 5, Item 50).

[0055] The pocket is now ready to accept the metal insert. The flat metal insert is placed into the pocket. Tests have confirmed that the metal insert will not sit in the pocket without tilting out and falling. To eliminate this problem, small holes are drilled (the number of holes will vary according to the size of the insert. On a 24″ by 47″ insert, five holes were drilled, one in each comer and one in the center). After the holes are drilled, small, flathead screws are screwed through the metal into the gypsum. This keeps the insert in place. After the insert is secured in place, adhesive fiberglass tape commonly used as joint tape for wallboard is applied in horizontal strips completely covering the metal insert. This provides an adhesive base for the joint compound to stick to. After the tape is applied, joint compound can be applied into the pocket and “feathered” over the outside edges of the pocket perimeter following standard wallboard finishing techniques. After cure and sanding, one or two additional coats of joint compound can be applied, if necessary. The finished area can then be painted or covered with wallpaper.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0056] The invention will be better understood upon reference to the following detailed description and the drawings in which:

[0057] FIG. 1 is an orthographic front view of a standard sized 4′×8′ gypsum panel illustrating the typical location of a 24″×47″ metal insert.

[0058] FIG. 2 is an orthographic side view of a standard sized 4′×8′×½″ thick (not to scale) gypsum panel illustrating the typical location and depth of the metal insert in the front side of the panel.

[0059] FIG. 3 is a perspective of wall sections with a window and doorway illustrating the perimeter location of the metal inserts in combination of multiple wall panels.

[0060] FIG. 4 is an orthographic front view of a standard sized 4′×8′ gypsum panel illustrating the typical location of score lines for inserting a metal insert into an existing installed gypsum wallboard.

[0061] FIG. 5 is an orthographic side view of a standard sized 4′×8′ gypsum panel illustrating the typical location of excavated or removes gypsum material for the purpose of inserting a metal insert into an existing installed gypsum wallboard.

[0062] FIG. 6 is an orthographic end view of a portion of a gypsum board forming line showing the location of an overhead sheet metal feeder-positioning system and an adhesive application spray system. The view also illustrates the metal insert being lowered into the gypsum slurry.

[0063] FIG. 7 is an orthographic side view of a portion of a gypsum board forming line showing the top and bottom paper rolls applying paper to the gypsum slurry and the position of the sheet metal feeder-positioning system and the slurry application device and the adhesive spray system and the metal insert depth placement system in relation to one another.

[0064] FIG. 8 is an orthographic side view of a portion of a gypsum board forming line showing the top and bottom paper rolls applying paper to the gypsum slurry and the position of the sheet metal feeder-positioning system and the slurry application device and the adhesive spray system in relation to one another.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

[0065] FIG. 1 illustrates a typical 4′×8′ gypsum panel with a hidden view (Item 11) that outlines the position of a typical metal insert in relation to the panels overall perimeter (Item 10). In the cases where 4′×8′ gypsum panels are installed vertically, the preferred location of the metal insert would be at approximate eye level (around 5′). The horizontal centerline of the insert would be placed into the uncured gypsum slurry approximately 36″ from either end of the panel and positioned in the center of the panel's vertical centerline. The depth of the metal insert shall be as close to the “front” of the panel as possible. This illustration depicts the most common configuration. Other configurations can be developed to accommodate specific or custom requirements.

[0066] FIG. 2 illustrates the side view of a 4′×8′ gypsum panel (Item 21) showing the location of the metal insert (Item 20) relative to the top and bottom of the panel. It also illustrates the approximate location of the depth of the metal insert relative to the “front” or the facing side of the gypsum panel. The two processes explained within the invention define two methods for inserting the metal insert into the gypsum panel. Process one positions the metal insert into the gypsum slurry to a maximum depth of ⅛″. Process two positions the metal insert directly onto the inner surface of the front facing paper by means of a delivery system and adhesive spray system. The illustration shows the approximate location of the metal insert for both processes.

[0067] FIG. 3 illustrates two wall sections of a room. The wall section depicts one window on one wall and one door opening on the second wall. The wall sections also depict vertical hidden lines (Item 31) that represent individual 4′×8′ gypsum wall panels in an erected, finished position. The horizontal hidden lines (Item 30) represent the location of the metal inserts within the multiple gypsum wall panels. As each wall panel is erected and placed in adjoining positions to each other, a continuous perimeter of metal inserts at approximately eyelevel is achieved.

[0068] FIG. 4 illustrates a 4′×8′ gypsum panel (Item 41) in a front and side view showing a series of squares (Item 40) that depicts the amount of score lines made by a utility knife that is necessary to allow chisel removal of approximately ⅛″ of the gypsum material and paper covering from the surface of the front facing of the panel. The removal of the materials from this area allows the insertion of the flat metal sheet into the area. After insertion the sheet is screwed into place. Finally, a layer(s) of gypsum compound can be applied over the metal and sanded smooth and painted or papered to match existing conditions.

[0069] FIG. 5 illustrates a side view of a 4′×8′×½″ thick gypsum panel (Item 51) with a section (Item 50) of the material removed necessary to accommodate a metal insert. The depth of the material removed cannot exceed ⅛″ or a reduction in magnetic strength will occur.

[0070] FIG. 6 illustrates an end view of a portion of a typical gypsum forming board process manufacturing line. Shown is the actual conveyor (Item 60) that conveys the gypsum panel throughout the operation. Above the conveyor a cutaway section (Item 70) of a gypsum (slurry) board with bottom paper, laying flat on the conveyor is shown. Above the gypsum board (slurry) a metal insert (Item 61) is shown being lowered into the gypsum slurry. Above the metal insert is a commercially available sheet metal feeder-positioning system (Item 64). Attached to the sheet metal feeder on each side are adhesive housings (Item 71) that are attached internally to powered spray nozzles (not shown). The nozzles deposit adhesive to the bottom of the metal insert to assist in preventing the insert from moving after placement in the slurry mixture. On the front face of the sheet metal feeder (Item 72) is an opening depicting the layers of metal inserts in position for processing. Above the sheet metal feeder (Item 73) is the loading area for the metal inserts.

[0071] FIG. 7 illustrates a side elevation view of a portion of a typical gypsum forming board process manufacturing line. Shown is the actual conveyor (Item 60) that conveys the gypsum panel throughout the operation. Above the conveyor shows a gypsum panel in the process of being formed. To the left, a dispensing roll of “bottom” paper (Item 62) is shown delivering the paper (Item 80) to the top surface of the conveyor. To the right of the paper dispenser, the gypsum slurry delivery system (Item 65) is shown. To the right of the slurry delivery system is the sheet metal feeder-positioning system (Item 64). On the side surface of the sheet metal feeder the adhesive housing (Item 67) is shown for clarity. Under the sheet metal feeder and above the conveyor, a metal insert (Item 61) is shown being positioned into place into the gypsum slurry (Item 70). To the right of the sheet metal feeder is the metal insert depth positioner (Item 68), which controls the depth of the insert into the slurry. To the right of the depth positioner is the “top” or “face” paper roll dispenser, which applies the top paper the gypsum slurry, completing the board assembly. It must be noted that this illustration reverses the position of the paper compared to traditional gypsum board manufacturing process lines. Tradition lines apply the “top” paper on the bottom of the board during processing. This illustration applies “top” paper to the upper surface of the board during the process.

[0072] FIG. 8 illustrates a second process for inserting a metal insert into a gypsum board manufacturing line. The illustration shows a side elevation view of a portion of a typical gypsum forming board process manufacturing line. Shown is the actual conveyor (Item 60) that conveys the gypsum panel throughout the operation. Above the conveyor shows a gypsum panel in the process of being formed (Item 70). To the left, a dispensing roll of “top” or “face” paper (Item 62) is shown delivering the paper (Item 80) to the top surface of the conveyor. To the right of the paper dispenser, a spray adhesive system applies adhesive to the inner surface of the top paper incrementally. To the right of the adhesive spray system the sheet metal feeder-positioning system (Item 64) is shown. Under the sheet metal feeder and above the conveyor, a metal insert (Item 61) is shown being positioned into place onto the sticky top paper (item 80). To the right of the sheet metal feeder system is the gypsum slurry delivery system (Item 65). The slurry is applied over the metal insert. After this operation the “bottom” paper (Item 63) is applied to the slurry mixture, completing the board assembly.