Title:
Enhanced celebratory chair
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An enhanced chair for usage in connection with honoring guests at various celebrations. More particularly, the invention is an improved “Simcha Chair,” or chair traditionally used at Jewish weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, and other affairs, wherein an honoree is seated in a chair and elevated by celebrants above the height of dancing guests. As such, there are inherent safety risks associated with the activity, and the improved chair of the present invention mitigates the incidence of potential damage and injury through the usage of a lifting rail, optional safety belts, and hand grips for the occupant and/or lifters.



Inventors:
Napell, David J. (Long Beach, NY, US)
Application Number:
10/053061
Publication Date:
07/24/2003
Filing Date:
01/18/2002
Assignee:
NAPELL DAVID J.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47C1/00; A47C15/00; (IPC1-7): A47C15/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GARRETT, ERIKA P
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
David J. Napell (Long Beach, NY, US)
Claims:
1. An enhanced celebratory chair comprising: a seat portion, which comprises a non-slip surface thereon, functioning to prevent an occupant from sliding, a back portion, which comprises a back portion front side and back portion rear side, a plurality of arms, each arm comprising a hand grip extending generally vertically from a distal end thereof, functioning to allow the occupant to grip the same for safety, a plurality of legs, each leg comprising a shoulder supports, extending outwardly therefrom, from a location approximately half a vertical height of each legs, and a lifting bar that extends around a left side of the chair, back of the chair and right side of the chair, the lifting bar fixed to the legs through usage of a plurality of diagonal support members and plurality of horizontal support members, the lifting bar functioning to allow persons to lift the chair upwardly, rest the chair upon their shoulders, and move the chair side to side, forwardly, or backwardly in a safe and secure manner.

2. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 1, wherein the chair comprises four legs to simulate previously existing chairs used by catering halls.

3. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 1, wherein the non-slip surface is applied to a previously determined area of the seat portion only.

4. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 1, wherein the non-slip surface is applied to the entire surface of the seat portion.

5. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 1, wherein the back portion front side comprises indicia thereon.

6. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 5, wherein the indicia comprises an inscription relating to an event being celebrated.

7. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 6, wherein the inscription is in the language of Hebrew.

8. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 5, wherein the indicia is located upon the surface of the back portion front side itself.

9. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 5, wherein the indicia is located upon a separate material that is draped over the chair.

10. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 9, wherein the separate material is selected form the group consisting of silk, satin, cotton, wool, vinyl, polyester, and denim.

11. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 5, wherein the indicia is previously selected to relate to an occupant selected form the group consisting of a bride, groom, bar mitzvah honoree, and bat mitzvah honoree.

12. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 5, wherein the indicia comprises generic messages, functioning to allow the chair to relate to all celebratory events.

13. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 1, wherein the hand grips comprise multiple grooves thereon, functioning as finger grips for increased occupant safety.

14. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 1, wherein the chair further comprises a seat belt assembly, functioning to prevent the occupant from falling from the chair when the chair is hoisted upwardly for the purposes of celebration.

15. The enhanced celebratory chair as described in claim 1, wherein the lifting bar extends around the chair from a location approximately half a vertical height of the legs.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

[0001] 1. Field of the Invention

[0002] The present invention is an enhanced chair for usage in connection with honoring guests at various celebrations. More particularly, the invention is an improved “Simcha Chair,” or chair traditionally used at Jewish weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, and other affairs, wherein an honoree is seated in a chair and elevated by celebrants above the height of dancing guests. As such, there are inherent safety risks associated with the activity, and the improved chair of the present invention mitigates the incidence of potential damage and injury by utilizing a lifting bar, hand grips, and other features.

[0003] 2. Description of the Prior Art

[0004] Many innovations for safe chairs have been provided in the prior art, described as follows. Although these inventions are suitable for the purposes they address, they differ from the present invention as contrasted herein. Following is a summary of patents most relevant to the invention at hand, including description of differences between features of the invention and those of the prior art.

[0005] 1. U.S. Pat. No. 5,015,037, invented by Giblin et al., entitled “Chair Assembly Having Non-Slip Seat”

[0006] The patent to Giblin et al. describes an assembly of a highchair having a smooth seat, and a thin, flat, compliant pad freely covering the seat surface. The pad is made from one piece of solid, rubbery material providing a high coefficient of friction, and it has a matrix of apertures formed through it, each defined by a sharp peripheral edge at its juncture with the faces of the pad. The pad conforms to the seat in an anti-slip relationship, and it provides good mechanical interengagement with the diaper or garment of a baby seated upon it, despite the lightness of the baby's body.

[0007] 2. U.S. Pat. No. 5,346,278, invented by Dehondt, entitled “Non-Slip Cushion”

[0008] The patent to Dehondt describes a non-slip high chair cushion, having globules of rubbery polymeric material deposited on a scrim fabric as by dipping same in a plastic foam material, preventing an infant from sliding forwardly out of the high chair.

[0009] 3. U.S. Pat. No. 4,177,807, invented by Ocel et al., entitled “Restraining Belt For Patients In Wheelchairs, Stretchers Or The Like”

[0010] The patent to Ocel et al. describes a restraining belt for securing a patient to a wheelchair, stretcher, bed or similar implement and for inhibiting the accidental uncoupling thereof or the intentional uncoupling by a patient being restrained. The belt comprises a flexible strap of a desired length which is adapted to be passed around the body of the patient and around the implement to which the patient is being secured and has the cooperating parts of a Velcro-type hook and loop fastener elements disposed on opposed surfaces thereof and extending a predetermined distance from the ends of the belt towards its center, such that when the ends are overlapped, the Velcro hook pad abuts the Velcro loop pad. Further included is a flexible, fabric sleeve, having a length generally the same as that of the Velcro pads. The sleeve is attached to one end of the strap at a point intermediate the two ends thereof and can be drawn back or collapsed so as to expose the Velcro pad on one of the ends. After the two ends are overlapped and thereby coupled, the flexible sleeve may be extended to substantially enclose the entire area of the Velcro fastener.

[0011] 4. U.S. Pat. No. 4,898,425, invented by Mundy, entitled “Seat Belt Kit For Wheelchairs”

[0012] In the patent to Mundy, a wheelchair seat back kit is disclosed, including a seat back defining shell having a generally upright back portion, and two integral sides leading forward there from. The outside dimension between the sides is less than the clear distance between the back posts of a wheelchair. Attachment points are provided for securing the shell with respect to the back posts at upper and lower seat back attachment points, with the back of the shell positionable rearward of the plane of the back posts. Preferably, at least the lower portions of the sides of the seat back project forward sufficiently to provide lateral hip support for a user of the wheelchair, and padding is positionable on the inside of the lower portions of the sides to narrow the dimension between the lower portions as required to provide the hip support for any given user. Bracket assemblies may be used to provide different seat back positions and angles. For example, the bracket assemblies may each include a vertical seat back support plate extending rearwardly from each back post, each support plate having several upper and lower attachment points.

[0013] 5. U.S. Design Pat. No. Des. 342,348, invented by Panarelli, entitled “Wheel Chair Safety Strap”

[0014] The patent to Panarelli depicts the ornamental design for a wheel chair safety strap, as shown and described.

[0015] 6. U.S. Design Pat. No. Des. 373,253, invented by Maple, entitled “Arm Chair With Ornamental Back”

[0016] The patent to Maple depicts the ornamental design for an arm chair with ornamental back, as shown and described.

[0017] 7. U.S. Design Pat. No. Des. 253,208, invented by Claman, entitled “Chair”

[0018] The patent to Claman depicts the ornamental design for a chair, as shown and described.

[0019] Although various prior art patents show usage of a chair with a non-slip seat surface, such are utilized in entirely different contexts than the present invention, such as for high chairs for infants and small children. Although additional prior art patents show “chairs” that utilize seat belts, such are primarily wheelchairs or other devices designed to facilitate transport of the handicapped or injured. As such, the prior art fails to teach the usage of an enhanced chair with a non-slip seat, seat belt, and hand grips for user safety, as well as shoulder supports for persons lifting the chair for celebratory purposes.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

[0020] As noted, the present invention is an enhanced chair for usage in connection with honoring guests at various celebrations. More particularly, the invention is an improved “Simcha Chair,” or chair traditionally used at Jewish weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, and other affairs, wherein an honoree is seated in a chair and elevated by celebrants above the height of dancing guests. As such, there are inherent safety risks associated with the activity, and the improved chair of the present invention mitigates the incidence of potential damage and injury by utilizing a lifting bar, hand grips, and other features.

[0021] The enhanced chair features a non-slip seat surface, and may include at least one seat belt and multiple hand grips for the security of the occupant. To provide additional safety, persons hoisting the chair may utilize a lifting bar that extends around the outside of the chair, to greatly reduce tipping or dropping of the chair and occupant. The chair may also be manufactured of an specially lightweight material, for ease in lifting and control.

[0022] In addition to providing a sturdy and safe alternative to the traditional Simcha chair, the present invention may also bear a meaningful inscription in Hebrew or another language, perhaps commemorating the celebration at which it is used.

[0023] Finally, the present invention may be produced in the form of multiple chairs, each specifically designed for a previously-determined type of honoree, such as a bride, groom, retiree, or a host of additional persons. In such instances, the chair may include a generic message or title of the honoree, and inscriptions may even be custom made for particular honorees, if desired.

[0024] In total, the novel features considered characteristic for the invention are set forth in the claims. The invention itself both as to its construction and method of operation, will be best understood from the following description of the embodiments when read and understood in connection with the drawings provided.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

[0025] FIG. 1 is a front three-quarter perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the enhanced celebratory chair, illustrating safety elements such as a lifting bar and lifting bar support members thereon.

[0026] FIG. 2 is a rear three-quarter perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the enhanced celebratory chair, again illustrating safety elements such as a lifting bar and lifting bar support members thereon.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

[0027] Referring to both FIG. 1, which is a front three-quarter perspective view of the preferred embodiment of the enhanced celebratory chair (10), and FIG. 2, which is a rear three-quarter perspective view of the preferred embodiment, illustrated are: seat portion (12), back portion (14), back portion front side (14A), back portion rear side (14B), arms (16), hand grips (16A), legs (18), lifting bar (18A), diagonal lifting bar support members (18B), and horizontal lifting bar support members (18C), each designed to prevent the occupant from falling from the chair while the same is hoisted above dancing guests at a celebration.

[0028] The chair itself (10) may be of a traditional size and shape, so as to render the invention suitable for a great variety of occasions. In one embodiment, the chair may be very similar to traditional chairs already found in such locations as catering halls and restaurants. Such will decrease potential manufacturing costs and render the invention relatively easy to produce.

[0029] Seat portion (12) may include a non-slip surface thereon, to prevent the occupant from slipping in any way during hoisting of the chair. The non-slip surface may be applied to the seat portion (12) in either a generally centered portion of the seat, or alternatively may comprise the entire surface of the seat portion, for maximum safety.

[0030] The back portion front side (14A) may bear graphics, indicia, or text thereon, to enhance the appearance of the chair or to create a specialized keepsake item for the honoree. For instance, such surface may include an inscription relating to the honoree or the particular event being celebrated. Such inscription is intended to be meaningful in nature, and may be in Hebrew for the aforementioned Jewish celebrations. It should be noted, however, that the same may also be in any other language so as to make the invention available to people of any nations and religions.

[0031] It should further be noted that such text or indicia may be located upon the surface of the back portion front side itself (14A), or may be upon a separate material, such as a decorative and aesthetically pleasing silk or satin that is draped over the chair. Due to the above, the chair of the present invention may be designed particularly for a bride, a groom, a bar mitzvah honoree, bat mitzvah honoree, or virtually any other honoree at the celebration. For the purposes of versatility, a generic simcha chair may even be produced, so as to be used a great variety of celebrations.

[0032] The back portion front side (14A) may bear graphic material thereon, such as a Hebrew inscription relating to the honoree or event. Again, the chair may include additional decorative elements, such as tassels or the like extending from the sides or back (14B) of the chair in any of a variety of colors and styles.

[0033] The chair arms (16) shall be of a size and location suitable for the occupant to conveniently grip the same in a secure manner during hoisting of the chair. The arms will be manufactured of a configuration that will not interfere will the view of the honoree being hoisted, and will similarly not interfere with locations of the chair being grasped by lifters thereof.

[0034] Hand grips (16A) preferably appear at the distal ends of the chair arms (16), such that the occupant can naturally and conveniently grip the same for additional support and safety. Such hand grips (16A) may be in the form of two generally vertical members that are of sufficient length as to allow the user's entire hand to wrap therearound. In an enhanced embodiment, the hand grips (16A) may comprise multiple grooves thereon to function as finger grips for better gripping thereof.

[0035] The chair legs (18) are preferably four traditional legs, one extending downwardly from each corner of the generally square seat portion (12).

[0036] Importantly, extending outwardly from each of the legs (18) is a lifting bar (18A), fixed to the legs (18) via diagonal support members (18B) and horizontal support members (18C). This construction provides the utmost in safety in lifting the chair and occupant. In the preferred mode, the lifting bar (18A) wraps around the left side of the chair, back of the chair and right side of the chair. The lifting bar (18A) does not extend around the front area of the chair, so that the occupant can access the seat without impediment. The lifting bar (18A) extends around the chair, from a location approximately half the vertical height of the legs (18).

[0037] In the preferred mode, the lifting bar (18A) is constructed of the same materials as the legs of the chair, providing a durable device that is consistent to the rest of the chair in its appearance and style. The lifting bar extends away from the legs and seat of the chair in a previously determined length that is sufficient to allow those lifting the chair to access the same without disturbing the occupant. The lifting bar is generally tubular in nature, allowing those lifting the chair to conveniently wrap their hands around the same. Enhanced embodiments of the celebratory chair may include hand grips and/or finger indentations at previously determined areas along the lifting bar, providing a comfortable means for persons to grasp and hoist the chair.

[0038] As such, the lifting bar (18A) allows persons to lift the chair upwardly, rest the chair upon their shoulders, and move the chair side to side, forwardly, or backwardly in the safest manner possible.

[0039] Based upon all of the foregoing, it is respectfully submitted that the present invention provides a unique celebratory chair that is truly both utilitarian and decorative in nature. While the invention has been described as embodied, it is not intended to be limited to the details shown, since it will be understood that various omissions, modifications, substitutions and changes in the forms and details of the device illustrated and in its operation can be made by those skilled in the art without departing in any way from the spirit of the invention.

[0040] Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the present invention that others can readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, constitute essential characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention. What is claimed as new and desired to be protected by Letters Patent is set forth in the appended claims.